Review Article

Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative

Diseases and Cancer

Michelle Barbi de Moura, Lucas Santana dos Santos, and Bennett Van Houten

*

Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, University of Pittsburgh

Cancer Institute,University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Mitochondria are important integrators of cellular
function and therefore affect the homeostatic bal-
ance of the cell. Besides their important role in pro-
ducing adenosine triphosphate through oxidative
phosphorylation, mitochondria are involved in the
control of cytosolic calcium concentration, metabo-
lism of key cellular intermediates, and Fe/S cluster
biogenesis and contributed to programmed cell
death. Mitochondria are also one of the major cel-

lular producers of reactive oxygen species (ROS).
Several human pathologies, including neurodege-
nerative diseases and cancer, are associated with
mitochondrial dysfunction and increased ROS dam-
age. This article reviews how dysfunctional mito-
chondria contribute to Alzheimer’s disease, Parkin-
son’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and several
human cancers. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 51:391–
405, 2010.

V

V

C

2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Key words: mitochondria; neurodegenerative disease; cancer; ROS

INTRODUCTION

Mitochondria use metabolic intermediates generated during

the tricarboxilic acid (TCA) cycle to generate adenosine tri-
phosphate (ATP) during oxidative phosphorylation. These or-
ganelles also serve as a host of other important functions
within the cell, such as homeostatic control of cytosolic cal-
cium and iron concentration [Feissner et al., 2009], Fe/S clus-
ter, and heme biogenesis [Lill and Muhlenhoff, 2005; Rouault
and Tong, 2005; Hausmann et al., 2008] and also contribute
to programmed cell death [Green and Reed, 1998; Garrido
and Kroemer, 2004]. Mitochondria also contain their own
genome, which must be replicated and maintained by nuclear
encoded proteins, and thus the function of this organelle is
fully integrated with the biology of the cell. Loss of mitochon-
drial function is associated with an increase in the generation
of reactive oxygen intermediates and a number of human
diseases [Van Houten et al., 2006]. After a brief overview of
mitochondrial function and a description of mitochondrial
deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA), this article discusses the role
of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases
[DiMauro and Schon, 2008; Schapira, 2008; Lee et al., 2009]
and cancer [McBride et al., 2006; DeBerardinis, 2008; Frezza
and Gottlieb, 2009] and shows that some gene products are
important for both human pathologies.

MITOCHONDRIAL DNA

Human mitochondria contain a 16,569-bp circular DNA

that encodes 37 genes. Thirteen of these genes encode for

*Correspondence to: Bennett Van Houten, Hillman Cancer Center, 5117
Center Avenue Research Pavilion, Suite 2.6, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863.
E-mail: vanhoutenb@upmc.edu

Abbreviations:

ABAD,

Ab-binding

alcohol

dehydrogenase;

AD,

Alzheimer’s disease; Akt, acute transforming retrovirus thymoma; Ab,
amyloid-b; APP, amyloid precursor protein; ASCT2, sodium-dependent
neutral amino acid transporter type 2; ATP, adenosine triphosphate;
CypD, cyclophilin D; DNA, deoxyribonucleic acid; ES, embryonic stem;
ETC, electron transport chain; FAD, flavin adenine dinucleotide; FDG,
[

18

F] 2-fluoro-2-

D

-glucose; FH, fumarate hydratase; Fis1, mitochondrial

fission 1 protein; GLUT 1, glucose transporter 1; GPx, glutathione
peroxidase; H

2

O

2

, hydrogen peroxide; HD, Huntington’s disease; HIF-1,

hypoxia-inducible transcription factor; HK, hexokinase; IDH1, isocitrate
dehydrogenase 1; LDH-A, lactate dehydrogenase A; LRRK2, leucine-
rich repeat kinase 2; Mfn1, mitofusin-1; Mfn2, mitofusin-2; MPTP,
1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-

tetra-hydropyridine; mPTP, mitochondrial per-

meability pore; mtDNA, mitochondrial DNA; NADH, nicotinamide ade-
nine dinucleotide; NFT, neurofibrillary tangles; 3-NPA; 3-nitropropionic
acid; OPA1, optic atrophy 1; OXPHOS, oxidative phosphorylation; PD, Par-
kinson’s disease; PDH, pyruvate dehydrogenase; PDK1, pyruvate dehydro-
genase kinase 1; PET, positron emission tomography; PFK-1, phosphofruc-
tokinase-1; PGC-1a, proliferator activator receptor g coactivator-1 a;
PolyQ, polyglutamine; PQ, paraquat; RNA, ribonucleic acid; ROS, reactive
oxygen species; SCO2, synthesis of cythocrome c oxidase 2; SDH, succinate
dehydrogenase; SNCA, a-synuclein; TCA, tricarboxilic acid; TFAM,
mitochondrial transcription factor A; VEGF, vascular endothelial growth
factor.

Grant sponsors: UPCI start-up, PA CURE.

Received 19 November 2009; provisionally accepted 22 February 2010;
and in final form 2 March 2010

DOI 10.1002/em.20575

Published online 13 April 2010 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.
wiley.com).

V

V

C

2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis 51:391^405 (2010)

protein subunits of the respiratory chain: NADH dehydro-
genase (ND)1, ND2, ND3, ND4, ND4L, ND5, and ND6 of
complex I, cytochrome

b of complex III, COI, COII, and

COIII of complex IV, and subunits A6 and A8 of the ATP
synthase complex. The remaining 24 genes encode two ri-
bosomal ribonucleic acids (RNAs) (12S and 16S), and 22
transfer RNAs are required for mitochondrial translational
machinery.

The majority of proteins required for electron transport

chain (ETC) and normal mitochondrial function (

900 pro-

teins) are encoded by the nuclear genome and imported into
the mitochondria by specialized import systems [Mokranjac
and Neupert, 2005]. In human cells, each mitochondrion
contains multiple copies of mtDNA, although the copy num-
ber can vary between different cell types [Gilkerson, 2009].

Mitochondrial genomes are tightly associated with pro-

teins forming structures called nucleoids [Legros et al.,
2004; Chen and Butow, 2005; Kucej and Butow, 2007].
Nucleoids are widely distributed inside the matrix of the
mitochondria and consist of 2–8 mtDNA molecules asso-
ciated with several different proteins. Some major pro-
teins that can be found in the nucleoids are mitochondrial
single-stranded DNA-binding protein, mitochondrial poly-
merase g, twinkle helicase, and the mitochondrial tran-
scription factor A (TFAM) [Garrido et al., 2003]. TFAM
is the major protein of these complexes and is important
for the regulation of mtDNA copy number, mtDNA pack-
aging, and maintenance [Alam et al., 2003; Ekstrand
et al., 2004; Kanki et al., 2004; Kaufman et al., 2007].

THE ‘‘LIGHT AND DARK SIDE’’ OF MITOCHONDRIAL
FUNCTION

ATP Production

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the molecular currency

of energy transfer in a cell. The major consumers of ATP
within the cell include the sodium potassium pump and
macromolecular synthesis including protein synthesis,
DNA replication, and transcription [Buttgereit and Brand,
1995; Wieser and Krumschnabel, 2001]. ATP is produced
by mitochondria as a result of sequential reactions through
the electron transport chain, which generate a proton gradi-
ent that is harvested by the F1F0 ATP synthase. During this
process, electrons liberated by the oxidation of nicotina-
mide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and/or FADH

2

during

metabolism of nutrients in the TCA cycle are transferred to
complex I (NADH dehydrogenase or NADH:ubiquinone
oxidoreductase) or from succinate to complex II (succinate
dehydrogenase or succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). A
pair of electrons is donated to ubiquinone (coenzyme Q),
which then is reduced to ubisemiquinone and then to ubiq-
uinol. Electrons from ubiquinol are transferred to complex
III (ubiquinone:cytochrome

c oxidoreductase or the bc

1

complex), which transfers them to complex IV (cytochrome

c oxidase, COX) through cytochrome c. The final acceptor
of the electrons is oxygen, which through a four-electron
addition, is reduced to water.

ROS and mtDNA Damage

During the ETC, electrons are occasionally captured by

oxygen to produce superoxide anion radicals (O

2



¯

). Within

the mitochondria, these superoxide radicals are converted to
hydrogen peroxide by the action of manganese superoxide
dismutase. Hydrogen peroxide in the mitochondria is broken
down to water by the action of glutathione peroxidase or per-
oxiredoxins (Fig. 1). Former estimates based on isolated
highly energized mitochondria have suggested as much as
2–4% of the oxygen consumed by mitochondria is liberated
as superoxide or hydrogen peroxide [Boveris et al., 1972].
More recent studies as well as extrapolation to whole cells
suggest that these early estimates are too high, and it has
been estimated that mitochondrial under normal physiologi-
cal cellular conditions probably produced one to two orders
lower amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) [St-Pierre
et al., 2002; Murphy, 2009]. Complexes I and III have been
demonstrated to be the main sites of superoxide [Brandon
et al., 2006]. Because superoxide is negatively charged, it
cannot cross the inner mitochondrial membrane, whereas
hydrogen peroxide is freely diffusible and its release into
media has been used to show dysfunctional mitochondria
[Santos et al., 2003]. Careful analysis of the topology, in
which superoxide is generated, has indicated that as much as
30% of the superoxide generated at complex III is in the
inner membrane space, whereas 70% is generated in the ma-
trix [St-Pierre et al., 2002]. It is of interest to note that in
2000, McLennan and Esposti demonstrated that when the
complex II activity is inhibited

80% by carboxin, a potent

inhibitor of this complex, a decrease of mitochondrial ROS
production is observed [Brandon et al., 2006]. It would there-
fore appear that complexes I, II, and III are all capable of
generating

ROS

during

oxidative

phosphorylation

(OXPHOS).

Besides the antioxidant enzymatic activities mentioned

earlier, cells have nonenzymatic (GSH, vitamin E, vitamin
C, and ubiquinone) scavengers to protect them against
ROS. However, in certain conditions of high-radical pro-
duction or lower antioxidants, often found in pathological
conditions, these increased ROS can then affect cell integ-
rity, oxidizing proteins, lipids, and DNA. The result of an
imbalance between ROS production and antioxidant
action is called oxidative stress [Ott et al., 2007; Scherz-
Shouval and Elazar, 2007] and is reviewed in more detail
by Jones in this issue.

mtDNA is more susceptible to oxidative damage than

nuclear DNA [Yakes and Van Houten, 1997; Mandavilli
et al., 2002]. We and others have proposed that chronic
mtDNA damage causes a vicious cycle of ROS produc-
tion and serves to amplify oxidant injury during disease

Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis. DOI 10.1002/em

392

de Moura et al.

[Ishii et al., 2006; Van Houten et al., 2006; Ott et al.,
2007] (Fig. 1.). Damaged mtDNA causes a decrease in
transcription and the synthesis of the 13 polypeptides
associated with the electron transport [Ballinger et al.,
1999, 2000]. This inhibition of ETC proteins can cause a
subsequent increase in ROS resulting in a decrease in the
mitochondrial membrane potential, loss of ATP, and
energy collapse and subsequent cell death [Mandavilli
et al., 2002; Santos et al., 2003]. Thus, mitochondrial dys-
function and ROS are intimately linked in a cellular death
spiral that underlies a large number of human pathologies
[Van Houten et al., 2006]. The following sections provide
evidence that dysfunctional mitochondria, alterations in
mitochondrial dynamics, increased ROS, mtDNA damage,
and the loss of energy production are important contribu-
tors to the pathophysiology associated with several neuro-
degenerative diseases and cancer.

MITOCHONDRIA AND NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES

Neurodegenerative diseases are associated with neuronal

death and progressive loss of synapses in vulnerable areas in
the brain and spinal cord. The major effects of these illnesses
are memory loss, emotional alterations, problems with body
balance, and movements. Neurodegenerative diseases are a
consequence of genetic mutations and/or environment factors
and are strongly associated with age [Mandemakers et al.,
2007; Jellinger, 2009]. After years of intense studies, a con-
siderable amount evidence has accumulated that demonstrates

an important role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative
stress to development of the more common neurodegenerative
diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s
disease (PD), and Huntington’s disease (HD) [Enns 2003;
Mandemakers et al., 2007; Sas et al., 2007; Gogvadze et al.,
2009; Jellinger, 2009].

Alzheimer’s Disease

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s

disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related
neurodegenerative disorders and is responsible for the ma-
jority of cases of dementia (www.alz.org) [Ott et al.,
1995; Cotter, 2007; Kester and Scheltens, 2009]. This
cognitive impairment is the result of progressive neuronal
loss in the cortex and hippocampus, combined with two
brain lesions: the accumulation of senile plaques com-
posed by amyloid-b (Ab) and neurofibrillary tangles
(NFT) is made of hyperphosphorylated protein tau
(Fig. 2).

Genetically, AD can be classified as either familial or

sporadic. Familial forms of AD usually occur at an early
age of onset (before 60–65 years) and are quite rare, ulti-
mately responsible for less than 2% of all AD cases
[Jakob-Roetne and Jacobsen, 2009]. These autosomal–
dominant forms are caused by mutations in three genes
related to Ab-peptide proteolysis:

APP, PSEN1, and

PSEN2. APP encodes for amyloid precursor protein
(APP) that, after sequential cleavage by b- and g-secre-
tases, generates Ab-peptide.

PSEN1 and PSEN2 encode

Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis. DOI 10.1002/em

Fig. 1.

Schematic model of mitochondrial ROS production. During mito-

chondrial respiration, a small amount of the molecular oxygen consumed
by cells is converted into superoxide anion (O

2

) by complexes I and III

as toxic by-products of OXPHOS. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes
(MnSOD and CuZn SOD) convert O

2

to hydrogen peroxide (H

2

O

2

),

which can be sequentially converted into H

2

O by glutathione peroxidase

(GPx) or peroxiredoxin enzymes. Also, H

2

O

2

can react with Fe

21

to

generate a hydroxyl radical (



OH). This radical can attack all molecules

including mtDNA and consequently cause a decrease in mitochondrial
mRNA and altered expression of mitochondrial proteins essential for
ETC and ATP synthesis. Defects in mitochondrial proteins affect ETC
activity culminating in a vicious cycle of ROS production. [Color figure
can be viewed in the online issue, which is available at www.interscience.
wiley.com.]

Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Disease

393

for presenilin 1 (PS1) and presenilin 2 (PS2) polypeptides,
respectively, both components of the g-secretase complex
[Moreira et al., 2006; Bertram and Tanzi, 2008; Jakob-
Roetne and Jacobsen, 2009]. Mutations in these genes
lead to the accumulation of the Ab42 peptide as an intra-
neuronal and extracellular species resulting in early amy-
loidosis of the brain. Ab42 peptide is the long form of
Ab and is considered more toxic than the short-form
Ab40 [Burdick et al., 1992]. Ab deposition is the basis
for the amyloid hypothesis [Hardy and Higgins, 1992;
Selkoe, 2000], which states that Ab formation is the first
pathological event to AD, triggering a cascade of inflam-
matory response, oxidative injury, and synaptic dysfunc-
tion with neurotransmitter deficits leading to dementia. In
this way, mitochondrial dysfunction is a secondary conse-
quence. However, the amyloid hypothesis cannot be
applied to the sporadic form of AD, because patients with
this common type of disease do not present mutations on
APP, PSEN1, or PSEN2 genes. The sporadic form of AD
is caused by environmental and/or endogenous factors and
manifests late in life [Baloyannis, 2006; Bertram and
Tanzi, 2008]. In 2004, Swerdlow and Khan [2004] pro-
posed a hypothesis to explain sporadic AD. The authors
state that sporadic AD is not caused by the accumulation
of Ab, but instead is a consequence of a decline in mito-
chondrial function with age. These impaired mitochondria

eventually reach a functional threshold that triggers sev-
eral events such as Ab deposition, synaptic loss, and
degeneration and NFT formation [Moreira et al., 2006;
Swerdlow and Khan, 2009].

Some studies have suggested that Ab can contribute to

the functional impairment of mitochondria in AD. APP
has a mitochondrial-signal sequence that targets the pep-
tide to mitochondria, but its incomplete translocation and
accumulation on the mitochondrial membrane leads to an
oxidative dysfunction [Anandatheerthavarada et al., 2003].
As mentioned earlier, APP is cleaved to Ab by the action
of the g-secretase complex, also identified within mito-
chondria [Ankarcrona and Hultenby, 2002; Hansson et al.,
2004]. Ab can directly interact with Ab-binding alcohol
dehydrogenase (ABAD), promoting a release of cyto-
chrome

c and an increase in ROS production [Lustbader

et al., 2004]. Ab can interfere with mitochondrial mem-
brane potential through interaction with cyclophilin D
(CypD), a component of the mitochondrial permeability
transition pore (mPTP). The process of CypD transloca-
tion from the mitochondrial matrix to the inner membrane
triggering the opening of the mPTP is induced by ROS
generated by Ab itself or by Ab-ABAD interaction [Lust-
bader et al., 2004; Du et al., 2008]. However, Ab-CypD
interaction per se increases the production and accumula-
tion of ROS, forming a vicious cycle.

Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis. DOI 10.1002/em

Fig. 2.

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mitochondria. Possible mecha-

nisms that lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in AD. (

1) Autosomal in-

heritance hypothesis for AD development. This hypothesis states that
mutations of the APP precursor or g secretase genes (PS1 and PS2)
lead to the accumulation of the Ab40 and Ab42 peptides and subse-
quent formation of amyloid plaques. Ab42 and Ab40 peptides can go
into the cell and interfere with mitochondrial dynamics. Also, these
peptides can be translocated into the mitochondria and cause several
problems. Ab can interact with Ab-binding alcohol dehydrogenase
(ABAD) promoting a cytochrome c release. Ab interaction with cyclo-
philin D (CypD) promotes a decrease mitochondrial membrane poten-

tial. Ab alone or in association with ABAD or CypD increase ROS
production. (

2) APP precursor has a mitochondrial target sequence;

thus, it can be translocated into mitochondria. However, if its transloca-
tion is impaired, APP will block the TOM channel preventing transloca-
tion of other proteins. This impairment can increase ROS production,
which can affect mitochondrial function (see Fig. 1). (

3) Moreover, mi-

tochondrial dysfunction caused by increased ROS levels, environment/
endogenous factors, and/or aging can cause amyloid plaques deposition.
In this way, mitochondrial dysfunction is the basis for the sporadic hy-
pothesis for AD. [Color figure can be viewed in the online issue, which
is available at www.interscience.wiley.com.]

394

de Moura et al.

Zhu and colleagues [Wang et al., 2008] showed another

way that Ab could interfere with mitochondrial function
by altering its dynamics. Using M17 cells, the authors
demonstrated that overexpression of Ab causes an altera-
tion in the mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins. They
observed a decrease in DLP1 and optic atrophy 1
(OPA1), an increase in Fis1, and no alterations in Mfn1
and Mfn2 levels. DLP1 and Fis1 proteins are required for
mitochondrial fission, whereas OPA1, Mfn1, and Mfn2
are required for mitochondrial fusion. This imbalance
between fusion and fission proteins results in mitochon-
drial

dysfunction,

mitochondrial

fragmentation,

an

increase in ROS and ATP production, and reduced mito-
chondrial membrane potential. In this case, APP-induced
mitochondrial dysfunction is apparently initiated by mito-
chondrial fragmentation, which contributes to a vicious
cycle of ROS generation [Wang et al., 2008].

Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common

progressive neurodegenerative disorder after AD [George
et al., 2009; Naoi et al., 2009; Winklhofer and Haass,
2009]. Pathologically, it is characterized by the extensive
and progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the sub-
stantia nigra pars compacta as well as an accumulation of

intraneuronal inclusions (Lewy bodies) in the surviving
neurons. Patients with PD exhibit motor abnormalities
including resting tremor, gait difficulties, postural instabil-
ity, and rigidity in addition to nonmotor symptoms such
as depression, cognitive, and autonomic problems [Hardy
et al., 2006; D’Amelio et al., 2009].

Despite intense study, the possible cause(s) of PD is still

unknown since about 90% of the cases are probably caused
by environmental toxins and are not linked to a specific
genetic mutation [George et al., 2009]. However, several
lines of evidence have linked mitochondrial dysfunctions
and oxidative stress with PD (Fig. 3). The first evidence of
chemically induced Parkinsonian syndrome was shown in
1983, when drug addicts developed rapid onset PD-like
symptoms after injecting heroin contaminated with 1-
methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-

tetra-hydropyridine

(MPTP)

[Langston et al., 1983]. MPTP blocks complex I [Langston
et al., 1983; Vila and Przedborski, 2003] of the ETC and
also promotes cytochrome

c release from the inner mem-

brane [Perier et al., 2005; Banerjee et al., 2009; George
et al., 2009]. Studies using two pesticides [rotenone and
paraquat (PQ)], commonly used in farming, have shown an
association linking them with dopaminergic alterations in
humans [Jones and Miller, 2008]. Rats continually exposed
to rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, presented similar charac-
teristics to PD, as dopaminergic degeneration and formation
of a-synuclein (SNCA)-positive cytoplasmic aggregate in

Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis. DOI 10.1002/em

Fig. 3.

Parkinson’s disease (PD) and mitochondria. Sporadic form of

PD is attributed to environmental contaminants. Substances like rotenone
and MPTP inhibit complex I and cause Parkinson-like symptoms, sug-
gesting an important role for this complex in PD. Mutations in several
genes (SNCA, PINK1, Parkin, DJ-1, HTRA2, HTRA2, and LRRK2)
associated with familiar forms of PD are found to affect mitochondrial
function. Mutations in the SNCA gene promotes complex I dysfunction,
cytochrome c release, and mtDNA mutations. Abnormal PINK1 gene is

associated with a decrease in complex I activity. Mutated Parkin affects
complex I and IV. Mutation in the DJ-1 gene leads to an increase in the
oxidative stress. Dysfunction in the HTRA2 protein was correlated to a
decrease in membrane potential as well as mitochondrial swelling.
Mutated LRRK2 was found to lead to mitochondrial dysfunction. [Color
figure can be viewed in the online issue, which is available at www.
interscience.wiley.com.]

Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Disease

395

nigral neurons [Betarbet et al., 2000; Sherer et al., 2003].
PQ, an herbicide MPP

1

-analog also used in animal models,

causes degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, dopamine
depletion, and increased production of oxidative stress
[Cicchetti et al., 2005; George et al., 2009].

About one tenth of all PD cases can be traced to both

dominant and recessive mutations in six nuclear genes
encoding proteins that can interact with mitochondria
[DiMauro and Schon, 2008]. The dominantly inherited
genes are SNCA encoded by PARK1/PARK4 and LRRK2
(dandarin) encoded by PARK8. Three-point mutations
have been identified in the SNCA gene: A53T, A30P, and
E46K; in addition, gene duplication and triplication are
involved with PD. SCNA, the major component of Lewy
bodies, has a natural tendency to form aggregates, and the
mutations as well as the gene amplification seem to
enhance such characteristics [Gasser, 2009]. Studies sug-
gest that oxidative damage to SNCA enhances its aggre-
gation potential and causes subsequent cell death [Dalfo
et al., 2005; Henchcliffe and Beal, 2008]. SNCA muta-
tions seem to promote severe damage in mtDNA and mi-
tochondrial function [Martin et al., 2006; Henchcliffe and
Beal, 2008; Shavali et al., 2008]. Mutations in the
LRRK2 gene are the most common cause of Mendelian
PD [Henchcliffe and Beal 2008; Gasser, 2009], despite
the fact that a link between clinical phenotype and these
mutations has not been established [Yao and Wood,
2009]. However, its association with the mitochondrial
outer membrane suggests a possible role of LRRK2 in
mitochondrial dysfunction [Henchcliffe and Beal, 2008;
Yao and Wood, 2009].

Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, and Omi/HTRA2 are the genes

associated with autosomal recessive PD and are localized
in mitochondria. Mutations in

PARK2, which encodes the

parkin protein, are related to early-onset development of
PD. Parkin is a E3 ubiquitin ligase associated with the
mitochondrial outer membrane that has been suggested to
play a role in mitochondrial morphology [Poole et al.,
2008] as well as complex I and IV activity [Muftuoglu
et al., 2004; Palacino et al., 2004]. Mutations in

PARK6,

the gene that encodes for PINK1, are the second most
common mutations found in PD. PINK1 is a mitochon-
drial kinase; however, its substrates are still unknown
[Valente et al., 2004]. PINK1 seems to be a neuroprotec-
tive molecule against apoptosis [Petit et al., 2005], and
PINK1 dysfunction promotes a decrease in complex I ac-
tivity and increase in oxidative damage [Henchcliffe and
Beal, 2008]. DJ-1 is encoded by

PARK7 and is responsi-

ble

protection

of

neurons

from

oxidative

stress

[Winklhofer and Haass, 2009]. Omi/HTRA2 is a serine-
protease, encoded by PARK13, that is localized to the mi-
tochondrial intermembrane space. Besides PD, Omi/
HTRA2 is also associated to AD once it can interact with
presenilin-1 and AD-associated amyloid b [Gray et al.,
2000; Park et al., 2004].

Huntington’s Disease

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodege-

nerative disorder, which differs from AD and PD in that
it is exclusively caused by a genetic factor. HD is inher-
ited as autosomal dominant disorder and is one of the
nine diseases generated by abnormal expansions of an
unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat sequence encoding a
polyglutamine (polyQ) tract [Gatchel and Zoghbi, 2005].
The CAG repeat within the N-terminal region of the hun-
tingtin protein, encoded by the

HD gene, causes a confor-

mational change in the protein, leading to neurological
impairments [Imarisio et al., 2008]. The CAG repeat is
common to all individuals, but the number of repeats is
what determines the pathology of HD. The CAG distribu-
tion in normal people is from 10 to 26 and in HD patients
is from 40 to 80 [Myers, 2004]. Also, the age of onset for
HD is related to the length of the CAG repeat, where
individuals, presenting 60 or more repeats, manifest HD
symptoms early, at age 20 or younger [Myers, 2004;
Andresen et al., 2007]. HD is characterized by involuntary
movements and cognitive and psychiatric decline arising
from neuronal loss in the caudate and putamen of the
striatum and cortex [Vonsattel and DiFiglia, 1998].

Mitochondrial dysfunction has been strongly linked to

HD development (Fig. 4). For example, a decrease in glu-
cose metabolism in the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex
in HD patients was detected by positron emission tomog-
raphy (PET) [Kuwert et al., 1990; Andrews and Brooks,
1998]. In the same region of the brain, elevated lactate
production was seen [Reynolds et al., 2005; Browne,
2008], and, in muscles, there was a reduction in ATP pro-
duction [Lodi et al., 2000]. Some groups observed a
reduction in the enzymatic activity of aconitase, pyruvate
dehydrogenase (PDH), succinate dehydrogenase, and cyto-
chrome oxidase. Furthermore, an analysis of postmortem
HD brain showed reduced activity in complex II, III, and
IV of the electron transport chain [Brennan et al., 1985;
Gu et al., 1996; Browne et al., 1997; Benchoua et al.,
2006].

Experiments using 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA), an

irreversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, suggest
that defects in complex II can contribute to the patho-
physiology of HD [Brouillet et al., 2005]. 3-NPA has
been shown to cause an increase in ROS production and
subsequent increase in damage to mtDNA, but not nuclear
DNA in PC12 cells [Mandavilli et al., 2005]. When com-
plex II was blocked by constant administration of 3-NPA,
rats and nonhuman primates presented degeneration in the
striatal neurons, mimicking the HD phenotype in humans
[Beal et al., 1993; Brouillet et al., 1995, 2005; Acevedo-
Torres et al., 2009; Damiano et al., 2010]. Furthermore,
in both a 3-NPA model and a CAG repeat mouse model
of HD, increased ROS damage and mtDNA damage were
observed [Acevedo-Torres et al., 2009]. This data strongly

Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis. DOI 10.1002/em

396

de Moura et al.

suggests that increased ROS, mtDNA damage, and mito-
chondrial dysfunction all contribute to HD. The sensitivity
to 3-NPA also seems to be proportional to CAG repeats.
Treatment with 3-NPA caused a higher rate of cell death
in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells overexpressing hunting-
tin with 82 repeats when compared with cells with just 23
repeats [Ruan et al., 2004].

Brouillet and coworkers showed that a decrease in

complex II/succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity is not
related to mitochondrial loss once levels of other subunits
of mitochondria complex did not change, but is due to the
presence of polyQs in the N-terminal of the huntingtin
protein. They also showed that defects in complex II/SDH
activity could cause a decrease in mitochondrial mem-
brane potential, corroborating other studies [Benchoua
et al., 2006]. The results obtained by Ruan and coworkers
[2004] cited earlier suggest that the cell death observed in
SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing mutated huntingtin is not
caused by apoptosis, but by mitochondrial calcium over-
load, the opening of mPTPs, and the loss of mitochondrial
membrane potential. Using lymphoblast mitochondria
from HD patients, Greenamyre and colleagues observed a
reduced mitochondrial membrane potential in these mito-
chondria when compared with control mitochondria. Also,
the CGA repeat number seems to interfere with mitochon-
drial depolarization, because the Ca

21

amount needed to

depolarize mitochondria from a patient with 65 repeats

was smaller than one needed for 46 repeats and for the
control. The same results were obtained in experiments
using HD transgenic mice [Panov et al., 2002].

Another way that huntingtin can interfere with mito-

chondrial metabolism has also been proposed. In 2006,
Krainc and coworkers [Cui et al., 2006] showed that
mutation in this protein represses proliferator activator re-
ceptor g coactivator-1 a (PGC-1a) gene transcription, a
protein that regulates some metabolic process such as b-
oxidation of fatty acids, mitochondrial biogenesis, and
oxidative phosphorylation [Puigserver et al., 1998]. The
relation between HD and PGC-1a was first suggested by
Spiegelman and coworkers using PGC-1a knockout mice
[Lin et al., 2004], where the authors observed that these
mice displayed behavior alterations and lesions in their
striatal neurons similar to those found in HD. A few
months later, a similar result was reported by Kelly and
coworkers [Leone et al., 2005].

In summary, studies presented in this section have dem-

onstrated how mitochondrial dysfunction is intimately
linked to several neurodegenerative diseases and is perhaps
a direct cause of the disease progression. Oxidative stress,
alterations in apoptosis, or impairment of ETC complexes
contribute to neurodegenerative diseases, and, in the next
section, we will explore how mitochondrial dysfunction
and alterations in mitochondrial metabolism contribute to
the development of the cancer cell.

Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis. DOI 10.1002/em

Fig. 4.

Huntington’s disease and mitochondria. HD is caused by an

abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the N-terminal region of

HD gene

that encodes huntingtin (htt) protein. A conformational change in htt can
cause a direct effect of mitochondrial function through a decrease in activ-
ity of mitochondrial complexes II, III, and IV. An impairment of complex
II affects the mitochondrial membrane potential and mPTPs, promoting a

mitochondrial depolarization by Ca

21

release. Also, defects in complex II

can trigger ROS production that can generate damage to mtDNA and initi-
ate a vicious cycle of damage (see Fig. 1). Indirectly, an abnormal htt inter-
fere with mitochondrial metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis by
repressing PGC-1a gene transcription. [Color figure can be viewed in the
online issue, which is available at www.interscience.wiley.com.]

Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Disease

397

MITOCHONDRIA AND CANCER

At first glance, cancer seems to be an extremely differ-

ent disease when compared either with PD, HD, or AD.
However, as described below in the following sections,
some studies have demonstrated several important links
between cancer and neurodegeneration.

Warburg Hypothesis

In 1924, Otto Heinrich Warburg made an important dis-

covery that has influenced the field of cancer research.
Measuring the metabolism of normal and tumor cells, he
observed a higher glucose consumption and higher lactate
production by tumor cells even in the presence of sufficient
oxygen, suggesting that these cells preferentially use glycol-
ysis to produce ATP [Warburg 1956a,b]. Based on these
observations, he proposed that alterations to respiratory
capacity generated by mitochondrial impairment could be
the origin of cancer. This phenomenon is known as ‘‘aerobic
glycolysis’’ or the ‘‘Warburg hypothesis’’ [Warburg 1956a].

The increase in glucose uptake has been demonstrated in
many types of tumors by PET using [

18

F] 2-fluoro-2-

D

-glu-

cose (FDG), a glucose analog [Mankoff et al., 2007].

Over the years, the Warburg hypothesis has been hotly

debated, as his original assumption that the mitochondria
are not functional in tumor has been refuted [Pedersen,
1978, 2007]. It is widely accepted that increased glyco-
lytic potential is one hallmark of cancer [Matsumoto
et al., 2008; Frezza and Gottlieb, 2009]. The current chal-
lenge is to determine whether metabolic changes in
tumors are a cause or a consequence of neoplastic trans-
formation [Garber, 2004; DeBerardinis, 2008; Frezza and
Gottlieb, 2009].

Metabolic Changes in Cancer Cells

Although it is clear that tumor cells have altered metab-

olism when compared with normal cells, it is difficult to
understand why tumors cells prefer to generate ATP
through glycolysis, even though oxygen is still present.
Glycolysis, although it produces 16-fold less ATP than

Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis. DOI 10.1002/em

Fig. 5.

Metabolic alteration in cancer cells. The rapid growth of tumors

cells outstripping their vasculature creates a stressful state of hypoxia that
leads to the release of hypoxia-related factors. These factors favor a shift
toward a more glycolytic metabolism by the stabilization of HIF-1a and
inhibition of PDH. Besides HIF-1a, oncogenes and tumor suppressors also
promote a more glycolytic metabolism. c-Myc as well as HIF-1a regulate
angiogenesis by the induction in the expression of VEGF. c-Myc can also
interferes with glutamine metabolism through the induction of the gluta-
mine transporter ASCT2 and glutaminase. p53, a tumor suppressor, enhan-
ces the expression of SCO2, which is necessary for the assembly of COX

complex. TIGAR, a gene that inhibits glycolysis by downregulating phos-
phofructokinase-2 is also under p53 control. Akt also plays a key role in
cancer cell metabolic changes. Growth factors activate Akt in a 3-phos-
phoinoside-inositol dependent-manner and, once activated, can increase
the uptake of glucose by directing GLUT1 to the plasma membrane. More-
over, Akt upregulates HK and PFK-1, thus enhancing glycolysis. The fate
of some TCA intermediates also varies in cancer cells. Malate and citrate,
for example, are allocated to nucleotide and lipid synthesis, to act as build-
ing blocks as well as energy production. [Color figure can be viewed in the
online issue, which is available at www.interscience.wiley.com.]

398

de Moura et al.

OXPHOS, has a high flux and can rapidly produce ATP,
which is required for higher rates of cell growth and
proliferation in tumor [DeBerardinis, 2008; Ortega et al.,
2009]. It has also been suggested that cancer cells
rather than burning the metabolic intermediates in the
TCA cycle for energy production use these intermediates
as important precursors to macromolecular synthesis. For
example, citrate is used to make lipids and malate for
de novo synthesis of nucleotides [DeBerardinis, 2008;
Deberardinis et al., 2008].

Uncontrolled cell proliferation within a developing tu-

mor often outstrips its blood supply. Consequently, oxy-
gen availability drops, but this physical barrier is not suf-
ficient to deprive cells from glucose [Gillies and Gatenby,
2007]. To cope with the lack of oxygen (hypoxia) and
still produce energy, cells switch their metabolism to gly-
colysis. In addition, a prolonged hypoxic state leads to
the stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible transcription
factor (HIF-1a), which will help cells adapt to stressful
environment by transcribing and synthesizing

70 hy-

poxia-related factors [Hsu and Sabatini, 2008; Trayhurn
et al., 2008]. HIF-1a is an important regulator of pyruvate
dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1). Under hypoxic condi-
tions, HIF-1a induces PDK1 expression that in turn inhib-
its PDH, responsible for converting pyruvate to acetyl
coenzyme A [Kim et al., 2006; Papandreou et al., 2006;
DeBerardinis, 2008]. To increase the glucose uptake as a
way to compensate for low-ATP yield of glycolysis, HIF-
1a promotes the overexpression of the GLUT1 transporter
[Airley and Mobasheri, 2007; Trayhurn et al., 2008].
However, HIF-1a is not the only way to regulate glycoly-
sis as mutations in signaling kinases, oncogenes, and/or
tumor suppressor genes also have implications on meta-
bolic changes in cancer cells [DeBerardinis, 2008; Hsu
and Sabatini, 2008; Yeung et al., 2008].

c-Myc is overexpressed in

20% of cancers and plays

an important role in the proliferation of tumor cells
[Prochownik, 2008]. In addition, this oncogene can
enhance biosynthesis of precursors and glycolysis [Dang,
1999; DeBerardinis, 2008]. c-Myc also regulates angio-
genesis and vasculogenesis, as depletion of this gene in
mice is early embryonic lethal and embryonic stem (ES),
and yolk sacs cells showed a decrease in vascular endo-
thelial growth factor (VEGF) expression [Baudino et al.,
2002]. Studies have been demonstrated that cells use glu-
tamine as a source of glutamate in the TCA cycle
[DeBerardinis et al., 2007; Wise et al., 2008; Heiden
et al., 2009] and that c-Myc contributes to the regulation
of glutamine metabolism. Thompson and coworkers, used
shRNA to knock down Myc expression in tumor cells and
showed a 80% reduction in glutamine consumption. They
also observed that Myc is able to induce the glutamine
transporter sodium-dependent neutral amino acid trans-
porter type 2 (ASCT2), LDH-A, and glutaminase, the first
enzyme in glutamine metabolism [Wise et al., 2008]. Laz-

ebnik and coworkers observed that glutamine, but not glu-
cose depletion, promoted apoptosis in Myc-dependent
manner [Yuneva et al., 2007]. These results suggest an
increase reliance on mitochondrial TCA cycle in Myc
overexpressing cells. In support of this hypothesis, Hock-
enbery and coworkers have shown that Myc expression
may help coordinate metabolic networks and stimulate
oxidative phosphorylation to allow rapid entry into the
cell cycle [Morrish et al., 2008]. Future studies are neces-
sary to determine how Myc mediates its control over me-
tabolism and the bioenergetics of cells.

In normal conditions, the tumor suppressor protein p53

induces apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, DNA repair, and senes-
cence in response to cellular stress [Bensaad and Vousden,
2007]. In this way, under hypoxia conditions, the loss of
p53 function can be an advantage to tumor cells. Interest-
ingly, p53 is found to be the most mutated or deleted gene
in

50% of all solid tumors [Royds and Iacopetta, 2006].

In 2006, Hwang and coworkers described a link between
p53 and mitochondrial respiration, where p53 loss favors
glycolysis [Matoba et al., 2006]. They showed a propor-
tional decrease in oxygen consumption in p53

1/1

, p53

1/2

,

and p53

2/2

cells, a fact that was observed in mitochondria

from mice liver and in isogenic human colon cancer
HCT116 cells. Serial analysis of gene expression showed
that p53 induced the gene, synthesis of cytochome c oxi-
dase 2 (SCO2), which is necessary for the assembly of the
mitochondrial COX II subunit into the COX complex.
Therefore, it has been suggested that the lack of p53 inter-
feres with ETC assembly, promoting a shift in cancer cell
metabolism to a more glycolytic state [Matoba et al., 2006].
Besides the

SCO2 gene, p53 also regulates TP53-induced

glycolysis and apoptosis regulator [Bensaad et al., 2006].
This gene indirectly inhibits glycolysis by downregulating
fructose-2,6-bisphosphate levels, an allosteric regulator of
phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1). In this way, cells with mu-
tant or inactive p53 have a higher level of glycolysis and
escape hypoxia-induced apoptosis [Corcoran et al., 2006;
Young and Anderson, 2008].

Three isoforms of serine/threonine kinase acute trans-

forming retrovirus thymoma (Akt) are found in humans:
Akt1 (Akta), Akt2 (Aktb), and Akt3 (Aktg). These three
proteins play an important role in cellular processes such
as cell proliferation, metabolism, and apoptosis [Manning
and Cantley, 2007]. Akt is activated by insulin and
growth factors in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-depend-
ent manner, followed by phosphorylation of residues
T308 and S473 by 3-phosphoinoside-dependent protein
kinase 1 and 2, respectively [Shiojima and Walsh, 2002].
Activation of Akt is commonly observed in many cancer
cells and believed to help mediate changes in metabolism.
Akt, as well as HIF-1a, contributes to increase glucose
uptake by directing the glucose transporters GLUT1 and
GLUT4 to plasma membrane. In addition, Akt promotes
hexokinase I and II translocation to the mitochondrial

Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis. DOI 10.1002/em

Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Disease

399

outer membrane [Plas and Thompson, 2005; Manning and
Cantley, 2007].

mtDNA Mutations and Changes in Mitochondrial
Function in Cancer

About a decade ago, two groups independently showed

an accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) muta-
tions in colon cancer [Polyak et al., 1998] as well as blad-
der, head and neck, and primary lung tumors [Fliss et al.,
2000]. Since then, a number of reports have shown
increased mutations in a large variety of solid tumors and
hematological malignancies [Carew and Huang, 2002;
Copeland et al., 2002; Brandon et al., 2006].

The current challenge is to determine if the mutated mi-

tochondrial genomes contribute to the tumor progression.
Recently, Sidransky and coworkers [Dasgupta et al., 2008]
showed that a mitochondrial cytochrome B gene mutation
promoted growth of bladder tumor cells both in vitro and in
vivo in a xenograft model. They re-engineered a 21-bp cytb
deletion mutation to be expressed in the nucleus of either a
mouse carcinoma cell line or an immortalized human uroe-
pithelial cell line. The protein was transported to the mito-
chondria using a mitochondrial leader sequence, where its
overexpression caused increase ROS production and
increased cell growth through nuclear factor kappa-light-
chain-enhancer of activated B cells signaling. They also
noted increased glycolysis, and surprisingly cells express-
ing the mutant cytochrome B gene also showed increased
oxygen consumption. Although they were unable to deter-
mine whether this increase in oxygen consumption was
directly due to alterations in OXPHOS, which would be
inconsistent with the Warburg hypothesis.

Using a slightly different approach, Hayashi and co-

workers [Ishikawa et al., 2008] used cybrid technology to
evaluate the metastatic potential of cells lines derived
from Lewis lung carcinoma cell line. They replaced the
endogenous mtDNA of P29 cell line that has low-meta-
static potential, with the mtDNA from a highly metastatic
A11 cell line, and vice versa. Cybrids with A11 mtDNA
showed high-metastatic potential, whereas cybrids with
P29 lost their potential for metastatic growth. These
results suggest that mutations in mtDNA could contribute
to alterations in mitochondrial function and metastatic
potential in cancer cells. Using the same methodology,
Wong and coworkers [Ma et al., 2010] fused 143B rho

0

osteosarcoma cell line with mitochondria derived from
different breast cancer cell lines. They observed a
decrease in cell viability, oxygen consumption, and
reduced activity of mitochondrial complexes, suggesting
that dysfunctional mitochondria can also drive the meta-
bolic changes in breast cancer cells. Future studies are
necessary to understand the precise events that cause a
change in mitochondrial function during the development
of a tumor.

CANCER AND NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES

Mutations in the TCA Cycle Are Associated with
Cancer and Neurodegeneration

Germline mutations in one allele of SDH cause inher-

ited phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas [Zanssen
and Schon, 2005], whereas mutations in both alleles
cause a childhood encephalomyopathies [Briere et al.,
2005a,b]. Mutations in another TCA enzyme, fumarate
hydratase (FH), are also associated with childhood ence-
phalomyopathies and in a heterozygous state cause cuta-
neous and uterine leiomyomas as well as renal cell carci-
nomas [Tomlinson et al., 2002]. HIF1-a plays an impor-
tant role in these two cancer syndromes [Maynard and
Ohh, 2007]. Mutations in SHD and FH promote an accu-
mulation of succinate and fumarate, respectively, two
TCA cycle enzymes. Succinate is one of the end products
of prolyl hydroxylase activity, the enzyme that catalyzes
HIF hydroxylation and subsequent degradation by von
Hippel–Lindau tumor suppressor protein. Thus, succinate
accumulation can block proly hydroxylase function and
cause an accumulation of HIF-1a [Gottlieb and Tomlin-
son, 2005; Dahia, 2006], and the induction of genes
involved in tumorigenesis [Gottlieb and Tomlinson,
2005]. Malate accumulation also interferes with prolyl
hydroxylase activity, leading to HIF1-a stabilization
[Esteban and Maxwell, 2005]. In addition, dysfunction of
the TCA cycle promotes an imbalance on ETC leading to
ROS production and HIF1-a stabilization [Enns 2003;
Gottlieb and Tomlinson, 2005]. In 2008, Kinzler and co-
workers [Parsons et al., 2008] identified in glioblastoma
a recurrent mutation in the gene that encode for isocitrate
dehydrogenase 1 enzyme (IDH1). Similar results were
founded in gliomas [Yan et al., 2009] and other types of
brain tumors [Balss et al., 2008]. This enzyme catalyzes
decarboxylation of isocitrate to a-ketoglutarate, but defi-
ciencies of its activity can stabilize HIF1-a [Thompson,
2009].

Links Between PD and Cancer

As mentioned earlier, a small fraction of PD cases is

due to inherited mutations in genes, which may also
affect cellular transformation [D’Amelio et al., 2009].
MG63 cells overexpressing SNCA showed a lower protein
kinase C activity. After treatment with phorbol ester, pro-
tein kinase C activity was restored together with protea-
some activity, which stopped cellular differentiation.
Also, these cells showed an inverse correlation between
cellular levels of SNCA and proteasome activity. These
results suggest that SNCA may have a role in tumor dif-
ferentiation [Fujita et al., 2007]. Other genes, besides
SNCA, may also play a role in cancer differentiation.
Analysis of loss of heterozygosity in 40 breast and ovar-

Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis. DOI 10.1002/em

400

de Moura et al.