Increased Theta and Alpha EEG Activity

During Nondirective Meditation

Jim Lagopoulos, Ph.D., F.A.I.N.M.,

1–3

Jian Xu, M.D.,

4

Inge Rasmussen, M.D.,

4

Alexandra Vik, M.Sc.,

4

Gin S. Malhi, M.D.,

1–3

Carl F. Eliassen, M.Sc.,

5,6

Ingrid E. Arntsen, M.Sc.,

5

Jardar G. Sæther, M.Sc.,

5

Stig Hollup, Ph.D.,

5

Are Holen, M.D.,

4

Svend Davanger, M.D.,

7

and Øyvind Ellingsen, M.D.

4

Abstract

Objectives: In recent years, there has been significant uptake of meditation and related relaxation techniques, as
a means of alleviating stress and maintaining good health. Despite its popularity, little is known about the neural
mechanisms by which meditation works, and there is a need for more rigorous investigations of the underlying
neurobiology. Several electroencephalogram (EEG) studies have reported changes in spectral band frequencies
during meditation inspired by techniques that focus on concentration, and in comparison much less has been
reported on mindfulness and nondirective techniques that are proving to be just as popular.
Design: The present study examined EEG changes during nondirective meditation. The investigational para-
digm involved 20 minutes of acem meditation, where the subjects were asked to close their eyes and adopt their
normal meditation technique, as well as a separate 20-minute quiet rest condition where the subjects were asked
to close their eyes and sit quietly in a state of rest. Both conditions were completed in the same experimental
session with a 15-minute break in between.
Results: Significantly increased theta power was found for the meditation condition when averaged across all
brain regions. On closer examination, it was found that theta was significantly greater in the frontal and
temporal–central regions as compared to the posterior region. There was also a significant increase in alpha
power in the meditation condition compared to the rest condition, when averaged across all brain regions, and it
was found that alpha was significantly greater in the posterior region as compared to the frontal region.
Conclusions: These findings from this study suggest that nondirective meditation techniques alter theta and
alpha EEG patterns significantly more than regular relaxation, in a manner that is perhaps similar to methods
based on mindfulness or concentration.

Introduction

I

n far Eastern cultures

, meditation has long been used

for the maintenance of ‘‘well-being,’’ and its gradual dis-

association from religious practice has allowed it to be sub-
jected to scientific inquiry. Of late, meditation has been widely
adopted in the West and is increasingly being used world-
wide for the alleviation of stress and for the treatment of
common psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxi-
ety.

1

The seemingly powerful effects of meditation are in-

triguing, and the potential health benefits have aroused
particular interest, as individuals search for alternatives to

modern-day medicines.

2

Since the 1970s, a majority of studies

have focused on concentrative meditation techniques and
transcendental meditation. Over the past decade, however,
there has been a shift toward various types of mindfulness
meditation

3

and nondirective meditation, as these techniques

have increasingly been embraced by psychologists and psy-
chiatrists. This is evidenced by their integration with psy-
chotherapeutic techniques for the treatment of medical and
psychologic problems.

4

Although recent studies have demonstrated the effective-

ness of such interventions, understanding of how meditation
exerts its biological effects remains rudimentary. Its neural

1

Discipline of Psychological Medicine and Northern Clinical School, and

2

Advanced Research and Clinical Highfield Imaging (ARCHI),

University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

3

CADE Clinic, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

4

Faculty of Medicine, and

5

Department of Psychology, NTNU–Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

6

Cognitive Rehabilitation Unit, Sunnaas Hospital (CRUSH), Drøbak, Norway.

7

Institute of Basic Medical Science, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

THE JOURNAL OF ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE
Volume 15, Number 11, 2009, pp. 1187–1192
ª Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
DOI: 10.1089=acm.2009.0113

1187

basis has been investigated using electroencephalography
(EEG), and these studies have provided some insight into the
neurophysiology of meditation, including long-term changes
in cortical activity.

5,6

An emerging body of literature sug-

gests that meditation activates regions of the brain involved
in the monitoring and regulation of emotion, attention, and
autonomic body functions

7

(Davenger et al., in review).

Several studies have reported increased EEG theta and alpha
activity

8,9

along with increased bilateral alpha coherence in

experienced meditators.

10,11

In the present study, we sought to identify electrical brain

activity changes associated with acem meditation using EEG.
Subjects were contrasted using a within-subject comparison
across meditation, and resting states. Acem meditation is de-
fined as a nondirective meditation technique, as it does not
require volitional direction of attention toward a specific sub-
jectively experienced state of mind. It is practiced with a
‘‘free mental attitude’’ similar to mindfulness meditation,
which allows any thought, memory, emotion, or sensation to
emerge and pass through the awareness of the practitioner,
without any volitional attempt to control the current content.
The meditation vehicle, a multisyllable sound with no seman-
tic, emotional, or symbolic meaning, is repeated mentally in
a gentle, effortless way to facilitate relaxation.

12

Previous

studies have demonstrated significant relaxation effects
during acem meditation, such as lowering of heart rate and
increased blood concentrations of melatonin,

13

as well as

long-term changes, such as enhanced competitive perfor-
mance of elite marksmen and less lactate increase during a
standardized physical challenge of long-distance runners.

14

In keeping with these behavioral and physiologic changes,
we hypothesized that there would be discernable changes in
theta and alpha brain activity during meditation, beyond
those occurring in a resting state of regular relaxation.

Materials and Methods

Participants

Thirteen (13) male and 5 female participants aged 28–63

years (mean 52) were recruited randomly from a broad
Norwegian acem meditation community. All were gainfully
employed, and had incorporated meditation practice in their
daily routine around career and employment commitments.
All subjects were experienced acem meditators (range of
meditation experience 9–14 years) and meditated 30 minutes
twice daily. All subjects had attended at least one 3-week-
long meditation retreat in the past 5 years. No subject had
any significant current or previous medical or surgical ill-
ness, neurologic disease, or history of drug or alcohol abuse.

Subjects acted as their own controls in the experiment. The

investigational paradigm involved 20 minutes of acem med-
itation as well as a separate 20-minute quiet rest condition.
Both conditions were completed in the same experimental
session with a 15-minute break in between. All subjects were
seated in a comfortable chair in a sound-attenuated room at
ambient temperature. The participants were only provided
with instructions for the two separate conditions and no
additional information was offered to the participants as to
the nature of the rest condition. For the meditation condition,
the subjects were asked to close their eyes and adopt their
normal meditation technique. For the quiet rest condition,
the subjects were asked to close their eyes and sit quietly in a

state of rest, without performing any meditation technique.
The allocation of the order in which the two conditions
(meditation or rest) were performed was randomly assigned
(and subsequently counterbalanced) such that an equal num-
ber of subjects (n ¼ 9) began with the meditation condition as
those that began with the rest condition.

EEG was recorded during the meditation and relaxation

periods via 20 scalp electrode sites (Fp1, Fp2, F7, F3, Fz, F4,
F8, T7, C3, Cz, C4, T8, P7, P3, Pz, P4, P8, O1, Oz, O2) ac-
cording to the international 10–20 electrode system using a
Neuroscan

Quik-Cap

(Compumedics,

Charlotte,

NC).

Linked mastoids served as reference. Horizontal eye move-
ment potentials were recorded using two electrodes placed
1 cm lateral to the outer canthi of the each eye. Vertical eye
movement potentials were recorded using two electrodes
placed on the center of the supraorbital and infraorbital re-
gions of the left eye. All electrode impedances were main-
tained at less than 5 kO. All potentials were amplified 200
times and acquired on a Neuroscan DC (Compumedics)
system at a sampling rate of 500 Hz. Ten (10) minutes of
eyes- closed EEG was recorded during each condition.

Spectral analysis

Prior to formal analysis, the data set was screened for

normality and outliers. The mean regional data (frontal,
temporal–central, posterior) for all four frequency bands
(delta, theta, alpha, and beta) was normally distributed for
rest and meditation conditions. Upon examination, these
data were skewed due to a single outlier (participant number
1), hence the data for the relevant electrode sites (C3, Cz, Pz,
P4, P8, P7, P3) were replaced with the respective mean score
in order to transform the data and control for the outlier.

Within-group analysis (meditation=rest) was undertaken

using multivariate regional analyses where the 20 electrode
sites were broken down into frontal (Fp1, F7, F3, Fz, F4, F8,
Fp2), temporal–central (T7, C3, Cz, C4, T8), and posterior
(P7, P3, Pz, P4, P8, O1, Oz, O2) regions. Additionally, the
EEG power was grouped into the following frequency
bands: delta (0.5–3 Hz), theta (3.1–7.9 Hz), alpha (8–12 Hz),
and beta (12.1–24 Hz). With the use of SPSS (version 12)
(SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL), each frequency band was submitted
to a within-subjects design analysis of variance (ANOVA)
over the factors of condition (meditation=rest) and region
(frontal=temporal–central=posterior). Within-subjects multi-
variate analyses of variance were conducted for each region
in order to compare regional differences according to ex-
perimental condition.

Results

Main effects and interactions

Repeated-measures ANOVAs revealed significant main

effects for experimental condition (F

(1,17)

¼ 4.99, p ¼ 0.04) and

region (F

(2,34)

¼ 5.48, p ¼ 0.01) for theta power. Hence, there

was a significant increase in theta power in the meditation
condition compared to the rest condition, when averaged
across all three brain regions (Table 1 and Fig. 1). Further-
more, there was a significant difference in theta power across
the three brain regions when averaged across the experi-
mental condition, with significantly greater theta power in
the frontal (F

(1,17)

¼ 5.83, p ¼ 0.03) and temporal–central

1188

LAGOPOULOS ET AL.

(F

(1,17)

¼ 13.86, p ¼ 0.003) regions when compared to the

posterior region (Table 2 and Fig. 2). There were no signifi-
cant interaction effects (F

(2,34)

¼ 1.27, p ¼ 0.30).

Repeated-measures ANOVAs revealed a significant main

effect for experimental condition (F

(1,17)

¼ 7.19, p ¼ 0.02) and

a significant trend for region (F

(2,16)

¼ 3.67, p ¼ 0.06, Pillai’s

Trace) for alpha power. Hence, there was a significant in-
crease in alpha power in the meditation condition compared
to the rest condition, when averaged across all three brain
regions (Fig. 1). Furthermore, there was a significant differ-
ence in alpha power across the three brain regions when
averaged across the experimental condition, with signifi-
cantly greater alpha power in the posterior (F

(1,17)

¼ 5.44,

p ¼ 0.04) region when compared to the frontal region. There
were no significant interaction effects (F

(2,16)

¼ 2.14, p ¼ 0.16,

Pillai’s Trace) (Fig. 2).

There were no significant main effects for experimental

condition or interaction effects for delta (F

(1,17)

¼ 0.99,

p ¼ 0.34; F

(2,34)

¼ 2.67, p ¼ 0.09). However, there were signif-

icant main effects for brain region for delta (F

(2,16)

¼ 15.52,

p ¼ 0.00; Pillai’s Trace), reflecting a significant difference in
delta power across the three brain regions when averaged
across the two conditions (Fig. 2). Post-hoc analyses revealed
significantly lower delta power in the posterior regions
compared to both the frontal (F

(1,17)

¼ 20.92, p ¼ 0.001) and

temporal–central (F

(1,17)

¼ 33.16, p ¼ 0.00) regions.

There were no significant main or interaction effects for

beta power (F

(1,17)

¼ 0.57, p ¼ 0.46; F

(2,16)

¼ 2.8, p ¼ 0.10, Pil-

lai’s Trace; F

(2,34)

¼ 0.46, p ¼ 0.64).

Regional analysis

Within-subjects ANOVAs were conducted to determine

whether there were differences in the frequency bands across
the two experimental conditions in each specific region, ra-
ther than averaged across all three regions. Given that we are
interested in group effects rather than specific differences
between electrode sites within the regions, only main effects
for condition (meditation versus rest) are reported.

There was a significant increase in alpha power in the

posterior (F

(1,17)

¼ 5.19, p ¼ 0.04), frontal (F

(1,17)

¼ 6.86, p ¼

0.02), and temporal–central (F

(1,17)

¼ 6.73, p ¼ 0.02) regions

and an increase in theta power in the posterior (F

(1,17)

¼ 5.59,

p ¼ 0.03), frontal (F

(1,17)

¼ 3.64, p ¼ 0.08; trend only), and

temporal–central (F

(1,17)

¼ 5.36, p ¼ 0.04) regions during the

meditation condition compared to at rest. There was also a
significant increase in delta power in the temporal–central
region in the meditation condition compared to rest (F

(1,17)

¼

4.75, p ¼ 0.05) (Figs. 3–5 and Table 3). There were no other
significant differences between the meditation and control
conditions.

Discussion

The novelty of the present study is that nondirective

meditation increases theta and alpha waves significantly
more than regular sitting relaxation. Theta activity was

FIG. 1.

Graphical representation of the effect of condition

on the spectral power across the four electroencephalogram
(EEG) bands. The EEG power from all three brain regions
was averaged.

Table

1. Mean Power Values (Standard Deviation

in Parentheses) Averaged Across All Three Brain

Regions for the Meditation and Rest Conditions

Delta (mV

2

) Theta (mV

2

) Alpha (mV

2

) Beta (mV

2

)

Meditation 2.96 (0.77)

5.59 (2.07) 13.14 (6.14) 0.98 (0.26)

Rest

2.81 (0.81)

4.53 (1.58)

9.93 (4.34) 0.96 (0.27)

FIG. 2.

Graphical representation of the effect of region on

the spectral power across the four electroencephalogram
(EEG) bands. The EEG power from both meditation and rest
conditions was averaged.

Table

2. Mean Power Values (Standard Deviation

in Parentheses) Averaged Across Both Conditions

and the Three Brain Regions

Delta

(mV

2

)

Theta
(mV

2

)

Alpha

(mV

2

)

Beta

(mV

2

)

Frontal

3.44 (0.46) 5.60 (1.68)

8.93 (2.48) 0.79 (0.14)

Temporal–

central

2.96 (0.81) 5.51 (2.36) 11.03 (4.56) 0.96 (0.23)

Posterior

2.35 (0.68) 4.30 (1.50) 14.14 (6.44) 1.13 (0.29)

EEG AND ACEM MEDITATION

1189

greater in frontal and temporal–central areas, whereas alpha
was more abundant posteriorly. These results concur with
previous studies of other meditation types, reporting similar
EEG patterns for either theta or alpha.

In general, several aspects of EEG recordings are associ-

ated with specific changes in brain function during medita-
tion and other mental activities. It is a well-established
technique, which measures cortical activity directly from the
scalp of subjects. These electrical signals are described in
terms of frequency bands, with the more reliable patterns
being delta (0.5–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha (8–12 Hz), beta
(12–30 Hz), and gamma (30–70 Hz). Delta activity is associ-
ated with pathological conditions such as tumors,

15

and also

occurs during sleep. In the context of meditation research,
the presence of delta can indicate that the subject is asleep.
Theta activity on the other hand is associated with alertness,
attention, and the efficient processing of cognitive and per-
ceptual tasks.

15

Theta activity has also been associated with

orienting, working memory, and affective processing,

16

with

frontal theta activity indicative of concentration. Hence, in-
creases in theta activity may reflect increased cognitive
processing and awareness. In contrast, alpha activity char-
acterized by large rhythmic waves is associated with relax-
ation and the lack of active cognitive processes. When an
individual is asked to engage in a cognitive task, alpha ac-
tivity will cease. This is termed alpha desynchronization,

15

and higher-band alpha wave desynchronization is indicative
of increased cognitive processing and external attention,
whereas synchronization reflects internal attention.

17

Initial stages of meditation research focused predomi-

nantly on alpha band effects. However, several investigators
have proposed that increased theta rather than alpha activity
is a specific state effect of meditative practice, and that in-
creased theta correlates positively with the level of medita-
tion experience.

18

Several studies have shown that long-term

meditators exhibit higher theta and alpha power.

16

Murata

et al.

19

compared 20 monks (10 with extensive experience, 10

with moderate experience) to 10 controls prior to and during
Zen meditation. They found that alpha appeared in all the
groups, whereas theta activity only appeared in the experi-
enced group, affecting the frontal region, proportionally to
the level of experience, hence supporting the previous find-
ings of Kasamatsu and Hirai.

18

Increased theta activity was

also observed in the frontal and posterior temporal region. In
a single case-study, repeated-measure design involving three
meditation scans and one control condition over 4 days,
Faber et al.

20

demonstrated increased theta coherence and

FIG. 4.

Graphical representation of the effect of condition

(meditation versus rest) averaged across the temporal–
central electrode (T7, C3, Cz, C4, T8) sites. EEG, electroen-
cephalogram.

FIG. 5.

Graphical representation of the effect of condition

(meditation versus rest) averaged across the posterior elec-
trode (P7, P3, Pz, P4, P8, O1, Oz, O2) sites. EEG, electroen-
cephalogram.

FIG. 3.

Graphical representation of the effect of condition

(meditation versus rest) averaged across the frontal electrode
(Fp1, F7, F3, Fz, F4, F8, Fp2) sites. EEG, electroencephalo-
gram.

1190

LAGOPOULOS ET AL.

decreased gamma coherence, except over temporal regions
where gamma coherence increased.

Kubota et al.

21

suggested that frontal theta reflects the

involvement of attention and working memory systems in
the prefrontal neural circuitry, including the anterior cingu-
late cortex, and that activity within these systems is inte-
grated with peripheral autonomic functioning. To test this
hypothesis, a study involving instruction of 25 novice par-
ticipants in the su-soku Zen technique was conducted. A
significant difference was found in frontal midline theta
rhythm during meditation, compared with the resting con-
trol condition. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic indi-
ces increased during frontal theta activity, suggesting a close
relationship between cardiac autonomic functioning and
activity of the medial frontal neural circuitry.

A study by Takahashi et al.

6

in 20 novice meditators also

found increased theta and alpha activity in frontal areas and
decreased sympathetic and increased parasympathetic ac-
tivity during meditation. The authors pointed out that alpha
and theta waves are independently involved in mental pro-
cessing during meditation. They also suggested that success-
ful meditation involves slower frontal alpha synchronization
coupled with reduced sympathetic activity, and that mind-
fulness may activate theta activity in the frontal areas as well
as increased parasympathetic activity.

Previous studies of the nondirective technique acem med-

itation documented a long-term reduction in blood pressure
and mental symptoms in everyday life outside meditation.

22

During practice, heart rate reduction compared to regular
relaxation indicated lower sympathetic and=or higher para-
sympathetic nerve activity.

23

The present study demonstrated

significant increases in theta- and alpha-wave activity in
frontal and temporal–central areas, and in posterior regions,
respectively. Higher theta activity probably reflects increased
awareness and attention, as well as cognitive and affective
processing during meditation,

16

whereas the increase in al-

pha activity likely relates to relaxation.

24,25

Predictably,

meditation produced little change in delta (sleep or patholog-
ical processes) or beta activity (concentration and demanding
tasks). Theta power, greater in frontal and temporal–central
regions than in posterior regions, may be meditation specific
and suggests neural processing in the frontal midline (ante-
rior cingulate cortex), and limbic areas, all of which have
been previously implicated in meditation. These areas are

known to a have a prominent role in emotion processing. In
contrast, alpha waves were more abundant in posterior re-
gions, which is compatible with reduced cognitive proces-
sing in sensory-related areas.

The experimental design of this study was such that all the

subjects acted as their own controls. This type of design af-
fords several advantages (including exact age and gender
matching for both conditions); however, it is associated with
several limitations. First, the potential interactive effects of a
combination of both practice and experience cannot be dis-
counted, as all the subjects were experienced meditators.
Second, although the meditation and rest conditions were
randomly assigned across all of the subjects, a lack of blind-
ing in this study may have contributed to a potential bias for
the meditation condition. Future studies need to elucidate
whether such an effect exists.

Conclusions

These novel EEG findings related to acem meditation

suggest that nondirective meditation techniques alter theta
and alpha EEG patterns significantly more than regular re-
laxation, in a manner that is perhaps similar to methods based
on mindfulness or concentration. Future studies should try
to delineate the functional meaning of the alpha and theta
activity in meditation (e.g., follow meditation novices who
comply with the technique over an extended period and look
for potential gradual alterations in brain activity that corre-
spond to the amount of meditation undertaken).

Acknowledgments

We acknowledge National Health and Medical Research

Council Program Grant 510135 and Belinda Ivanovski for
assistance with statistics.

Disclosure Statement

Svend Davanger, Øyvind Ellingsen, and Are Holen are

affiliated with Acem School of Meditation, an international
nonprofit organization.

References

1. Thachil AF, Mohan R, Bhugra D. The evidence base of

complementary and alternative therapies in depression.
J Affect Disord 2007;97:23–35.

2. Davidson RJ, Kabat-Zinn J, Schumacher J, et al. Alterations

in brain and immune function produced by mindfulness
meditation. Psychosom Med 2003;65:564–570.

3. Germer C, Siegel R, Fulton P. Mindfulness and Psycho-

therapy. New York: Guilford Press, 2005.

4. Ivanovski B, Malhi G. The psychological and neurophysio-

logical concomitants of mindfulness forms of meditation.
Acta Neuropsychiatr 2007;19:76–91.

5. Aftanas LI, Golosheikin SA. Changes in cortical activity

during altered state of consciousness: Study of meditation
by high resolution EEG. Fiziol Cheloveka 2003;29:18–27.

6. Takahashi T, Murata T, Hamada T, et al. Changes in EEG

and autonomic nervous activity during meditation and their
association with personality traits. Int J Psychophysiol
2005;55:199–207.

7. Lazar SW, Bush G, Gollub RL, et al. Functional brain map-

ping of the relaxation response and meditation. Neuroreport
2000;11:1581–1585.

Table

3. Mean Power Values (Standard Deviation

in Parentheses) from the Regional Analysis

Comparing Between Meditation and Rest Conditions

Delta

(mV

2

)

Theta
(mV

2

)

Alpha

(mV

2

)

Beta

(mV

2

)

Frontal

Meditation 3.41 (0.34) 6.24 (2.02) 10.32 (3.56)

0.8 (0.16)

Rest

3.48 (0.57) 4.98 (1.34)

7.54 (1.40)

0.8 (0.14)

Temporal–

central
Meditation 3.16 (0.89) 6.14 (2.55) 12.99 (6.15)

1 (0.2)

Rest

2.78 (0.75)

4.9 (2.18)

9.06 (2.98)

0.9 (0.25)

Posterior

Meditation 2.45 (0.73)

4.7 (1.67)

15.7 (7.37) 1.13 (0.29)

Rest

2.24 (0.62)

3.9 (1.34)

12.6 (5.51) 1.13 (0.29)

EEG AND ACEM MEDITATION

1191

8. Mason LI, Alexander CN, Travis FT, et al. Electrophysio-

logical correlates of higher states of consciousness during
sleep in long-term practitioners of the Transcendental Medi-
tation program. Sleep 1997;20:102–110.

9. Travis F. Autonomic and EEG patterns distinguish trans-

cending from other experiences during Transcendental
Meditation practice. Int J Psychophysiol 2001;42:1–9.

10. Gaylord C, Orme-Johnson D, Travis F. The effects of the

transcendental mediation technique and progressive muscle
relaxation on EEG coherence, stress reactivity, and mental
health in black adults. Int J Neurosci 1989;46:77–86.

11. Travis F, Wallace RK. Autonomic and EEG patterns during

eyes-closed rest and transcendental meditation (TM) prac-
tice: The basis for a neural model of TM practice. Conscious
Cogn 1999;8:302–318.

12. Ellingsen O, Holen A. Meditation: A scientific perspective.

In: Davanger S, Eifring H, Hersoug A, eds. Fighting Stress:
Reviews of Meditation Research. Oslo: Acem Publishing,
2008:11–35.

13. Solberg E, Holen A, Ekeberg O, et al. The effects of long

meditation on plasma melatonin and blood serotonin. Med
Sci Monit 2004;10:CR96–CR101.

14. Solberg E, Ingjer F, Holen A, et al. Stress reactivity to and

recovery from a standardised exercise bout: A study of 31
runners practising relaxation techniques. Br J Sports Med
2000;34:268–272.

15. Stern R, Ray W, Quigley K. Psychophysiological Recording.

New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

16. Aftanas LI, Golocheikine SA. Human anterior and frontal

midline theta and lower alpha reflect emotionally positive
state and internalized attention: High-resolution EEG in-
vestigation of meditation. Neurosci Lett 2001;310:57–60.

17. Shaw JC. Intention as a component of the alpha-rhythm re-

sponse to mental activity. Int J Psychophysiol 1996;24:7–23.

18. Kasamatsu A, Hirai T. An electroencephalographic study on

the zen meditation (Zazen). Folia Psychiatr Neurol Jpn 1966;
20:315–336.

19. Murata T, Koshino Y, Omori M, et al. Quantitative EEG

study on premature aging in adult Down’s syndrome. Biol
Psychiatry 1994;35:422–425.

20. Faber P, Lehmann D, Gianotti LRR, Pascual-Marqui R. Scalp

and intracerebral (LORETA) theta and gamma EEG coher-
ence in meditation. International Society for Neuronal Reg-
ulation, Winterthur, Switzerland, 2004.

21. Kubota Y, Sato W, Toichi M, et al. Frontal midline theta

rhythm is correlated with cardiac autonomic activities dur-
ing the performance of an attention demanding meditation
procedure. Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2001;11:281–287.

22. Westlund P, Holen A. Sleep, alertness and quality of life. In:

Davanger S, Eifring H, Hersoug A, eds. Fighting Stress:
Reviews of Meditation Research. Oslo: Acem Publishing,
2008:129–137.

23. Solberg E, Ekeberg O, Holen A, et al. Hemodynamic changes

during long meditation. Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback
2004;29:213–221.

24. Holzel B, Ott U, Hempel H, et al. Differential engagement

of anterior cingulate and adjacent medial frontal cortex in
adept meditators and non-meditators. Neurosci Lett 2007;
421:16–21.

25. Newberg A, Alavi A, Baime M, et al. The measurement of

regional cerebral blood flow during the complex cognitive
task of meditation: A preliminary SPECT study. Psychiatry
Res 2001;106:113–122.

Address correspondence to:

Jim Lagopoulos, Ph.D., F.A.I.N.M.

Department of Psychological Medicine

Level 5 Building 36

Royal North Shore Hospital

St. Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065

Australia

E-mail: jlagopoulos@med.usyd.edu.au

1192

LAGOPOULOS ET AL.

This article has been cited by:

1. Eun-Jeong  Lee,  Joydeep  Bhattacharya,  Christof  Sohn,  Rolf  Verres.  2012.  Monochord  sounds  and  progressive  muscle

relaxation reduce anxiety and improve relaxation during chemotherapy: A pilot EEG study. Complementary Therapies in
Medicine
 . [

CrossRef

]

2. K. Plattner, M. I. Lambert, N. Tam, J. Baumeister. 2012. The response of cortical alpha activity to pain and neuromuscular

changes  caused  by  exercise-induced  muscle  damage.  Scandinavian  Journal  of  Medicine  &  Science  in  Sports  n/a-n/a.
[

CrossRef

]

3. Jesús  Poza,  Carlos  Gómez,  María  T.  Gutiérrez,  Nuria  Mendoza,  Roberto  Hornero.  2012.  Effects  of  a  multi-sensory

environment on brain-injured patients: Assessment of spectral patterns. Medical Engineering & Physics . [

CrossRef

]

4. Pascal L. Faber, Dietrich Lehmann, Shisei Tei, Takuya Tsujiuchi, Hiroaki Kumano, Roberto D. Pascual-Marqui, Kieko Kochi.

2012. EEG source imaging during two Qigong meditations. Cognitive Processing . [

CrossRef

]

5. Andrew  Scholey,  Luke  A.  Downey,  Joseph  Ciorciari,  Andrew  Pipingas,  Karen  Nolidin,  Melissa  Finn,  Melissa  Wines,

Sarah  Catchlove,  Alirra  Terrens,  Emma  Barlow,  Leanne  Gordon,  Con  Stough.  2011.  Acute  neurocognitive  effects  of
epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). Appetite . [

CrossRef

]

6. References 239-251. [

CrossRef

]

7. SVEND DAVANGER, ARE HOLEN, ØYVIND ELLINGSEN, KENNETH HUGDAHL. 2010. MEDITATION-SPECIFIC

PREFRONTAL  CORTICAL  ACTIVATION  DURING  ACEM  MEDITATION:  AN  fMRI  STUDY  1,2.  Perceptual  and
Motor Skills
 111:1, 291-306. [

CrossRef

]