Powered by 

 

 

 
 
 

 
 

Food Loss 

& Waste  

Africa 

 

Intelligence Report 8 

June – December 2016 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food Food Loss & Waste Africa 
Intelligence Report 8 
June – December 2016 
Written by Christine Chege and Dr. Melissa Carson 

Funded by The Rockefeller Foundation 

For public sharing and dissemination.  

 
 

June-December 2016 

Food Loss & Waste Africa | Intelligence Report

  

 

 

3  

 

Being

 

Informed

 

Making  good  decisions  is  all  about  being 
informed.  Agricultural  industry  reports  do  just 
that, and more broadly reputable news agencies 
provide similar services. But what happens when 
an  issue  like  post-harvest  loss,  that  has  both 
development  elements  and  commercial  impacts, 
is underserved? There is currently no one place to 
go  for  the  information  you  need:  the  latest 
innovations and issue dynamics from a country or 
value chain perspective.  

Post-harvest loss in Africa is an issue that a wide 
group  of  stakeholders  are  concerned  with,  as  its 
costs are vast: 

-  The  amount  of  food  lost  each  year  due  to 

post-harvest loss (PHL) is enough to feed the 
total  number  of  undernourished  people 
globally.

1

  

-  In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) alone, 30-50% of 

production is lost at various points along the 
value chain.

1

 

-  FLW causes as much as $940 billion per year 

in economic losses.

2

 

Numerous  organizations  and  groups  are  putting 
significant  effort  into  advancing  the  issue,  but 
there is a massive information gap.  

What if you could tap into the varied and diverse 
expertise across these stakeholder groups, across 
countries  and  regions  through  an  information 
resource at regular intervals (quarterly / monthly)? 
Such  a  resource  could  provide  a  richer 
understanding  of  what  is  happening  in  your 
country or region, in innovations along the value 
chain emerging from around the world, and in the 
biggest  game  changing  investments  and  policy 
shifts.  

Do  you  or  your  organization  want  to  learn  more 
about how to make this possible and to be a part 
of  the  group  shaping  this  initiative,  its  content 
and impact? Please contact: 
foodloss@dalbergresearch.com  

                                                 

1

 Reducing Food Loss Along African Agricultural Value Chains, 

Deloitte, 2014. 

2

 Food Loss and Waste Accounting and Reporting Standard, 

WRI, 2016. 

Request free copy 

The  current  report  covers  our  mandate  with  the 
Rockefeller  Foundation  and  is  freely  available.  If 
you would like a copy of this or any future reports 
please  simply  send  your  name,  organization  and 
job 

title 

with 

your 

request 

to 

foodloss@dalbergresearch.com

 

and  we  will  send 

these to you electronically as they come out.  

We would love your input on what else you would 
like to see covered. Please send your needs and 
we will endeavor to include additional content.

 

About this report 

The  report  answers  the  question  what  key 
movements  related  to  food-loss  along  the  value 
chain  and  across  commodities,  have  been 
happening in the last quarter / period in Africa? It 
pulls  from  a  wide  range  of  sources  to  provide  a 
full  list  of  all  relevant  stories  and  provides  an 
overview  from  both  a  country  perspective  and  a 
value  chain  perspective,  and  highlights  on  some 
of the biggest innovations or particularly forward 
looking  stories  as  well  as  links  to  each  story  so 
readers can pursue further information.  

This  intelligence  has  been  prepared  for  the 
Rockefeller  Foundation  to  support  the  YieldWise 
initiative, which aims to reduce post-harvest food 
loss  for  African  farmers.  It  is  the  8

th

  volume  of 

Food Loss & Waste reports and currently focuses 
on Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Malawi. 

This report could be so much more. It could cover 
more countries, it could go deeper on important 
themes  like  innovation,  funding  or  risk  analysis, 
and it could be a broader shared resource for the 
wide  range  of  related  initiatives  to  both  provide 
and  extract  insights.  It  could  meet  the  needs  of 
vested  interest  organizations  and  agencies,  as 
well as Agricultural Ministries.    

Do  you  or  your  organization  want  to  learn  more 
about how to make this possible and to be a part 
of  the  group  shaping  this  initiative,  its  content 
and impact? Please contact: 
foodloss@dalbergresearch.com  

June-December 2016 

Food Loss & Waste Africa | Intelligence Report

  

 

 

4  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contents:  
Food Loss & Waste Africa 

Intelligence Report 8 
June – December 2016 

 

Overview ............................................................5 

Value Chain Summaries......................................6 

Highlighted Stories.............................................8 

Media Monitoring.............................................14 

Country Summaries ..........................................24 

 

 

 

June-December 2016 

Food Loss & Waste Africa | Intelligence Report

  

 

 

5  

 

Overview  

Food 

loss, 

occurring 

at 

production, 

postharvest and processing stages of the value 
chain, is vital to agriculture and food security. 
It is estimated global food loss and waste amount 
to  1.3  billion  tons  per  year,  representing  one-
third  of  the  food  produced  for  human 
consumption.  The  FAO  estimates  post-harvest 
losses  are  worth  US$4bn  every  year.  Causes  of 
food loss in emerging economies are mainly due 
to  financial,  managerial  and  technical  limitations 
in harvesting techniques, weak infrastructure and 
storage and cooling facilities and poor packaging 
and  marketing  systems.  Africa  is  the  continent 
with the highest post-harvest losses (PHL) rates. 

Major 

economic 

development 

and 

diversification investments will have significant 
impact for agriculture and food loss and waste. 
The sector across sub-Saharan Africa got a major 
commitment  of  US$30  billion  to  finance 
agricultural  infrastructure  projects,  credit  to 
SMEs/agribusiness,  crop  and  livestock  research, 
and  capacity  building  initiatives  and  emerged 
from an Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa 
(AGRA)  forum.  Contributions  will  come  from  the 
African  Development  Bank  (AfDB),  Bill  and 
Melinda  Gates  Foundation  and  the  Rockefeller 
Foundation among others. Kenya also received a 
major  investment  pledge  from  Japan,  worth 
US$27 billion in loans and grants to facilitate the 
development  of  Special  Economic  Zones,  which 
will  host  wholesale  and  retail  trading  entities, 
breaking 

bulk, 

re-packaging 

logistics, 

warehousing,  cargo  handling  and  storage. 
Smaller  announcements  around  agricultural 
transformation  include  a  Central  Bank  allocation 
of N1.7 trillion (USD $1.6bn) in Nigeria, and KES 
111billion  (USD  $1bn)  from  the  World  Bank  in 
Kenya’s arid areas.  

Government  policies  have  received  mixed 
reviews,  some  readily  embraced  while  some 
criticized.  Nigeria  passed  a  bill  for  the 
establishment  of  the  Nigerian  Agricultural 
Quarantine  Service  2016  which  will  prevent  the 
introduction  of  exotic  pests  and  diseases  in 
addition  to  encouraging  a  15%  cassava  flour 
inclusion  in  bread.  In  Malawi  the  drafting  of  the 
sugar  bill  is  aimed  at  promoting  local  sugar 
sector,  through  preventing  illegal  importation, 
addressing  industry  barriers  and  assisting 
manufacturers  access  more  markets.    Tanzania 
banned  the  export  of  unprocessed  cereal  crops 
and  others,  a  move  highly  criticized  by  tomato 
farmers  due  to  subsequent  losses.  Kenya, 
allowed  potato  seeds  import,  a  move  cited  to 
pile  pressure  on  local  seed  development  and 
production. 

Despite  the  above  notable  contributions,  the 
sector  continues  to  grapple  with  some  broad 
natural  and  economic  challenges.  In  the  past 
quarter, adverse climatic changes and an El Niño 
induced  drought  plummeted  previous  food 
security  efforts  across  Sub-Saharan  Africa.  The 
failed/below  average  harvest  effects  will  be  felt 
until  April  2017  with  La  niña  like  effects  being 
recorded in some countries. Malawi was strongly 
affected.Tomato  absoluta,  a  crop-killing  moth, 
devastated  Nigeria’s  tomato  industry  leading  to 
more  than  90%  crop  ruin.  Erisco  Foods,  the 
largest tomato paste manufacturer, threatened to 
shut its processing plant with plans to relocate to 
China citing frustrations with the ailing economy 
particularly  inability  to  access  foreign  exchange 
and  also  the  government’s  apparent  indirect 
support to importation of pastes. 

 

June-December 2016 

Food Loss & Waste Africa | Intelligence Report

  

 

 

6  

 

Value Chain Summaries 

Farm 

Some  large-scale  training  initiatives  and 
extension  services  were  announced  this  period. 

The African Development Bank (AfDB) earmarked 
$12.5  billion  to  train  250,000  agripreneurs  in  25 
African  countries  before  2025,  and  in  Malawi, 
Farm  Radio  Trust  plans  to  reach  twice  as  many 
farmers  (500,000)  though  its  farmer  to  farmer 
capacity  building  videos.  USAID’s  US$2  million 
will  also  promote  agriculture  and  nutrition 
extension services.  

Technology continues to be prevalent in recent 
announcements.  In  Kenya,  for  example,  more 
than  300,000  watermelon  and  onion  farmers  are 
accessing  agronomic  services  on  Expressions 
Global  Group’s  social  media  site.  Similarly, 
Nigeria’s Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural 
Development  (FMARD)  launched  an  electronic 
agricultural  portal  to  enhance  access  to 
information across all value chains.  

On-farm 

productivity 

shows 

impressive 

evidence  of  impact  through  the  use  of  high 
yielding seed varieties. More than 35,000 farmers 
in  Kenya  are  harvesting  double  yields  per  acre 
after adopting the high producing orange-fleshed 
sweet  potato  varieties  from  the  International 
Potato Center (CIP).  

New  seed  varieties  and  pest  management 
products  and  better  access  have  also  been 
announced. ICRISAT released new seed varieties 
of green grams, millet, sorghum and groundnuts 
ideal for hot weather conditions to more than 300 
farmers in Kenya in addition to training on better 
agronomic  and  post-harvest  practices.  A  new 
tomato  hybrid  variety  from  Syngenta  was 
announced  that  allows  up  to  one  month  selling 
window  before  rotting  and  regenerating.  A 
biological  control  for  spider  mites,  which  can 
account  for  up  to  50%  loss  in  vegetables,  was 

released  by  Real  IPM,  Real  IPM  Phytoseiulus.  A 
communal  seed  bank  in  Malawi,  for  distribution 
during  disasters,  in  a  partnership  between 

Concern Universal (CU) and Village Development 
Committee (VDC) was also announced.  

Storage  

Renewable powered storage is getting a boost 
in  Nigeria  and  Kenya.  ColdHub’s  new  solar 
powered walk in stations were introduced to the 
fruit and vegetable markets in Nigeria. Kikapu, a 
new  portable  and  collapsible  solar  or  battery 
powered  grain  silo  facility,  was  introduced  in 
Kenya. The KinoSol is developing a low-tech and 
low-cost  and  lightweight  dehydrator  prototype 

that  harnesses  the  sun’s  rays  to  dry  fruits, 
vegetables and insects. 

Investments  in  expansion  of  storage  capacity 
were most prevalent in Tanzania and Malawi this 
period.  Improved  import  and  export  facilities  in 
Tanzania  followed  the  development  of 
Swissport’s  US$13  million  warehouse.  Malawi’s 
agricultural  storage  capacity  has  been  given  a 

boost by a US$31 million (€30 million) European 
Investment  Bank  (EIB)  funding,  developed  in 
collaboration  with  USAID  and  the  National  Bank 
of  Malawi  (NBM),  to  target  agri-storage  projects 
spearheaded by the private sector. Smaller scale 
storage  investments  included,  for  example,  the 
construction of US$67k storage warehouses.  

Promotion  of  best  practice  in  PHL  aims  to 

create/expand  the  markets  for  storage 
products including metal silos produced by local 
tinsmiths  and  the  use  of  PICs  bags,  run  by 
Tanzania’s  Grain  Post-Harvest  Loss  Prevention 
Project,  supported  by  Helevetas  Swiss  Inter-
corporation.  

Processing 

Several  processing  zones  and  facilities  have 
been set up across all focus countries. The largest 
was  Tanzania’s  first  aseptic  fruit  and  vegetable 
packing  facility  worth  $120  million  opened  by 
Bakhresa Group with capacity to process between 
20-25,000  tonnes  of  fruit  per  year.  Salima  Sugar 
company,  Malawi’s  second  sugar  company, 

June-December 2016 

Food Loss & Waste Africa | Intelligence Report

  

 

 

7  

 

announced  that  it  has  started  production.  Other 
announcements  were  more  prospective.  Sameer 
Group’s Sasini Limited is planning to set up a Sh 
400  million  (US$4  million)  macadamia  plant  in 
Kenya,  and  the  National  Sugar  Development 
Council  (NSDC)  in  Nigeria  identified  10  sites  for 
the establishment of new sugar factories.  

Breakthrough 

research 

innovations 

in 

commodity  processing  continue  to  gain 
traction 

this 

quarter. 

Researchers 

are 

collaborating  on  developing  a  nanotechnology 
application  of  hexanal,  a  natural  fruit  extract 
which  inhibits  fruit  ripening.    Similarly,  Australian 
firm  Naturo  Pty  developed  the  Natavo  Zero™ 
technology,  which  stops  browning  of  cut  and 
pulped  avocado  and  allows  avocados  to  last  up 
to  two  years  when  frozen,  30  days  once 
defrosted,  and  a  minimum  of  10  days  when  the 

packaging is opened. 

Transport  

Major  rail  and  road  infrastructure  investments 
were  reported  in  Kenya  and  Tanzania  and 
beyond. A $7.6 billion loan from China’s Export-
Import  Bank  (EXIM)  was  provided  to  construct  a 
standard gauge railway to link the Dar es Salaam 

port  with  Burundi,  Rwanda  and  DR  Congo.  The 
Tanzania-Zambia  Railway  Authority  (TAZARA) 
increased  its  cargo  haulage  capacity  following  a 
rail  revamp,  from  600,000  tonnes  to  two  million 
tones.  The  African  Development  Bank  (AfDB)  is 
funding the rehabilitation of the 75 km Liwonde–
Mangochi road in Malawi. 

Access to Market 

Contract  farming  initiatives  for  sorghum  and 
potatoes and hot chilli were announced in Kenya, 
providing  a  guaranteed  market  access  for 
farmers.  East  African  Breweries  Limited  (EABL)  is 
seeking to raise its sorghum uptake by three-fold 
to  30,  000  tonnes  a  year.  Deepa  Industries  and 
Sereni  Fries  will  buy  potatoes  worth  US$1.8 
million  this  year.  And  an  initiative  funded  by 
USAID  and  Golden  Solutions  is  buying  two 
tonnes of chillis per week. 

Multi-stakeholder partnerships are also making 
progress in bridging gaps to market. Nakumatt 
joined  the  COMESA  Business  Council’s  Local 

Sourcing  for  Partnerships  project  which  engages 
large  corporations  to  source  products  from  the 
region’s  small  growth  enterprises.  In  Malawi,  a 
multi-stakeholder  partnership  between  Tesco, 
Marks & Spencer (M&S), and Unilever, has made 
significant  progress  towards  achieving  a 
competitive  Malawian  tea  sector.  The  Fair  Trade 
Organization  has  partnered  with  Just  Trading 
Scotland  (JTS)  to  sell  Malawian  rice  in  Scottish 
stores

Access to Finance 

Financing  continues  to  get  a  major  push. 
Various  banks  have  committed  to  single  digit,  9 

per cent, interest rates on agricultural based loans 
in  addition  to  earmarking  billions  to  the  sector. 
The government of Tanzania with private sectors 
collaborators  have  resulted  in  Sh500  billion  and 
US$460 million loan and infrastructure allocations 
by the National Microfinance Bank (NMB) and the 
CRDB respectively.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Highlighted Stories   

Stories from over the period that are particularly innovative, looking for scale, strong local focus or tapping 
into new technologies.   

Naturo  Pty  Ltd  develops  new  natural  avocado 
processing technology 
Naturo,  an  Australian  based  company  that 
develops  original  and  healthy  technologies  and 
products  for  businesses  in  the  food  sector, 
recently  developed  a  flagship  product.  It  is  an 
avocado  processing  machine  dubbed  Avocado 
Time  Machine  (ATM)  which  uses  its  Natavo 
Zero™ technology to naturally stop the browning 
of  cut  and  pulped  avocado  by  inhibiting  the 
enzyme,  Polyphenol  Oxidase  or  PPO,  which 
causes browning.    
Natavo  Zero-processed  avocados  last  up  to  two 
years when frozen, 30 days once defrosted, and a 
minimum  of  10  days  when  the  packaging  is 
opened. The technology is a major boost to the 
avocado  industry;  it  will  eliminate  waste  by 
processing second grade, cosmetically ‘ugly’ and 

undersized avocados into pulps and slices. It will 
also allow farmers and processors to access new 
export  markets,  and  ensure  avocado  availability 
all year round.  
Alternative  avocado  processing  technologies 
present various shortcomings. The High-Pressure 

Processing  (HPP)  has  a  shorter  shelf  life,  is 
expensive and is only applied to pulped avocado 
not  cut.  Antioxidant  dips  or  acid  baths  change 
the  natural  taste  &  texture  and  add  chemicals 
raising  food  safety  concerns.  The  technology 
therefore lasts longer and is chemical- free.  
The  machine  processes  500  kilograms  of 
avocados in an hour. Currently, it’s aimed at large 
scale  avocado  processers  or  consumers  like 
airlines and restaurants. The company states that 
it could develop a consumer scale product in the 
future. 
Naturo  has  an  explicit  food  waste  reduction 
strategy  “We  strongly  support  the  efforts  in 
reducing  waste  and  spoilage  of  good  food  from 
paddock  to  plate.  The  careful  use  of  natural 
resources and the protection of our environment 
is our first priority.”  
(

www.naturotechnologies.com

 

ColdHubs  sets  up  and  installs  modular,  solar-
powered  walk-in  cold  rooms  in  farms  and 
markets 
ColdHubs  is  a  Nigerian  based  company  with  an 
explicit  food  loss  reduction  strategy.  “Our 
innovation,  ColdHubs,  is  a  “plug  and  play” 
modular,  solar-powered  walk-in  cold  room,  for 
24/7  off-grid  storage  and  preservation  of 
perishable foods.”  
ColdHubs  addresses  the  challenges  associated 
with  post-harvest  losses  in  fruits  and  vegetables. 
The  cold  rooms  are  installed  in  major  food 
production  and  consumption  centers  (in  markets 
and  farms),  farmers  place  their  produce  in  clean 
plastic crates, and these plastic crates are stacked 
inside the cold room. It extends the freshness of 
fruits, vegetables and other perishable food from 
2 days to about 21 days. The solar powered walk-

in  cold  room  is  made  of  120mm  insulating  cold 
room  panels  to  retain  cold.  Energy  from  solar 
panels mounted on the roof-top of the cold room 
are  stored  in  high  capacity  batteries,  these 
batteries feeds an inverter which in turn feeds the 
refrigerating unit.  
This innovation is critical in tackling constraints in 
cold  storage  due  to  erratic  power  supply  in 
developing  countries.  The  alternative  which 
includes  buying  a  refrigerator  and  a  diesel 
powered  generator  is  expensive;  related 
operational  costs  are  $37.50  per  month 
compared to ColdHubs’ $0.20 daily rate per crate 
stored.  
As  of  January  2017,  ColdHubs  had  set  up  five 
cold  rooms  across  Nigeria;  Owerri,  Orlu,  Ihiala 
and Kano. ColdHubs plans to build about 60 cold 
rooms across Nigeria by the end of the year with 
plans  to  venture  into  Kenya  and  Zimbabwe  in 
2018. Ultimately, the company is working towards 
setting  up  a  cold  chain  business;  with  plans  to 
start  a  logistics  line  which  will  include  reefer 
trucks  for  guaranteed  cooling  from  farm  to 
market/until the last crate is sold. The company is 

currently  in  its  initial  rolling  out  phase  and 
anticipates  commercial  viability  from  end  of 

June-December 2016 

Food Loss & Waste Africa | Intelligence Report

  

 

 

9  

 

2018/early  2019.  It  has  received  a  $12,  000 
funding for a 27% equity stake.  
(www.coldhubs.com) 
 
Farm  Radio  Trust  (FRT)  fosters  rural 
development via communication technologies. 
Farm  Radio  Trust  (FRT)  is  a  non-governmental, 
non-profit  organization  that  exists  to  foster  rural 
and  agricultural  development  in  Malawi  through 
the  use  of  radio  and  other  information  and 

communications technologies (ICTs).”  
FRT  received  a  EUR  1.04  million  grant  from  the 
Belgium government towards its 

Scaling-up Radio 

and  ICTs  in  Enhancing  Extension  Delivery 
(SRIEED)  project

,  aimed  to  improve  the  access 

and  reach  of  agricultural  extension  services  for 

smallholder  farmers.  In  an  aim  to  deliver 
alternative,  interactive  and  complementary 
services,  the  organization 

distributed

  smart-

phones  which  farmers  are  using  to  watch  farm 
videos.  The  videos  have  been  translated  into 
local  languages  by 

Access  Agriculture

an  INGO 

which  showcases  agricultural  training  videos  in 
local  languages.  FRT  plans  to  reach  around  500 
000  smallholder  farmers.  The  project  will  run  till 
2019.  
Some of its partners to date include; Alliance for 
Green  Revolution  in  Africa  (AGRA),  Irish  Aid,  Bill 
and Melinda Gates Foundation, World University 
Service  of  Canada,  Rural  Livelihoods  and 
Economic  Enhancement  Program,  among  other 
Malawi based corporations.  
 (

www.farmradiomw.org

 
FarmCrowdy provides a platform for investing 
in agriculture 
Farmcrowdy  is  an  agric-tech  platform  that  gives 
Nigerians the opportunity to invest in Agriculture. 
“We  use  the  investors  funds  secure  the  land, 
engage  the  farmer,  plant  the  seeds,  insure  the 
farmers  and  farm  produce,  complete  the  full 
farming  cycle,  sell  the  harvest  and  then  pay  the 
investor  a  return  for  their  investment.  While  this 
farm  process  is  on-going,  the  farm  sponsors  are 
able  to  keep  track  of  the  full-cycle  by  getting 
updates in text, pictures and videos.”  
Farm  sponsors  go  through  a  profile  of  available 
farms  and  identify  one  of  interest.  Farm  types 
include; cassava,maize, tomato, chicken, and fish 
farms.  All  farms  have  a  different  tenure/contract 

period  and  varying  returns  on  investment;  from 
13-25%.  The  investment  fund,  paid  at  the 
beginning of a farming cycle includes; land lease 
costs,  agricultural  inputs  like  seedlings/livestock, 
&fertilizers,  maintenance,  supervisions  and 
administration.  
Farm  sponsors  receive  periodic  updates  and 
reports in form of text, pictures & videos and are 
able to learn what it takes to farm selected farms. 
They can also engage the farmer at will and may 
request  a  physical  visit  to  the  farm.  At  harvest, 
produce  is  sold  to  consumer  markets  and  profit 
split  between  the  farmer  (40%),  farm  sponsor 
(40%  plus  original  capital  paid  back)  and 
FarmCrowdy  (20%).  To  date,  FarmCrowdy  has 
planted 298 acres of the 1287 available; it has 52 

farm sponsors and 1511 farmers. It was founded 
in 2016.  
FarmCrowdy  secures  investments,  provides 
agricultural  insurance  for  farmers’  lives  and 
expected 

produce 

against 

pests 

and 

uncontrollable circumstances. The platform allows 

farm  sponsors  and  farm  followers  (those  who 
don’t invest but follow farms of interest) to learn 
about agriculture conveniently. It also provides an 
avenue  to  utilize  untapped  arable  land. 
(

www.farmcrowdy.com

 
Ignitia  informs  farmers  on  the  optimum  times 
to sow, fertilize and harvest 
Ignitia  is  a  Ghanian  based  company  which 
provides  daily  forecasts  and  monthly  &  seasonal 
outlooks  to  over  100,000  subscribers.  Ignitia 
works  closely  with  small-scale farmers,  providing 
them  with  reliable  forecasts,  to  reduce  risk  and 
loss.  Their  forecasts  have  an  accuracy  of  84%; 
more than twice as accurate as global producers.   
Ignitia  partners  with  mobile  telecommunications 
companies and customers pay $0.02 per message 
using their phone credit. It is fully operational in 
Ghana  through  a  partnership  with  MTN  Ghana, 
with  pilots  in  other  West  African  countries  and 
plans  to  expand  to  Cote  d’ivoire  and  Niger  in 
2017 and other regions in 2018.  
 
The  innovation  emerged  second  at  the  USAID 

and  partners  Agricultural  Innovation  Investment 
Summit  in  2016;  winning  $5,000.  Similarly,  the 
company plans on scaling operations following a 
$2.5  million  grant  from  the  Securing  Water  for 

June-December 2016 

Food Loss & Waste Africa | Intelligence Report

  

 

 

10  

 

Food  challenge  funded  by  the  governments  of 
the United States, Sweden, South Africa, and the 
Netherlands.  Ignitia  has  partnered  with  GIZ  and 
WFP.  
The company may not have a specific interest in 
tackling food loss; however its forecasting model 
informs  farmers  on  the  most  favourable  time  to 
sow, fertilize and harvest which leads to risk and 
loss reduction. (

www.ignitia.se

 
Kinosol  SBC  provides  solar-powered  food 
dehydrators  with  temporary  storage  compon-
ents  
KinoSol  is  an  American  based  company  which 
produces  solar-powered  food  dehydrators 
capable of dehydrating fruits, vegetables, grains, 
and insects. The dehydrators are fully powered by 
natural solar i.e. dry fruits, vegetables, grains and 
insects in a process of natural convection in about 
six to eight hours.  
Kinosol  has  sold  over  50  dehydrators  (also 
referred to as the Orenda) across 20 countries to 
date.    The  Dehydrator,  with  temporary  storage 
and  10  Mylar  bags  retails  at  $130  whereas  the 
dehydrator alone retails at $110. 
The company has run field tests across the world, 
and  has  developed  8  prototypes  to  date.  It 
partners  with  various  civil  society  members  keen 
on  tackling  food  loss  for  example;  the  Lutheran 
Church of Hope in Ghana, South Africa, Haiti, and 
Uganda,  the  Green  Africa  Initiative  (GAI)  in 
Tanzania,  Kyosiga  Kyokungura  One  Voice 
Campaign  in  Uganda  and  Gundersen  Clinic  in 
Ethiopia among others.   
The  team  is  currently  working  on  expanding  the 
dehydrator  use  by  developing  a  domestic  unit 
aimed  at  addressing  consumer  food  waste  in 
urban  environments.  Through  its 

Kickstarter 

Campaign

  which  ended  in  November  2016,  the 

team  raised  $10,  445  for  research  and 

development,  of  a  unit  for  use  in  United  States, 
Western Europe, and other areas. 
KinoSol has 

received

 a couple of awards; $35,000 

following the start-up’s participation in the 

Innové 

Project

,  $5,000  award  from  the  2015 

Pappajohn 

New Venture Student Business Plan Competition

and  $300  cash  price  from  the 

Pappajohn  Center 

for Entrepreneurship

Kinosol  has  an  explicit  food  loss  and  waste 
reduction strategy. “The goal of KinoSol is to end 

food  waste,  increase  nutrient  availability,  and 
improve  the  livelihoods  of  subsistence  farmers 
around  the  world.  Today,  one-third  of  all  food 
produced  is  wasted  and  KinoSol  is  working  to 
save this third.” (

www.getkinosol.com

 
FarmForce uses mobile technology to redefine 
contract farming  
FarmForce is a mobile solution that simplifies the 
management  of  small-holder  farmers,  increases 
traceability and enables access to formal markets. 
It  is  used  to  efficiently  manage  outgrower 
schemes and contract farming programs. 
FarmForce helps smallholder farmers gain access 
to  formal  markets  and  improve  the  effectiveness 
of  outgrowerschemes. Formal  markets  can 
increase  the  number  of  potential  buyers  for 
smallholder  produce  but  these  markets  require 
traceability  and  compliance  to  food  safety 
standards; something which has traditionally been 
challenging and time-consuming. 
T

he  app

  requires

  at  least  50  acres  therefore 

contracted  farmers  can  amalgamate  their  small 
pieces  and  feed  the  information  into  the  system 
to  allow  for  central  management.  The  cost  of 
installation  depends  on  the  crops  under 
management. Installing the app for 20 users can 
cost the contractor about Sh300, 000.  

It  is  created  and  developed  by  the  Syngenta 
Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture and is co-
founded  by  the  State  Secretariat  for  Economic 
Affairs of Switzerland. (

www.farmforce.com

 
BrazAgro  Ltd  distributes  solar  or  battery 

powered and collapsible Kikapu Silos 
BrazAgro  Ltd  is  a  leading  supplier  of  farm 
machinery  and  equipments,  based  in  Nairobi, 
Kenya  with  representation  in  Uganda,  Rwanda, 
Mozambique, Tanzania and Ethiopia. Founded in 
1996,  the  company  is  known  for  marketing  and 

distributing  leading  brands  from  Brazil  which 
include  Kepler  Weber,  Trapp,  JF  Maquinas, 
Lavrale, Incomagri and Mesel.  
In 2014, the company started distributing Kikapu 
Silos  developed  by 

Kepler  Weber

.  Kikapu  is  a 

solar  or  battery  powered,  portable  and 

collapsible  silo  facility  which  aerates  grains  and 
reduces  moisture  content  to  13%.  The  silo  is 
tailormade  to  fit  smallholder  and  medium 
enterprises needs.