Level 2, 15 Osterley Way, Manukau, Auckland 2104 

PO Box 75517, Manurewa, Auckland 2243 

P. 09 263 5240 

E. 

darrell@tamakilegal.com

 

 

Counsel Acting: Darrell Naden/Reece Autagavaia 

 

IN THE WAITANGI TRIBUNAL                                                      WAI 2358         

                                                                                                           

IN THE MATTER 

of the Treaty of Waitangi Act 1975 

AND 

IN THE MATTER 

the 

National 

Fresh 

Water 

and 

Geothermal Resources Inquiry 

AND  

IN THE MATTER  

of  a  claim  by  Nuki  Aldridge  on  behalf 

of  himself,  his  whanau,  the  hapū  of 

Ngāti  Uru,  Ngāti  Pakahi  and  Te 

Tahawai,  of  Ngāpuhi,  and  the  Lake 

Omapere Trustees 

 
 

BRIEF OF EVIDENCE OF NUKI ALDRIDGE 

Dated 23 September 2016 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAY IT PLEASE THE TRIBUNAL 

 

Ko Emiemi te maunga  

Ko Rataroa te papa 

Komutu te manga 

Ko Whangaroa te wahapu ki te tai tamawahine ki te Moana-nui-a-kiwa 

Ko Mataatua te waka 

 

1. 

My  name  is  Nuki  Aldridge.  I  am  the  named  claimant  for  various  Wai 

numbers including Wai 2376, Wai 2377 and Wai 2382. All of these claims 

are  currently  being  heard  in  the  Wai  1040  Northland  inquiry.  The  Treaty 

claims are for and on behalf of myself, my whānau, the hapū of Ngāti Uru, 

Ngāti  Pakahi  and  Te  Tahawai,  of  Ngāpuhi,  and  the  Lake  Omapere 

Trustees.  I  am  a  claimant  in  the  Wai  2358  National  Fresh  Water  and 

Geothermal Resources Inquiry. 

2. 

I  presented  evidence  during  Stage  1  of  the  water  inquiry  on  behalf  of  the 

trustees of Lake Omapere.1 I am the chairman of the trust. In this brief of 

evidence,  I  expand  on  the  evidence  I  presented  on  behalf  of  the  Lake 

Omapere trustees and I also give evidence in relation to the waterways of 

Whangaroa.  

3. 

Without  reference to  my ancient ancestry,  I trace my recent descent from 

Te  Hotete,  who  married  Tuhikura  of Whangaroa.  Te  Hotete  and  Tuhikura 

were the parents of Hongi Hika. Hongi Hika married Turikatuku and one of 

their  sons  was  Poi  Hakena.  Following  the  death  of  his  elder  brother  in 

battle, my tupuna took the name Hare Hongi Hika Tuarua. Hare Hongi had 

a  son  named  Toetoe.  Through  the  union  of  Toetoe  and  Horiana,  Hau 

Toetoe  was  born.  Hau  Toetoe  married  Te Owai  and  they  had  a  daughter 

named Rawinia. On 20 May 1934, I was born to Rawinia Hau Toetoe and 

Will Autridge. I was born at Rataroa, which was once named the shores of 

the Whangaroa harbour in Northland. I currently live at Rataroa.  

 

 

                                                           
 

1

 Affidavit of Nuki Aldridge dated 1 March 2012, Wai 2357 and 2358, #A7. 

 

4. 

My whakapapa is as follows: 

 

5. 

The union between Te Owai and Hau Toetoe was a marriage between the 

hapu of Ngati Uru and Tahawai. I am Ngati Uru ki Whangaroa through Te 

Owai,  I  am  Te  Tahawai  of  Whangaroa  through  Hau  Toetoe.  Te  Tahawai 

hapu is named after an event: 

Korero mo Te Tahawai; 

Ka  tata  Hotete  i  te  mate  ka  hokia  mai  ia  ki  Tapua  Haruru,  i  a  ia  e 

noho  ana  i  kona  ka  hoki  mai  ia  ki  te  taha  o  te  Roto  O  Mapere,  ka 

mate  hoki  ia  ki  reira,  no  reira  ka  huaina  nga  uri  e  noho  mai  raka  I 

Whangaroa tenei hapu a te Tahawai (Taha-a-wai) mo te matenga o 

Te Hotete ki te taha o te wai. I atamiratia a Te Hotete ki Te Ripi (Te 

Roto  O  Mapere)  ka  mauria  mai  ana  koiwi  ka  takoto  ki  runga  o 

Pakinga  mo  tetahi,  no  muri  ka  mauria  mai  ka  takoto  tuturu  ki 

Wharepaepae a kei Wharepaepae i Nga tenei ra. 

Close to the time of the passing of (Te) Hotete, he returned to Tapua 

Haruru, and it was while there he returned to Lake Ōmāpere. It was 

at that place that he passed away, and so his descendants who were 

living  at  Whangaroa  came  to  be  known  as  Tahawai  (Taha-

ā-wai, 

meaning those near or close to the water), because of the passing of 

Te Hotete next to the water. Te Hotete lay in state at Te Ripi at Lake 

Ōmāpere,  then  his  bones  were  taken  and  laid  upon  Pakinga  for  a 

while,  after  that  they  were  taken  to  be  laid  (put  to  rest)  at 

Wharepaepae, and it is at Wharepaepae where they are today. 

6. 

The facts of my birth  determined in advance the conditions of my life and 

the outline of my destiny. It has made me who I am and I am a Maori. Not a 

 

white man, nor a negro, a European or a Frenchman or Asian. Nor am I a 

savage  or  a  barbarian.    From  my  nurturing  has  come  my  health,  my 

instincts, my intellectual faculties and my moral inclinations (values). From 

the  society  in  which  I  grew  up,  I  have  my  matauranga  (education),  my 

ancestral heritage (nga taonga tuku iho.)   

7. 

My first language is Māori and my world is Māori. I must have shown some 

promise  or  something  because  the  elders  began  speaking  to  me  about 

history  and  other  things  when  I  was  just  a  young  boy.  They  would  sit 

beside  me  at  the  marae  and  start  talking  to  me  for  hours.  This  was  a 

recurring  pattern  for  me  as  I  made  my  way  through  life.  It  seemed  to  me 

that wherever  I went, the 

kaumātua kuia would single me out and start to 

tell  me  things  about  the  old  days  and  our  culture.  Much  of  their  korero 

stuck  with  me.  In  addition  to  receiving  their  korero,  throughout  my  life  I 

have made a point of reading widely on many of the topics and much of the 

history that the old people talked with me about. 

8. 

My  inheritance  are  from  my  Tupuna,  which  imposes  upon  me  the 

irresistible  bias  of  ancestral  life;  political  order,  which  shuts  me  up  in  its 

decrees;  customs,  values.  This  in  time  becomes  second  nature;  historic 

tradition  and  testimony  of  my  people,  which  extend  my  life  in  time  and 

space  and  enlarge  my  personal  experience  to  embrace  the  total 

experience of humanity.

 

ORIGINS OF WATER 

9. 

When  I  consider  the  “wai”  or  water,  I  think  immediately  of  its  association 

with “wairua”. If there is no wairua, there cannot be form and without form, 

there is no life. When I look 

at the meaning of the word “wairua”, to me it 

means  that  the  spirits  of  both  Io-matua-kore  and  of  the  ira  atua  reside 

within  us.  From  this  simple  word  association  exercise,  we  can  start  to 

understand the significance of water to the Maori people. It is an important 

feature of our spirituality. 

10. 

As we Maori walk through life to understand the origin of life, the cause of 

growth  and  the  finality  of  death.  We  tread  a  very  ancient  path  where  our 

mental  processes  often  yield  to  our  taha  wairua  and  so  we  have  evolved 

 

our own theory of life that has given rise to a specific set of values and to a 

particular world view.  

11. 

We  turn  to  some  of  the  most  ancient  korero  tuku  iho  of  Ranginui  and 

Papatuanuku. That is: 

 

Ka  tu Io ki  runga  i  tona rangi  tuhaha,  ka tuku atu i tona reo ki te 

Whanau-Ariki, ara, ka puta mai a Ranginui raua ko Papatuanuku i 

te kohao. Ka noho Io ki tona rangatiratanga. 

 

Io stood aloft in his celestial abode and with a proclamation to the 

Universe, Ranginui and Papatuanuku emerged from the aperture. 

And Io affirmed his omnipotence.  

12. 

This korero tuku iho is remarkably similar  to the essence of the Big Bang 

Theory

—the  most  widely  accepted  scientific  theory  on  the  origin  of  the 

Universe.  But  Maori  civilisation  has  long  known  how  the  Universe  was 

formed whereas the Big Bang Theory is relatively recent. Our tupuna were 

aware  long  ago  of  numerous  celestial  events  and  of  numerous  celestial 

bodies, many of which cannot be seen with the naked eye: 

a. 

Whanau Ariki  

 

 

celestial realm; the Universe 

b. 

Takā i te Rangi   

 

a galaxy 

c. 

Mango roa 

 

 

the Milky Way 

d. 

Taki-o-autahu  

 

 

Southern Cross constellation 

e. 

Pateri  

 

 

 

Magellan Cloud 

f. 

Marau  

 

 

 

meteor or comet 

g. 

Kohao  

 

 

 

wormholes 

h. 

Puangahori  

 

 

Procyon 

i. 

Atutahi  

 

 

 

Canopus 

j. 

Puanga-rua 

 

 

Rigel 

 

Puanga-rua  is  to  the  northern  iwi  Maori  what  Mataariki  is  to  the 

eastern/southern  iwi  Maori.  Here  then  is  part  of  the  northern  iwi 

karakia to farewell the old year and to welcome the new 

 

Haere rā, kua momoe nei ngā hau, 

Kua 

ngarongaro hoki ngā whetu o te tau. 

Ko whetu-kau-

pō anake ka kitea ake nei,  

M

āna e whakarewa a Puangarua, 

Te whetu nui o te tau hou; ko te Rua-o-

Puanga tēnā. 

He 

oti ake ngā kupu poroporoaki;  

W

aiho mā te tomairangi e whakamākuku’. 

k. 

Mataariki   

 

 

the Pleiades 

l. 

Rehua  

 

 

 

Antares 

m. 

Whanau a Tama-nui-te-Ra  

the solar system 

n. 

Tama-nui-te-Ra   

 

the sun 

o. 

Takero  

 

 

 

closest planet from the sun 

p. 

Tawera/Kopu- 

 

 

second planet from the sun 

 

      Tawera tauhokai ana I te ata 

the morning star 

Meremere-tu-ahiahi 

 

the evening star 

q. 

Ao-turoa   

 

 

third planet from the sun 

r. 

Matawhero  

 

 

fourth planet from the sun 

s. 

Manawhenua o Koponui   

fifth planet from the sun 

t. 

Parearau   

 

 

sixth planet from the sun 

u. 

Rangipo   

 

 

seventh planet from the sun 

v. 

Tangaroa   

 

 

eighth planet from the sun 

 

w. 

Whiringa Tawhiti  

furthermost  known  planet  from 

the sun 

x. 

Te Ao Whenua or Te Ao Turoa   Earth 

y. 

Atarau  

 

 

 

the moon. 

13. 

The ancients used symbols known as ariā to represent their understanding 

of  matters  such  as  the  evolutionary  process.  These  representations  were 

the  means  by  which  they  could  apprehend  and  reconcile  the  realities  of 

their world. As stated above, Takā i te Rangi is a galaxy. Takā is also the 

name for the spiral design that is often carved on the tauihu of waka. Only 

recently has Western science determined that galaxies are spiral shaped. 

14. 

Papa-tu-a-Nuku  personified  the  Earth  and  the  whenua.  Papa-tu-a-Nuku 

was  the  primordial  mother  figure  who  married  Rangi.  She  bore 

departmental  Atua  who  were  tasked  with  overseeing  the  elements  and 

natural resources. Tawhirimatea was responsible for the wind and storms, 

Tanem

ahuta’s  domain  was  the  forests,  Rongo-ma-Tane  looked  after 

cultivated  crops  and  Tangaroa  had  dominion  over  the  sea,  rivers,  lakes 

and fish. 

15. 

Papa-tu-a-Nuku  is  a  living  organism  with  her  own  biological  systems  and 

functions.  She  provides  a  network  of  support  systems  for  all  her  children 

and  so  they  live  and  function  in  a  symbiotic  relationship.  The  different 

species and genera contribute to the welfare of other species and they also 

help to sustain the biological function of Papa-tu-a-Nuku.  

16. 

The  streams  of  water  are  the  arteries  of  Papa-tua-Nuku.  The  life  giving 

waters  are for  her to  imbibe  and  share  with  her  offspring. The  process of 

water leading to life is captured in the following saying

“Inu ki te wai o te 

awa, hei oranga mou”, or, “Go to the river and drink, for it will give you life”. 

17. 

Our relationship with water is as ancient as the world we live in for it began 

at  the  beginning

—when  Tane  Mahuta  separated  Ranginui  and  Papa-tua-

nuku.  Their  sudden  and  violent  separation  evoked  an  outpouring  of 

emotion and grief as Ranginui wept for his beloved wife.  His tears were so 

many  that  a  dewy  shroud  eventually  covered  all  the  land.  They  say 

– 

“Waiho ma tomairangi e makuku ki te roimata”, or, when the dewy shroud 

 

settled,  it  became  the  water-filled  arteries  of  Papa-tu-a-Nuku.  Water, 

because of its origins, is tapu to 

Māori.  

18. 

Western science recently laid out a theory that at least some of the water 

on Earth was carried here by ice-laden comets and asteroids. When these 

celestial  bodies  struck,  the  Earth  was  very  hot.  The  collisions  caused  the 

planet to steam over. The steam rose off the planet and condensed in the 

outer atmosphere causing the water to fall from the sky and gather on the 

Earth.  The  planet's  atmosphere  was  created.  This  theory  about  the 

celestial  origins  of  water  is  reflected  in  nga  roimata  o  Ranginui  and  the 

creation of the tomairangi that eventually clothed Papa-tu-a-nuku.  

19. 

In  the  new  world  created  by  Tane,  life  sprang  forth.  At  Kurawaka  in 

Hawaikii, the sacred earth there was fashioned into the form of a woman. 

Once  that  had  been  completed,  the  divine  beings  bestowed  the  woman 

with a beating heart, with breath, with the life principle and with wairua. At 

that point in time, Hineahuone was born. 

20. 

When Tane laid his eyes upon Hineahuone for the very first time, he fell in 

love  and  soon  they  were  betrothed.  The  whakapapa  of  man  stems  from 

their  union.  But  crucial  to  the  whakapapa  of  man  is  the  whakapapa  of 

water

—the  many  derivatives  of  water.  Without  the  many  derivatives,  we 

would not exist today: 

Ko te wai-tatea, ko te iwi   

Semen, the tribe 

Ko te wai-orako te hapu  

Birth fluid, the sub-tribe 

 

Ko te wai-u, ko te whanau 

Fluid from the breast, the family 

 

 

Ko te wai-

Māori, ko te    

Fresh water, from childhood to  

 

 

whanaketanga a tae noa   

death 

 

 

ki tona matenga 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

waikamo    

 

 

tear 

 

waiaruhe    

 

 

bitterness, anguish 

 

wairuturutu  

 

 

to weep uncontrollably 

 

waikohu   

 

 

mist, fog 

 

waipuke    

 

 

flood 

 

waiwaha (hukarere) 

 

sleet  

 

waitara  

 

 

 

hail 

 

 

waituhi  

 

 

 

pool of water, fresh sign of flood 

 

waipuna    

 

 

spring of water 

wairanu, wairaraua 

 

gravy or juice 

waihonga   

 

 

nectar/juice from flower 

 

TIKANGA MO TE WAI 

21. 

I have talked in the Northland inquiry about how the English have failed to 

reach the heart of Māori society. They have never properly met and talked 

with us. This is particularly true in the case of the English understanding of 

how 

Māori made and enforced their laws. When settlers arrived, they saw 

no  police  force;  they  saw  no  court  houses;  they  saw  no  judges.  In  that 

situation,  the  English  assumed,  how  then  is  this  civilisation?  The  simple 

answer is that people lived it. The Māori way was that we didn't just teach 

the law  to  the  rangatira,  we  taught  everyone  the  law.  And  everybody 

walked  around  with  the  law  being  part  of  them.  It’s  ironic  that  a  society 

claiming  to  be  more  advanced  needed  people  and  buildings  and  tools  to 

tell them how to do or not to do things. How I understand the psyche of the 

Māori is, it is one where the individual is responsible—where the individual 

asks him or herself whether their actions are right or wrong. Māori lived the 

tapu and rahui. They knew what it meant to manaaki, and they knew what 

tapu  meant.  The  people  governed  themselves  through  their  long-

established social systems.  

22. 

Kaupapa,  or  philosophy,  is  the  body  of  principles  that  underpin  tikanga. 

Tikanga flows from kaupapa. The old people used ma te tapu, ma te wehi 

and  ma  te  muru  when  creating  tikanga.  Tupu  was  considered  to  be  the 

quintessence of life itself. Mana is social standing and utu is an adjustment 

mechanism  that  ensures  equality.  Tapu  is  about  the  stability  of 

conservation and muru is social sharing. 

23. 

Ritenga  is  the  application  of  law.  For  social  cohesion,  there  is  a  way  to 

behave  and  there  are  actions  that  are  appropriate.  Elsewhere  in  the 

country it is known as kawa but in the North we call it ritenga.  

10 

 

24. 

The right to make law is mana motuhake.  Maru is the power  to apply the 

law. You need maru in order to have mana. 

25. 

There  is  ritenga  in  relation  to  water.  An  important  ritenga  is  that  human 

waste  should  never  enter  the  awa.  I  was  very  young  when  I  was  caught 

urinating  into  the  stream  by  my  parents.  They  said, 

“Don’t  do  that. 

Somebody’s going to drink that.” It was just common sense but more than 

that,  it  was  about  consideration  for  others.  It  was  important  to  leave  the 

water  in  the  same  condition  you  found  it  in.  The  water  that  left  the 

mountains should be the same water we drink downstream. 

26. 

Children learn by seeing and copying the actions of their parents. I never 

once saw my parents throw things into the river. There was always a place 

where rubbish was disposed of. Even the rubbish from our gardens never 

went into the river.  

27. 

If  there  was  a  drowning or  an  accident,  a rahui would  be  placed  over  the 

awa  and  a  tapu  placed  on  gathering  of  kai.  The  hapu  would  gather  to 

determine what happened and to if there were any measures that could be 

taken  to  prevent  it  from  happening  again.  If  a  death  resulted,  then  these 

issues were discussed at the tangi. Often, the mishap would give rise to a 

new  name.  During  one  tangi,  my  grandaunt  had  Poti  added  to  her  name 

because of a boating incident at sea. This practise kept what happened in 

the collective memory. It acted as a warning or reminder so that the mishap 

did not happen again.   

28. 

There was ritenga around the use of water to wash the sick and the dead. 

Tupapaku,  were  cleansed  and  blessed  in  a  separate  area  away  from  the 

awa. That area was tapu. I do not know the detail of where these acts were 

done because only wahine could do the task.  

29. 

One of the ritenga for our punawai is that a tuna should be left in it to keep 

the  punawai  clean.  It  was  known  to  Maori  that  tuna  was  a  filter  for  any 

contaminants that came into the puna. 

30. 

In  pre-European  times,  Ngati  Uru,  Ngati  Pakahi,  Te  uri  Taniwha,  Te 

Whanau Pani and other hapu such as were in existence in the Whangaroa 

area long before the advent of Nga Puhi. It is hapu and whanau that have 

dominion  over  the  water  resources  in  our  rohe.  I  do  not  know  of  any