THE  PARADOX  OF THE 

PARADIGM 

Punctuated  Equilibrium  and  the 

Nature  of Revolutionary  Science 

Down went the  owners - greedy men whom hope of gain al­
lured: 

Oh,  dry the starting tear, for they were heavily insured. 

-w. S. 

Gilbert, 

The (Bab) Ballads, 

"Etiquette" 

STEPHEN JAY  GOULD  CAN FIND  meaning  and metaphor in the most un­
usual of literary places,  so  perhaps  we  can  consider this  consoling  advice  of his 
favorite  operatic  authors  in the light of ambitious  proprietors  of scientific ideas 

who have  apparently been rejected,  as later exonerated by the insurance of the 

truth. But how can we know today who will be villified or venerated tomorrow? 

As 

paranormalists are fond of saying  (after citing such notable blunders as Lord 

Kelvin's paper "proving" that heavier-than-air craft could not fiy), "they laughed 

at  the  Wright  Brothers."  The  standard  rejoinder,  made  by  skeptics  for  both 

levity and effect,  is:  "They also laughed at  the 

Marx Brothers." 

The point is that specific historical references to wrongly rejected theories is not 

a general principle that applies to all cases of intellectual rebuff. Every instance of 

dismissal has its peculiar set of historical contingencies that led to that outcome. 
Historical abnegation does not automatically equal future vindication. For every 

Columbus,  Copernicus,  and  Galileo  who  turned  out  to  be  right,  there  are  a 
thousand Velikovskys 

(Worlds  in  Collision), 

von Danikens  (ancient astronauts), 

and N ewmans  (perpetual motion machines)  who  turned out to be wrong. 

This  is why  scientists  and  skeptics  bristle  when  they hear  descriptions  such 

97 

98 

THE BORDERLANDS OF SCIENCE 

as  "revolutionary,"  "earth-shattering,"  and  "paradigm  shift"  freely  thrown 

about  by  any  and  all  would-be  (and  wanna-be)  revolutionaries.  To  reverse  the 

analysis,  however,  just  because  some  quacks  and flimflam  artists  (and  genuinely 
honest  thinkers)  malcing  claims  of a  new  paradigm  are  wrong,  does  not  mean 

that 

all 

challenging  new  ideas  will  go  the  way  of colliding  planets,  ancient  as­

tronauts,  and  perpetual  motion machines.  We must  examine  each  claim on  its 
own. 

In  1992 

Skeptic 

magazine  marked  the  I50th  anniversary  of Charles  Darwin's 

first  essay  on natural selection,  and the  20th anniversary of Niles Eldredge's and 
Stephen Jay Gould's first paper  on punctuated equilibrium,  by considering their 
status  as  paradigms.  Few would  challenge  the  idea  that  Darwin's  theory of evo­
lution  by  natural  selection  triggered  a  paradigm  shift,  but  many  are  skeptical 
that  punctuated  equilibrium  deserves  equal  status  as  a  new  paradigm.  Since 
Darwinism  is  alive  and well as  we  begin the twenty-first  century it seems para­
doxical  to  even  consider  the  question.  Darwinism  displaced  creationism,  but 

itself has  not  been  displaced,  so  no  other  paradigm  shift  can  have  occurred. 

This is  what I  call the 

paradox of the paradigm. 

It is  a false dichotomy created, 

in part,  by  our  assumption that  only  one paradigm may  rule  a scientific field at 
any one  time,  and  that paradigms  can only "shift"  from one to  another,  instead 
of building upon  one  another  (and  cohabitating within the  same  field) .  What I 

wish to  argue is  that there exists  simultaneously  an overarching Darwinian par­

adigm  and  a  subsidiary  punctuated  equilibrium  paradigm,  both  constituting 

paradigm  shifts  (with  the  former  significantly  broader  in  scope  and  the  latter 
more narrowly focused), and that they presently and peacefully coexist and share 
overlapping  methods  and  models.  The  paradigm  paradox  disappears  when  we 
define  with  semantic  precision  science,  paradigm,  and  paradigm  shift,  and  es­
chew the either-or fallacy of a false alternative choice by seeing punctuated equi­

librium  as  a paradigm  set within  a larger  Darwinian  paradigm. 

THE  SCIENCE  OF  PARADIGMS 

Science  is  a  specific way of thinking  and  acting  common  to  most members  of 
a scientific group, as  a tool to understand information about the past or present. 

More  formally,  I  define  science  as 

a set of  cognitive  and  behavioral  methods  to 

describe  and  interpret  observed  or  inferred phenomenon)  past  or present)  aimed  at 
building  a  testable  body  of  knowledge  open  to  rejection  or  confirmation. 

Cognitive 

methods  include  hunches,  guesses,  ideas,  hypotheses,  theories,  and  paradigms; 
behavioral  methods  include  background  research,  data  collection  and  organi-

The Paradox of the Paradigm 

99 

zation,  colleague  collaboration  and communication, experiments, correlation of 
findings,  statistical  analyses,  manuscript  preparation,  conference  presentations, 
and paper and book publications. 

There  are two  major methodologies  in  the sciences - experimental  and his­

torical.  Experimental  scientists  (e.g.,  physicists,  geneticists,  experimental  psy­
chologists)  constitute what most people think of when they think  of scientists 
in the laboratory with their particle accelerators, fmit flies,  and rats.  But histor­
ical scientists  (e.g., cosmologists, paleontologists, archaeologists) are no less rig­
orous  in  their cognitive  and behavioral methods  to  describe  and interpret past 
phenomena,  and they share the same goal as experimental scientists of building 
a testable  body of knowledge open to  rejection  or confirmation. Unfortunately 
a  hierarchical  order  exists  in  the  academy,  as  well  as  in  the  general  public, 

in 

two orthogonal  directions : 

(

I

experimental  sciences higher than historical sci­

ences,  (2)  physical  sciences  higher  than  biological  sciences  higher  than  social 

sciences.  Within  both  of these  there exists  a corresponding ranking from hard 

science  to  soft  (with  experimental  physicists  on  top  and  social  scientists  and 
historians  on  the  bottom) ,  further  discoloring  our  perceptions  of how  science 
is  done.  The  sooner  we  can  overcome  what  is  known  colloquially  as  "physics 
envy,"  the  deeper  will  be  our  understanding  of  the  nature  of  the  scientific 
enterprise. 

One  common  element  within  both the experimental  and historical sciences, 

as  well  as  within  the  physical,  biological,  and  social  sciences,  is  that  they  all 
operate  within  defined paradigms,  as  originally  described  by Thomas  Kuhn  in 
1962 as  a way of thinking  that defines  the  "normal science" of an  age,  founded 
on  "past  scientific  achievements  . . .  that  some  particular  scientific  community 
acknowledges  for  a time  as  supplying the  foundation for its  further  practice."l 
Kuhn's concept of the paradigm has achieved nearly cult status in both elite and 
populist  circles  (even motivation  speakers - as  populist  as they come - speak of 
shifting paradigms) .  But he has  been challenged time and again for his multiple 
usages  of the  term without  semantic clarification.2 His  1977 expanded meaning 
of "all  shared  group  commitments,  all  components  of what  I now wish to  call 

the  disciplinary matrix," still fails  to  give the reader  a sense  of just what Kuhn 

means  by paradigm. 

Because  of this lack of clarity,  and based  on  the  definition  of science above, 

define  a  paradigm  as 

framework(s)  shared  by  most  members of  a scientific  com­

munityy  to  describe  and  interpret  observed  or inferred phenomenay  past  or presenty 
aimed at building a testable body of knowledge open to  rejection or confirmation. 

The 

singular/plural  option  and  the  modifier "shared  by  most"  is  included  to  allow 

roo 

THE BORDERLANDS OF SCIENCE 

for competing paradigms  to  coexist,  compete  with,  and  sometimes  displace old 
paradigms,  and to  show that  a paradigm(s)  may exist even if all scientists work­
ing  in  the  field  do  not  accept  it/them.  Philosopher  Michael  Ruse,  in fact,  iden­
tified  four  usages  of "paradigm"  in  his  attempt  to  answer  the  question  "Is  the 
theory  of punctuated  equilibria  a  new  paradigm?"4 These  include: 

(

r

)  Sociological, 

focusing  on  "a  group  of people  who  come  together,  feeling 

themselves  as  having  a  shared  outlook  (whether  they  do  really,  or  not),  and to 
an  extent  separating  themselves  off from  other  scientists." 

(

2

)  Psychological, 

where  individuals  within  the  paradigm  literally  and  figura­

tively  see  the  world  differently  from  those  outside  the  paradigm. 

An 

analogy 

can  be made  to  people  viewing  the  reversible  figures  in  perceptual  experiments, 
for example,  the old woman/young woman shifting figure where the perception 
of one  precludes  the  perception  of the  other. 

(3) 

Epistemological, 

where "one's ways of doing  science are bound up with the 

paradigm"  because  the  research  techniques,  problems,  and  solutions  are  deter­
mined  by  the  hypotheses,  models,  theories,  and  laws. 

(4) 

Ontological, 

where  in  the  deepest  sense  "what  there  is  depends  crucially 

on  what  paradigm  you  hold.  For  Priestley,  there  literally was  no  such  thing  as 

oxygen . . . .  In  the  case  of  Lavoisier,  he  not  only  believed  in  oxygen:  oxygen 

existed." 

In my definition of paradigm the  shared cognitive framework for interpreting 

observed  or  inferred  phenomena  can  be  used in  the  sociological,  psychological, 
and  epistemological  sense.  To  make  it wholly ontological,  however,  risks  draw­
ing the  conclusion  that  one paradigm  is  as  good  as  any other paradigm because 

there  is  no  outside  source  for  corroboration.  Tea-leaf  reading  and  economic 

forecasting,  sheep's  livers  and  meteorological  maps,  astrology  and  astronomy, 
all  equally  determine  reality  if one  fully  accepts  the  ontological  construct  of a 

paradigm.  But  paradigms  are  not  equal  in  their  ability  to  understand,  predict, 

or  control  nature.  As  difficult  as  it  is  for  economists  and  meteorologists  to 
understand,  predict,  and  control  the  actions  of the  economy  and  the  weather, 
they  are  still  better  at  it  than  tea-leaf readers  and  sheep's  liver  diviners. 

The  other  component  of science that makes  it  different  from  all  other  para­

digms  and  allows  us  to  resolve  the  paradigm  paradox  is  that  it  has  a  self­
correcting  feature  that operates,  after  a  fashion,  like  natural  selection  functions 
in  nature.  Science,  like  nature,  preserves  the  gains  and  eradicates  the  mistakes. 
When  paradigms  shift  (e.g.,  during  scientific  revolutions)  scientists  do not nec­
essarily abandon the entire paradigm any more than a new species is begun from 
scratch.  Rather, what remains  useful in the paradigm is retained, as new features 

The Paradox of the Paradigm 

lOI 

are  added  and  new  interpretations  given,  just  as  in  homologous  features  of 

organisms  the  basic  structures  remain  the  same  while  new  changes  are  con­
structed  around  it.  Thus,  I  define  a 

paradigm shift as a new cognitive frameworky 

shared by a minority in the early stages and a majority in the latery  that significantly 

changes  the description and interpretation of observed or inferred phenomenay past or 

presenty  aimed  at  improving  the  testable  body  of  knowledge  open  to  rejection  or 

confirmation. 

As Einstein observed about his own new paradigm of relativity (which added 

to  Newtonian  physics  but  did not  displace  it) : 

Creating  a  new  theory  is  not  like  destroying  an  old  barn  and  erecting  a 
skyscraper  in  its  place.  It  is  rather  like  climbing  a  mountain,  gaining  new 
and  wider  views,  discovering  unexpected  connections  between  our  starting 
point  and  its  rich  environment.  But  the  point  from  which  we  started  out 

still  exists  and can be seen,  although it appears smaller and forms  a tiny part 

of our broad view gained  by the mastery of the obstacles on our adventurous 
way Up.5 

The  shift  from  one  paradigm  to  another  may  be a  mark of improvement  in 

the understanding  of causality,  the prediction of future  events,  or the alteration 

of the environment. It is,  in fact, the attempt to refine and improve the paradigm 
that  may  ultimately  lead  to  either  its  demise  or  to  the  sharing  of the  field with 

another  paradigm,  as  anomalous  data  unaccounted for by the  old  paradigm  (as 

well  as  old data accounted  for but capable  of reinterpretation)  fit into  the new 

paradigm  in  a  more  complete  way. 

Science  allows  for both cumulative  growth  and paradigmatic  change. This is 

scientific progressy 

which  I  define  as 

the cumulative growth  of a system  of knowledge 

over timey in which useful features are retained and non-useful features are abandonedy 
based  on  the rejection  or  confirmation of testable knowledge. 

THE  PUNCTUATED  EQUILIBRIUM  PARADIGM 

deeper question to ask about paradigms is  what causes them to shift and who 

is  most  likely  to  be  involved  in  the  shift?  Kuhn  answers  the  question this  way: 
"Almost  always  the  men  who  achieve  these  fundamental  inventions  of a  new 
paradigm have either been very young or very new to the field whose paradigm 
they  change."6  Kuhn was  reflecting 

Max 

Planck's  famous  quip: 

"An 

important 

scientific  innovation  rarely  makes  its  way  by  gradually  winning  over  and  con-

102 

THE BORDERLANDS OF SCIENCE 

verting its  opponents. What does happen is that its  opponents  gradually die out 

and  that  the  growing  generation  is  familiarized  with  the  idea  from  the  begin­
ning."7 In his 

1996 

book, 

Born to Rebel, 

social scientist Frank Sulloway presented 

experimental  and  historical  evidence  for  the  relationship  between  age  and  re­

ceptivity  to  radical  ideas,  with  openness  related to  youthfulness  (see  chapter 

for  a  complete  discussion) .8 

It was  in 

1972 

that  two  young  newcomers  to  the  field  of paleontology  and 

evolutionary  biology,  Niles  Eldredge  and  Stephen  Jay  Gould,  presented  the 
theory  of  punctuated  equilibrium.  What  Eldredge  and  Gould  proposed  is  a 

model of nonlinear change- long periods of equilibrium punctuated by, in geo­

logical  terms,  "sudden"  change.  This  appears  to  contrast  sharply with the Dar­
winian  gradualistic model of linear change - slow and steady  (and  so minute it 
cannot  be  observed)  transformation  that  given  enough  time  can  produce  sig­
nificant  change.  Thus  its  challenge  to  the  Darwinian paradigm might  be  con­
sidered  by  some  to  be  a  paradigm  shift.  Michael  Ruse  called punctuated  equi­

libria a paradigm "as far  as the sociological aspect is concerned," but he expressly 

denies  it  paradigm  status  at  the  psychological,  epistemological,  and ontological 
levels.9 We  shall  see. 

The development  of the  theory  of punctuated  equilibrium was stimulated by 

Tom  Schopf,  who  in 

1971 

organized  a  symposium  integrating  evolutionary  bi­

ology  with  paleontology.  The goal  was  to  apply  theories  of modern  biological 
change  to  the  history  of life.  Eldredge had  already done  this  with  a 

1971 

paper 

in  the  prestigious  journal 

Evolution, 

under  the  title  "The Aliopatric Model  and 

Phylogeny  in  Paleozoic  Invertebrates."l0  Schopf  then  directed  Gould  and  El­
dredge  to  collaborate  on  a  paper  applying  theories  of speciation  to  the  fossil 
record,  and this  resulted  in  a  paper  published  in 

1972 

in  the volume 

Models in 

Paleobiology 

(with  Schopf as  the  editor) .  This  paper  was  entitled  "Punctuated 

Equilibria: 

An 

Alternative  to  Phyletic  Gradualism."ll  Gould  explained that  he 

coined the term but "the  ideas  came  mostly from  Niles, with yours truly acting 
as  a  sounding  board  and  eventual  scribe."12 In  brief,  they  argued  that  Darwin's 
linear  model  of change  could  not  account  for  the  apparent  lack  of transitional 
species  in  the  fossil  record.  Darwin  himself was  acutely aware of this  and  stated 
so up  front in  the 

Origin of Species: 

"Why then is  not every geological formation 

and  every  stratum 

full 

of such  intermediate  links?  Geology  assuredly  does  not 

reveal any such  finely  graduated  organic  chain;  and  this,  perhaps,  is  the  gravest 

objection which  can  be  urged  against  my  theory."13 

Ever  since  the 

Origin 

the  missing  transitional  forms  have  vexed  paleontolo­

gists  and evolutionary biologists.  Collectively both groups have tended to ignore 

The Paradox of the Paradigm 

103 

the problem,  usually dismissing it  as  an  artifact  of a spotty fossil  record.  (This 

is  actually  a  reasonable  argument  considering  the  exceptionally low probability 
of any  dead  animal  escaping  the jaws  and  stomachs  of scavengers  and  detritus 
feeders,  reaching  the  stage  of fossilization,  and  then  somehow  finding  its  way 

back  to  the  surface  through  geological  forces  and  contingent  events  to  be  dis­

covered  millions  of years  later.  It's  a wonder we  have 

as 

many fossils  as  we do.) 

Eldredge  and  Gould,  however,  see  the  gaps  in  the  fossil  record  not  as  missing 
evidence of gradualism but 

as 

extant evidence of punctuation.  Stability of species 

is  so  enduring  that  they leave  plenty  of fossils  (comparatively  speaking)  in  the 
strata  while  in  their  stable  state.  The  change  from  one  species to  another,  how­
ever,  happens  relatively  quickly  (on  a  geological  time  scale)  in  "a  small  sub­
population  of the  ancestral form,"  and occurs  "in  an isolated area at the periph­
ery  of  the  range,"  thus  leaving  behind  few  fossils.  Therefore,  the  authors 

conclude,  "breaks  in  the  fossil  record  are  real;  they  express  the  way  in  which 

evolution  occurs,  not  the  fragments  of an  imperfect  record."14 

Punctuated equilibrium is primarily the application of Ernst Mayr's  theory of 

allopatric speciation to the history of life. Mayr's theory states that living species 

most commonly give rise to  a new species when a small group breaks away (the 
"founder"  population)  and  becomes  geographically  (and  thus  reproductively) 
isolated  from  the  ancestral  group.  This  new  founder  group  (the  "peripheral 
isolate"),  as  long  as  it  remains  small  and  detached,  may  experience  relatively 

rapid  change  (large  populations  tend  to  sustain  genetic  homogeneity) . The spe­

ciational  change  happens  so  rapidly  that  few  fossils  are  left  to  record  it.  But 
once  changed  into  a  new  species  they will  retain  their phenotype  for  a  consid­
erable  time,  living  in  relatively large populations  and leaving  behind many well 
preserved  fossils.  (See 

FIGURE 

13.) 

Millions  of years  later  this  process  results  in 

a  fossil  record  that  records  mostly  the  equilibrium.  The  punctuation  is  there  in 
the  blanks. 

Eldredge  and  Gould  claim  in  this  first  paper  that  "the  idea  of punctuated 

equilibria is just as  much  a  preconceived  picture  as  that of phyletic gradualism," 

and that  their  "interpretations  are  as  colored  by  our preconceptions  as  are  the 

claims  of the  champions  of phyletic  gradualism." There  is,  however,  a  sense  of 

paradigmatic  progress  when they note  that "the  picture  of punctuated equilibria 
is  more  in  accord with the  process  of speciation  as  understood  by modern evo­
lutionists."15 It  is  not just that the gaps in the fossil record can now be ignored, 
but  that  they  are  real  data.  Thus,  the  gradualistic  "tree  of  life"  depicted  by 
Darwin  in  the 

Origin, 

appears  to  be  in  conflict  with  the  punctuated  model  of 

Eldredge and Gould.  If punctuated equilibrium is a paradigm, this would appear 

Figure 

13. 

Competing  or  complementary  paradigmsr 

A.  Above,  the  gradualistic  model  of shifting  means  of 

species  characteristics  through  time  (from Moore,  et al., 
1952). 

B. 

The punctuated equilibrium model, below, with 

static  species  abruptly giving  rise to  new  species  through 

geological  time  (from Eldredge  and  Gould,  1972) . 

B. 

TIME 

MORPHOLOGY 

The Paradox of the  Paradigm 

lOS 

to  be  a  paradigm  shift,  and thus we  would be  forced  to  accept  the  problem of 
the  paradigm  paradox  and  choose  between  the  two  competing  models  of evo­
lutionary  change. 

The  reaction  to  the theory,  in  Gould's words,  "provoked  a major brouhaha, 

still  continuing,  but  now  in  much  more  productive  directions."l6 Initially,  says 

Gould,  paleontologists  missed  the connection with allopatric speciation because 
"they  had  not  studied  evolutionary  theory  . . .  or  had  not  considered  its  trans­

lation  to  geological  time." Evolutionary  biologists  "also  failed to  grasp  the  im­
plication,  primarily  because  they  did  not  think  at  geological  scales."l7 Though 

more  in  acceptance  now,  the  theory  at  first  received  a thorough  round of bash­
ing for both  good and bad reasons, the latter of which,  Gould observes, include 
the  "misunderstanding  of basic  content";  association with  creationists  who mis­
represented  the  theory  as  spelling  the  demise  of Darwin  and  all  evolutionary 
theory;  and,  "this  is  harder  to  say  but  cannot  be  ignored,  a  few  colleagues 
allowed  personal  jealousy  to  cloud  their  judgment."l8  Of  course,  the  critical 
pounding  could  also  be  because  Eldredge  and  Gould  are  wrong.  But  I  think 
something  else  is  going  on  here.  The  veracity  of punctuated  equilibrium  aside, 
the  paradigm  paradox  has  forced  observers  to  judge  punctuated equilibrium  as 

either  completely  right  or totally  wrong,  when  it can  clearly  be judged in  fuzzy 

shades  of correctness or wrongness,  depending  on the specific cases  under  ques­
tion.  In fact,  Ruse  notes  that Eldredge and  Gould "have polarized evolutionists 
in such a way that punctuated equilibria theory has defining paradigm properties 
at  the  social level."l9 Why must  paradigms  polarize?  Because  of this  unresolved 
paradox. 

Of course,  we  cannot judge  a  book  by  its  author.  As  Gould  confesses,  "the 

worst  possible  person  to  ask  about  the  genesis  of  a  theory  is  the  generator 
himself."20  The  ideal  person  to  ask  is  a  second  generation  student  of the  first 
generators,  which  I  found  in  Occidental  College  world-class  paleontologist 
Donald  Prothero,  who  was  a  college  freshman  in 

I973 

when  his  paleontology 

class was assigned the new Raup  and Stanley textbook, 

Principles of Paleontology, 

focusing  on theoretical  issues  of fossil interpretation.  Is punctuated equilibrium 
a  paradigm,  and  was  there  a  paradigm  shift?  Applying  my  definition  of each, 
we  can  restate the  question in  several parts. 

I. 

Was punctuated  equilibrium  a  new  cognitive framework? 

Yes  and  no.  Yes, 

says  Don  Prothero,  who  writes  that  before  punctuated  equilibrium,  ''Virtually 

all  the  paleontology  textbooks  of  the  time  were  simply  compendia  of fossils. 

The  meetings  of the  Paleontological  Society at the Geological Society of Amer­

ica  convention  were  dominated  by  descriptive  papers."  After  the  introduction 

106 

THE BORDERLANDS OF SCIENCE 

of the  theory,  new  theoretical  journals  sprang  up,  old  journals  changed  their 
emphasis  from  description  to  theory,  and  paleontological  conferences  were 
"packed with mind-boggling theoretical papers."21 

No  says  Ernst  Mayr,  who  makes  it  clear  that 

he 

"was  the  first  author  to 

develop  a  detailed  model  of the  connection  between  speciation,  evolutionary 
rates,  and  macroevolution"  and  thus  he  finds  it  curious  "that  the  theory  was 
completely  ignored  by  paleontologists  until  brought  to  light  by  Eldredge  and 
Gould."22 Mayr recalls  that "In  1954 I was already fully aware of the macroevo­
lutionary  consequences  of my  theory,"  quoting  himself as  saying  that  "rapidly 
evolving  peripherally  isolated  populations  may  be  the  place  of origin  of many 
evolutionary novelties. Their isolation and comparatively small size may explain 
phenomena  of rapid evolution  and  lack  of documentation  in the  fossil  record, 
hitherto puzzling to  the palaeontologist."23 In a 1999 interview with Mayr (still 

going strong at the remarkable age of 95), he clarified for me the proper priority 
for the  paradigm of punctuated equilibrium: 

I published that  theory in  a 

1954-

paper and  I  clearly related it to  paleontol­

ogy.  Darwin  argued that the  fossil record is very incomplete  because  some 
species  fossilize  better than  others.  But what I derived from my research in 
the  South  Sea  islands  is  that  you  get  these  isolated  little  populations  for 

which it is much easier to make  a genetic restructuring because it is small so 
it takes rather few  steps  to  become  a new  species.  Being a  small local pop­
ulation  that  changes very rapidly  I  noted that you  are never  going to  find 
them  in the  fossil  record.  My  essential  point was  that gradual populational 

shifts  in founder populations  appear in  the  fossil record as  gaps.24 

I  then  pointed out to Mayr  that  Eldredge  and Gould did credit him,  citing 

his  1963  book 

Animal  Species  and  Evolution 

several  times.  To  this  Mayr  re­

sponded:  "Gould  was  for  three  years  my  course  assistant  at  Harvard  where  I 
presented  this  theory again  and  again,  so  he  thoroughly  knew  it,  so  did  El­
dredge.  In  fact,  Eldredge  in  his  1971  paper  credited  me with it.  But  that was 
lost over time."25 

Was  it lost  over  time? 

All 

professionals  I  have  spoken  to  about  punctuated 

equilibrium recognize this fact, as they do Niles Eldredge's solo paper published 
in 

Evolution 

in  197I. 

As 

Prothero  concludes, however, it was the joint Eldredge 

and  Gould  paper  published  in  1972 that "has  been  the  focus  of all the  contro­
versy."  Even  Mayr  admits:  "Whether  one  accepts  this  theory,  rejects,  it,  or 
greatly modifies  it,  there  can  be no  doubt that it  had  a major impact on  pale­
ontology and evolutionary biology."26