1

Financial Inclusion  

in Mewat

Report 2013-2014

2

Background:

One way of defining financial inclusion (FI) 

can be as  -- “access to fair, appropriate, 

cost  effective  financial  products  and 

services by mainstream service providers 

to  a  certain  segment  of  society.’  It 

can  also  be  defined  as  the  delivery  of 

financial services at an affordable cost to 

vast  sections  of  disadvantaged  and  low 

income groups.  FI is not an end in itself, 

it is a gateway to a better life, better living 

and better income; a process that makes 

access to financial services possible and 

provides  equal  opportunity  for  availing 

adequate and timely credit.  FI opens up 

the financial system for those who could 

not  earlier  muster  up  the  resources  to 

improve  their  lives,  but  now  with  easy 

access  to  savings,  loans,  insurance 

and  affordable  rates  these  opportunities 

are  not  out  of  their  reach.  The  Indian 

banking credit system in the last decade 

has  registered  a  significant  growth, 

which  has  enabled  them  to  diversify  

their portfolio.

FI is one such initiative that seeks to bridge 

a large gap in facilities available to people 

in India. . Despite immense efforts to reach 

out  to  those  who  were  earlier  unable  to 

avail  banking  facilities,  and  to  establish 

a robust system of financial services; the 

results  have  been  slow,  far  below  the 

global  benchmark  of  credit  penetration. 

The  statistics  on  financial  exclusion  in 

India provides a very depressing picture. 

Just about 40 per cent of the population 

across  the  country  has  bank  accounts 

and this ratio is much lower in the north-

eastern part of the country. The proportion 

of people having any kind of life insurance 

cover is as low as 10 per cent, and the 

proportion having insurance of other types 

than  ‘life  insurance’  is  an  abysmally  low 

0.6  per  cent.  People  having  debit  cards 

comprise  only  13  per  cent  and  those 

having credit cards a marginal 2 per cent. 

However  staggering  these  figures  may 

seem,  they  still  convey  only  part  of  the 

extent of financial exclusion in India. 

3

Around  2009-10  in  Mewat,  the  ratio  of 

people without access to banks/accounts 

and facilities was worse, as the awareness 

levels on banks and their purpose was very 

low. Almost 80 per cent of the households 

were  financially  excluded.  This  was 

mainly because of lack of information and 

sensitization of the community besides of 

course  several  other  reasons  including 

poverty  and  dependence  of  agriculture 

for their livelihoods, fewer entrepreneurial 

activities etc. 

But the situation is a changing, in the district 

now.  This  has  been  possible  because 

of  the  intervention  of  National  Bank  for 

Agriculture  and  Rural  Development 

(NABARD)  that  has  been  working 

tirelessly in the district since the last few 

years.  It has partnered the administration 

and  civil  society  and  the  results  have 

started to show.

About Mewat:

Mewat, the twentieth district of the state, 

was created as a result of the bifurcation of 

the Gurgaon district on 4th April 2005. The 

district is mostly inhabited by a numerically 

preponderant  ethnic  group  called  Meo, 

who  are  reported  to  have  embraced 

Islam during the reign of the Tughlaq’s in 

the 14th Century C.E, and subsequently 

during Aurangzeb’s time in 17th century. 

Earlier,  they  claimed  Kshatrias  descent 

and traced their origins to Hinduism. Their 

adherence  to  the  Islamic  faith  over  time 

blended with their social and cultural life. 

Mewat  is  an  insulated  and  backward 

district of Haryana, in contrast to the glitzy 

malls and broad boulevards of Gurgaon. 

The region is not connected by rail, and 

barely  connected  by  buses;  the  closest 

station is approximately 35 KM from Nuh, 

the  district  headquarters.  There  is  only 

one  major  bus  terminus,  with  barely  42 

buses  plying  to  and  from  the  city  for  a 

population of 1.2 million. The nearest bus 

stop for a village is on average a minimum 

distance  of  6  kms.  The  only  regular 

transportation is run by a private provider 

and  is  often  overcrowded  and  unsafe 

for  women.  Accidents  are  a  common 

feature  and  according  to  a  newspaper 

4

report around 60 people lose their life on 

the road per month. The weak transport 

system is characteristic of the endemic of 

the destitute condition of Mewat.

The  administrative  set  up  of  the  district 

is  as  follows:  the  district  has  two  sub-

divisons:  Nuh  and  Firozepur  Jhirka; 

within  these  subdivisions  there  are  five 

blocks  -  Nuh,  Tauru,  Nagina,  Punhana 

and  Firozepur  Jhirka.  The  total  number 

of villages is approximately 500 and the 

number of Panchayats is 301.

Mewat  fares  low  on  all  development 

indicators  such  as  health,  education, 

literacy  of  financial  inclusion.

  With  the 

literacy rate at an abysmal low of 37 per 

cent  amongst  women,  as  per  the  2011 

census,  it  is  an  extremely  obscurantist 

society determined largely by the clergy. 

Women  are  subjugated  and  deprived  of 

any  form  of  entertainment  –even  radio. 

Only  5  per  cent  households  have  a 

Television set . 

However,  Mewat  has  the  highest 

penetration  of  mobile  phones  with 

FM  features.  This  has  served  as  an 

advantage  for  Radio  Mewat,  as  most 

of  the  phones  these  days  have  a  FM 

radio.  We  believe  that  information  is  an 

important tool for empowerment and it is 

the  lack  of  information  which  has  been 

a major reason for the backwardness of  

this region.

ABOUT SMART

Seeking  Modern  Applications  for  Real 

Transformation  (SMART)  a  not  for 

profit  organisiation

  registered  under  the 

Society’s Registration Act, 1860. Providing 

media  and  communication  technologies 

for developing new paradigms for social 

transformation, 

SMART, 

conceives 

strategies  to  improve  to  the  quality  of 

life  of  the  community  especially  women 

and  children.  Poverty,  according  to  the 

organization,  has  a  woman’s  face,  and 

that  literacy  and  information  are  major 

tools  for  inclusive  growth,  eradicating 

poverty, 

enlarging 

employment 

opportunities, advancing gender equality, 

promoting  democratic  participation  and 

for  empowering  people.  The  endeavour 

is then, to provide awareness with a view 

to  enhance  existing  skills  and  support 

sustainable  growth  models  for  the 

underprivileged sections to think, act and 

exercise  their  choices  to  their  maximum 

potential.  The  main  objectives  of  the  

NGO are:

To  bring  about  real  transformation 

in  the  lives  of  the  socially  excluded 

and  marginalised  sections  of  the 

population, especially women.

To  use  mass  media  and  new  tools 

of  communication  to  include  women 

in  the  process  of  decision  making, 

devlopment and governance.

To  create  alternative  employment 

opportunities  for  the  youth  and  help 

bridge the digital divide and create a 

skilled  man  power  that  can  face  the 

challenges of the future.

To  increase  the  self  worth  of  target 

groups  through  capacity  building 

and 

economically 

sustainable 

programmes.

To  work  in  the  areas  of  health, 

environment, 

water, 

education, 

5

domestic violence, rural development, 

community and resource development, 

human rights, culture etc to empower 

the communities.

To enable a sustainable development 

model.

RADIO MEWAT 

Radio Mewat, the regions first community 

radio  in  Mewat,  l

icensed  to  SMART, 

Serving  a  catalyst  in  the  development 

of  rural  and  underprivileged  urban 

communities,  it  provides  citizens  with 

access  to  information,  opportunities 

to  build  local  capacity,  and  promotes 

community empowerment by informing the 

poor and providing them a voice in public 

discourse even if illiterate. Reaching the 

common  man,  involving  the  community 

and  democratizing  communications  are 

some  of  its  prime  strengths. 

This  radio 

station is an attempt to use communication 

technology for disseminating information 

on  financial  products  in  both  monetized 

and non-monetized areas.

 

Radio Mewat was launched on September 

1,  2010,  and  is  centrally  located  in  the 

administrative  block,Nuh  ,  of  Mewat. 

Broadcasting for 17 hours a day it reaches 

out to over 500,000 people in a radius of 

25-30 kilometers. The broadcast timings 

every day are – 8am-11 pm.  

 

Radio  Mewat  has  received  two  National 

Awards  in  a  short  span  of  a  little  over 

four years. In February 2012, it won the 

Sustainability award, leading the way for 

many  CR  stations  that  were  struggling 

for  survival. The  program  “ Aapki  Police 

Aapke Saath” won the National Award for 

the most innovative program in 2013. The 

programme focused on better governance 

by bringing the SSP to the station every 

week.  Complaints  from  women  and  the 

marginalized  sections  were  taken  up  by 

the radio station and given to the police, 

who in turn carried out investigations and 

shared  the  reports  and  actions  taken 

on  the  community  radio.  This  was  an 

extremely successful program which was 

much appreciated by the community.

In 2014 it has won the SKOCH Order of 

Merit for financial inclusion and deepening 

of financial understanding. And recently in 

2015, it found a place in the LIMCA book 

of Records for receiving the highest calls 

on the community radio based Consumer 

Helpline.

Some  of  the  current  programmes  of 

Radio Mewat are the Consumer helpline, 

supported  by  the  Ministry  of  Consumer 

Affairs, a program on agriculture sponsored 

by ATMA, a program on financial inclusion 

supported by NABARD, on Panchayati Raj 

supported by Ministry of Panchayti Raj, on 

Aajeevika,  supported  by  Haryana  State 

Rural Livelihoods Mission, a program on 

education  supported  by  CEMCA  a  part 

of  the  community  learning  programme 

initiate,  besides  this  the  station  has 

promoted the local talent in music through 

is  Mewat  Idol  programme,  it  broadcasts 

programs  for  children,  for  women,  for 

youth  and  for  the  elderly.  Its  programs 

‘Aaj ki baat; Kaam ki Baat, Gaon Gaon ki 

Baat etc are extremely popular and have 

been running on demand since its launch.

6

Radio Mewat has 15 full time employees, 

4  part-time  employees  and  around  15 

volunteers,  who  volunteer  to  work  on 

projects  on  demand.  Besides  this  it  has 

10  women  trainers  and  rapporteurs 

for  its  Mothers  School  project  and  10 

field  workers  for  its  project  on  Financial 

Inclusion project.

Being  an  agrarian  economy  there  has 

been  a  demand  for  agriculture  related 

programs.  Radio  Mewat  has  aired  over 

750  programs  on  various  aspects  of 

agriculture.  Low  in  health,  Radio  Mewat 

has  aired  over  400  programs  on  health 

related  issues  .The  outreach  activities 

undertaken  by  the  NGO  and  the  CR 

station  have  increased  the  demand  for 

health infrastructure. There is a constant 

endeavor  to  empower  communities  to 

participate  in  the  development  process 

and become stakeholders. 

When  Radio  Mewat  started  working  in 

the  financial  inclusion  sector  barely  10 

percent  of  the  households  were  linked 

with banks. After continuous intervention 

today  close  to  40  per  cent  people  have 

opened  accounts  and  have  built  an 

association with banks. 

Radio Mewat has been working tirelessly 

for  the  inclusion  of  the  most  vulnerable 

population in the process of growth. With 

a vision to reach out to the last person in 

the last village by providing a voice, the 

Radio has been able to build on the local 

wisdom and knowledge and instill a sense 

of pride in the community. It has become 

the  identity  of  the  people  of  Mewat  and 

has helped preserve the local traditions, 

music, culture and values . It has served 

as a repository of the local heritage and 

has provided a platform for the local talent 

to blossom.

Its deep engagement with the community 

has given it an edge and has helped it serve 

as  the  bridge  between  the  community 

and  the  administration.  It  has  a  large 

listenership base and its programmes on 

governance and its redressal mechanisms 

have served the people of Mewat well.

It has partnered with various departments 

and  sectors  like  the  banks  and  banking 

sector,  the  agriculture  sector,  the 

horticulture, 

floriculture, 

watershed 

management,  DRDA,  education  sector, 

panchayati 

raj 

department, 

rural 

development,  health  sector,  banks, 

Medical College, the Chief Medical Officer 

and his team, grassroot workers like the 

ANM,  ASHA  workers  and  Anganwadi 

teachers,  other  NGOs,  education 

department,  the  police  and  the  District 

Collector.  Radio  Mewat  has  played  an 

active role in strengthening democracy and 

broadcasting public service messages.

Financial Inclusion in Mewat

Financial inclusion in Mewat is permeating 

through the society at a rapid pace. More 

and  more  families  have  been  included 

in the banking sector. NABARD and the 

lead  bank,  Syndicate  Bank,  along  with 

the Rural Bank- Sarva Haryana Grameen 

Bank,  have  been  working  relentlessly 

to  achieve  100  %  financial  inclusion  in  

the district. 

7

To  achieve  the  objectives  of  this 

mission  NABARD  decided  to  engage 

with  Seeking  Modern  Applications  for 

Real  Transformation  (SMART)  a  not  for 

profit  organisiation

  registered  under  the 

Society’s Registration Act, 1860. Providing 

media  and  communication  technologies 

for developing new paradigms for social 

transformation, 

SMART, 

conceives 

strategies  to  improve  to  the  quality  of 

life  of  the  community  especially  women 

and  children.  Poverty,  according  to  the 

organization,  has  a  woman’s  face,  and 

that  literacy  and  information  are  major 

tools  for  inclusive  growth,  eradicating 

poverty, 

enlarging 

employment 

opportunities, advancing gender equality, 

promoting  democratic  participation  and 

for  empowering  people.  The  endeavour 

is  then,  to  provide  awareness  with  a 

view  to  enhance  existing  skills  and 

support  sustainable  growth  models  for 

the  underprivileged  sections  to  think, 

act  and  exercise  their  choices  to  their  

maximum potential. 

PROJECT FI 2012-13

 

SMART believes in creating awareness to 

enable people to exercise their choices. In 

line with this mission 

it started its project 

on  Financial  Inclusion  with  support  from 

NABARD  in  2012.This  initiative  was  a 

first  of  its  kind.  Never  before  had  any 

organization worked with the community 

on  FI  and  informed  them  about  the 

advantages  of  engaging  with  banks. 

Majority  of  the  community  was  in  the 

clutches of petty lenders and they had no 

idea about how to access banking facilities 

or build linkages with financial institutions. 

The objectives of the programme were: 

To build an environment  in favour of 

financial inclusion

To  inform  and  educate  the  masses 

through  200  radio  programs  and 

repeat broadcast

To  help  the  community  access  

banking services

To  help  overcome  reduce  hurdles  in 

accessing financial services, 

To work closely with the banking staff 

and  help  in  completing  the  standard 

procedures  for  opening  account  and 

accessing services

To  help  the  community  benefit  from 

the services provided by the banks.

The  idea  was  to  inform  the  community 

about borrowing and lending facilities, low 

rates of interests, Self help groups, Joint 

liability groups, Kisan credit cards, Farmers 

Clubs and more. SMART in consultation 

with  NABARD  fixed  targets  for  itself.  It 

adopted a two pronged approach- firstly 

it created awareness on all components 

of  FI  through  its  community  radio  and 

second,  it  facilitated  access  to  banks 

and  the  banking  services  through  its 

field workers.   SMART with support from 

NABARD and the other banks succeeded 

in  meeting  all  its  targets  and  more. The 

targets were: 

1.  200  programs  to  be  broadcast  on 

Radio  Mewat  (a  community  radio 

station  licensed  to  and  operated  

by SMART)

2.  Open  10,000  accounts,  50  SHGs, 

20 JLGs, 50 KCCs, 50 SCC/GCC,10 

8

Farmer  Clubs,50  general  loans  and 

deep engagement with the community 

and the banks.  

The program was the first of its kind, at 

least  in  Mewat,  Haryana,  where  access 

to banking services for women, landless 

and  petty  farmers  was  limited.  Through 

over 200 fresh programs, the community 

was apprised about things like a cheque 

book,  its  use,  need  to  open  accounts, 

form SHG groups, establish linkages with 

banks, education loan, vehicle loan, farm 

loan,  crop  insurance,  micro  insurance, 

life insurance, Kisan credit card, farmers 

clubs etc. 

As a result of this intervention 

Radio  broadcast  205  fresh  programs, 

and  repeated  each  program  at  least 

twice. It helped open  10000 accounts,  

52 Self Help Groups, 28 Joint Liability 

groups and helped each of the groups 

get  a  loan  of  Rs  25000  each,  got  112 

KKCs  issued,  73  SCC/GCC  issued, 

got  60  general  loans  sanctioned  and 

helped form 29 farmer clubs in a period 

of 13 months.

This  was  the  highest  number  achieved, 

in  a  year,  by  any  organization  through 

information and hand holding. A number of 

group discussions were held, interaction 

with  banks  and  insurance  agencies 

were  organized,  success  stories  were 

broadcast,  facilitators  were  provided  for 

ensuring that the beneficiary did not face 

any hurdle

The  list  achievements  along  with 

documentary  evidence  in  the  form  of 

account  numbers  etc  were  submitted  to 

NABARD and the project came to a close 

in a little over a year. 

LESSONS LEARNT

This deep engagement with the community 

threw up many lessons for SMART. It was 

clearly felt that an investment in building 

the  knowledge  base  of  the  community 

was needed. There was an urgent need 

for  financial  literacy  and  for  creating  a 

bottom  up  demand  from  the  people  of 

Mewat  for  banking  facilities.  It  was  felt 

that  a  top  down  approach  would  serve 

limited  purpose  of  opening  accounts 

and  reaching  out  the  other  financial 

components but it and would not actually 

empower the community. 

The basic gaps noticed by SMART in its 

yearlong project were as below:

1.  Absence  of  financial  literacy  in  the 

community

2.  Lack  of  capacity  building  of 

the  community  to  make  use  of  

banking facilities

3.  Lack of capacity building of the bank 

staff leading to an indifferent attitude in 

the branch managers

4.  Slow  implementation  of  policies 

introduced  to  facilitate  FI  in  Mewat 

for  eg  Unique  Identification  Card  as 

Identity proof.

5.  Large number of defaulters in Mewat

6.  Attitudinal and behavioral problems of 

the community

7.  Lack  of  understanding  and  need  for 

financial services

Thus  SMART  felt  that  a  lot  of  ground 

needed  to  be  covered  to  bring  about 

9

100%  Financial  Inclusion  in  the  real 

sense. It was not important to just open 

an account- it was important to operate an 

account. Taking a loan was as important 

as  repaying  a  loan.  Small  savings 

could  also  go  a  long  way  in  providing  

financial security.

Thus,  SMART  felt  that  there  was  a 

need  to  continue  the  project  along  with 

new  additions  and  more  emphasis  on 

awareness  through  modern  as  well  as 

traditional  tools.  In  consultation  with  the 

DDM, NABARD, Mr VS Bhatnagar and the 

Regional Office in Chandigarh, Haryana, 

SMART  submitted  a  proposal  for  the  

year 2013-14.

FINANCIAL INCLUSION  

PROJECT 2013-14

The  aim  was  to  reach  out  to  every 

household  in  the  identified  villages. 

Using FI as an empowering tool for poor 

communities,  it  was  felt  that  information 

on all components would be essential for 

establishing economic goals that facilitate 

the management of cash flows, minimize 

debt  and  support  informed  financial 

decisions  that  guarantee  economic 

security.  These  skills  are  particularly 

important  for  the  rural  and  urban  poor, 

and can help mitigate the risks associated 

with  unpredictable  economic  and  social 

circumstances.  Financial  literacy  can 

contribute  to  building  capacities  and 

increasing  confidence  in  decision-

making  and  money  management  -  the 

transfer of these skills can be particularly 

empowering for women, and can translate 

into  increased  bargaining  power  within 

the household. 

This  time  along  with  the  targets  of 

opening  accounts  etc  SMART  looked 

at the following components:

Financial literacy interventions to build 

the capacities of the community. 

Environment building for FI by use of 

traditional  methods  of  door  to  door 

publicity  with  the  help  of  nukkad 

nataks, song mandlis, mobile publicity 

van and pamplets etc

Video documentation to document the 

process and the best practices

Radio  programs  on  Radio  Mewat  to 

create  awareness  and  expose  the 

community  to  all  the  instruments  of 

financial inclusion

Product and services driven approach 

for ensuring financial inclusion and thus 

act as a facilitator for those interested

Promote  a  banking  habit  among  

the community

Partners in the Project:

SMART/RADIO MEWAT

NABARD: 

Mr 

VS 

Bhatnagar 

,DDM,NABARD 

Syndicate Bank: Mr Tribhuvan Singh, 

Lead Bank Manager

SHGB: Mr Sharma, Regional Manager

THE PROJECT PROPOSAL 2013-14

 

In  order  to  ensure  that  the  community 

understands the implications of financial 

inclusion,  financial  literacy  was  to  be 

10

provided  across  100  villages  and  to  all 

segments of society. 

In  addition  to  the  conventional  topics 

linked to financial literacy training, focus 

in  this  project  would  include  the  use  of 

technology  and  linkages,  as  relevant,  to 

the methods that would be adopted in the 

villages for access to funds by household 

members.  In  particular,  SMART  would 

encourage the registration of the people 

in the selected villages to register under 

UID or Aadhar and request banks to open 

bank accounts. 

SMART would explore various traditional 

and  modern  options  that  have  been 

developed  for  easy  access  to  banking 

facilities. Needless to point out that Mewat 

has a high mobile penetration. 

Target groups

Women  who  have  basic  knowledge 

of  finances,  as  well  as  accounts  

in cooperatives. 

Women  who  are  not  part  of  the 

financial  inclusion  program  and  lack 

basic financial knowledge

Men who are defaulters and have not 

paid loans

Men who lack basic financial knowledge 

and are ignorant of possible benefits

Children:  Basic  and  child  friendly 

trainings for children above the age of 

10-18 within households and schools

Methodology

A  multi  pronged  approach  would  

be adopted.

There would be field workers to facilitate 

access,  folk  artistes  to  propagate  the 

messages  and  benefits  of  FI,  mobile 

vans to reach out the information through 

pamphlets,  display  boards  and  audio 

messages, the radio that would broadcast 

programs  and  events  in  schools  and 

villages  to  engage  with  the  different 

segments of society.

1.Financial Literacy Facilitators

 

10  facilitators  were  to  be  identified  from 

among  existing  SMART  volunteers  and 

trained  to  function  as  financial  literacy 

facilitators,  including  providing  onsite 

follow up facility to recipients, addressing 

questions and providing advice as sought. 

a)  A  day-long  training  would  be 

conducted in all villages and would be 

expected to lead to:

 

An understanding of financial literacy 

concepts,  products  and  services 

and  improved  management  of 

money  (including  how  to  open  and 

operate  accounts;  understanding  of 

government,  banks  and  other  social 

security and protection schemes); 

The  capacity  to  make  informed 

financial choices to ensure economic 

security and well-being; 

Demand  for  the  financial  inclusion 

of  excluded  and  economically 

disadvantaged communities; 

Participants  would  be  able  to 

understand  the  application  forms,