EEG theta rhythm in infants and preschool children

E.V. Orekhova

a,

*, T.A. Stroganova

b

, I.N. Posikera

b

, M. Elam

a

a

Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 41345 Gothenburg, Sweden

b

Moscow University of Psychology and Education, 103051 Moscow, Russian Federation

Accepted 25 December 2005

Available online 3 March 2006

Abstract

Objective: To study behavioral correlates of theta oscillations in infants and preschool children.
Methods: EEG was recorded during baseline (visual attention) and two test conditions—exploration of toys and attention to ‘social’
stimulation. Age specific frequency boundaries of theta and mu rhythms were assessed using narrow bin analysis of EEG spectra.
Results: Theta spectral power increased whereas mu power decreased under test conditions in both age groups. In preschoolers theta rhythm
increased predominantly over anterior regions during exploratory behavior and over posterior regions during attention to social stimulation.
Theta frequency range changed with age from 3.6 to 5.6 Hz in infants to 4–8 Hz in children, and mu range from 6.4–8.4 Hz to 8.4–10.4 Hz.
Conclusions: In early life, theta oscillations are strongly related to behavioral states with substantial attentional and emotional load. The scalp
distribution of theta spectral power depends on age and behavioral condition and may reflect engagement of different brain networks in
control of behavior.
Significance: The findings contribute to the scanty knowledge about the developmental course of theta rhythm. Data on behavioral correlates
of theta rhythm in early life may improve our understanding of cognitive and mental processes in healthy and neuropsychiatrically diseased
children.

q

2006 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords: EEG; Development; Theta rhythm; Sensorimotor rhythm; Attention; Emotions

1. Introduction

It is now commonly acknowledged that in waking adults

slow-wave EEG rhythms, in particular those in the theta
range, are intimately related to cognitive and emotional
processes (

Aftanas et al., 2001, 2004; Inanaga, 1998;

Kahana et al., 2001; Kirk and Mackay, 2003; Klimesch,
1999

). Theta activity is abundant in the EEG of infants and

young children and this feature is generally considered as a
sign of immaturity (

Clarke et al., 2001; Somsen et al., 1997

).

However, even in infancy spontaneous theta oscillations are
closely related to behavior. The appearance of a peculiar
‘hedonic’ 4–6 Hz rhythm in infants and toddlers during
positive affect, evoked by a new puppet or tactile
stimulation, was described in 1971 (

Kugler and Laub,

1971; Maulsby, 1971

). Since then, a large number of

conditions provoking both positive and negative affective
states in infants have been shown to be accompanied by high
amplitude theta rhythm (

Futagi, 1998 no. 121; Lehtonen

et al., 2002; Nikitina et al., 1985; Paul et al., 1996; Posikera
et al., 1986; Stroganova and Posikera, 1993

). However, in

spite of the effectiveness of emotional stimuli for provoking
theta rhythm in infants, even in this early age the
significance of theta oscillations probably extends far
beyond their being the correlates of emotional arousal.
The neurophysiological mechanism linking theta to beha-
vior was proposed by

Miller (1991)

in his theory of Cortico-

Hippocampal interplay. He argued that “. the periods of
animal’s activities when information important to that
species requires to be gathered from the environment, are
the times when theta synchronization is most likely to be
generated in the hippocampus.” He further argued that the
phenomenon of the theta rhythm is common for mammalian
species and reflects functional coupling of limbic and
cortical neurons. Miller predicted that for primates,

Clinical Neurophysiology 117 (2006) 1047–1062

www.elsevier.com/locate/clinph

1388-2457/$30.00 q 2006 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
doi:10.1016/j.clinph.2005.12.027

* Corresponding author. Tel.: C46 31 3424802; fax: C46 31 821268.

E-mail address:

elena@neuro.gu.se

(E.V. Orekhova).

including man, “the most potent way of triggering theta
rhythm. would be by the use of socially significant stimuli,
or novel stimuli.” Indeed, social stimulation and exploration
of new objects very effectively elicit theta rhythm in infants
(

Nikitina et al., 1985; Posikera et al., 1986; Stroganova and

Posikera, 1993

). Experimental studies in humans and

animals show that theta oscillations are important for neural
plasticity and information coding (

Kahana et al., 2001

).

Thus, the theta rhythm may be a unitary phenomenon in
humans and animals. This line of reasoning leads us to
suggest that the functional significance of theta rhythm in
infants and children may be similar to that in adults. Indeed,
in infants as well as in adults, theta rhythm is related to both
emotional (

Maulsby, 1971; Posikera et al., 1986

and

cognitive (

Orekhova et al., 1999; Stroganova et al., 1998

)

processes.

Taking into account the close relation of theta

oscillations to cognition and emotions, the age-related
changes of theta rhythm may provide valuable information
for developmental neurophysiology. Surprisingly, theta
oscillations and their relation to behavioral states have
received little attention in developmental EEG research.
Specifically, there is no information on scalp topography,
behavioral correlates, and frequency range of the theta
rhythm in young children, beyond the infancy period. In the
present study, we focused on the properties of theta
oscillations in preschool children in comparison with infant
theta. We expected that the prominent state-related theta
synchronization may not be exclusively the feature of infant
EEG but can be evoked in older children during situations of
species-specific and subjective importance, such as social
interaction with an adult (e.g. child-addressed speech) and
exploration of unfamiliar attractive toys.

The comparison of theta oscillations in infants and

preschool children is complicated by the lack of consistent
knowledge about frequency boundaries of functionally
meaningful EEG bands in early life. The frequency
characteristics of EEG rhythmical components change
with development (

Hudspeth and Pribram, 1992

). There-

fore, identification of alpha, theta and delta bands in EEG is
important for correct interpretation of the results of any
developmental EEG study. There is, however, a great
discrepancy in opinions on the theta and alpha frequency
ranges throughout ontogeny. In infant EEG research, for
example, one recent study designated the frequency band
4–8 Hz as theta (

Futagi et al., 1998

), while another study

described the same frequency band as alpha rhythm
(

Schmidt et al., 2003

). Some authors use arbitrary frequency

bands without denoting them as theta or alpha (

Bell and

Fox, 1997; Bell, 2002

).

Such discrepancy inevitably leads to inconsistency in

results and contradictions in their interpretation. To over-
come this problem, we proposed to analyze narrow
frequency bins of the spectrum using a ‘functional
topography’ approach (

Kuhlman, 1980; Stroganova et al.,

1999

). This strategy implies inspection of the ‘behavior’ of

the adjacent frequency bins (e.g. 0.4 Hz) under adequate
functional load, provoking topographically specific ampli-
tude changes in a given physiological rhythm. The
similarity in reactive changes of adjacent frequency bins
and correspondence of the direction of changes and the
scalp topography with the well-known properties of the
physiological rhythm of interest helps to identify the age-
specific frequency boundaries. In our previous infant EEG
studies using narrow-bin analysis, we have identified 4 co-
existing rhythms that bear functional and topographic
similarity with 4 EEG rhythms in adults: delta, theta,
central alpha (mu) and occipital alpha (

Orekhova et al.,

1999; Stroganova, 1987; Stroganova et al., 1999

). We found

that the frequency band 6–9 Hz in infant EEG was similar to
adult alpha (8–12 Hz) and, analogous to the alpha band in
adults, comprised two rhythms of the ‘alpha family’—
occipital alpha and central mu rhythm. The frequency band
3.6–5.6 Hz was similar to adult theta (4–8 Hz) (

Orekhova

et al., 1999; Stroganova et al., 1999

).

Less is known about the frequency boundaries of alpha,

mu and theta rhythms in preschool children. Although
recent EEG research on toddlers and preschool children
applied ‘infant’ 4–6 theta and 6–9 Hz alpha frequency bands
(

Jones et al., 2000; Marshall and Fox, 2004; Wolfe and Bell,

2004

it is unclear whether this choice is adequate. The

frequency of the theta rhythm, as well as the frequencies of
alpha and mu rhythms, may increase with age and in older
children the 6–9 Hz band may include an essential part of
the functional theta range. A correct discrimination between
functionally meaningful theta and alpha frequency bands is
especially important, given the tendency of these rhythms to
demonstrate opposite direction of state- and task-related
changes (

Klimesch, 1999

).

In the present study, we used the narrow frequency bins

analysis strategy to define a functionally meaningful theta
band in preschool children and to compare it with that of
infants. The EEG was registered in infants aged 7–12
months and in preschool children, under baseline and two
experimental conditions. During baseline, the subject
remained still and his/her attention was attracted by novel
visual stimuli. We expected that this condition of behavioral
stillness and sustained visual attention would be character-
ized by a relatively low level of theta activity and the
expression of central sensorimotor (mu) rhythm (

Mulhol-

land, 1995; Stroganova et al., 1999

). The other two

experimental conditions represented natural behavioral
situations involving a higher degree of emotional and
cognitive load; exploration of unfamiliar attractive toys and
attention to child-addressed speech during communication
with an adult. Based on previous findings (

Nikitina et al.,

1985; Posikera et al., 1986; Stroganova and Posikera, 1993

)

we expected that both conditions would provoke a
pronounced theta increase that would be widely distributed
over the scalp with the most prominent theta response over
associative (parietal, temporal, frontal) cortical areas.
Concurrently, the reactive changes of spectral power in

E.V. Orekhova et al. / Clinical Neurophysiology 117 (2006) 1047–1062

1048

mu frequency bins should be opposite to those of theta, at
least under the condition of exploration of toys. An active
manipulating with objects, accompanied by hand move-
ments, should lead to reduced spectral power of frequency
bins within the mu range compared to baseline. The
topographical maximum of this state-related power decline
should be over the central scalp regions. Thus, comparison
of baseline and manipulation conditions allows separation
of theta and mu frequency ranges based on two criteria:
opposite direction of spectral power changes and differences
in the distribution of maximal power changes across the
scalp areas.

To summarize, as a first step we planned to corroborate

our previous findings on theta and mu frequency boundaries
in infants, and as a second step to justify the application of
certain mu and theta frequency bands in the EEG of
preschool children. As a final step, we compared the
condition-related changes of the whole band theta spectral
power in the two age groups. We expected that both the
magnitude and scalp topography of the theta response would
differ in infants and preschool children, reflecting develop-
mental changes of theta-generating neural networks
subserving behavior.

2. Method

2.1. Participants

2.1.1. Infants

Twenty eight healthy infant twins (19 male) were

recruited in Moscow city. These subjects were included in
a previous twin EEG study described elsewhere (

Orekhova

et al., 2003

). In the present study, we considered the data

obtained from only one member of a twin pair. The criterion
of inclusion was at least 30 s of artifact-free EEG record
sampled under each of the 3 experimental conditions
described below. All infants were born between 32 and 40
weeks of gestation (mean 36.7, SD 2.0) and weighed
between 1900 and 3500 (mean 2505, SD 364) grams at
birth. Their chronological age ranged from 8.0 to 12.4
months (mean 10.0, SD 1.5) and the age corrected for the
period of gestation ranged from 6.3 to 11.7 months (mean
9.2, SD 1.3). The psychomotor and mental developmental
indexes, assessed by Bayley scales of infant development
(

Bayley, 1969

were within the normal range in all subjects.

2.1.2. Preschool children

Nineteen preschool children were recruited by adver-

tisements in Gothenburg city and suburbs. The parents gave
informed consent as approved by the Ethics Committee.
According to parent reports, the children had no neurologi-
cal or other known medical problems. Three children were
excluded because of pathological paroxysmal activity in the
EEG, excessive artifacts, or negative mood and the absence
of eye contact with the experimentor under ‘Speech’

condition. The 16 children included in the study (11 male)
ranged from 3 years 8 months to 6 years 11 months in age
(mean 5 years 5 months, SD 359 days). Fifteen subjects
were right-handed and one was left-handed.

2.2. Experimental conditions

2.2.1. Infants

During the whole experiment, the infant was sitting on

the mother’s lap. EEG was registered under 3 experimental
conditions, each of approx. 2 min duration. The infant
behavior was video monitored throughout the session and
synchronized with the EEG recording. During the first
condition (baseline), the infant was looking at an adult
blowing soap bubbles 1.5–2 m away. The situation was
terminated if the subject demonstrated overt signs of
emotional expression (smile, fussiness, vocalization, etc.).
The periods when the subject remained still and attended to
the soap bubbles were marked on-line at the EEG record and
further analyzed. EEG corresponding to periods of overt
affective reactions were also marked and not sampled. Thus,
this baseline condition was characterized by absence of
active movements and sustained visual attention. Under the
second experimental condition (manipulation), the infant
was presented with a box containing a number of relatively
small unfamiliar toys. The EEG was sampled during periods
of active exploration of toys (i.e. the infant grabs a toy,
looks at it, keeps it in the hand or moves the toy from one
hand to the other continuously tracking it visually, etc.).
Periods when the infant was mouthing the toy or dropped it
were excluded. During the third experimental situation
(speech), the experimentor talked to the infant in the age-
appropriate tone-modulated set (rhythmical speech, verse or
song) in order to maximally attain her/his attention and
interest. The distance between the infant and the adult was
about 60 cm. The EEG was sampled during the periods of
gazing at the face of the speaking adult. Throughout the
study, these 3 experimental conditions will be addressed as
‘Baseline’, ‘Manipulation’ and ‘Speech’, respectively.

2.2.2. Preschool children

In children, EEG was recorded under ‘Baseline’,

‘Manipulation’ and ‘Speech’ experimental conditions
similar to those for infants. The child’s behavior was
videotaped continuously throughout the session and
synchronized with the EEG record. In the beginning of
manipulation condition the experimentator presented the
child with a box containing a number of small unfamiliar
toys and suggested “look what we have here.” not giving
other instructions. Periods when the child was actively
manipulating the objects were chosen for EEG analysis.
Under speech condition, the experimentor told a short fairy-
tale story, sitting in front of the child at a distance of approx.
1 m. The fairy-tale was adapted from the Swedish collection
of stories and fairy-tails for children (

http://www.bums.nu/

index.php

“Sagan om musen som hade ga˚tt vilse”) and was

E.V. Orekhova et al. / Clinical Neurophysiology 117 (2006) 1047–1062

1049

unfamiliar for participants. It was told with emotionally
modulated tone. Periods when the child looked at the face of
the speaking adult were selected for EEG analysis.

2.3. Recording and processing of EEG

2.3.1. Infants

The EEG recording was carried out in an electrically-

shielded chamber. Ag/AgCl disc electrodes were placed at
AF3, AF4, FC3, FC4, F7, F8, P7, P8, PO3, PO4, O1, and O2
positions according to the extended 10–20 positioning system
(

Pivik et al., 1993

). The FC3 and FC4 electrode positions were

used because they are more appropriate than C3 and C4
positions for registration of mu rhythm in infants, due to a
more anterior location of the central sulcus in infants than in
adults (

Blume et al., 1974

). Linked ears served as reference.

The electrode impedance was kept below 10 kUm. EEG was
recorded on a Nihon Kohden 4217 G electroencephalograph
using a time constant of 0.1 s and a high frequency cutoff of
30 Hz. The data were stored on magnitograph Teak XR-510
and digitized off-line at 256 Hz. The digitized EEG was
visually checked for eye movements and motor artifacts.
Periods of artifacts were eliminated from subsequent analyses.
For each subject between 30 and 60 s of artifact-free record
was obtained for each experimental condition. The EEG data
were fast Fourier transformed using a 2.5 s window smoothed
by Hanning weighting function and 50% overlap. Spectral
power values were obtained for each of the 0.4-Hz bins within
a 2.8–10 Hz range. The 10 Hz cut-off was applied because the
small amplitude of the higher frequency EEG activity in
infants did not allow distinction from myogenic artifacts. To
normalize amplitude distributions, power values were log 10
transformed.

2.3.2. Preschool children

EEG was recorded using Quik-cap at 23 EEG electrode

positions (Fp1, Fp2, AF3, AF4, F7, F8, F3, F4, T7, T8, C3,
C4, P7, P8, P3, P4, PO3, PO4, O1, O2, Fz, Cz and Pz). EOG
electrodes were placed above and below the left eyes as well
as at the outer canti of both eyes. The ground electrode was
positioned 3 cm anterior to Fz. Linked ears served as
reference. The signal was amplified using a Schwarzer
headbox with 0.4 s time constant and 70 Hz low-pass filter,
and digitized on-line at 500 Hz. The electrophysiological
data were saved on hard disk together with the video record.
The EEG and EOG signals were post-hoc digitally filtered
with 50 Hz notch and 0.5 Hz high pass filters. EEG was
visually inspected and periods with movement artifacts, eye
blinks or other vertical eye movements were rejected.
Horizontal EOG artifacts were corrected separately for each
condition, using ICA decomposition implemented in
EEGlab software (

Delorme and Makeig, 2004

). The

decomposition was based on all EEG and two symmetrical
horizontal EOG channels. The ICA derived components
were visually inspected and those reflecting horizontal eye
movements were subtracted from the original signal. For

each experimental condition, between 30 and 60 s of
artifact-free EEG record was obtained for each subject.
The EEG data were fast Fourier transformed using the same
parameters as for infants. Log-transformed power was
calculated for 0.4 bins within 2.8–11.6 Hz range.

2.4. Statistical analysis

This study was focused on comparison between baseline

and each of the test conditions, separately within each age
group. The data for infants and children were obtained in
different laboratories using different recording parameters
and artifact correction procedures. However, as the com-
parisons of spectral power values were performed separately
within each age group, this fact was unlikely to influence the
main results. In particular, the different time constants
applied in infants and children are unlikely to influence the
results systematically, because the linear filters used could
only introduce a scaling coefficient that is eliminated when
the difference between experimental conditions is analyzed.

Two types of repeated measures ANOVAs were

performed, each one including baseline and one of the test
conditions as the levels of condition repeated measures
factor. The repeated measures factors were condition
(manipulation vs. baseline or speech vs. baseline), electrode
and hemisphere. The repeated measures ANOVAs were
performed for each of the 0.4 Hz frequency bins within the
2.8–10.0 Hz (for infants) or 2.8–11.6 Hz (for children)
ranges. The midline electrodes Fz, Cz and Pz were excluded
from statistical analysis. In this study, only the effect of
Condition and its interaction with the other repeated
measures factors were analyzed. The application of
ANOVA for a number of bins and electrode positions
imposes a problem of correction for multiple comparisons
(e.g. Bonferroni correction). However, due to the strong
correlation of the power in adjacent frequency bins,
application of such a correction would severely inflate the
probability of false negative results (the type II error).
Therefore, we choose to report uncorrected P values. We
believe that this approach is appropriate for justification of
the functionally meaningful EEG frequency bands. As soon
as we had a clear prediction about condition-related
behavior of theta and mu rhythms, the compliance of the
direction of the spectral power changes in adjacent bins with
such predictions constituted a strong argument in support of
their inclusion in the same theta or mu range. This approach
evidently requires cautiousness in interpretation of unpre-
dicted results. We report such results, but did not derive the
main conclusions of the study from them. Furthermore,
narrow-bin analysis was just a preliminary step for the
subsequent analysis of age and condition-related EEG
changes within the whole theta and mu bands.

Adjacent frequency bins demonstrating the predicted

properties of the theta or mu rhythms were combined into the
same age specific theta or mu band. To compare the whole
band theta power changes in relation to baseline under the

E.V. Orekhova et al. / Clinical Neurophysiology 117 (2006) 1047–1062

1050

two test conditions the changes scores were calculated
according to the formula: (POWmanKPOWbas)/POW-
bas!100 or (POWspeKPOWbas)/POWbas!100, where
POWman, POWspe and POWbas were the mean spectral
power values under speech, manipulation or baseline
conditions for the whole age adjusted theta band. ANOVA
with factors condition (manipulation, speech), electrode (6
levels) and hemisphere (left, right) was performed on change
score values. For this type of analysis Bonferroni procedure
with correction for the mean correlation between variables
(

Uitenbroek, 2004

was adopted for post-hoc multiple tests.

For all ANOVAs the within subject effects with two or

more degrees of freedom were adjusted using the Green-
house-Geisser correction. The original degrees of freedom
and corrected P-values are reported. Planned comparisons
were used as post-hoc tests.

3. Results

3.1. Theta frequency range

3.1.1. Infants

Both manipulation with objects and social interaction

with an adult resulted in a sharp increase of EEG activity

within the 3.6–5.6 Hz range, with a distinct peak at 4.4 Hz in
the EEG spectra (

Fig. 1

). Samples of the original EEG

records of an infant demonstrating pronounced EEG
synchronization at 4–5 Hz frequency under these conditions
are shown in

Fig. 2

(upper part).

Fig. 3

(I) represents the narrow bin ANOVA results and

results of the planned comparisons between baseline and
each of the test conditions performed for each electrode
position. Highly significant main effects of condition or its
interaction with Electrode were observed for spectral power
within the 3.6–5.6 frequency range, and were due to power
increase under each of the test conditions compared to
baseline. During manipulation, the condition effect was also
significant for the 2.8 and 3.2 Hz frequency bins. This
increase of power in the lower frequencies could be a true
EEG phenomenon related to increase of delta power caused
by mental activity (

Harmony et al., 1996

during explora-

tory behavior. Alternatively, it could represent an artifact,
induced by minor head and body movements, which are
unavoidable during manipulation with toys.

Thus, EEG activity within the 3.6–5.6 Hz range

demonstrated a generalized increase of spectral power, as
was expected for infant theta rhythm. A close inspection of
condition!electrode interactions for 3.6–5.6 spectral
power revealed a possible heterogeneity of this band in

AF3

AC3

PO3

3e+006 

µV

2

O2

O1

VO4

AC4

F7

F8

P7

P8

AF4

θ

θ

θ

θ

µ

µ

2 4

6 8 10 HZ

Fig. 1. Grand average power spectra in infants under three experimental conditions. Blue line—visual attention (baseline); green line—exploration of toys; red
line—attention to social stimulation. The spectral peak of 6–8 Hz sensorimotor rhythm (m) is evident over precentral regions under baseline condition. The
prominent generalized theta peak (q) with a maximum of 4.4 Hz is observed under both test conditions.

E.V. Orekhova et al. / Clinical Neurophysiology 117 (2006) 1047–1062

1051

infants. For the lower frequencies of this band (4.0 and
4.4 Hz), a predominantly frontal increase of power was
observed under both experimental conditions. The planned
comparisons of least square means showed that the power
increase at 4.0 and 4.4 Hz during manipulation, relative to
baseline, was significantly greater for the frontal electrodes
that were pooled together (Fp1, Fp2, F7, F8) as compared to
all other electrode sites combined (both Fs

(1,27)

O

8.3, P

s

!

0.01). This effect was even more prominent for the speech
condition (Fs

(1,27)

O

6.0; 4.0 Hz, P!0.05; 4.4 Hz, P!

0.001, 4.8 Hz, P!0.0001). In contrast, significant con-
dition!electrode interactions at the high boundary of the
range (5.6 Hz) was due to power increase over the posterior
temporal scalp areas during manipulation and over temporo-
parieto-occipital regions during speech (

Fig. 3

(I)A,B).

Despite the differences in scalp topography between higher
and lower frequencies within the 3.6–5.6 Hz range, in both
cases the maximum power increase was over the associative
cortical areas (frontal or TPO). This topographical
distribution complies with that predicted for a theta rhythm.

To compare the whole-band theta power changes under

the two test conditions in relation to baseline, the ANOVA
was performed for the change score values calculated for the
mean spectral power across the whole theta band (3.6–
5.6 Hz). There was a highly significant main effect of
electrode (F

(5,135)

Z8.3509, P!0.0003) due to the distinct

predominance of theta increase over anterior frontal
electrode positions under the both test conditions (

Fig. 4

).

3.1.2. Preschool children

In children, both manipulation of objects and attention to

social stimulation resulted in a prominent increase of 4.0–
7.6 Hz spectral power, as compared to baseline. The EEG

power spectra of both test conditions were characterized by
distinct peaks, with a peak frequency of about 6 Hz (

Fig. 5

).

The main effect of condition was significant for both
manipulation and speech ANOVAs for all frequency bins
within the 4.0–7.6 Hz range (

Fig. 3

(II)).

There was a striking topographical difference in the state-

related change of 4–7.6 Hz power under the two test
conditions. This was evident from the grand average power
spectra (

Fig. 5

), and clearly observable also in some

individual EEG records (

Fig. 2

, lower part). During

manipulation with toys 4–7.6 Hz power increased predomi-
nantly over the frontal and temporal scalp areas, whereas
during attention to speech in the situation of interaction with
an adult it increased mainly over posterior scalp regions.
The condition!electrode interaction was significant in the
case of both manipulation and speech ANOVAs
(

Fig. 3

(II)A,B). Planned comparisons of the pooled frontal

and temporal (Fp1, Fp2, AF3, AF4, F7, F8, F3, F4, T7, T8)
electrode sites against pooled central and posterior (P7, P8,
P3, P4, PO3, PO4, O1, O2) electrode sites revealed
significant fronto-temporal predominance of the power
increase during manipulation (F

(1,15)

O

8.85, P!0.05 for

all bins within 4.4–7.6 Hz range) and a more posterior
predominance during speech (F

(1,15)

O

7.6, P!0.05 for all

bins within 4–7.6 Hz range) as compared to baseline.

For the 8.0 Hz bin, the main effect of Condition was not

significant. However, as evident from significant con-
dition!electrode interactions (

Fig. 3

(II)A,B), the pattern

of state-related power changes at this frequency resembled
that of the 4–7.6 Hz range.

Thus, in children spectral power in frequency bins within

the 4–7.6 Hz range increased under the test condition, when
a theta increase would be expected. Moreover, all frequency

Fig. 2. Examples of 10 s EEG records in two boys (11 months and 5 years). (A) Visual attention (baseline); (B) exploration of toys; (C) attention to social
stimulation. In the infant, prominent generalized 4–5 Hz theta rhythm is evident under conditions B and C. In the 5-year-old child, the 6 Hz theta rhythm is
expressed over frontal regions during exploratory activity and predominantly over posterior regions during attention to speech.

E.V. Orekhova et al. / Clinical Neurophysiology 117 (2006) 1047–1062

1052

Fig. 3. ANOVA results and frequency-by-location probability plot. ANOVAs were performed separately for each age group (I—infants, II—children) and
frequency bin. The color plots show the spatial distribution of P values for planned comparisons of spectral power between baseline (visual attention) condition
and one of the test conditions: manipulation with toys (A) or attention to social stimulation (B). The planned comparisons were performed for pairs of
symmetrical electrode locations pooled together. Yellow to red colors denote an increase, and light-blue to blue a decrease, of spectral power under the test
condition relative to baseline. Color maps are shown only for frequency bins demonstrating significant main effect of condition (C) or its interaction with
electrode position (C!El) or electrode and hemisphere (C!El!H). The F- and Pvalues for significant ANOVA effects are shown on the right side of the
corresponding bin color plot: *P!0.05, **P!0.01, **P!0.001, ****P!0.0001.

E.V. Orekhova et al. / Clinical Neurophysiology 117 (2006) 1047–1062

1053

bins within the 4–8 Hz range demonstrated similar task-
related scalp topography. These facts strongly support
assigning all discrete frequency bins of the 4–7.6(8) Hz
range to the functional theta band in 4–6-year-old children.

During manipulation, the power growth was significant

also at the lower frequencies (2.8, 3.2, 3.6 Hz). However,
there was no significant condition!electrode interaction in
this case, suggesting a more wide-spread scalp distribution
of the spectral power. The increase of slow wave power in
children, like in infants, could be either a true EEG
phenomenon (

Harmony et al., 1996

) or stem from the

artifacts of mild head and body movements.

For manipulation, narrow bin ANOVAs revealed a

significant condition!electrode!hemisphere effect for
the 5.6 and 6.4 Hz frequency bins. Planned comparisons
suggested that this effect was due to the right-side
predominance of state-related power increase over pre-
frontal (Fp1!Fp2), anterior frontal (AF3!AF4), and
frontal regions (F3!F4) and its left-side predominance
over middle and posterior lateral sites (T7OT8, P7OP8).

To compare the whole band theta power changes under

the two test conditions in relation to baseline, the ANOVA

Fig. 4. The change scores of the wide-band (3.6–5.6 Hz) theta spectral
power in infants. Solid line represents manipulation with toys; dashed line
represents attention to social stimulation. Change scores were calculated
according to the formula: (testconditionKbaseline)/baseline!100. Under
both conditions theta increases predominantly over frontal regions as
documented by the main effect of electrode: F

(5,135)

Z8.35, P!0.0003 and

absence of significant electrode!condition interaction. Here and further
on, vertical bars denote 0.95% confidence intervals.

Fp1

AF3

F3

F7

T7

C3

P3

Pz

P4

P8

T8

F8

F4

Fz

Cz

AF4

PO3

PO4

O1

O2

P7

Fp2

θ

θ

µ

µ

5e+006 

µV

2

2

4

6

8 10 Hz

Fig. 5. Grand average power spectra in preschool children under 3 experimental conditions. Blue line—visual attention (baseline); green line—exploration of
toys; red line— attention to social stimulation. The spectral peak of 8–10 Hz sensorimotor rhythm (m) is evident over central regions under baseline condition.
The prominent peaks of theta rhythm (q) with maximum of about 6.0 Hz are observed over anterior regions during manipulation with toys and predominantly
over posterior regions during attention to social stimulation. Note, that the absolute power values on

Figs. 1 and 5

are not directly comparable due to different

sampling frequencies and high-pass filters applied.

E.V. Orekhova et al. / Clinical Neurophysiology 117 (2006) 1047–1062

1054

was performed on the change score calculated for the whole
4–7.6 Hz range. There was highly significant condition!
electrode interaction (F

(9,135)

Z17.5, P!0.00002), due to a

predominance of theta increase over prefrontal and anterior
frontal areas during manipulation and over parietal and
posterior parietal regions during speech (

Fig. 6

).

3.2. Mu frequency range

3.2.1. Infants

Compared to baseline, both experimental conditions

were accompanied by a significant reduction of spectral
power for the majority of frequency bins lying within
previously defined (

Stroganova et al., 1999

) infant alpha

range (6–9 Hz) (

Fig. 3

(I)A,B). In addition, during

manipulation the power increased at the 8.4 Hz and
higher frequency bins over occipital and temporal
regions. The probable explanation for this increase is
that myogenic artifacts, originating from the neck
muscles involved in the head movements during
manipulation, contaminated the EEG at these electrode
locations.

As implied by significant electrode by condition

interactions, the alpha power reduction depended on the
electrode location under both test conditions. In the
manipulation/baseline comparison, the condition!elec-
trode interactions for alpha frequency bins (6.4–8.4 Hz)
were due to the predominant suppression of the power over
the precentral scalp regions, where the spectral peak of the
mu rhythm was observed (

Fig. 1

). This result corresponds

well with our previous results on the frequency range of the

mu rhythm (6.0–8.8 Hz) in infants in the second half of the
first year of life.

In the speech/baseline comparison the same phenom-

enon—predominant suppression of alpha frequency bins
power over the anterior scalp regions—was seemingly less
prominent (

Fig. 3

(I)B). As planned comparisons revealed,

reduction of alpha power within the 6.4–7.6 Hz frequency
range during speech was greater over pooled precentral and
lateral frontal electrodes as compared to all other electrodes
pooled together (F

(1,27)

O

12.3, P!0.05 for all bins within

this range).

To compare the dynamics of the central mu rhythm under

the 3 experimental conditions, a separate ANOVA with
repeated measures factors condition (baseline, manipu-
lation, speech) and hemisphere was performed for the mean
6.4–8.4 Hz power over precentral electrode positions (FC3,
FC4). The main effect of condition was highly significant
(F

(2,54)

Z27.1, P!0.000001). The planned comparisons

showed that the spectral power of the central mu rhythm
decreased from attention to speech (F

(1,27)

Z13.0, P!

0.002) and further decreased from speech to manipulation
condition (F

(1,27)

Z13.5, P!0.002). Thus, in accordance

with the well-known properties of mu rhythm (

Pfurtscheller

and Neuper, 1994

) the experimental condition that was

associated with active hand movements provoked the
greatest reduction of mu spectral power over the precentral
scalp areas. There was also a significant effect of hemi-
sphere (F

(1,27)

Z13.4, P!0.002) due to the left-side

predominance of the central rhythm.

3.2.2. Preschool children

The ANOVA results and inspection of the respective

means showed that at 8.4 Hz and higher frequency bins, in
sharp contrast to the lower frequencies, EEG power
predominantly decreased during the test conditions as
compared to baseline (

Fig. 3

(II)A,B). In addition, there

was significant increase of the power at 10.0 Hz and higher
frequencies over the occipital and posterior temporal scalp
regions. This appeared more pronounced during manipu-
lation, and may reflect a myogenic artifact from the neck
muscles.

Under baseline (visual attention) condition there were

distinct peaks of spectral power between 8 and 11 Hz at the
central regions. Similar spectral peaks, although of smaller
magnitude, were evident during speech but were not
observed during manipulation (

Fig. 5

). In the manipu-

lation/baseline comparison, ANOVAs revealed significant
electrode!condition interactions for all the bins within the
8.4–10.4 Hz range. The planned comparisons confirmed
that all the bins of this range showed decreased power over
the central regions during manipulation, as compared to
baseline (for planned comparisons all P

s

!

0.01). Hence, by

its topography and functional reactivity this 8.4–10.4 Hz
rhythmic component represents the mu rhythm of child
EEG.

Fig. 6. Change scores of the wide-band (4.0–7.6 Hz) theta spectral power in
children. The designations are the same as in

Fig. 4

. Theta power increases

predominantly over frontal electrode locations during manipulation with
toys and over parietal locations during social stimulation. The electrode!
condition interaction effect is highly significant: F

(9,135)

Z17.515,

P!0.00002. The Bonferroni adjusted probabilities of difference between
manipulation and speech change scores at the separate electrode locations:

#

P!0.1, *P!0.05, **P!0.01.

E.V. Orekhova et al. / Clinical Neurophysiology 117 (2006) 1047–1062

1055

To compare the dynamics of the central mu rhythm under

the 3 experimental conditions, a separate ANOVA with
repeated measures factors condition (baseline, manipu-
lation, speech) and hemisphere (left, right) was performed
for the mean 8.4–10.4 Hz power over central electrode
positions (C3, C4). The main effect of condition was highly
significant (F

(2,30)

Z16.428, P!0.00002). The planned

comparisons showed that, similar to infants, the amount of
central mu rhythm in children decreased from attention to
speech (F

(1,15)

Z5.5, P!0.05) and decreased further from

speech to manipulation (F

(1,15)

Z10.6, P!0.006). Further-

more, there was a significant condition!hemisphere effect
(F

(2,30)

Z4.1969, P!0.03) due to the left-side predomi-

nance of the central mu power during baseline (attention)
condition (F

(1,15)

Z5.2, P!0.05).

The decrease of 8.4–10.4 Hz power under the test

conditions was not exclusively due to suppression of the
central mu rhythm. The spectral power of some frequency
bins within this range decreased symmetrically over parietal
and parieto-occipital regions during manipulation and over
frontal regions during speech as compared to baseline
(

Fig. 3

(II)A,B).

3.3. Comparison of condition-related theta power changes
in preschool children and infants

Verification of the age-specific frequency boundaries

of the theta band in infants and preschool children allows

tracking of the developmental changes in scalp topo-
graphy and functional reactivity of the theta rhythm from
infancy to childhood. The difference in recording
parameters and artifact rejection techniques used in the
two laboratories prevents direct statistical comparison of
EEG power values between the two age groups.
Nevertheless, the condition-related power changes rela-
tive to the baseline level (change scores) were unlikely to
depend on these methodological differences. As the age-
related differences in topographical distribution of the
theta power seemed to be most prominent in anterior–
posterior direction, we compared change scores in infants
and children for the electrode positions AF3, AF4, PO3
and PO4 that were the same for the two age groups.
Change scores were calculated for the mean spectral
power of the whole theta bands (3.6–5.6 Hz in infants
and 4.0–7.6 Hz in children). ANOVA was performed
with factors group, condition (manipulation vs. speech),
electrode and hemisphere. There was a significant group
effect due to a greater state-related increase of theta
power in infants than in children (F

(1,42)

Z4.1, PZ0.05).

There was also a significant group!condition!electrode
interaction effect (F(1, 42)Z10.8, P!0.002) that is
illustrated in

Fig. 7

. During manipulation theta power

increased predominantly over anterior scalp areas in both
groups, whereas during speech it increased predominantly
over anterior scalp areas in infants and over posterior
scalp areas in children.

Fig. 7. The comparison of whole-band theta power change scores in infants (open bars) and preschool children (closed bars). (A) manipulation with toys; (B)
social stimulation. Differences between groups or electrode locations:

#

P!0.1, *P!0.05, **P!0.01, ***P!0.001. During manipulation, a frontal maximum

of the theta increase is observed in both groups, whereas during attention to social stimulation the topography of the theta response is different in infants and
preschool children.

E.V. Orekhova et al. / Clinical Neurophysiology 117 (2006) 1047–1062

1056