A GUIDE TO 

WEALTH PRESERVATION 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

WELCOME 

 

Making your wealth last for you and future generations 

 
 

Welcome to our Guide to Wealth Preservation
After a lifetime of hard work, you want to make sure 
you protect as much of your wealth as possible and 
pass it to those who you would like to receive it. 
Wealth, just like your health, must be carefully 
preserved, and the correct solution for you is the 
one that suits your personal circumstances. 

 

The subject of wealth preservation can be an 
emotional and complex matter. By making use of 
lifetime planning opportunities and tailor-making 

Wills and trusts to your particular circumstances, 
you can ensure that your valuable assets are 
retained for future generations in the most 
financially prudent and effective way. 

 
 

The preservation and constructive transfer of wealth 
are primary components of a successful wealth 
protection strategy. While assets can grow over a 
lifetime, so can the need to consider a variety of 
products and services to protect wealth for the 
future. A forward-looking, integrated wealth 
protection strategy will help ensure a lasting legacy 
for you and your loved ones. 
 
With numerous options, available when structuring 
and preserving your wealth, with our advice you can 
be confident of making the right decisions based on 
your financial and family situation to best meet your 
personal objectives. To review your situation and 
discuss your options, please contact us for further 
information. 

 

 

This guide is for your general information and use only and is not intended to address your particular requirements. It should not 

be relied upon in its entirety and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute, advice. Although endeavors have been made to 

provide accurate and timely information, there can be no guarantee that such information is accurate as of the date it is received 

or that it will continue to be accurate in the future. No individual or company should act upon such information without receiving 

appropriate professional advice after a thorough examination of their particular situation. We cannot accept responsibility for any 

loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of any articles. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

02 

A GUIDE TO 

WEALTH PRESERVATION 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

CONTE

NTS

 

 
 
 

 

Welcome 

 

Making your wealth last for you and 

future generations 

 

Life insurance 

 

Helping dependents to cope 

financially in the event of your 

premature death 

 

Term life insurance 

 

The most basic type of life 

insurance 

 

Whole-of-life insurance 

 

Guaranteed financial protection that 

lasts for the rest of your life 

 

Critical illness cover 

 

Minimize the financial impact on you 

and your loved ones 

 
1 1  

I n c o m e / p r o t e c t i o n  
i n s u r a n c e 
 

 

No  one  is  immune  to  the  risk  of 

illness and accidents 

 
13 

Making a Will 

 

An  essential  part  of  your 

financial planning 

 
14 

Power of Attorney 

 

Permitting someone to act on your 

behalf 

 
15 

Inheritance Tax 

 

Passing your estate to the people that 

matter to you in the most effective way 

 
17 

Trusts 

 

Control over your assets for the benefit 

of one or more people 

 
20 

Glossary 

 

Understanding the jargon 

 

 

03 

A GUIDE TO 

WEALTH PRESERVATION 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

LIFE INSURANCE 

 

Helping dependents to cope financially in the event of your premature death 

 

It may be the case that not everyone 
nee

ds life insurance (also known as ‘life 

cover’ and ‘death cover’). But if your 
children, partner or other relatives 
depend on your income to cover the 
mortgage or other living expenses, then 
the answer is yes 

– you probably do 

want life insurance, since it will help 
provide for your family in the event of 
your death. 

 

Life insurance can make sure they’re 
taken care of financially if you die. So, 
whether you’re looking to provide a 
financial safety net for your loved ones, 

moving to a new house or a first- time 

buyer looking to arrange your mortgage 

life 

 

insurance 

– or simply wanting to add 

some cover to what you’ve already got – 
you’ll want to make sure you choose the 
right type of cover. That’s why obtaining 
the right advice and knowing which 
products to choose 

– including the most 

suitable sum assured, premium, terms 

and payment provisions 

– is essential. 

 

Coping financially 

 

Life insurance helps your dependents 
to cope financially in the event of your 
premature death. When you take out 
life insurance, you set the amount you 
want the policy to pay out should you 
die 

– this is called the ‘sum assured’. 

Even if you consider that currently you 

 

have sufficient life insurance

, you’ll 

probably need more later on if your 
circumstances change. If you don’t 
update your policy as key events 

happen throughout your life, you may 

risk being seriously under-insured. 

 

Own personal circumstances 

 

As you reach different stages in your life, 
the need for protection will inevitably 
change. How much life insurance 

 

you need really depends on your 
circumstances, for example, whether 
you’ve got a mortgage, you’re single or 
have children. Before you compare life 
insurance, it’s worth bearing in mind that 
the amount of cover you need will very 

 
04 

A GUIDE TO 

WEALTH PRESERVATION 

 
 
 

 

much  depend  on  your  own  personal 

circumstances,  such as  the  needs of 

your family and dependents. 

 

There is no one- size-fits- all solution, 

and the amount of cover 

– as well as 

how long it lasts for 

– will vary from 

person to person. 

 

These are some events when you 
should consider reviewing your life 
insurance requirements: 

 

n

 

Buying your first home with a partner

 

n

 

Covering loans

 

n

 

Getting married or entering into a 

registered civil partnership

 

 
n

 

Starting a family

 

n

 

Becoming a stay-at-home parent

 

n

 

Having more children

 

n

 

Moving to a bigger property

 

n

 

Salary increases

 

n

 

Changing your job

 

n

 

Reaching retirement

 

n

  Relying  on  someone  else  to  support 

you

 

n

 

Personal guarantee for business loans

 

 

Individual lifestyle factors 

 

The price you pay for a life insurance 

policy depends on a number of things. 
These include the amount of money you 
want to cover and the length of the 
policy, but also your age, your health, 
your lifestyle and whether you smoke. 

 

Household to household 

 

If you have a spouse, partner or children, 
you should have sufficient protection to 
pay off your mortgage and any other 
liabilities. After that, you may need life 
insurance to replace at least some of 
your income. How much money a family 
needs will vary from household to 
household, so, ultimately, it’s up to you to 
decide how much money you would like 
to leave your family that would enable 
them to maintain their current standard of 
living. 

 

Two basic types 

 

There are two basic types of life 
insurance, ‘term life’ and ‘whole -of-
life’, but within those categories there 
are different variations. The cheapest, 
simplest form of life insurance is term 
life insurance. It is straightforward 
protection: there is no investment 

 
 
 

 

element, and it pays out a lump sum if 
you die within a specified period. There 
are several types of term insurance. 

 

The other type of protection available 
is a whole-of-life insurance policy, 
designed to provide you with cover 
throughout your entire lifetime. 

 

The policy only pays out once the 
policyholder dies, providing the 
policyholder’s dependents with a lump 
sum, usually tax-free. Depending on the 

individual policy, policyholders may 
have to continue contributing right up 
until they die, or they may be able to 
stop paying in once they reach a stated 
age, even though the cover continues 
until they die. 

 

Tax matters 

 

Although the proceeds from a life 
insurance policy are tax -free, they could 
form part of your estate and become 
liable to Inheritance Tax. The simple way 
to avoid Inheritance Tax on the proceeds 
is to place your policy into an appropriate 

trust, which enables any payout to be 
made directly to your dependents. 
Certain kinds of appropriate trust allow 
you to control what happens to your 
payout after death, and this could speed 
up a payment. However, they cannot be 
used for life insurance policies that are 
assigned to (earmarked for) your 
mortgage lender. 

 

Remove the burden 

 

Generally speaking, the amount of life 
insurance you may need should 
provide a lump sum that is sufficient to 
remove the burden of any debts and, 
ideally, leave enough over to invest 

 

in  order  to  provide  an  income  to 

support  your  dependents  for  the 

required period of time. 

 

The first consideration is to clarify 

what you want the life insurance to 

protect. If you simply want to cover 

your mortgage, then an amount equal 

to the outstanding mortgage debt can 

achieve that. 

 

To prevent your family from being 
financially disadvantaged by your 
premature death, and to provide 

 
 
 

 

enough financial support to maintain 
their current lifestyle, there are a few 
more variables you should consider: 

 

n

 

What  are  your  family  expenses,  and 

how would they change if you died?

 

n

 

How much would the family 

expenditure increase on requirements 
such as childcare if you were to die?

 

 

n

 

How  much  would  your  family  income 

drop if you were to die?

 

 

n

 

How much cover do you receive from 

your employer or company pension 
scheme, and for how long?

 

 

n

 

What  existing  policies  do  you  have 

already, and how  far  do  they  go  to 
meeting your needs?

 

 

n

 

How  long  would  your  existing 

savings last?

 

 

n

 

What state benefits are there that 

could provide extra support to meet 
your family’s needs?

 

 

n

 

How would the return of inflation to 

the economy affect the amount of 
your cover over time?

 

 
 
 

If you have a spouse, 

partner or children, you 

should have sufficient 

protection to pay off 

your mortgage and any 

other liabilities. 

 

 
05 

A GUIDE TO 

WEALTH PRESERVATION 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

TERM LIFE 

 

INSURANCE 

 

The most basic type of life insurance 

 

With term life insurance, you choose the 
amount you want to be insured for and 
the period for which you want cover. This 
is the most basic type of life insurance. If 
you die within the term, the policy pays 
out to your beneficiaries. If you don’t die 
during the term, the policy doesn’t pay 
out, and the premiums you’ve paid are 
not returned to you. 

 

There  are  two  main  types  of  term  life 
insurance  to  consider:  level-term  and 
decreasing-term life insurance. 

 

Level-term life insurance policies 

 

A  level-term  policy  pays  out  a  lump  sum 
if  you  die  within  the  specified  term.  The 
amount you’re covered for remains level 
throughout the term 

– hence the name. 

 

The monthly or annual premiums you 
pay usually stay the same, too. 

 

Level-term policies can be a good 
option for family protection, where you 
want to leave a lump sum that your 

 

family can inve

st to live on after you’ve 

gone. It can also be a good option if you 
need a specified amount of cover for a 
certain length of time, for example, to 
cover an interest-

only mortgage that’s 

not covered by an endowment policy. 

 

Decreasing-term life insurance 

policies 

 

With a decreasing-term policy, the 
amount you’re covered for decreases 
over the term of the policy. These 
policies are often used to cover a debt 
that reduces over time, such as a 
repayment mortgage. 

 

Premiums are usually cheaper than 
for level -term cover, as the amount 
insured reduces as time goes on. 

 

Decreasing-  term  insurance  policies 
can also be used for Inheritance Tax 
planning purposes. 

 

Family income benefit policies 

 

Family income benefit life insurance 

 

is a type of decreasing-term policy. 
However, instead of a lump sum, it pays 
out a regular income to your 
beneficiaries until the policy’s expiry date 
if you die. 

 

You can arrange for the same amount of 
your take-home income to be paid out to 
your family if you die. 

 

 
 
06 

A GUIDE TO 

WEALTH PRESERVATION 

 
 
 
 

Whole life insurance policies can be a useful 

way to cover a future Estate Tax bill. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

WHOLE LIFE 
INSURANCE 

 

Guaranteed financial protection that lasts for the rest of your life 

 

As the name suggests, whole-of-life 
insurance policies are ongoing policies 
that pay out when you die, whenever that 
is. Because it’s guaranteed that you’ll die 
at some point (and therefore that the 
policy will have to pay out), these policies 
are more expensive than term insurance 
policies, which only pay out if you die 
within a certain time frame. 

 

Paying Inheritance Tax 

 

Whole life insurance policies can be a 
useful way to cover a future Inheritance 
Tax bill. If you think your estate will 

 

have to pay Inheritance Tax when you 
die, you could set up a whole -of- life 
insurance policy to cover the tax due, 
meaning that more is passed to your 
beneficiaries. However, to ensure the 
proceeds of the life insurance policy are 
not included in your estate, it is vital that 
the policy be written in an appropriate 
trust. This is a very complicated area of 
estate planning, and you should obtain 
professional advice. 

 

A whole life policy has a double 
benefit: not only are the proceeds of 
the policy outside your estate for 

 

Inheritance  Tax  purposes,  the  premium 

paid  for  the  policy  will  reduce  the  value 
of your estate while you’re alive, further 

 

reducing your estate’s future 
Inheritance Tax bill. 

 

Providing financial security 

 

These policies provide financial security 
for people who depend on you 
financially. As the name suggests, 
whole-of-life insurance helps you protect 
your loved ones financially with cover 
that lasts for the rest of your life. This 
means the company providing the cover 
will have to pay out in almost every 
case, and premiums are therefore 
higher than those charged on term 
insurance policies. 

 

Different types of policy 

 

There are different types of whole- of-
life insurance policy 

– some offer a set 

payout from the outset while others are 
linked to investments, and the payout 
will depend on performance. 
Investment-linked policies are either 
unit-linked policies, linked to funds or 
with-profits policies which offer 
bonuses. 

 

Some whole life policies require that 

premiums are paid all the way up to 

your death. Others become paid-up at a 

certain age and waive premiums from 

that point onwards. 

 

Whole life policies can seem 
attractive because most (but not all) 
have an investment element and 

 

therefore a surrender value. If, however, 
you cancel the policy and cash it in, you 
will lose your cover. Where there is an 
investment element, your premiums are 
usually reviewed after ten years, and 
then every five years. 

 

Whole life policies are also available 

without an investment element and with 

guaranteed or investment-linked 

premiums from some providers. 

 

Reviews 

 

The level of protection selected will 
normally be guaranteed for the first ten 
years, at which point it will be reviewed 
to see how much protection can be 
provided in the future. If the review 
shows that the same level of protection 
can be carried on, it will be guaranteed 
to the next review date. 

 

If the review reveals that the same 
level  of  protection  can’t  continue, 
you’ll have two choices: 

 

n

 

Increase your payments

 

n

 

Keep  your  payments the  same  and 

reduce your level of protection

 

 

07 

A GUIDE TO 

WEALTH PRESERVATION 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Maximum cover 

 

Maximum cover offers a high initial level 
of cover for a lower premium until the first 
plan review, which is normally after ten 
years. The low premium is achieved 
because very little of your premium is 
kept back for investment, as most of it is 
used to pay for the life insurance. 

 

After a review, you may have to increase 
your premiums significantly to keep the 
same level of cover, as this depends

 

on how well the cash in the investment 
reserve (underlying fund) has performed. 

 

Standard cover 

 

This cover balances the level of life 
Insurance with adequate investment to 
support the policy in later years. This 
maintains the original premium 
throughout the life of the policy. 
However, it relies on the value of units 
invested in the underlying fund growing 
at a certain level each year. Increased 
charges or poor performance of the fund 
could mean you’ll have to increase your 
monthly premium to keep the same level 
of cover. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

After a review, you may have to increase your 

premiums significantly to keep the same level of 

cover, as this depends on how well the cash in the 

investment reserve (underlying fund) has performed. 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
08 

A GUIDE TO 

WEALTH PRESERVATION 

 
 
 

Critical illness cover could help to minimize the 

financial impact on you and your loved ones. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

CRITICAL 
ILLNESS COVER 

 

Minimize the financial impact on you and your loved ones 

 

We never think a critical illness is going 
to happen to us, especially when we feel 

fit and healthy, but it can and does. If the 
worst does happen, it’s important to 
make sure you’re financially protected 
against the impact a critical illness could 
have on you and your family. 

 

Critical illness cover could help to 
minimize the financial impact on you and 
your loved ones. For example, if you 
needed to give up work to recover, or if 
you passed away during the length of the 
policy, the money could be used to help 
fund the mortgage or rent, everyday bills, 
or even simple things like the weekly food 
shop 

– giving you and/ or your family 

some peace of mind when you need it 
most. 

 

Surviving financial hardship 

 

After surviving a critical illness, 
sufferers may not be able to return 
to work straight away (or ever), or 
may need home modifications or 
private therapeutic care. It is sad to 

 

contemplate a situation where someone 
survives a serious illness but fails to 
survive the ensuing financial hardship. 

 

Preparing for the worst is not something 

we want to think about when feeling fit 

and healthy, but you never know what 

life is going to throw at you next. 

 

Tax-free lump sum 

 

Critical illness cover, either on its own 
or as part of a life insurance policy, is 
designed to pay you a tax-free lump 
sum on the diagnosis of certain 
specified life-threatening or debilitating 

 

(but not necessarily fatal) conditions, 
such as a heart attack, stroke, certain 
types/stages of cancer and multiple 
sclerosis. A more comprehensive policy 
will cover many more serious conditions, 
including loss of sight, permanent loss of 
hearing and a total and permanent 
disability that stops you from working. 

 

Some policies also provide cover 

against the loss of limbs. But not all 
conditions are necessarily covered, 

which is why you should always obtain 

professional advice. 

 

Much-needed financial support 

 

If you are single with no dependents, 
critical illness cover can be used to pay 
off your mortgage, which means that 
you would have fewer bills or a lump 
sum to use if you became very unwell. 
And if you are part of a couple, it can 
provide much-needed financial support 
at a time of emotional stress. 

 

Exclusions and limitations 

 

The illnesses covered are specified in 
the policy along with any exclusions 

 

and limitations, which may differ between 

insurers. Critical illness policies usually 
only pay out once so are not a 
replacement for income. Some policies 

offer combined life and critical illness 
cover. These pay out if you are 

diagnosed with a critical illness or you 
die, whichever happens first. 

 

Pre-existing conditions 

 

If you already have an existing critical 
illness policy, you might find that by 
replacing a policy, you would lose some 
of the benefits if you have developed any 
illnesses since you took out the first 
policy. Before 2014 some insurance 
policies would not cover expenses due 
to pre-existing conditions that is no 

longer the case. 

 

Lifestyle changes 

 

Some policies allow you to increase 
your cover, particularly after lifestyle 
changes such as marriage, moving 
home or having children. If you cannot 
increase the cover under your existing 
policy, you could consider taking out a 
new policy just to ‘top up’ your existing 
cover. 

 

Policy definition 

 

A policy will provide cover only for 

 

09 

A GUIDE TO 

WEALTH PRESERVATION 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

conditions defined in the policy 
document. For a condition to be 
covered, your condition must meet the 
policy definition exactly. This can mean 
that some conditions, such as some 
forms of cancer, won’t be covered if 
deemed insufficiently severe. Similarly, 
some conditions may not be covered if 
you suffer from them after reaching a 
certain age, for example, many policies 
will not cover Alzheimer’s disease if 
diagnosed after the age of 60. 

 

Survival period 

 

Very few policies will pay out as soon 
as you receive diagnosis of any of the 
conditions listed in the policy, and most 
pay out only after a ‘survival period’, 
which is typically 14, 30 etc days. This 
means that if you die within those days 
of meeting the definition of the critical 
illness given in the policy, the cover 
would not pay out. 

 

Range of factors 

 

How much you pay for critical illness 
cover will depend on a range of factors 
including what sort of policy you have 
chosen, your age, the amount you want 
the policy to pay out and whether or not 
you smoke. 

 

Permanent total disability is usually 
included in the policy. Some insurers 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

define ‘permanent total disability’ as 
being unable to work as you normally 

would as a result of sickness, while 
others see it as being unable to 

independently perform three or more 
‘activities of daily living’ as a result of 
sickness or accident. 

 

Activities of daily living include: 

 

n

 

Bathing

 

n

 

Dressing and undressing

 

n

 

Eating

 

n

 

Transferring from bed to chair and 

back again

 

 

Make 

sure you’re fully covered 

 

The good news is that medical 
advances mean more people than ever 
are surviving conditions that might have 
killed earlier generations. Critical illness 
cover can provide cash to allow you to 
pursue a less stressful lifestyle while 
you recover from illness, or you can use 
it for any other purpose. 

Don’t leave it to 

chance 

– make sure you’re fully 

covered. 

 

10