1 | 

P a g e

 

 

REPORT ON FREEDOM OF ARTISTIC 

EXPRESSION AND CENSORSHIP IN 

ZIMBABWE  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 2015

2 | 

P a g e

 

 

ABBREVIATIONS 

ACHPR  

 

 

African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights  

ACHR  

 

 

American Convention on Human Rights 

ACmHPR 

 

 

African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights 

AIPPA  

 

 

Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act  

 

 

 

 

2003 

ARHRS 

 

 

African Regional Human Rights System 

AU 

 

 

 

African Union 

BAZ   

 

 

Broadcasting Authority of Zimbabwe  

CIO   

 

 

Criminal Intelligence Organisation  

CISOMM 

 

 

Civil Society Monitoring Mechanism  

CRC   

 

 

Convention on the Rights of the Child 

CRPD  

 

 

Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities 

HIFA   

 

 

Harare International Festival of the Arts  

HRC   

 

 

Human Rights Committee 

ICCPR 

 

 

UN International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights 

ICESCR 

 

 

International Covenant on Economic, Social and  

 

 

 

         Cultural Rights  

IPA 

 

 

 

Interparty Political Agreement 

NPA   

 

 

National Plan of Action  

MDC   

 

 

Movement for Democratic Change  

POSA  

 

 

Public Order and Security Act  

UDHR 

 

 

Universal Declaration of Human Rights 

UN 

 

 

 

United Nations 

UNESCO 

 

 

The United Nations Organisation for Education,   

 

 

 

 

Science and Cultural Organisation  

UNHRC 

 

 

United Nations Human Rights Council 

UPR   

 

 

Universal Periodic Review  

ZANU PF 

 

 

Zimbabwe African National Union Patriotic Front   

ZLHR  

 

 

Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights 

3 | 

P a g e

 

 

Table of Contents 

(i)

  BACKGROUND AND AIM OF CONSULTANCY ..................................................... 5 

(iii)

 

Methodology ................................................................................................ 6

 

(iv)

 

Executive Summary ..................................................................................... 8

 

Chapter 1 – NATIONAL LEGAL FRAMEWORK ON ARTISTIC EXPRESSION ............... 14

 

1.1

 

Introduction .............................................................................................. 14

 

1.2

 

Brief history of censorship in Zimbabwe ..................................................... 16

 

1.3

 

National laws regulating artistic expression ................................................ 17

 

1.3.1

 

Constitutional provisions ........................................................................ 18

 

1.3.2

 

Constitutional framework on limitation of artistic expression ................... 21

 

1.3.3

 

Nature of law limiting artistic freedom ..................................................... 21

 

1.3.4

 

Law of general application ....................................................................... 22

 

1.4

 

Judicial decisions bearing on artistic freedom ............................................. 23

 

1.5

 

Other legislation impacting on freedom of artistic expression ....................... 26

 

1.5.1

 

Censorship and Entertainment Control Act [Chapter 10:04] ..................... 27

 

1.5.2

 

Criminal Law (Codification and Reform) Act [Chapter 9:23]....................... 27

 

1.5.3

 

Public Order and Security Act [Chapter 11:17] ......................................... 29

 

1.5.4

 

Official Secrets Act [Chapter 11:09] ......................................................... 30

 

1.5.5

 

Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act [Chapter 10:27] ......... 31

 

1.5.7

 

Broadcasting Services Act [Chapter 12:06] ............................................... 32

 

1.5.8

 

National Arts Council of Zimbabwe Act (Chapter 25:07) ............................ 33

 

1.5.8.1 Statutory Instrument 136 of 2003 ........................................................... 34

 

1.5.8.2 Statutory Instrument 87 of 2006 as amended by SI 166 of

 

  2009 

(NACZ General Regulations) 

34

 

1.5.9

 

The Draft National Cultural Policy of Zimbabwe 2015 .............................. 38

 

Chapter 2:

 

LOCAL CENSORSHIP STANDARDS OF WORKS OF ART .................... 40

 

2.1

 

Censorship and censorship standards ........................................................ 40

 

4 | 

P a g e

 

 

2.2

 

Standards of art in Zimbabwe – The framework .......................................... 43

 

2.3

 

Administration of censorship of artistic expression ...................................... 45

 

2.4

 

Censorship of films and recorded video or film material ............................... 47

 

2.5

 

Censorship of literature, pictures, statues and records ................................ 48

 

2.6

 

The Appeal Procedure ................................................................................ 49

 

2.7

 

The Role of the Police Service ..................................................................... 51

 

Chapter 3:

 

INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS ON ARTISTIC EXPRESSION ............... 53

 

3.1

 

Zimbabwe ratification practice.................................................................... 53

 

3.2

 

International law on freedom of artistic expression ...................................... 54

 

3.3

 

The UNESCO framework ............................................................................ 55

 

3.3.1

 

Recommendations in tandem with international obligations  (UNESCO, UPR 

and international treaty framework) .................................................................... 58

 

3.4

 

International law on freedom of artistic expression ...................................... 59

 

Regional law on freedom of artistic expression ......................................................... 63

 

3.5

 

Limitation of freedom of expression ............................................................ 64

 

3.6

 

Consistency with the international standards ............................................. 66

 

3.7

 

The Universal Periodic Review Process ........................................................... 69

 

Chapter 4:

 

EXAMPLES  OF  WORKS  OF  ART  THAT  HAVE  BEEN  CENSORED  IN 

ZIMBABWE  74

 

4.1

 

Introduction .............................................................................................. 74

 

Chapter 5:

 

CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS ........................................ 80

 

5.1

 

Conclusion ................................................................................................ 80

 

5.2

 

Recommendations to Government .............................................................. 82

 

5.3

 

Reform of the broadcasting services sector .................................................. 83

 

 

5 | 

P a g e

 

 

(i) 

BACKGROUND AND AIM OF CONSULTANCY 

Zimbabwe  is  coming  up  for  the  United  Nations  Human  Rights  Council 

(UNHRC)  Universal  Periodic  Review  (UPR)  2

nd

  cycle  in  2016.  The  aim  is  to 

conduct a study on censorship legislation and practices in Zimbabwe, with the 

purpose  of  submitting  a  UPR  report  to  the  UN  Human  Rights  Council  in 

January  2016  including  recommendations  to  the  Zimbabwean  Government 

and  relevant  authorities.  It  is  hoped  the  study  will  influence  the  current 

legislation  and  censorship  practices  in  Zimbabwe  and  serve  as  an  indicator  of 

good  practice  for  network  partners  and  human  rights  organisations  in 

Zimbabwe and across the African creative sector.(ii) 

Objectives 

1.  To  analyse  and  describe  provisions,  articles  and  paragraphs  in  current 

legislation  in  Zimbabwe  restricting  and/or  guaranteeing  artistic  freedom  of 

expression  (music,  film,  literature,  theatre,  visual  arts  etc.)  including  the 

production,  publishing,  distribution  and  access  to  take  part  in  cultural 

activities). 

2.  To  analyse  and  describe  mechanisms  and  practices  of  (pre  and  post) 

censorship  boards  and  authorities  (such  as  police,  institutions,  syndicates, 

state-controlled  media/broadcasting,  universities  etc.)  regulating  artistic 

freedom  including  description  and  analysis  of  existing  complaints 

mechanisms  and  transparency  of  the  decisions  and  work  of  such  boards. 

The  study  shall  include  specific  restrictions  and  regulations  applied  to 

cultural products and artists from other countries. 

3.  To  describe  and  discuss  typical  examples  of  pre  and  post  censorship  and 

decisions  made  by  censorship  boards  and/or  authorities  with  regard  to 

artistic freedom. 

4.  To  analyse  and  describe  Zimbabwe’s  ratification  in  practice  and  theory  of 

international  conventions  and  covenants  promoting  and  defending  artistic 

freedom  and  discuss  issues  related  to  Zimbabwe’s  ratifications  and 

reservations of these specifically: 

6 | 

P a g e

 

 

a)  The  International  Covenant  on  Economic,  Social  and  Cultural  Rights 

(ICESCR) – specifically article 15  

b)  The  International  Covenant  on  Civil  and  Political  Rights  (ICCPR)  – 

specifically article 19 

c)  The 1980 UNESCO recommendations concerning the Status of the Artist 

d)  The  2005  UNESCO  Convention  On  the  Protection  and  Promotion  of  the 

Diversity of Cultural Expressions 

e)  The report will further discuss proposed  alignment of current legislation 

with the new Constitution in relation to the above 

The report refers to the recommendations of the report The Right to Freedom of 

Artistic Expression and Creation by Farida Shaheed, the UN Special Rapporteur 

in the field of cultural rights. 

The  study  was  not  be  limited  to  the  above  description  but  included  any 

relevant  information  such  as  the  use  of  devices  used  to  carry  out  artistic 

censorship. 

The study also took into account as inspirational background the scope of the 

reports: 

 

Censorship in the Lebanese Legal System  

 

 Censors of Creativity 

 

 ArtWatch Report 2013 

 

 All That is Banned is Desired (Conference Report and Article Collection) 

(iii) 

Methodology 

The  consultant  carried  out  a  desk  review,  gathered,  reviewed  and  analysed 

relevant  literature  and  engaged  in  consultation  with  key  arts  and  culture 

stakeholders,  including:  independent  experts,  academics,  and  international, 

regional  and  local  non-governmental  organisations.  In  particular,  national 

reports,  stakeholder  reports,  outcome  reports  and  mid-term  implementation 

7 | 

P a g e

 

 

reports  from  the  previous  UPR  cycle,  including  recommendations  made  to  the 

government of Zimbabwe, were reviewed in the penultimate part of this report.  

Interviews  with  artists  and  artist  bodies  were  carried  out.  Semi-structured 

interviews  were  conducted  with  a  fairly  open  framework  to  allow  for  focused, 

conversational,  two-way  communication.  Not  all  questions  were  designed, 

phrased and shared ahead of time to allow both the interviewer and the person 

being  interviewed  the  flexibility  to  probe  for  details  or  discuss  issues.  For  the 

complete list of guiding questions see Annex 1.  

Purposive  sampling  of  interviewees  was  implemented  and  a  total  of  16  artists 

were  interviewed.  Purposive  sampling  is a  form  of  non-probability  sampling  in 

which  decisions  concerning  the  individuals  to  be  included  in  the  sample  are 

taken  by  the  researcher,  based  upon  a  variety  of  criteria  which  may  include 

specialist  knowledge  of  the  research  issue,  or  capacity  and  willingness  to 

participate in the research. The researcher took a decision about the individual 

participants  who  would  be  most  likely  to  contribute  appropriate  data,  both  in 

terms of relevance and depth. For the full list of interviewed people see Annex 

2. 

8 | 

P a g e

 

 

(iv)Executive Summary  

The  project  analysing  the  legal 

context 

of 

artistic 

freedom 

in 

Zimbabwe  was  commissioned  by 

Freemuse  and  Nhimbe  Trust  as  a 

platform  to  feed  into  the  Universal 

Periodic 

Review 

process 

when 

Zimbabwe enters the second cycle of 

review  following  the  submission  of 

the  inaugural  National  Report  in 

2011. 

This 

report 

examines 

restrictions  on  freedom  of  artistic 

expression 

in 

Zimbabwe. 

The 

findings  and  recommendations  will 

be  submitted  to  the  United  Nations 

Human  Rights  Council  as  part  of 

the  UPR  –  the  UN  system’s  official 

mechanism for reviewing all member 

states  human  rights  records  in 

cycles  of  four  and  a  half  years. 

Zimbabwe 

comes 

up 

for 

‘examination’  of  its  human  rights 

record in 2016. A central part of the 

UPR process is qualified inputs from 

civil society. 

 

The legal analysis made a number of 

findings.  Zimbabwe  practices  pre-

censorship of artistic production. 

Censorship is a practice exercised in 

different jurisdictions the world over 

and  takes  different  forms  and 

approaches.  The  rationale  being  to 

restrict access to and distribution of 

materials 

through 

which 

information  is  shared  and  received 

in  the  belief  that  society  must  be 

protected 

from 

undesirable 

information. 

The  first  legislation  to  implement 

and 

regulate 

censorship 

was 

enacted in the form of two laws, one 

regulating  obscenity  and  another 

cinematography, 

in 

the 

then 

Southern 

Rhodesia 

in 

1912, 

culminating 

in 

one 

piece 

of 

legislation first in 1932, and then  in 

1967 in the form of Censorship and 

Entertainments  Control  Act,  1967. 

This  is  the  current  legislation  with 

amendments since its enactment.  

Freedom of artistic expression is a 

key component of the right to 

freedom of expression. Section 61 (b) 

of the 2013 Constitution of 

Zimbabwe says that every person 

has the right to freedom of 

expression which includes freedom 

of artistic expression and scientific 

research and creativity . It 

specifically provides for artistic 

expression thereby eliminating any 

9 | 

P a g e

 

 

doubt about its constitutional 

protection.

1

 

The 

full 

enjoyment 

of 

artistic 

expression  is  dependent  on  other 

rights  such  as  right  to  access  to 

information,  freedom  of  association 

and 

assembly, 

freedom 

of 

conscience,  and  right  to  language 

and  participation  in  cultural  life, 

among  others.  All  these  rights  also 

enjoy 

constitutional 

protection 

thereby  fortifying  the  protection  of 

artistic  expression  by  the  supreme 

law of the land. 

The importance attached to freedom 

of  expression,  and  by  extension 

artistic  expression,  is  one  reiterated 

by Zimbabwean courts as one of the 

most 

important 

rights 

for 

individuals 

to 

achieve 

full 

development,  challenge  the  status 

quo 

and 

hold 

public 

officials 

accountable. 

Yet,  freedom  of  expression  and 

artistic 

expression 

is 

not 

an 

absolute;  it  is  subject  to  the 

limitation provisions of Section 86 of 

the 2013 Constitution. Among other 

criteria  for  its  limitation,  laws  of 

general  application  in  a  society 

                                       

1

  

 

based  on  dignity,  equality,  freedom 

and 

justice 

may 

limit 

artistic 

expression. 

Artistic expression enjoys protection 

at  international  level.  The  treaty-

based  human  rights  systems  of  the 

United 

Nations, 

the 

UNESCO 

framework, as well as African Union 

and sub-regional blocs, to the extent 

of  their  relevance,  enshrine  and 

protect  these  rights.  Common  in  all 

these  initiatives  is  the  requirement 

that  states,  including  Zimbabwe, 

conform  in  law  and  conduct  to 

ensure  that  they  respect,  fulfil, 

promote and protect artistic freedom 

in a context devoid of discrimination 

against particular artists. Zimbabwe 

is  a  signatory  to  most  of  the 

international 

instruments 

on 

freedom  of  expression  and  artistic 

expression 

and 

constitutional 

provisions  have  fully  domesticated 

the  international  law  provisions,  for 

example 

UNESCO 

AND 

ICC. 

However, 

consistent 

with 

its 

susceptibility 

to 

limitation, 

number  of  laws,  policies  and  public 

decisions have been deployed by the 

state  to  limit  freedom  of  expression 

in general, and artistic expression in 

specific  situations.  The  Censorship 

10 | 

P a g e

 

 

and  Entertainments  Act  leads  the 

line  in  terms  of  subjecting  works  of 

art 

to 

censorship. 

This 

Act 

establishes  the  Censorship  Board 

responsible for censoring all manner 

of artistic work.  

In  Zimbabwe  censorship,  which  in 

principle 

is 

violation 

of 

international  obligations,  backdates 

to  1911.  The  grounds  upon  which 

censorship  is  administered,  which 

in  a  way  reflect  expected  standards 

of  works  of  art  in  Zimbabwe,  have 

remained  the  same  to  this  day. 

These  have  been  interpreted  to 

include  elastic  definitions  such  as  

harm  to  national  security,  public 

order,  public  health  or  threat  to  the 

economy  of  the  state.  Political 

controversy  and  morality  are  still 

grounds  dominating  the  rationale 

for censorship as they did in 1911.        

Notwithstanding the presence of the 

Censorship  Board,  there  are  now 

numerous  self-appointed  censors  of 

freedom  of  expression  including  the 

Police  Service  whose  conduct  in 

censoring 

artists 

puts 

the 

Censorship 

Board’s 

record 

to 

shame.  

Research  has  shown  that  the  State 

cannot  tolerate  political  criticism  at 

any  level.  Political  discussion  of 

whatever  form  is  thwarted  not  least 

in the arts sector. More than 90 per 

cent of banned artistic performances 

or  works  were  declared  undesirable 

for  the  political  satire  contained 

therein,  which  arts  experts  have 

subsequently  evaluated  as  non-

offensive. 

Examples 

of 

banned 

works  have  been  included  in  the 

report.  In  these  samples,  political 

controversy  dominated  the  grounds 

for censorship  

However,  the  public,  as  a  key 

component of the right to freedom of 

expression,  has  had  no  chance  to 

exercise  its  own  evaluation  of  the 

banned  works  and  events  since  the 

practice is to censor materials before 

public  consumption  –  the  very 

essence of censorship.  

There  is  excessive  criminalisation  of 

artistic expression with the Criminal 

Law  (Codification  &  Reform)  Act 

bent  and  stretched  to  cover  artistic 

works.  As  if  banning  was  not  in 

itself a sufficient penalty, creators of 

such  works  were  prosecuted  on  the 

basis  of  the  content  of  their  artistic