1

This  essay  was  produced  in  an  academic  module  to  draft  the  main  topics  from  the  secret  trade  agree- 

ment exposed by WikiLeaks, on November 2015. The author of this document, known on the web by the 
nickname Praxis (@enterpraxis), is an academic researcher, activist and journalist.

 

 

TiSA REVIEW

1

 

 

 
 
 

WikiLeaks releases new secret documents from the Trade in Services 

Agreement (TiSA) which is being negotiated by the US, EU and 22 other 

countries that, along with the TTIP and the TPP, account for 2/3rds of 

global domestic product (GDP)

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION 

 

 

he  TISA  negotiations 

are  an  effort  by  23 

countries,  accounting  for  more  than 

70% of the world’s trade in services, to 

write new rules in an area that has been 

stalled at the multilateral level since the 

end of the Uruguay  Round  negotiations 

two decades ago. The goal is to expand 

trade in services among a smaller group 

of  mostly  wealthier  countries  that  be-

lieve  it  to  be  in  their  interests  to  do  so. 

The leaked texts are bracketed negotiat-

ing  documents,  with  the  brackets  re-

flecting  the  still  large  areas  of  disa-

greement among countries. So any con-

clusions about the final outcome have to 

be tentative ones. That covers the situa-

tion  where  US  companies  with  servers 

inside or outside the EU gather personal 

data in Europe, and then want to pull  it 

back across the Atlantic.  

TiSA  negotiations  started  in 

February  2012.  Fifty  countries  are  in-

volved,  with  the  European  Union  and 

the  United  States  representing  two-

thirds  of  world  trade.  All  the  large 

emerging  countries  have  been  carefully 

kept  out  and,  in  actual  fact  an  anti-

BRICS (Brazil, Russia India, China, and 

South  Africa)  alliance  is  being  forged. 

Currently, that's possible using the total-

ly  useless  "Safe  Harbor"  agreement, 

which  may  be cancelled  in the wake of 

NSA spying. If the  European Commis-

sion  signs  up  to  TiSA  with  the  above 

clause,  there  would  be  no  way  it  could 

stop  US  companies  from  taking  infor-

mation  -  including,  specifically,  "per-

sonal  information"  -  overseas.  At  that 

point,  the  EU's  data  protection  frame-

work would be completely neutered. 

But  the  damage  doesn't  end 

there.  Article  X.5  on  "Open  Networks, 

Network Access  and Use"  is as  follows 

Each Party as recognizing that consum-

ers  in  its  territory,  subject to  applicable 

laws, and regulations, should be able to: 

1.  access  and  use  services  and  ap-

plications of their choice availa-

ble  on  the  Internet,  subject  to 

reasonable  network  manage-

ment; 

The problem is that "subject to reasona-

ble  network  management”  is  not  only 

undefined here, but it is not well defined 

anywhere."  That  opens  the  door  to  any 

kind of network management that might 

 

 

be  claimed  as  "reasonable"  -  including 

forms that destroy network neutrality. 

What  the  latest  WikiLeaks  re-

lease reminds us is that fast track won't 

just  be  used  to  pass  the  TiSA.  It  will 

also be used to pass the TTIP, the  TPP, 

and  future  agreements

2

  --  perhaps  not 

even  yet  imagined.  Behind  closed 

doors,  in  the  offices  of  lobbying  firms 

and  corporate  boardrooms,  law  firms 

and  foreign  ministries,  smart  people 

working  for  special  interests  will  be 

empowered  to  reshape  the  world, 

through  secret  negotiations,  and  under 

the banner of “free trade”. 

Trade  in  services  is  an  esoteric 

concept for most, including many at the 

highest levels of government. To a great 

extent  this  is  because  the  concept  has 

changed so dramatically in recent years, 

with the Internet and the forces of glob-

alization  having  massively  altered  op-

portunities  for  the  cross-border  move-

                                                             

2

  “The  Three  Trade  in  Services  Agreement  ex-

posed in a 17 document dump by Wikileaks on 
November 2015, relates to ongoing negotiations 
to  lock  market  liberalizations  into  global  law. 
that corporations would be able to use the law in 
its current form to hold sway over governments, 
deciding  whether  laws  promoting  culture,  pro-
tecting  the  environment  or  ensuring  equal  ac-
cess  to  services  were  ‘unnecessarily  burden-
some’,  or  whether  knowledge  of  indigenous 
culture  or  public  services  was  essential  to 
achieve 

‘parity’”. 

Source: 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/ne
ws/trade-agreements-like-tisa-tpp-and-ttip-will-
sideline-national-laws-wikileaks-says-
10299907.html

 Acess: 18 December 2015.

 

ment  of  services.  Yet  services  could 

make up more than 40% of global trade 

today,  according  to  the  World  Trade 

Organization,  and  account  for  some  80 

percent of U.S. jobs. 

For  greater  clarity,  here  we  are 

summing  up  the  very  numerous  partial 

analyses  that  are  available,  as  well  as 

some  of  our  own  insights  into  the  dif-

ferent  proposals  for  ‘free  trade’  agree-

ments.  To  put  it  more  precisely,  for 

business freedoms, the best known trea-

ty  being  the  one  between  the  European 

Union  and  the  United  States  as  well  as 

the parallel one with Canada, the Trade 

in Services  Agreement, as well as three 

proposed treaties between the European 

Union and Africa. We shall also consid-

er  other  treaties  on  free  trade,  bilateral 

and  multilateral  investment  treaties  that 

have been in force for years, particular-

ly NAFTA (North American Free Trade 

Agreement). In fact, at the beginning of 

2014  there  were  already  some  3,300 

bilateral  or  multilateral  agreements  on 

investments  or  free  trade  treaties  in  the 

world, of which 1,400 have been signed 

by Member States of the European Un-

ion.  The  European  Union  itself  has  al-

ready  signed  about  fifty  trade  agree-

ments  and  is  currently  negotiating  a 

dozen of them. 

 

 

 

  Sectors being negotiated: 

 

  International Maritime Transport 

Services 

  Air Transport Services 

  Financial Services 

  Electronic Commerce 

  Telecommunication Services 

  Environmental Services 

  Movement of Natural Persons 

  Professional Services 

  Government Procurement 

  Competitive Delivery Services / 

Logistics 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.  TiSA – Annex on Energy Related Services 

 

Proposal by Iceland and Norway 

 

he  "market  access",  ap-

plied on the Iceland and 

Norway  proposal,  measure  the  rules  of 

the  TiSA  limit  public  regulation  of  the 

number  of  services  suppliers;  the  total 

value of the services supplied; the legal 

form  of  the  services  corporation;  and 

other  regulatory  aspects,  and  would 

affect  not only  the  energy  and  environ-

mental  services  covered  by  the  specific 

annexes but approximately 160 services 

sectors,  many  of  which  greatly  impact 

the  environment,  including:  real  estate; 

retail;  construction,  air,  road,  and  mari-

time  passenger  and  freight  transport; 

electricity,  gas,  and  water  distribution; 

services  for agriculture, hunting,  forest-

ry, fishing, mining, utilities; and others.  

The 

draft 

annex 

on 

road 

transport reveals similar problems to the 

annexes  on  maritime  and  air  transport 

previously  released.  While  citizens  and 

elected  officials  have  public  environ-

mental  and  job  creation  goals  around 

the construction of infrastructure includ-

ing bridges and roads, and environmen-

talists  and  labor  activists  have  a  huge 

stake  in  taxing  and  regulating  maritime 

and  air  transport  in  order  to  fund  cli-

mate  adaptation  and  mitigation  and  re-

duce  carbon  emissions 

from  the 

transport  industries,  the  TiSA  proposes 

to impose a corporate model that would 

favor  the  transnational  corporations' 

"rights" to operate, and limit regulation. 

On the WikiLeaks analysis of the Cross-

Border  Trade,  Commercial  Presence 

and Sovereignty over Energy Resources 

chapter,  the  International  Transport 

Workers  Federation  (ITF)

3

  notes  that 

the  "combined  impact  of  the  leaked 

TISA documents' provisions would con-

stitute  serious  barriers  for  any  state 

wanting  to  invest  in,  manage  and  oper-

ate  its  national  infrastructure,  to  plan 

development  or  to  defend  social  and 

safety  standards  across  the  transport 

industry itself."

4

 

These  new  and  improved  com-

mitments are very important for the EU, 

                                                             

3

  The  International  Transport  Workers'  Federa-

tion  (ITF)  is  an  international  federation  of 
transport  workers'  trade  unions. The  ITF repre-
sents  the  interests  of  transport  workers'  unions 
in  bodies  that  take  decisions  affecting  jobs, 
employment conditions or safety in the transport 
industry,  such  as  the  International  Labour  Or-
ganization, the International Maritime Organiza-
tion and the International Civil Aviation Organ-
ization. 

 

4

 WikiLeaks - The US strategy to create a new 

global legal and economic system: TPP, TTIP, 
TISA – Video Documentary: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rw7P0RG
ZQxQ

 

 

 

 

because  the  services  sector  constitute 

the  most  dynamic  maritime  economic 

activity in this region.  

The  EU  companies  are  leading 

providers  of  services  in  many  sectors 

and are the biggest exporters of services 

worldwide,  with  almost  26%  of  world 

total  export  of  services  and  half  of  all 

foreign investment flowing from the EU 

to other parts of the world. Legal securi-

ty  and  new  market access  opportunities 

are therefore crucial for European com-

panies. 

 

 

 

 

2.  TiSA as an environmental hazard 

An assessment of the environmental impact of the leaked Annex on Environmental Ser-
vices in the context of TiSA as a whole 

 

 

t  the  same  time  an 

agreement  on  TPP 

(Trans-Pacific  Partnership)  was  under 

negotiation  since  March  2010  between 

12  countries  from  America,  Asia  and 

Oceania,  including the United States. It 

was  initialed  in  October  2015.  Many 

other  treaties  of  lesser  importance  are 

being negotiated in parallel. All of them 

are  very  similar  and  share  many  com-

mon characteristics, which we shall now 

analyze. The financial services, logistics 

and  technological  corporations,  largely 

in the United States and also the EU, are 

attempting  to  expand  the  World  Trade 

Organizations  (WTOs)  and  General 

Agreement  on  Trade  in  Services 

(GATS) to develop a set of deregulation 

and  privatization  rules  that  constrain 

public oversight of how services operate 

domestically  and  globally,  setting  aside 

environmental,  labor,  and  development 

issues  in  favor  of  transnational  corpo-

rate rights to operate and profit.  

The analysis of a proposal for an 

Energy  Related  Services  (ERS)  annex 

of  the  WikiLeaks  TiSA  leak,  it  would 

give "rights" to  foreign energy corpora-

tions  in  domestic  markets.  Far  from 

mandating  reductions  in  carbon  emis-

sions  or  promoting  access  for  poor 

countries to clean technologies, the pro-

posed  TiSA  annex  would  actually  limit 

the  ability  of  governments  to  set  poli-

cies that differ entitle between polluting 

 

 

and  carbon-based  energy  sources,  such 

as oil and coal, from clean and renewa-

ble  energy  sources  such  as  wind  and 

solar.

The protections and supports for 

renewable  energy  that  are  being  called 

for  by  countries  across  the  globe  are 

nowhere to be found in the leaked chap-

ters of the proposed TiSA. Thus far, the 

restrictions  on  subsidies  for  renewable 

energy,  such  as  India's  supports  for  so-

lar  power  that  have  been  successfully 

challenged  by  the  United  States  in  the 

WTO,  remain  in  place,  along  with  a 

lack  of  disciplines  on  similar  subsidies 

that  are  forked  over  by  publics  coffers 

to the  fossil  fuel (oil, coal, and gas)  in-

dustries  in  the  hundreds  of  billions  ac-

cording to Oil Change International.  

The TiSA also shares similarities 

with  another  agreement  being  negotiat-

ed  in  contrast  to  environmental  goals, 

according to environmental analysis: the 

Transatlantic  Trade  and  Investment 

Partnership  (TTIP).  The  new  rights  for 

investors  and  corporations  proposed  in 

the  TiSA  and  the  TTIP,  like  the  TPP, 

would  become  legally  binding  and  en-

forceable,  while  any  environmental 

provisions  would  not.  This  situation  is 

reflected  in  the  Paris  conference  for  a 

new  United  Nations  Framework  Con-

vention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) 

agreement,  where  the  U.S.  has  led  the 

call for environmental targets to be only 

voluntary  and  has  refused  any  provi-

sions that would be binding under inter-

national law.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.  TiSA - Annex on Road Freight Transport

 

Review on a secret draft of the Trade in Services Agreement Annex on Road 

Freight Transport and Related Logistics Services

 

 

n  this  annex,  it  is 

measured  that  the  23 

governments involved, 

together  with  the  EU,  aim  to  conclude 

an  international  trade  treaty  that would 

liberalize  the  worldwide  trade  of  ser-

vices,  including  transport.  The  TiSA 

texts have been negotiated in secret with 

no  possibility  of  the inclusion  of  a  sus-

tainability or labor chapter. 

"In  road  freight  transport this  is 

particularly  disastrous.  There  are  so 

many labor  market  and  social  problems 

in  the  sector that  even  the  EU  has  stat-

ed it sees no value in this text," said ITF 

road  transport  secretary  Mac  Urata.  

Which  means  that  it  will  allow  multi-

modal  transport  operators  unfettered 

access to and rights to supply road, rail 

or  inland  waterways  transport  services, 

generally  public  infrastructure  —  and 

enable  them  to  fast-track  their  goods 

through ports. 

 

In  that  scenario,  major  corpora-

tions  will  play an  important role  on the 

trade  agreement.  Corporations  would 

get  to  comment  on  any  new  logistic 

regulatory  attempts,  and  enforce  this 

regulatory straitjacket through a dispute 

mechanism  similar  to  the  investor-state 

dispute  settlement  (ISDS)

5

  process  in 

other  trade  agreements,  where  they 

could  win  money  equal  to  “expected 

future profits” lost through violations of 

the regulatory cap.  

The local leaders further empha-

size that the TiSA negotiations shall not 

cover  the  privatization  of  public  ser-

vices  and  call  for  the  government  right 

to  regulate  in  the  public  interest  of  Eu-

ropean,  national,  regional  and  local  au-

thorities  to  be  fully  recognized  in  the 

negotiating  transport  text.  They  also 

favor  a "positive  list" of policy areas  in 

the context of  market access to be cov-

ered  by  the  agreement  instead  of  the 

envisaged  "negative  list"  of  spheres 

excluded.  This  would  make  it  much 

                                                             

5

  ISDS  grants  a  foreign  investor  the  right  to 

initiate dispute settlement proceedings against a 
foreign government. It is commonly included in 
free  trade  agreements,  but  opponents  say  it 
could leave local level policymakers vulnerable 
to  libel  proceedings  from  overseas  investors, 
should  local  laws  interfere  with  their  ability  to 
turn  a  profit.  –  ISDS  Democracy  challenge: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NaLClb5
YOg

 .

 

 

 

clearer  and  transparent  which  policy 

areas the agreement affects. 

4.  TiSA – Annex on International Maritime Transport Services  

And other Maritime Services 

 

he  TiSA’s  releases  con-

firms the hazards identi-

fied by the ITF (Interna-

tional  Transport  Workers’  Federation)

6

 

when it warned that a previous airing of 

the  trade  agreement  documents  predict-

ed  a  power  grab  by  transport  industry 

players  at the  expense  of  the  public  in-

terest,  jobs  and  a  voice  for  workers. 

Despite some slight changes to the pro-

posed  TiSA  Maritime  Annex  originally 

revealed  in  November  leak,  its  replace-

ment  still  contains  a  least  one  highly 

potentially damaging clause. 

The  annex  recognizes  the  stand-

ards  adopted  by  the  United  Nations’ 

International  Maritime  Organization 

and  the  International  Labor  Organiza-

tion  –  the  two  giants  of  international 

regulation on work at sea and the safety 

and  rule  of  law  at  sea.  Crucially, 

                                                             

6

 

International Transport Workers' Federation is 

a  global  union  federation  of  transport  workers' 
trade unions, founded in 1896. In 2009 the ITF 
had 654 member organizations in 148 countries, 
representing  a  combined  membership  of  4.5 
million 

workers. 

http://www.internationaltransportforum.org/

 

 

 

though,  it  fails  to  recognize  that  their 

standards  set  minimum  protections. 

Typically,  as  in  the  example  of  the 

enormously  important  Maritime  Labor 

Convention 2006, the standards co-exist 

with actual or desired higher ones set by 

individual nations. 

Despite  this,  in  Article  12,  the 

annex  states that  in  cases  where  parties 

‘apply  measures  that  deviate  from  the 

above  mentioned  international  stand-

ards,  their  standards  shall  be  based  on 

non-discriminatory, objective and trans-

parent criteria’.  

ITF  president  Paddy  Crumlin 

stated: “This questions seafarers’ condi-

tions 

everywhere. 

The 

ILO minimum wage  standard  for  sea-

farers  is  intended  as  a  safety  net – not 

an absolute. Who decides these criteria, 

and  how  will  this  be  enforced?  What 

will happen to safety provisions, pay or 

qualifications  which  are  better  than  the 

minimum?  The  ILO  Maritime  Labor 

Convention 

explicitly 

sets minimum standards,  with  member 

states being encouraged to go above and 

beyond its provisions. Almost unbeliev-

 

 

ably  this  fact  appears  to  have  escaped 

those drawing up the TiSA plans.”

7

 

The  concerns  on  TiSA  Interna-

tional  Maritime  Transport  Services  are 

that  in  the  three  areas  covered  -  mari-

time transport, air transport and express 

delivery – deregulation and will aim to: 

 

Enhance  the  bargaining  power 

of major shipping lines over port 

services,  and  give  global  port 

operators  further  consolidated 

power 

 

Open  up  offshore  energy  ser-

vices  raising  potential  sustaina-

bility  and  environmental  con-

cerns 

 

Allow  multimodal  transport  op-

erators  unfettered  access  to  and 

rights  to  supply  road,  rail  or  in-

land  waterways  transport  ser-

vices,  generally  public  infra-

structure  –  and  enable  them  to 

fast-track  their  goods  through 

ports 

 

Undermine the social  and safety 

standards  of  the  International 

Labor  Organization  (ILO),  by 

failing  to  recognize  these  as 

                                                             

7

http://worldmaritimenews.com/archives/16312

1/itf-leaked-tisa-annexes-give-all-power-to-
transport-industry-heavyweights/

  Acess: De-

cember 22 2015

 

minimum  standards  subject  to 

continuous improvement 

 

Create an aviation industry dom-

inated by global giants whilst al-

lowing  flags  of  convenience  to 

become  an  established  practice 

in the global aviation market 

 

Shift  the  aviation  system  onto  a 

fully  liberalized multilateral sys-

tem  in  one  go,  in  a  way  that’s 

unmanageable  for  many  coun-

tries and aviation workforces 

 

See  the  worst  employment  con-

ditions at airports and  in ground 

handling  mirrored  by  similar 

trends  in  aircraft  repair  and 

maintenance 

 

Remove  the  economic  regula-

tion of international air transport 

from the International Civil Avi-

ation 

Organization 

(ICAO), 

leaving aviation policy to be de-

termined by international market 

forces and  by decisions  made  in 

boardrooms  serving  shareholder 

interests 

 

Increase  potential  safety  risks, 

by  separating  the  safety  regula-

tion  and  economic  regulation  of 

international  air  transport  and 

undermining  their  close  interac-

tion under the same regime 

 

Protect the position of the major, 

private global courier companies