1. 

Executive Summary 

70%  of  Indian  population  is  dependent  on  Agriculture  for  their  livelihood. 

Around 190 million hectares area in under total gross cropped area, which is 

largest  in  the  world.  The  Indian  economy  is  significantly  dependent  on 

agriculture. It contributes to 27% of total GDP and provides employment to 

67%  of  total  workforce  of  India.  Despite  this,  all  has  not  been  well  with 

Agriculture sector in India. However, the annual growth rate of agriculture 

is  less  than  0.2%  per  annum.  Farmers  have  been  facing  several  complex 

problems  such  as  growing  costs,  low  productivity,  lower  market  prices  for 

agricultural  produce  immediately  after  harvesting  season,  high  interest 

rates in rural credit market, spurious seeds and pesticides etc. The farmers 

are facing multi layers problem.  There are problems at government policy 

level,  business/market  level  as  well  as  at  village/individual  levels. 

Therefore, the project tries to address these problems.  

The  core  objective  of  the  Project  “To  improve  the  livelihoods  of  the 

farmers,  thereby  the  quality  of  their  life,  by  creating  enabling  policy 

environment  through  policy  advocacy  and  by  lobbying  for  support  from 

national and international organizations.” 

The project considers establishing a network and platform, whereby farmers 

can  raise  their  issues,  concerns,  problems,  suggestions,  recommendation 

related to agricultural policies at Central and State level and participate in 

policy  making  are  crucial  activities  for  creating  enabling  policy 

environment.  Knowing  that  these  farmers  have  limited  resources  for 

investing in agricultural activities, the project emphasises in lobbying with 

national  and  international  level  organisation  for  mobilising  support  and 

resources in terms of cash, kind and services.  

 

 

 

 

End-of-the-project outcomes/outputs: 

 

The  income  from  agriculture  is  increased,  whereby  its  livelihoods  and 
quality of life has improved.  

 

Farmers’ position within the society is improved so that they are able to 
get respect in the society for their occupation.  

 

The  policy  advocacy  hub  has  created  a  strong  platform  for  farmers  to 
participate  in  policy  making  through  suggesting  changes,  raising  their 
issues and problems at national level. 

 

Creation  of  favorable  policy  environment,  which  is  enabling  the  inputs 
flow in Indian agriculture and improvements in agricultural activities.  

 

The  constraints,  bottlenecks  and  gaps  in  the  policies  addressed 
effectively. 

 

The  farmers  are  linked  with  national  and  international  level 
organizations and these organizations are supporting them in cash, kind 
and services.   

 

The  main  partners  in  the  project  are  Federation  of  Farmers  Associations 

Andhra  Pradesh  (FFAAP),  other  state  level  Federations  of  Farmers 

Associations  (FFAs)  (existing  and  planned  ones)  and  local  organizations. 

FFAAP  will  be  accountable  for  coordinating  and  managing  the  overall 

project as well as the Policy Advocacy Hub at national level, whereas other 

partners  will  be  the  link  between  Policy  Advocacy  Hub  and the  farmers  in 

the  respective  states.  The  other  state  FFA  and  local  organizations  will 

interact  with  farmers,  identify  their  problems,  raise  these  problems  at 

national  level  through  PAH  and  mobilize  the  farmers  to  interaction  with 

policy makers, legislators and support organizations.  

 

The total budget of the project is Rs. 1,67,37,320, which will be utilized 

in a period of three years. To continue the activities after the project-

funding  period,  appropriate  mechanisms  will  be  evolved  for  generating 

its  resources  to  support  the  activities.  Some  of  the  mechanisms  have 

been already thought through and given in detail in the project proposal. 

 

2. 

Context

 

2.1.1

 

Physical Profile

 

India has at its northern boundary, the highest and most extensive mountain 

system  of  the  world,  the  Himalayas,  which  obstructs  the  moisture-laden 

clouds  from  the  south,  causing  them  to  shed  copious  rain  in  the  Indo-

Gangetic plains, and snowfall in the ranges further north. At its west is the 

Arabian Sea, in the east the Bay of Bengal, in the south the Indian Ocean. 

The Andaman and Nicobar Islands in the Bay of Bengal and the Lakshadweep 

in the Arabian Sea are parts of India. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The  Indian  sub-continent  has  an  area  of  3.28  million  sq.  km  (329  million 

hectares).  It  is  the  second  largest  country  in  Asia  and  the  seventh  in  the 

world. It measures 3,214 km from north to south and 2,933 km from east to 

west, with a total area of 3,287,263 sq. km. The land frontier is 15,200 km 

and  the  coastline  is  7,516.5  km.  It  lies  within  the  latitude  of  8  degrees 

North in the extreme south and 37 degrees in the North, providing adequate 

sunshine throughout the year in most regions. 

The  rainfall  distribution  is  very  uneven.  The  southwest  monsoon  accounts 

for almost all the rain in 75% of the geographical area and 78% of the gross 

cropped area. The annual rainfall averages 1,170 mm. About a third of the 

cropped  area  is  still  rain  fed.  More  than  61  million  hectares  receive  the 

benefit  of  irrigation  by  exploiting  groundwater.  The  three  seasons  of  the 

sub-continent  are  winter  (December-February),  summer  (March-May),  and 

monsoon  (southwest  monsoon  from  June  to  September,  and  northeast 

monsoon from October-November). 

The  types  of  soil  found  are  the  red  soil,  alluvial  soil,  and  black  soil.  The 

Gangetic  plains  lying  about  100  metres  above  the  sea  level  are  ideal  for 

intensive  farming.  The  mountainous  terrain  of  the  Himalayas  are 

uneconomical  and environmentally  too  fragile  to  cultivate.  With  its  varied 

climate, soil types and geographical areas, a rich diversity of habitats and 

wildlife  is  found.  There  are  about  75,000  species  of  fauna  and  45,000 

species of flora. 

2.1.2.

 

Socio-economic Profile

 

India is a country of social contrasts and enormous ethnic, linguistic and 

cultural  diversity.  The  country's  25  States  and  seven  Union  Territories, 

vary  in  size  from  the  gigantic  Uttar  Pradesh  with  almost  150  million 

people to tiny Sikkim. The principle of division is mainly along linguistic 

lines: there are more than 1,600 languages. The majority of the people 

are  Hindu  (83%).  Muslims  account  for  a  sizeable  11%  while  Christians, 

 

Sikhs,  Buddhists,  Jains  and  Parsis  account  for  the  balance.  The  total 

population, estimated at the end of 1996 is around 953 million. Hindi is 

the  principal  official  language.  English  is  also  widely  used.  Sixteen 

regional languages are used in respective States. 

India is a land of small farm holders. The average size of operational farm 

holding  is  about  1.18  hectares.  Of  the  total  329  million  hectares,  124.58 

million hectares are devoted to raising food crops to provide food security 

for  the  country.  The  gross  irrigated  area  is  61.78  million  hectares.  Rice, 

wheat,  sorghum,  maize,  pearl  millet,  finger  millet,  minor  millets,  barley, 

pulses  are  the  major  staple  crops.  Groundnut  (peanut),  sesame,  Niger, 

sunflower,  rapeseed,  safflower,  soybean  and  linseed  are  the  important 

oilseeds. The country produces over 200 million tonnes of food grains, and it 

is  self-sufficient  in  food  grain  production.  Important commercial  crops  are 

sugarcane,  cotton,  jute,  mesta,  tobacco  and  potato  and  major  plantation 

crops are tea, coffee, cocoa, rubber, coconut, areca nut. The country also 

boasts  a  host  of  spices  such  as  pepper,  cardamom,  ginger,  chillies, 

coriander,  garlic,  cloves  and  nutmeg.  Popular  horticultural  crops  include 

tropical to temperate fruits, vegetables, flowers, cashew nut, a host of root 

and  tuber  crops  and  medicinal  and  aromatic  plants.  Fruits  and  vegetables 

including onion and potato contribute 20% of the total agricultural output of 

the country. India occupies the second place in the world in the production 

of  rice,  wheat,  fruits  and  vegetables.  In  the  world  trade  of  spices,  its 

contribution is 20%. It is the largest producer of ginger and turmeric. 

 

Next to crop production, animal husbandry is the most important economic activity 

in the rural areas. India has the largest bovine population in the world. The total 

milk production in 1998 was 74 million tonnes, which is the highest in the world. 

Egg  production  the  country  ranks  sixth  and  broiler  production  eighteenth  in  the 

world.  The  annual  fish  production  has  exceeded  2.71  million  tonnes  in  1997-98, 

which is the seventh largest in the world. 

 

2.1.3

Agriculture in Indian Economy

  

The Indian economy is significantly dependent on agriculture. It contributes 

to 27% of total GDP, whereas industry contributes to 23% and service sector 

contributes to 50%. However, 67% of total workforce of India is employed in 

agriculture,  whereas  only  13%  and  20%  of  that  in  industry  and  service 

sectors  respectively.  In  other  words,  however,  agriculture  contributes  less 

in the economy, but provides employment to more people.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although  the  Indian  economy  has  been  growing  at  the  rate  of  5.5%  per 

annum,  the  same  in  agriculture  sector  has  been  very  slow  due  to  various 

reasons. This has been less than 0.2% per annum.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution in Total GDP (in %) 

Agriculture

27%

Industry

23%

Services

50%

 

People employed in sectors (%)

Agricultur

e

67%

Industry

13%

Services

20%

 

Growth rate in various sectors (in % )

0.2

5.2

7.7

5.5

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Agriculture

Industry

Services

Total GDP

 

 

2.1.4.

 

Agriculture in India

   

India has the second largest population with over one billion people. 70% of 

the  population  in  India  is  dependent  on  Agriculture  for  their  livelihood. 

Around 190 million hectares area in under total gross cropped area, which is 

largest  in  the  world.  Even  today,  Nation’s  GDP  is  largely  dependent  on 

agricultural production. Despite this, all has not been well with Agriculture 

sector in India. Farmers have been facing several complex problems such as 

growing  costs,  low  productivity,  lower  market  prices  for  agricultural 

produce  immediately  after  harvesting  season,  high  interest  rates  in  rural 

credit  market,  spurious  seeds  and  pesticides  etc.  The  successive 

Governments  have  done  very  little  to  address  these  problems.  Farmers  in 

India are most disorganized and suffer silently. An increase in onion prices 

results  in  widespread  protests  by  the  highly  organized  urban  middle  class 

forcing the Government to curb experts and increase the supply in domestic 

markets. No analysis has ever been made of impact of such a step on onion 

farmers. 

The average land holding is of 35 hectares. The major problems of farmers 

are  they  are  not  organized  as  other  service  sectors,  natural  wageries, 

illiteracy,  small  -  holdings,  unrealistic  loan  and  insurance  policies  etc. 

Agriculture as a whole has improved technically and yielding-wise, but the 

lives  of  farmers  in  becoming  increasingly  miserable  and  pathetic  as  the 

saying goes ‘Indian farmer is born in debts, lives in debts and dies in debts’.  

 

The green revolution and white revolution have been successful in changing 

the outlook  of  agriculture as  a  whole.  These  have helped  India  to  achieve 

the following –  

 

Highest milk production in the world - 78 million tones. 

 

Second highest production of wheat and rice in the world. 

 

Second highest production of vegetables in the world - 43 million tones 

 

Third rank in the world in production of cotton, groundnut and fruits 

 

Fourth rank in the world in production sugarcane and potato 

 

 

Despite  these  achievements,  the  benefits  from  these  revolutions  have  not 

trickle  down  to  the  farmers.  They  are  still  marginalized,  neglected  and 

unable to reap the benefits all these revolutions and technological changes. 

This  has  led  to  unhappiness,  dissatisfaction  and  frustration  among  them. 

Some of them have been driven to suicides also due to this.  

 

2.1.5.

 

Problems of farmers in Agriculture in India

   

The  farmers  are  facing  multi  layers  problem.    There  are  problems  at 

government  policy  level,  business/market  level  as  well  as  at 

village/individual levels. All these coupled together creates a vicious net for 

him, which is beyond his level to address and solve alone. The following at 

various layers are given in detail in below.  

 

  Individual Problems:  

 

Agriculture is no longer a respected occupation in India, therefore more 
and more youth are looking for employment outside.  

 

Income from agriculture is not guaranteed and sufficient also.  

 

Although agriculture has grown due to revolutions, it has benefited only 
large  farmers.  The  growth  and  development  have  not  trickled  to  small 
and marginalized farmers level. The growth in terms of purchase of new 
lands, tractors, new house, cycle, fan, phone etc. 

 

Non-availability of quality inputs – access, easy availability and at lower 
price. 

 

Failure of Prompt extension – advice services 

 

Water and electricity are not regular in supply. This creates problems as 
most of the Indian agriculture suffers from water shortage.  

 

Since around 60% area small and marginalized, there land holding sizes 
are very small. This has made these units non viable for mechanizations.  

 

Since  small  and  marginal  farmers  do  not  have  access  to  heavy 
mechanical  equipments  on  account  of  lack  of  money  and economies  of 
scale, the physical drudgery is very high in Indian agriculture. 

 

 

Most of the farmers do not have access to market information. 

 

Wiggeries  of  weather  keeps  the  crop  production  uncertain,  therefore 
most  of  the  farmers  do  not  plan  to  invest  more.  Even  if  they  invest, 
returns from it are not certain due to weather.  

 

Problems at Business/Market level  

 

Adulterated  inputs  chemicals,  fertilizers  and  pesticides,  and  spurious 
seeds 

 

Seasonality of prices  

 

Inverse relation between crop production and market prices, which keep 
more or less their incomes equal irrespective of the crop production 

 

Cheating in weighing 

 

Exploitation by agents and middlemen 

 

Heavy interest on private borrowing  

 

Problems at Government policy level  

 

Less budget allotment by Central and State Government for agriculture  

 

Crop  Insurance  –  no  suitable  schemes  are  available  to  cover  the  risk 
related  to  crop  production.  Whatever  schemes  are  implemented  by 
government from time to time, claim and getting the claim money is an 
issue.   

Restriction by Government on storage, movement, processing and exports of 
agricultural commodities 

 

 

10 

 

 

Sri.  Raghuvansh  Prasad  Singh,  Hon’ble  Minister  for  Rural  Development,  GOI  delivering 
Conclave  Message  while  Sri.  P.  Chengal  Reddy,  Hon’  Chairman,  FFA  and  other  Delegates 
looks on  

A  view  of  delegates  /    farmers  leaders  who  participated  in  the  Farmers  Associations 
Conclave at 

N

N

N

e

e

e

w

w

w

 

 

 

D

D

D

e

e

e

l

l

l

h

h

h

i

i

i

 on 6

th

 December’04.