iii 

 

 

 

 

Free Chapter Two Preview

vi 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

1264 Old Alpharetta Rd.  
Alpharetta, GA 30005 
 
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or 
transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, 
including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and 
retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. For 
more information,  address Permissions Department, 1264 Old 
Alpharetta Rd., Alpharetta, GA 30005 or permissions@booklogix.com 
 
Copyright © 2013 by Jane S. Goldner 
 
ISBN: 978-1-61005-413-3 
Library of Congress Control Number: 2013949753 
 
Printed in the United States of America 
 
For information about special discounts for bulk purchases, please 
contact BookLogix Sales at sales@booklogix.com. 
 
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2  

 

 

 

0  9 1 0 1 3  

 
Printed in the United States of America 
 

This paper meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 

(Permanence of Paper) 

 

 

Legend 

 

 

Along the way, you will have the opportunity to take the time 
to think through and answer the Your Turn questions in 
order to stay on the road to success. Transfer your responses 
for each Your Turn exercise to the My All Profile Summary 
booklet at the back of the book as a handy reference. 

 

 

 

For a more in-depth look at any or all of the topics, take the 
time to read the recommended books at the end of each 
chapter. 

 

 

 

Interspersed throughout this book are inspiring and 
motivating stories from successful women who share how 
they discovered what it meant for them to 

have their all

 

 

The Six Essentials comprise the Toolkit that will ensure 
you successfully reach your destination of 

having your all

 

 

A Toolkit for Your Journey 

29

 

 

Chapter Two 

 

Standing in Your Power:  
Be the Change You Want 

The most common way people give up 
their power is by thinking they don’t have 
any. 

ALICE WALKER 
Pulitzer Prize winning novelist 

 

 

 

 

Standing in Your Power 

WOMEN HAVE A CURIOUS RELATIONSHIP WITH

 

power.  The

 

view that power equals control, specifically control over 

others, is not one that women easily embrace. 

Some believe that power 

is a masculine trait, which gives a negative connotation when a woman is in 
the position of giving orders to others; however, many have the healthier 
view that power is gender neutral and its influence makes meaningful things 
happen. 

These women  are  clear about who  they are and what is 

important to them. If women reframe their definition of  power as 
meaning influence, developing the right strategic relationships, 
accomplishing goals, and making a difference rather than assuming 
control over others, then these positive definitions may turn around 
the perception of power from a negative attribute to a positive one.  

What does it mean to stand in your power? It means knowing who 

you are and what’s important for you in order to make good choices 
and understand the associated trade-offs. Regardless of what anyone 
tells you, every choice has a trade-off. It might be choosing between 
something healthy versus unhealthy to eat, “Do I eat that square of 
chocolate or a piece of fruit?” Other choices may be, “Do I stay late at 
work to finish that project so I can have the weekend free? Or do I 
make it to  my daughter’s soccer game on time?”  Remember  that 
Laurie Anne Goldman, CEO of Spanx, Inc. said, “You 

can have your 

all

, just not every day.” 

Standing in your power comes from being clear about your 

personal Core. Your Core is comprised of your  personal  mission, 
vision, and values. (These concepts are described in the next chapter.) 
An individual should have a mission, vision,  and set of values just 
like companies. In fact, if your personal Core is aligned with the core 
of the organization where you work, then you are able to bring your 
whole self to work with passion and purpose each day.  

Women driven to success need to stand in their power in order 

to be successful. We’re often pulled in many directions  with 
expectations coming from all sides.  Knowing your Core helps you 
focus on living the right life and negotiating the options based on 
that right life. Women who try to be Everything-to-Everybody sacrifice 
their own needs, wants, and wishes—and often their health. My story 

Jane S. Goldner 

is only one example. Another comes from one of my workshops. A 
recently divorced woman reported that her son asked her a  simple 
question, “Do you like fish?” She realized that she truly didn’t know. 
After all the  years  of  catering to her family  she  never  even  thought 
about the foods she liked to eat. How many women eat on the run, 
don’t exercise, and sacrifice their “me time” to meet everybody else’s 
needs? Do you? 

The old adage that money is power is meaningful now that 

women are becoming financial powerhouses with their earning and 
spending abilities; the average woman’s view of that type of power 
may be shifting. According to Catalyst research, women control $12 
trillion of the $18 trillion in consumer spending. They make many of 
the spending decisions like buying a house, arranging vacations, 
selecting a car, and purchasing electronic equipment. According to 
Ameritrade, women will control $22 trillion in assets by 2020.  

Women need to stand in their power so they can change the 

current statistics that indicate: 

•  Women who off-ramp for two years have 18% less earning 

power; after three years, they have 37% less earning power. 

•  Women typically hold 50% of front-line management 

positions in many large companies. That number often drops 
to 6% at the senior executive level. 

•  Only 6.7% of Fortune 500 top wage earners are female. 
•  Two-thirds of male senior leaders have children; one-third of 

women senior leaders have children. 

•  Women do twice the amount of housework and three times 

the amount of child rearing as men.

9

 

Standing in your power allows you to move from being reactive 

to being proactive. Being proactive shifts you  from wishing things 
would happen to visioning what you want to happen and acting on it. 
It allows you to focus  on taking risks that may make you 

                                                 

9

 The Catalyst Group, “Statistical Overview of Women in the Workplace,” 

http://www.catalyst.org/knowledge/statistical-overview-women-workplace. 

Standing in Your Power 

uncomfortable,  instead of avoiding  risk and being  frustrated. The 
bottom line is to stop  being a victim of others’  expectations,  and 
create desirable and realistic expectations for yourself. 

 

From 

To 

Reactive 

Proactive 

Wishing 

Visioning 

Frustration 

Focus 

Avoiding Risk 

Managing Risk 

Other’s Expectations 

Your Own Expectations 

Right Life? 

Right Life! 

 
I can’t imagine at the end of my life wondering if I should have 

lived my life differently. I’m not talking about things we would have 
done differently  if  given the chance, but  major  choices  that impact 
your life journey. Standing in your power is making the right choices 
for 

you

, acknowledging the trade-offs,  and being okay with  those 

decisions. The biggest consequence of not standing in your power is 
not living the right life. Women who don’t stand in their power tend 
to overextend their time and resources to accommodate and 
acquiesce to others’ demands. It could be their boss, significant other, 
children, friends, other family members, and/or community relation-
ships. The result is that these women live their lives  according to 
others’  expectations, becoming  Everything-to-Everybody…except 
themselves. 

Women diffuse their power by trying to be Everything-to-

Everybody and doing it all perfectly. Some workplace examples 
include: 

•  Saying yes when your plate is already overflowing, and then 

not asking for clarity on prioritization. 

•  Not delegating because it either takes too long to explain the 

process to someone else, you don’t want to bother someone 

Jane S. Goldner 

else, or you believe you are the only one who can do a task 
correctly. 

•  Continuing to spend more time perfecting something when 

it is right and acceptable to go.  

The  concept of standing in your power is true not only in the 
workplace but also outside of work. 

Buying into stereotypical beliefs such as: “I’m the wife, it’s my 

role…” or “I’m the mother, it’s my role…” leads to the Everything-to-
Everybody syndrome. I went back to full-time work outside the home 
when each of my sons was eight weeks old. I made it very clear to my 
husband  that home was not  my  other full-time job.  It was a shared 
responsibility (except when I was trying to be perfect as demonstrated 
in  My  Story).  My husband was,  and  still  is,  the better cook so he 
usually  cooks dinner.  He doesn’t like to  clean up the kitchen and 
wash dishes so I generally do that chore. 

I wasn’t born with an iron 

in my hand. When my husband and sons needed something ironed, 
they learned how to do it themselves.

  

Women need to develop the skills of delegation, negotiation, and 

constructive confrontation.  (These essential skills are a part of the 
Toolkit  you will find later in this book.) A spouse should be a 
significant partner at home. As Sheryl Sandberg stated in Lean In, the 
most significant decision that you will make is who will be your life 
partner.  I  heard  about  Sallie Krawcheck, former President of the 
Global Wealth & Investment Management Division of Bank of 
America, who convinced her husband that when their toddler called 
“Mommy” in the middle of the night, the child really meant parent 
of either sex.  The responsibility of  sharing doesn’t stop with the 
nuclear family; it also applies to extended family and friends as well. 
Ask your neighbors, friends, and families for support when you need 
it. For example, like many Baby Boomers, I help care for an elderly 
parent. I choose to spend Friday afternoons with my mother-in-law, 
but I know I can call on my husband or other siblings to step in when 
I have a client commitment. 

Standing in Your Power 

The difference  between how men and women view power may 

have its origins in how cave people lived. Men hunted; they went for 
the kill. Women were gatherers, a more collaborative activity. 
Translated into  business negotiations, for example, this means men 
go for the win in full battle armor  with the attitude that “I win as 
much as I can and you lose accordingly.” Women tend to search for 
win-win results through identifying common interests and goals and 
building relationships. While the workplace norms may be somewhat 
shifting toward collaboration, power in negotiation is lagging behind. 
To stand in their power,  women need to develop the skills of 
delegation, negotiation, and constructive confrontation both at home 
and in the workplace. (These essential skills are a part of the Toolkit 
you will find in Chapter Four.) Women should also learn that real 
power comes from within, not from an official title or position. 

Have you ever thought about your beliefs concerning power and 

your relationship to it?  Does your definition enhance or limit your 
choices? 

The next chapter continues your journey as you  learn  essential 

skills women need in order to stand in their power, beginning with 
defining your Core.