This article was downloaded by: [Tulane University]
On: 04 October 2014, At: 09:42
Publisher: Routledge
Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954
Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

International Journal of Clinical
and Experimental Hypnosis

Publication details, including instructions for authors and
subscription information:

http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/nhyp20

Modulating the Default Mode
Network Using Hypnosis

Quinton Deeley 

a

 , David A. Oakley 

b

 , Brian Toone 

a

 ,

Vincent Giampietro 

a

 , Michael J. Brammer 

a

 , Steven C.

R. Williams 

a

 & Peter W. Halligan 

c

a

 Kings College London , Institute of Psychiatry , United

Kingdom

b

 University College London and Cardiff University ,

Wales , United Kingdom

c

 Cardiff University , Wales , United Kingdom

Published online: 23 Mar 2012.

To cite this article: Quinton Deeley , David A. Oakley , Brian Toone , Vincent Giampietro ,
Michael J. Brammer , Steven C. R. Williams & Peter W. Halligan (2012) Modulating the
Default Mode Network Using Hypnosis, International Journal of Clinical and Experimental
Hypnosis, 60:2, 206-228, DOI: 

10.1080/00207144.2012.648070

To link to this article:  

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00207144.2012.648070

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE

Taylor & Francis makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of all the information
(the “Content”) contained in the publications on our platform. However, Taylor
& Francis, our agents, and our licensors make no representations or warranties
whatsoever as to the accuracy, completeness, or suitability for any purpose
of the Content. Any opinions and views expressed in this publication are the
opinions and views of the authors, and are not the views of or endorsed by
Taylor & Francis. The accuracy of the Content should not be relied upon and
should be independently verified with primary sources of information. Taylor and
Francis shall not be liable for any losses, actions, claims, proceedings, demands,
costs, expenses, damages, and other liabilities whatsoever or howsoever caused
arising directly or indirectly in connection with, in relation to or arising out of the
use of the Content.

This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes.
Any substantial or systematic reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-
licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly
forbidden. Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found at 

http://

www.tandfonline.com/page/terms-and-conditions

Downloaded by [Tulane University] at 09:42 04 October 2014 

Intl. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 60(2): 206–228, 2012
Copyright © International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
ISSN: 0020-7144 print / 1744-5183 online
DOI: 10.1080/00207144.2012.648070

MODULATING THE DEFAULT MODE

NETWORK USING HYPNOSIS

1

Quinton Deeley

2

Kings College London, Institute of Psychiatry, United Kingdom

David A. Oakley

University College London and Cardiff University, Wales, United Kingdom

Brian Toone, Vincent Giampietro, Michael J. Brammer, and

Steven C. R. Williams

Kings College London, Institute of Psychiatry, United Kingdom

Peter W. Halligan

Cardiff University, Wales, United Kingdom

Abstract:

Debate regarding the neural basis of the hypnotic state

continues, but a recent hypothesis suggests that it may produce alter-
ations in the default mode network (DMN). DMN describes a network
of brain regions more active during low-demand compared to high-
-demand task conditions and has been linked to processes such as
task-independent thinking, episodic memory, semantic processing,
and self-awareness. However, the experiential and cognitive corre-
lates of DMN remain difficult to investigate directly. Using hypnosis
as a means of altering the resting (“default”) state in conjunction with
subjective measures and brain imaging, the authors found that the
state of attentional absorption following a hypnotic induction was
associated with reduced activity in DMN and increased activity in
prefrontal attentional systems, under invariant conditions of passive
visual stimulation. The findings that hypnosis and spontaneous con-
ceptual thought at rest were subjectively and neurally distinctive are
also relevant to understanding hypnosis itself.

Manuscript submitted March 24, 2011; final revision accepted April 7, 2011.

1

We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Psychiatry Research Trust

and the assistance of our volunteers. There are no competing financial interests.

2

Address correspondence to Quinton Deeley, Kings College London, Institute of

Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom.
E-mail: q.deeley@iop.kcl.ac.uk

206

Downloaded by [Tulane University] at 09:42 04 October 2014 

DEFAULT MODE NETWORK AND HYPNOSIS

207

Hypnotic suggestion is increasingly used as an experimental tool

in cognitive neuroscience particularly in conjunction with functional
imaging techniques (Oakley, 2008; Oakley & Halligan, 2009a, 2009b).
However, little attention has been paid to the neurocognitive basis of
the hypnotic “state” and its potential for investigating forms of con-
sciousness and in particular the normal resting state of brain activity
(Zhang & Raichle, 2010). In contrast, there is a long history of the-
oretical debate as to whether hypnosis is a uniquely altered state of
consciousness or whether the hypnotic induction procedure per se pro-
duces its own distinctive brain activity, and also the extent to which
behavioral effects seen in hypnosis can be attributed to alterations
in normal psychological functions such as expectancy and attentional
changes (Kirsch & Lynn, 1995). One hypothesis is that evidence for such
changes might be found in the default mode network (DMN) of brain
activity (Oakley, 2008; Oakley & Halligan, 2009a, 2009b). This raises the
possibility that the state of hypnosis (i.e., the neural consequences of
the hypnotic induction procedure) given its relation to attentional pro-
cesses (Gusnard & Raichle, 2001) may prove to be a novel means of
manipulating and exploring the DMN.

Evidence for a “default” mode of brain function originally stemmed

from convergent findings from several neuroimaging studies all of
which suggested the existence of a distinctive network of brain regions
more active at rest or in low-demand conditions than during goal-
directed cognitive tasks (Gusnard & Raichle, 2001; Mazoyer et al.,
2001). While early studies proposed a single “default mode” of brain
function (Gusnard & Raichle, 2001), subsequent research has estab-
lished that a variety of networks are involved in such rest condi-
tions, such as the dorsal attention network, sensorimotor network,
and “default mode network” (DMN; Zhang & Raichle, 2010). The
DMN (previously described as the more generic “default mode of
brain function”) comprises cortical midline structures including medial
prefrontal cortex, superior frontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, pos-
terior cingulate cortex, precuneus, and retrosplenial cortex, along with
parahippocampal gyri and lateral parietal cortices (Binder et al., 1999;
Mazoyer et al., 2001; Northoff & Bermpohl, 2004; Raichle & Snyder,
2007). Task-induced deactivation in parts of this network have been
reported where the control condition consisted of lying quietly in an
alert state with eyes shut or open, or when passively viewing a stimulus
such as a fixation cross or a checkerboard display (Greicius, Krasnow,
Reiss, & Menon, 2003; Greicius & Menon, 2004; Gusnard, Akbudak,
Shulman, & Raichle, 2001; Mazoyer et al., 2001; Northoff & Bermpohl,
2004; Raichle & Snyder, 2007). Critically the magnitude of task-
dependent decreases in activity of DMN structures has been shown to
depend on relative attentional task demands (McKiernan, D’Angelo,
Kaufman, & Binder, 2006; McKiernan, Kaufman, Kucera-Thompson,

Downloaded by [Tulane University] at 09:42 04 October 2014 

208

QUINTON DEELEY ET AL.

& Binder, 2003). Moreover, momentary lapses in attention have been
shown to be associated with both reduced activity in ventrolateral
prefrontal regions and less task-induced deactivation in the DMN
(Weissman, Roberts, Visscher, & Woldorff, 2006).

However, uncertainty remains regarding the cognitive and subjec-

tive correlates of DMN. This arises because attempts to measure the
experiential state and

/or cognitive performance of subjects at rest runs

the risk of altering the target phenomena under investigation by engag-
ing goal-directed cognitive activity, when the aim is elucidating the
subjective and neural correlates of task-independent cognitive activ-
ity (cf. Grecius & Menon, 2004). Given this methodological problem,
previous attempts to establish the cognitive correlates of brain activity
in the DMN have tended to rely on extrapolations from experiments
using various goal-directed tasks (Binder et al., 1999; Greicius et al.,
2003; McKiernan et al., 2003; Northoff & Bermpohl, 2004). However,
the brain structures thought to comprise the DMN have been shown to
be active under different cognitive task conditions, leading to various
characterizations of cognitive and subjective correlates such as episodic
memory, problem solving and planning, conceptual processing, and
reflexive or “autonoetic” awareness (Binder et al., 1999; Greicius et al.,
2003; Greicius & Menon, 2004; Gusnard et al., 2001; Mazoyer et al.,
2001).

A more direct approach for investigating the DMN has been to

measure the neural correlates of “stimulus-independent” or “task-
unrelated” thoughts (SITs

TUTs) in subjects who concurrently perform

cognitive tasks (Mason et al., 2007; McGuire, Paulesu, Frackowiak,
& Frith, 1996; McKiernan et al., 2006). This method has demon-
strated correlations between SITs and activation in DMN structures,
including medial prefrontal regions (McGuire et al., 1996), anterior
cingulate gyrus, and parieto-occipital cortex (McKiernan et al., 2006).
Nevertheless, the requirement that subjects restrict themselves to
merely reporting the frequency of SITs during task performance pro-
vides limited information about the phenomenological content of SITs
and their association with brain activity.

Hypnosis offers a novel method for directly investigating the cog-

nitive and experiential correlates of DMN whilst circumventing these
methodological limitations (Oakley, 2008; Oakley & Halligan, 2009a,
2009b). Firstly, the standard hypnotic induction procedure employed
in “neutral hypnosis” is designed to promote attentional focusing and
disattention to extraneous stimuli (Cardeña, 2005; Oakley, Deeley, &
Halligan, 2007). As such, it engages cognitive changes (increased sus-
tained attention) with corresponding experiential changes (a sense
of increased attentional focus and decreased stimulus-independent
thoughts) (Cardeña, 2005; Rainville & Price, 2004) predicted on the
basis of prior studies to produce a decrease in DMN activity and

Downloaded by [Tulane University] at 09:42 04 October 2014 

DEFAULT MODE NETWORK AND HYPNOSIS

209

increased activity in prefrontal systems supporting sustained atten-
tion (Oakley, 2008; Oakley & Halligan, 2009a, 2009b). These changes
could be described as “task-related” to the extent that the induction
procedure can be envisaged as a “task” eliciting alterations in cogni-
tion and experience until the point at which they are reversed by the
experimenter (or otherwise remit). However, it should be emphasized
that the cognitive and experiential effects of the induction procedure
are qualitatively distinct from the “task-related” procedures typically
employed in fMRI experimentation—that is, they are not elicited by
performance of a goal-directed task (e.g., an n-back task) (Raichle &
Snyder 2007). Further, subjects are able to describe aspects of their expe-
rience in both the normal alert state and following a hypnotic induction
procedure using self-report measures, in addition to more detailed
phenomenological interviews following reversal of the hypnotic state
(Oakley et al., 2007). The ability of subjects to describe aspects of expe-
rience both in the normal alert state and hypnosis potentially allows
associated changes in DMN and other aspects of brain activity to
be related more directly to cognitive and experiential changes than
previous paradigms.

It should be noted that one previous study employed fMRI to

investigate the effects of induction of hypnosis on DMN (McGeown,
Mazzoni, Venneri, & Kirsch, 2009). Eleven highly hypnotizable sub-
jects required to attend to a fixation point in and out of hypnosis
showed reduced activity in anterior DMN regions (anterior cingulate,
medial and superior frontal gyri bilaterally), in addition to the left
inferior and middle frontal gyri. The reverse contrast of hypnosis ver-
sus the normal alert state at rest revealed no significant differences
(McGeown et al., 2009). The study provided preliminary support for
the hypothesis that induction of hypnosis is associated with reduction
in activity in components of the DMN. Nevertheless, the study design
was based on between-condition contrasts without detailed self-report
and phenomenological measures and consequently did not allow a
more direct investigation of the experiential and cognitive correlates
of DMN by employing correlations between self-rated depth of hyp-
nosis and brain activity, supplemented with qualitative descriptions of
experience before and after induction of hypnosis.

In the present study, we report an fMRI experiment that employed

hypnosis as a means of systematically varying neurocognitive function
(sustained attention and stimulus-independent thought) under iden-
tical low-demand stimulus conditions, in conjunction with self-report
and phenomenological measures as the means to define the experiential
correlates of changes in DMN and other brain systems. We employed
a standard hypnotic induction procedure in 8 highly hypnotizable
subjects, all of whom had been hypnotized on at least two previous
occasions (Oakley et al., 2007). Brain activity was measured with fMRI

Downloaded by [Tulane University] at 09:42 04 October 2014 

210

QUINTON DEELEY ET AL.

before hypnosis (prehypnosis), following hypnotic induction (hypno-
sis), and following reversal of hypnosis (posthypnosis) under identical
conditions of passive visual stimulation with reversing checkerboards.
The use of passive visual stimulation as a low-demand experimental
condition has been shown to be associated with activity in the DMN
and thus was appropriate for investigating subjective and neurocogni-
tive dimensions of the resting state (Greicius & Menon, 2004). Subjects
were told that the study was concerned with motor function in hypno-
sis and a variety of motor tasks were carried out but are not reported
on here. The checkerboard displays were presented completely inde-
pendently of the motor tasks. Subjects were simply asked to look at
the screen while it was present and no suggestions were given at any
time that related to the checkerboard display. This served to mini-
mize the possible influence of task-related expectations and demand
characteristics on brain activity during the checkerboard stimulation.

Currently, there is no neural measure of hypnotic depth (the degree to

which an individual has entered into the experience of hypnosis). There
are, however, well-established self-report procedures such as the hyp-
notic depth scale described by LeCron (1953), later developed as the
Long Stanford Scale (Tart, 1970), and more recently, McConkey, Wende,
and Barnier (1999) have used a more sensitive method in which the par-
ticipant moves the pointer on a dial to indicate changes in the intensity
of their experience of hypnosis. Given space limitations in the scan-
ner and to avoid unnecessary motor movement, we employed a more
traditional self-report approach. Subjects rated their depth of hypnosis
immediately prior to, and after, each presentation of the checkerboard
display (see Oakley et al., 2007). We used correlation analyses to explore
the relationship between this experiential state and brain activity. Most
studies of hypnosis and cognitive control relate to the state produced
by hypnosis plus suggestion. Where hypnosis has been explored in the
absence of task-specific suggestion (neutral hypnosis), as in our study,
alterations in attentional control in particular seem to be involved;
though evidence on the direction of these changes is inconsistent (Egner
& Raz, 2007; Raz, 2005). Given that hypnosis appears to be associ-
ated with alterations in sustained attentional focus (Price & Barrell,
1990; Raz, 2005), we predicted (Oakley, 2008; Oakley & Halligan, 2009a)
that (a) increasing the depth of hypnosis would be associated with
increased activity in prefrontal attentional networks (Bunge, Ochsner,
Desmond, Glover, & Gabrieli, 2001; Fletcher & Henson, 2001; Gehring
& Knight, 2002), and (b) decreased activity in cortical midline and
other DMN structures previously proposed to be active during spon-
taneous (stimulus-independent) thought (Binder et al., 1999; Greicius
et al., 2003).

We also used qualitative findings from postscanning phenomenolog-

ical interviews to explore a related set of hypotheses. At an experiential

Downloaded by [Tulane University] at 09:42 04 October 2014 

DEFAULT MODE NETWORK AND HYPNOSIS

211

level, we predicted that compared to the normal alert resting state,
hypnosis would be associated with increasingly focused attention and
absorption (indexed by an increase in self-reported absorption and a
reduction in distraction by outside stimuli) accompanied by decreased
spontaneous thought (indexed by a reduction in self-reported analytic
thinking and the feeling that the mind is “cluttered up” with thoughts
and associations) (Cardeña, 2005; Rainville & Price, 2004).

Method

Subjects

We studied 8 right-handed healthy volunteers (male

= 4,

female

= 4) with a mean age of 22.6 years (Range 19–36; SD = 5.6).

Subjects were selected from a larger sample tested on the Harvard
Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A; Shor &
Orne, 1962) as being of medium to high hypnotizability (8

+ out of

12) and had experienced at least two subsequent standardized hypnotic
induction procedures before the present study. Their mean HGSHS:A
score was 10.25 (Range 8–12; SD

= 1.49). Ethical approval was obtained

from the Ethical Committee of the South London and Maudsley Trust
and Institute of Psychiatry, United Kingdom. After description of the
study to the subjects, written informed consent was obtained.

Passive Viewing Condition

The three experimental conditions were all carried out in the scan-

ner and involved a visual stimulus display presented at the beginning
of the session (prehypnosis

condition 1); in the middle of the session

after hypnotic induction (during-hypnosis

condition 2); and at the end

of the session after reversal of hypnosis (posthypnosis

condition 3).

A 16-second period of stimulation, consisting of a reversing checker-
board pattern presented at one of three reversal frequencies (2, 4, or
8 Hz), was alternated with a 16-second period of central crosshair fixa-
tion. This cycle was repeated nine times in the course of the condition.
The order of reversal frequencies was randomized within each set of
three consecutive stimulation

/fixation cycles. The total duration of each

condition was 4 minutes 48 seconds, resulting in acquisition of 144 total
brain volumes.

Hypnosis procedure. Participants remained in the scanner for the

duration of the hypnosis induction procedure spread over a 10-minute
period. The induction was based on Gruzelier’s Three-Stage model
(1998) and is described in detail elsewhere (Oakley et al., 2007). Briefly,
this involved (a) visual fixation on a projected central crosshair and
listening to the experimenter’s voice, (b) suggestions of fatigue at

Downloaded by [Tulane University] at 09:42 04 October 2014 

212

QUINTON DEELEY ET AL.

continued fixation, eye closure and tiredness, with deep relaxation
and counting from 1 to 20, and (c) instructions for relaxed and pas-
sive imagery (Special Place or “Safe Place”; Heap & Aravind, 2002).
Suggestions of Special Place imagery were reversed before the during-
hypnosis passive viewing condition (Condition 2) was administered.
Prior to presentation of each of the three passive viewing conditions,
subjects were simply told “Keep your eyes open. Please look at the
screen—you will not be asked to make any movements.” No other
instructions were given and no suggestions were made at any time
regarding the checkerboard display. Hence, subjects were in a state of
neutral hypnosis during the second passive viewing condition. That is,
they were in the mental state produced by the hypnosis procedure in
the absence of any suggestions that related to their experience of view-
ing the reversing checkerboard display (Oakley et al., 2007). Hypnosis
was subsequently terminated by reversing Steps a and b.

As noted above, the study reported here was carried out along-

side an unrelated study of motor function. The hypnosis part of the
study (including motor function tests) lasted for approximately 1 hour
and 15 minutes and hypnosis was finished approximately 15 minutes
before the participant left the scanner. A detailed description, complete
with scripts, of the experimental sequence for the motor function study
and the hypnosis induction and reversal procedures common to both
studies is provided in Oakley et al. (2007). For the present study, the
prehypnosis passive viewing condition (Condition 1) took place before
the motor function study commenced. There then followed a motor
testing condition that involved the subject moving a joystick repeat-
edly from side to side with their dominant hand when instructed to
do so. This was followed by the hypnosis induction procedure and
then the during-hypnosis passive viewing condition (Condition 2). The
motor function test was then repeated twice—once with a suggested
paralysis of the dominant hand and once with the paralysis suggestion
removed and normal limb function restored. Hypnosis was then termi-
nated and the passive viewing condition was repeated for a third time
(posthypnosis passive viewing condition—Condition 3).

Self-Ratings of Depth of Hypnosis and Postscanning Assessments

Subjects were asked to rate the subjective depth of their hypnotic

experience immediately before and after each of the passive view-
ing conditions on a scale of 1–10 (Tart, 1970), where 0 was defined
as not hypnotized at all and 10 was as deeply hypnotized as you have
ever been
. To secure a more detailed account of the experience of hyp-
nosis, we conducted a semi-structured interview immediately after
subjects had left the MR scanner in which they were asked to describe
their experience of hypnosis compared to their normal alert state. The
duration of the complete session in the scanner was approximately

Downloaded by [Tulane University] at 09:42 04 October 2014 

DEFAULT MODE NETWORK AND HYPNOSIS

213

2 hours. Six of the 8 subjects also completed visual analogue scales
consisting of two measures of attentional focus (absorption and dis-
traction by outside stimuli), two measures of spontaneous thought
(tendency to analytic thinking and the feeling of the mind being clut-
tered by thoughts and associations), and a measure of relaxation.
Subjects completed these scales in relation (a) to when they had felt
most hypnotized and (b) to when they were not hypnotized. Each of the
scales consisted of a 100 mm horizontal line marked at one end “Not at
all (relaxed

/distractedanalytical/absorbed/cluttered up)” and at the

other end “Very (relaxed

/distractedanalytical/absorbed/cluttered up)

indeed.” Subjects were asked to make a mark on the line to represent
the extent to which they experienced each of these feelings. Scores were
derived by direct measurement in mm from the left of each scale where
Not at all

. . . corresponded to 0 and Very. . . . indeed to 100.

Image Acquisition

Gradient-echo echoplanar imaging (EPI) data were acquired with

a 1.5 Tesla (T) MR system based at the Maudsley Hospital, United
Kingdom. A GE LX-NV

/CV system equipped with ultrafast SR

150 magnetic field gradients was employed, allowing a maximum gra-
dient amplitude of 40 mT

/m (General Electric, Milwaukee, Wisconsin,

USA). Functional MRI examinations were conducted using the follow-
ing scanner parameters: pulse sequence

= single shot, echo planar, gra-

dient echo imaging; repetition time

= 2000 msec; echo time = 40 msec;

RF flip angle

= 70 degrees; slice orientation = near-axial; number of

slices

= 16; slice thickness = 7 mm; gap between slices = 0.7 mm; acqui-

sition matrix resolution

= 64 × 64 (for a 24 cm field of view); acquisition

mode

= interleaved; K-space sampling = FULL, ramp sampling ON;

frequency direction

= right-left; number of dummy acquisitions = 4;

total number of images per slice

= 144.

Brain Image Analysis

Data were analyzed with XBAM software developed at the Institute

of Psychiatry, London, using a nonparametric statistical approach
(for a full description and references, see www.brainmap.co.uk). The
nonparametric approach is of importance here to achieve rigorous sta-
tistical inference given the difficulty of establishing normality in fMRI
experiments (Thirion et al., 2007). A 3D volume consisting of the aver-
age intensity at each voxel over the whole experiment was calculated
and used as a template. The 3D-image volume at each time point was
then realigned to this template by computing the combination of rota-
tions (around the x-, y-, and z-axes) and translations (in x, y, and z)
that maximized the correlation between the image intensities of the vol-
ume in question and the template. Following realignment, data were
then smoothed using a Gaussian filter to improve the signal to noise

Downloaded by [Tulane University] at 09:42 04 October 2014