VTA

 

GUIDANCE

 

 

May 16, 2016 

 

 

 

On  May  5,  2016,  the  Vapor  Technology  Association  (VTA)  issued  its  Initial  Thoughts  on  the  Deeming 
Regulation.   As noted, the 500+ pages of Deeming Regulations and guidance documents are very complex 
and require significant analysis.   We have prepared for you our next level thoughts on the Deeming and hope 
you find it helpful.  Rest assured, this will not answer all of your questions.   However, VTA has assembled a 
group of FDA and regulatory experts in Washington, D.C. on June 7 and 8, 2016, who will be able to provide 
specific practical information on how to survive in a post-deeming world.  Very shortly, we will be providing 
more details on our conference.  Click here to learn more

VAPE & THE FDA: Understand It.  Manage It. 

 

 
 
 
 
 

 

VTA’s  Next  Level  Thoughts  on  the  Deeming  Regulation 

The FDA Attempts to Kill the Hope of Vape 

On May 10, 2016, the FDA issued its long-awaited Deeming Regulation 
that  reflects  little  advanced  thinking  about  how  to  regulate  the  only 
ground-breaking  technology  that  shows  remarkable  promise  for 
reducing cigarette smoking. 
 
One thing is clear: the FDA has ignored all industry comments, giving 
little  consideration  to  the  advances  in  vapor  technology,  the  industry’s  
survival as a whole, or the broader objective of advancing public health.  
Given  that  the  law  of  the  land  already  prohibits  the  sale  of  vapor 
products  to  youth  and  requires  child  resistant  packaging,   the   FDA’s  
primary justifications for imposing the Deeming are fictions. 
 
Instead,  by  targeting  for  extinction  the  overwhelming  majority  of 
companies  that  manufacture  or  supply  vapor  products,  the  FDA  has 
demonstrated a certain callousness to the millions of adult consumers 
of  cigarettes  who  have  been  relying  on  vapor  products.      And,  by 
imposing  an  antiquated  tobacco  regulatory  scheme  on  non-tobacco 
products, the FDA has demonstrated a lack of vision for how to regulate 
a  revolutionary  technology  and  the  innovative  companies  that  are 
driving that technology forward.  
 
Locked in its antiquated mindset, the FDA now subjects vapor products 
to a regulatory bramble which will squander a decade of technological 
innovation and replace it with the burden of papering over untenable 
demands.   Understanding the Deeming comes first.  But, shortly we will 
take the next step to level the playing field for the industry and hope 
that you join us. 
 

 

 

 

– Vapor Technology Association 

 

In this Guidance 

 

General Overview 

Page 2 

 

Expansive List of  

Deemed Products 

Page 2 

 

Companies That Are Regulated 

Page 3 

 

Applications Abound? 

Page 4 

 

Labeling & Advertising 

Page 7 

 

Other Compliance 

Requirements 

Page 8 

 

Deadlines 

Page 8 

 

 

__________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

The following information is being provided for general educational purposes only, and is neither intended nor should be construed as legal advice with respect to 

the Deeming Regulation.  Companies affected by the Deeming Regulation should retain able counsel to advise them with respect to compliance. 

To learn more about the Vapor Technology Association sign up at 

www.vaportechnology.org

 

VTA

 

GUIDANCE

 

 

May 16, 2016 

Page 2 of 8 

 

 

WHY IS FDA NOW REGULATING  

VAPOR PRODUCTS? 

In  2009,  Congress  enacted  The  Family  Smoking 
Prevention  and  Tobacco  Control  Act.    The  law 
imposed  significant  new  requirements  on  the  sale 
and advertising of cigarettes, roll-your-own tobacco 
(RYO),  and  smokeless  tobacco  and  placed  those 
products under the authority of FDA.  Congress also 
stated  that  FDA  could  expand  its  jurisdiction  to 
other  tobacco  products  if  it  so  chose  by  issuing 
regulations.  Five years later, FDA issued proposed 
regulations that would bring under its control vape 
products  and  e-cigarettes,  e-liquids  and  other 
components.   After considering comments from the 
general  public,  health  groups,  industry  and  other 
interested parties, FDA published its final Deeming 
Regulations (the  “Deeming”)  on May 10, 2016. 
 

WHAT DO THE NEW REGULATIONS DO? 

What  we  call  vapor  products,  the  FDA  is  calling 
Electronic  Nicotine  Delivery  Systems  (ENDS).    In 
short,  under  the  Deeming  the  FDA  exercises 
extensive  control  over  ENDS  products  through  all 
stages  –  development, manufacturing,  advertising, 
and retail sales – by deeming them covered tobacco 
products. 

 

WHAT  IS  A  “COVERED  TOBACCO  PRODUCT”? 

A   “covered   tobacco   product”   is   a   product   that  
contains, is made or is derived from tobacco – in no 
matter how small an amount – and is intended for 
human consumption.   
 

 
Electronic  Nicotine  Delivery  Systems.    
ENDS 
products  that  contain  nicotine  or  any  other 
ingredient or component derived from tobacco are 
covered by the new rule.  Currently, FDA generally 
considers  ENDS  as  tobacco  products  that  use  an 
electronic or other power source to heat e-liquids, 
tobacco, or other material derived from tobacco.  
 
FDA had defined 3 sub-classes of ENDS products:  

  E-liquids,  
  aerosolizing apparatus and   
  ENDS  products  that  package  e-liquids  and 

aerosolizing apparatus together.   

In  other  words,  while  these  sub-classes  may  be 
considered  components  of  tobacco  products  (as 
discussed  below),  if  they  themselves  contain 
tobacco they are also  “covered  tobacco  products.”   
The easiest example is an e-cigarette cartridge filled 
with e-liquid derived from tobacco.  However, if an 
e-liquid,  which  does  not  contain  tobacco,  is 
intended or reasonably expected to be mixed with 
an  e-liquid  made  from  or  derived  from  tobacco,  it 
will be treated as a covered tobacco product.  
 

WHAT OTHER PRODUCTS ARE AFFECTED  

BY THE NEW REGULATIONS? 

Components.  Basically,  a  component  is  anything 
(software, assembly materials, you name it) that is 
intended or reasonably expected to either: (1) alter 
or 

affect 

the 

performance, 

composition, 

constituents or characteristics of a tobacco product, 
OR  (2)  be  used  with  or  for  the  consumption  of  a 
tobacco  product.  The  FDA  considers  e-liquids, 
atomizers,  batteries  (with  or  without  variable 
voltage),  cartomizers  (atomizer  plus  replaceable 
fluid-filled cartridge), digital display/lights to adjust 
settings, clearomisers, tank systems, flavors, bottles 
that contain e-liquids, and programmable software 
all to be examples of components regulated under 
the new rules.   

GENERAL OVERVIEW 

EXPANSIVE LIST OF PRODUCTS  

COVERED BY DEEMING 

__________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

The following information is being provided for general educational purposes only, and is neither intended nor should be construed as legal advice with respect to 

the Deeming Regulation.  Companies affected by the Deeming Regulation should retain able counsel to advise them with respect to compliance. 

To learn more about the Vapor Technology Association sign up at 

www.vaportechnology.org

 

VTA

 

GUIDANCE

 

 

May 16, 2016 

Page 3 of 8 

 

However,   products   that   meet   FDA’s   definition   of  
“accessory”   are   not   “components”   and   are   not  
regulated at this time. 
 
Accessories.    FDA   defines   an   “accessory”   as   a  
product that is intended or reasonably expected to 
be  used  with  or  for  consumption  of  a  tobacco 
product,  but  is  not  made  or  derived  from  tobacco 
and meets either one of these two tests:   
 
(1)  the  product  is  not  intended  or  reasonably 
expected  to  affect 
or 

alter 

the 

performance, 
composition, 
constituents 

or 

characteristics 

of 

the 

tobacco 

product; OR  
 
(2)  the  product  is 
intended  to  do  so 
only by: 
  
(a)  Controlling  the 
moisture 

or 

temperature  of  a 
stored 

tobacco 

product 

(e.g., 

humidors) or  
 
(b)  Providing  an 
initial  heat  source 
for  ignition  of  a 
tobacco 

product, 

but not to maintain 
combustion  (e.g., 
lighters).  If an item 
used with your product does not meet the definition 
of accessory, it is more than likely a component. 
 
 

 

WHO DOES THE DEEMING APPLY TO? 

Most  of  the  regulations  are  directed  at 
manufacturers and importers of tobacco products.  
FDA  defines  manufacturer  broadly  to  include  any 
facility  or  establishment  that  handles  the  tobacco 
product 

during 

its 

manufacture, 

including 

assemblers, re-packers and re-labelers.  FDA also 
regulates  any  retailer  which  is  defined  as  any 
person or entity that that sells covered tobacco 
product to anyone for personal consumption.  A 
retailer may also include the owner of an adult-
only  venue  that  operates  a  vending  machine 
containing ENDS or other self-service offerings of 
ENDS.  
 
However, as discussed below, a retailer (even a 
small  vape  shop)  may  be  considered  a 
manufacturer  if  it  engages  in  manufacturing 
activities.  
 

WHAT IF I MAKE COMPONENTS? 

If  you  make  components  of  vape  systems,  but 
only  sell  them  for  use  in  the  manufacture  of 
other  products,  you  will  still  be  subject  to  the 
deeming.    However,  while  you  are  subject  to 
deeming under the rule, FDA currently plans to 
limit  its  enforcement  of  some  of  the  most 
demanding 

requirements 

(i.e., 

market 

authorization  applications,  HPHC  testing)  to 
manufacturers  of  “finished  tobacco  products”  – 
products  (including  components)  that  are 
packaged for final retail sale. 
 

Thus,  if  you  make  e-liquids  sold  only  to 
manufacturers  of  other  ENDS  products,  you  need 
not  submit  a  market  authorization  application.  
However,  you  will  likely need to  work  closely  with 

FDA Says All of the 

Following Are 

Regulated 

“Components” 

   

E-liquids 

Atomizers 

Batteries  

Cartomizers  

Replaceable cartridges 

Digital display/lights 

Clearomisers 

Tank systems 

Flavors 

Bottles containing e-liquids 

Software 

   

And, this is not an 

exhaustive list.

 

COMPANIES THAT ARE REGULATED 

 

__________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

The following information is being provided for general educational purposes only, and is neither intended nor should be construed as legal advice with respect to 

the Deeming Regulation.  Companies affected by the Deeming Regulation should retain able counsel to advise them with respect to compliance. 

To learn more about the Vapor Technology Association sign up at 

www.vaportechnology.org

 

VTA

 

GUIDANCE

 

 

May 16, 2016 

Page 4 of 8 

 

your  customers  to  make  sure  they  have  the 
information  they  need  to  file  a  successful 
application for the final retail product. 
 
Importantly, manufacturers of components that are 
not made or derived from tobacco (e.g., an atomizer 
or  e-liquid  tank  sold  packaged  alone  at  retail)  are 
not  required  to  comply  with  certain  provisions  of 
the  rule,  such  as  required  warning  statements  on 
packages  and  in  advertising,  minimum  age 
verification  requirements,  and  the ban  on  vending 
machine  sales.    However,  components  of  tobacco 
products  that  are  not  “covered  tobacco  products,”  
i.e.,  are  not  made  or  derived  from  tobacco,  must 
comply  with  all  other  provisions  of  the  Deeming, 
including filing product authorization applications. 
 

WHAT IF I AM SMALL OPERATION? 

Retailers.  Retailers, even single vape shop owners, 
are required to comply with numerous regulations 
set forth in the Deeming:    
  The sale of covered ENDS products is prohibited 

to those under 18 years of age (or higher under 
state or local laws).   

  Retailers must require photo ID of anyone who 

appears to be 26 years old or younger beginning 
August 8, 2016.   

  It appears at this point that FDA also will require 

photographic  ID  for  internet  and  mail  order 
sales.  Self-certification of age is prohibited. 

  Product labels and advertising must not contain 

any  representation  that  ENDS  might  help 
cessation of or reduction in tobacco use.  

  Free  samples  of  tobacco  products  are 

prohibited, beginning August 8, 2016. 

  No vending machines will be allowed except in 

an  “adult  only”  facility. 

In addition, if you operate a retail shop but engage 
in  “manufacturing”  activities,  FDA will regulate you 
as  a  manufacturer  regardless  of  how  small  your 

“manufacturing”   operations   may   be.      These  
activities include the blending of liquids, assembling 
vape  components  or  devices,  and/or  repackaging 
products.  

Small  Scale  Manufacturers.    If  you  are  a  small 
manufacturer,  the  FDA  has  provided  what  it 
believes to be some relief with respect to deadlines.  
small-scale manufacturer is one who employs 150 
or  less  full-time  equivalent  employees  and  has 
annual total revenues of $5 million or less.  Small-
scale  manufacturers  are  given  a  six-month 
extension  on  reporting  ingredients  and  providing 
health documents to FDA, and may be treated more 
generously with respect to extensions of time. 

 

WILL I NEED TO FILE A COSTLY APPLICATION? 

The FDA now requires all manufacturers of tobacco 
products on the market on or before August 8, 2016, 
to  file  costly  applications  to  simply  keep  those 
products 

on 

the 

market. 

However, 

the 

manufacturer of any tobacco product that was sold 
domestically  on  February 15,  2007  (the   “Predicate  
Date”),  and  has  not  been  modified  since  February 
15,  2007,  will  not  need  to  file  any  product 
authorization applications with the FDA.   
 

WHAT ARE MY APPLICATION OPTIONS? 

The FDA says it offers three potential pathways for 
companies to keep their products on the market: 
(1)  file  a  Premarket  Tobacco  Application  (PMTA) 
within  24  months  of  the  Effective  Date;  (2)  file  a 
Substantial Equivalence Application (SE) within 18 
month of the Effective Date; or (3) file a Substantial 
Equivalence  exemption  
request  within  12  months 
of the Effective Date.  However, as discussed below, 
these are false choices for the vast majority of the 
industry  since  companies  will  not  be  able  to  take 

APPLICATIONS ABOUND? 

__________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

The following information is being provided for general educational purposes only, and is neither intended nor should be construed as legal advice with respect to 

the Deeming Regulation.  Companies affected by the Deeming Regulation should retain able counsel to advise them with respect to compliance. 

To learn more about the Vapor Technology Association sign up at 

www.vaportechnology.org

 

VTA

 

GUIDANCE

 

 

May 16, 2016 

Page 5 of 8 

 

advantage of either of the less expensive substantial 
equivalence pathways. 
 

WHY  CAN’T  I  FILE  A   

SUBSTANTIAL EQUIVALENCE APPLICATION? 

The  substantial  equivalence  exemption  and 
substantial equivalence pathways are the two least 
burdensome applications for a company seeking to 
keep  its  products  on  the  market.    However,  both 
pathways  require  the  existence  of  a  predicate 
product, which must be a grandfathered product (at 
least  until  other  products  receive  a  SE  marketing 
order).  
 
It  is  well  accepted  that  virtually no  ENDS products 
will   qualify   for   such   “grandfather”   status   since  
virtually no ENDS products were on the market on 
the Predicate Date – February 15, 2007.  In fact, in 
the Deeming, the FDA admitted that it has been able 
to identify only one e-product that might serve as a 
predicate  for  either  substantial  equivalence 
pathway.  
 
But,  the  “predicate”   identified  is  not  publicly 
available  for  use  by  companies  as  a  predicate  for 
substantial  equivalence  purposes.    Even  if  it  were, 
the  first  generation  e-cigar  identified  is  likely  so 
vastly  different  from  any  currently  marketed  e-
products  that  FDA  is  unlikely  to  issue  either  a 
substantial  equivalence  exemption  or  marketing 
order on such an application.   
 
To  date,  the  FDA  has  applied  the  substantial 
equivalence standard to require that the predicate 
product  be  virtually  identical  to  the  product  for 
which  the  application  is  filed.    Moreover,  the  FDA 
has  implied  that  it  would  be  reluctant  to  accept 
cross-product  category  comparisons.    For  all  of 
these  reasons,  two  out  of  the  three  pathways  are 
simply  foreclosed.    Hence,  manufacturers  of  ENDS 
products  will  be  required  to  file  a  full  Premarket 

Tobacco Product Application (PMTA) simply to keep 
their products on the market. 
 

WHAT MUST I DO TO FILE A  

PREMARKET TOBACCO APPLICATION? 

FDA’s  

PMTA Guidance for ENDS Products

 contains 

more   detail   on   FDA’s   initial   expectations   for   ENDS  
applications.   A PMTA requires a detailed showing 
through  scientific  analysis,  public  literature,  and 
testing that the marketing of the product would be 
“appropriate   for   the   protection   of   the   public  
health,”  including  effects  on  quit  rates  and  uptake.    
That standard remains ill-defined.  New clinical and 
non-clinical studies may be required. 
 
It is important to note that FDA Guidances are not 
binding  law.    They  only  state  FDA’s  current  thinking. 
However, FDA has a track record of requiring more, 
not less, than what the guidance provides.  Both FDA 
and  industry  may  take  a  different  approach  if  it 
reaches the same goal.   
 
Manufacturers  can  get  FDA  input  as  it  begins 
structuring its PMTA by scheduling a meeting as set 
forth in FDA Guidance 

Meetings with Industry and 

Investigators on the Research and Development of 
Tobacco  Products

.    As  detailed  in  the  guidance, 

manufacturers should be prepared with the specific 
questions  or  issues  they’d  like  to  discuss  and  need  
to provide detailed supporting information prior to 
that  meeting.    FDA  does  not  answer  broad,  open 
questions  with  respect  to  the  requirements  of  a 
specific  application.    The  best  approach  is  to  have 
developed  a  proposed  answer  to  your  questions, 
fully justify that to the agency, ask them for input, 
and  confirm  that  you  and  the  agency  have  an 
agreed-upon approach before you leave.  Make sure 
that  approach  is  reflected  in  FDA’s  meeting  minutes 
and  send  a  confirming  letter  post-meeting  stating 
your understanding of all points of agreement.  
 

__________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

The following information is being provided for general educational purposes only, and is neither intended nor should be construed as legal advice with respect to 

the Deeming Regulation.  Companies affected by the Deeming Regulation should retain able counsel to advise them with respect to compliance. 

To learn more about the Vapor Technology Association sign up at 

www.vaportechnology.org

 

VTA

 

GUIDANCE

 

 

May 16, 2016 

Page 6 of 8 

 

HOW WILL THE FDA APPLICATION AND REVIEW 

PROCESS AFFECT MY CURRENT PRODUCTS? 

Products introduced or changed since the Predicate 
Date and on the market prior to August 8, 2016, will 
be required to undergo the PMTA process.  PMTAs 
for  each  new  product  must  be  filed  by  August  8, 
2018,  in  order  to  stay  on  the  market  beyond  that 
date.  FDA then – in theory but likely not in practice 
–  has  180  days  to  review  the  application.  FDA 
announced  it  will  allow  for  “continued  compliance,”  
meaning it will not take products off the market for 
another  12  months  after 
August  8,  2018,  if  a  PMTA 
was  timely  filed.    If  FDA 
decides  the  product  does 
not meet the standards set 
forth  in  the  Tobacco 
Control 

Act 

or 

the 

manufacturer 

fails 

to 

provide 

additional 

information 

requested 

during  review,  FDA  may 
order  the  product  be 
removed  from  the  market 
at 

the 

end 

of 

the 

“continued  

compliance”  

period.   
 

WILL I BE ABLE TO 

INTRODUCE  

NEW PRODUCTS AND 

NEW BRANDS? 

After  August  8,  2016,  no 
new  products  or  brands 
can  be  introduced  into  the  marketplace  without 
prior  authorization  by  FDA,  and  no  changes  to 
current  products,  however  small,  may  be  made.  
Given  the  detailed  review  process,  the  backlog  of 
existing  and  new  applications,  and  the  uncertain 
level of resources FDA will commit to newly deemed 
products,  it  will  almost  certainly  be  a  number  of 
years before any new tobacco products of any sort 

will  be  able  to  enter  the  market  after  August  8, 
2016. 
 

HOW QUICKLY WILL FDA REVIEW  

PMTA APPLICATIONS? 

Frankly,  we’re  not  sure.    That  depends  on  FDA.    FDA  
still has a significant backlog of applications dating 
back to when cigarette, RYO and smokeless tobacco 
products were first regulated.  FDA only authorized 
new  products  under  a  PMTA  for  the  first  time  in 
November  2015,  for  products  which  were  already 

well-known 

and 

well  characterized 
in 

product 

category  familiar  to 
the  agency.  The 
new regulations will 
result  in  a  huge 
number  of  new 
applications  being 
filed 

by 

manufacturers 

of 

cigars,  pipes,  e-
cigarettes 

and 

liquids, 

vape 

products,  hookahs 
and  other  tobacco 
products.   
 
FDA  will  need  to 
hire  and  train  new 
staff  and  educate 
itself about the new 
products now under 

its authority.  To date, despite the fact that tobacco 
product  manufacturers  pay  the  costs  of  tobacco 
regulation  through  “user  fees”,  only  a  small  amount  
of  those  fees  have  been  devoted  to  review  of 
tobacco product applications.  Most of that money 
is spent on public education programs, the setting 
up  and  funding  of  tobacco  research  centers,  and 
administrative costs. 

 

FDA TRACK RECORD ON APPLICATIONS 

 

The FDA is sitting on 3,500 provisional substantial 

equivalence applications (for tobacco products 

currently on the market).  These applications, 

which have not been ruled on by FDA, have been 

pending for up to 5 years. 

 

 

Through FY2015, 2,000 new substantial 

equivalence applications are also still awaiting a 

decision by the FDA.  

 

 

The likelihood that FDA can or will process 

hundreds if not thousands of more complicated 

and more burdensome PMTAs within 12 months 

is, frankly, not encouraging. 

__________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

The following information is being provided for general educational purposes only, and is neither intended nor should be construed as legal advice with respect to 

the Deeming Regulation.  Companies affected by the Deeming Regulation should retain able counsel to advise them with respect to compliance. 

To learn more about the Vapor Technology Association sign up at 

www.vaportechnology.org

 

VTA

 

GUIDANCE

 

 

May 16, 2016 

Page 7 of 8 

 

WHAT  HAPPENS  IF  THE  FDA  DOESN’T  APPROVE  

MY APPLICATION IN 12 MONTHS? 

Every PMTA application filed must be decided upon 
by FDA within 12 months after the respective filing 
deadline.  If FDA fails to issue a marketing order by 
the  end  of  this   12   month   “Continued   Compliance  
Period,”  you could be required to pull your product 
from  the  market  by  FDA  until  it  decides  on  your 
application.    Given   the   FDA’s   track   record   on  
processing less complicated substantial equivalence 
applications,  it  is  highly  unlikely  that,  without  a 
dramatic change of procedure and manpower, the 
FDA  will  be  able  to  process  any  PMTA  in  12  months’  
time.  

 

 

WHAT ARE THE NEW  

WARNING REQUIREMENTS? 

Beginning  August  8,  2018,  retail  packages  of  all 
ENDS products sold at retail that are made from or 
derived from tobacco must  contain a permanently 
affixed  label  that  contains  the  following  Warning 
Statement:  
 

WARNING: This product contains nicotine. 

Nicotine  is  an  addictive  chemical.” 

 

Labels.    Warning  statements  must  take  up  30%  of 
both  sides  of  the  product  package  label.  Alternate 
means  of  compliance  are  available  for  small 
packages. 

Advertisements.  For  advertisements,  warning 
statements  must  comprise  20%  of  the  top  of  the 
advertisement. This applies to all advertising with a 
visual  component,  including  print  advertisements, 
websites, e-mails, social media postings, videos, etc. 

 

Nicotine-Free.    If  your  tobacco  product  does  not 
contain  nicotine,  you  may  certify  to  FDA  that  the 
product contains no nicotine and that you have the 
data  to  prove  it.    Based  on  that  certification,  you 
may  use  the  statement  “This product is made from 
tobacco
”  following  the  same size, format and style 
requirements 

of 

the 

Warning 

Statement.  

 
Detailed specification with respect to type style and 
size,  placement  and  borders  is  included  in  the 
regulations and accompanying FDA guidance. 

WHAT OTHER CHANGES WILL BE  

REQUIRED ON MY LABEL? 

In addition to the warning statement, FDA imposes 
numerous other product label requirements: 

(1)  Product  labels  must  include  the  statement 

Not  for  sale  outside  the  United  States”   and   a  
statement  of  the  percentages  of  foreign  and 
domestic  tobaccos  used.  It  is  unclear  yet  how  the 
latter  requirement  will  be  applied  to  e-liquids  and 
components that do not contain tobacco. 

(2)  Product  labels  must  also  contain  an 

established  name  (i.e.,  vapor  pen,  e-cigarette,  e-
liquid, etc.).  

(3)  Product labels must include net quantity of 

content. 

(4)  Product   labels   must   identify   the   product’s  

manufacturer, distributor or packer. 

(5)  Product labels and advertising may not use 

the   terms   “light”,   “low”,   or   “mild”,   or  other  terms 
that might suggest that the product is safer than or 
contains less additives than other tobacco products
.  
 

ARE STATE LAW PRODUCT LABELING 

REQUIREMENTS PRE-EMPTED ? 

The  new  warning  statement  requirements  are 
characterized  by  FDA  as  “minimum  requirements”.    
FDA is attempting to leave the door open to require 
additional  federal  warning  statements  and/or 
continued  use  of  warning  statements  required 

LABELING AND ADVERTISING 

__________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

The following information is being provided for general educational purposes only, and is neither intended nor should be construed as legal advice with respect to 

the Deeming Regulation.  Companies affected by the Deeming Regulation should retain able counsel to advise them with respect to compliance. 

To learn more about the Vapor Technology Association sign up at 

www.vaportechnology.org

 

VTA

 

GUIDANCE

 

 

May 16, 2016 

Page 8 of 8 

 

under state law.   We believe  FDA’s  interpretation  of  
the  law  is  incorrect  and  that  all  other  warning 
statements are prohibited. 

 

WHAT ELSE WILL I NEED TO DO TO COMPLY?  

The  Deeming  requires  domestic  tobacco  product 
manufacturing establishments to comply with more 
general FDA controls including the following:   

(1)  Registering  all  domestic  manufacturing 

facilities with the FDA. 

(2)  Filing  a  full  listing  of  products  and 

advertising; 

(3)  Filing with FDA a full list of ingredients, and 

certain “smoke” constituents for all products;  

(4)  Notifying FDA of changes in ingredients;  
(5)  Providing FDA with certain internal tobacco 

health related documents; and  

(6)  Conducting 

other 

reporting 

and 

recordkeeping requirements.  
 
In 

addition, 

domestic 

tobacco 

product 

establishments  

must  

comply  

with  

FDA’s  

adulteration (unsanitary manufacturing conditions, 
contaminated product, etc.) and misbranding (false 
or  misleading  labeling,  failure  to  include  required 
information, etc.) requirements. 
 
Further,  domestic  manufacturers  and  importers 
must  create  consumer  complaint  files,  determine 
whether  consumer  complaints  present  a  health  or 
safety risk other than those inherent in the tobacco 
product,  take  action  to  cure  such  risks,  maintain 
complaint files, and where necessary conduct recalls 
in conjunction with FDA.  

At some point, FDA also will issue regulations setting 
Good  Manufacturing  Practices  for  all  tobacco 
products.  

WILL I BE SUBJECT TO FDA INSPECTIONS? 

Yes.    FDA  intends  to  inspect  each  facility 
approximately every 2 years.  During an inspection, 
FDA  investigators  will  want  to  inspect  and  take 
samples  of  products,  review  your  physical  plant, 
manufacturing process, on-site warehouses, quality 
control  procedures,  recordkeeping  and  other 
aspects  of  your  operations.   Full  inspections  can 
take from 2-3 days to a couple of weeks.   
 
First-time inspections will tend to be less rigorous, 
more of an introductory meeting and review, absent 
extreme  circumstances.   Manufacturers  should 
start  work  on  developing  procedures  to  react  and 
respond to FDA inspections, e.g., who is responsible 
for  accompanying  inspectors,  procedures  for 
requested documents, parallel sampling, etc.    

 

WHEN MUST I COMPLY WITH  
ALL OF THESE REGULATIONS? 

The  Deeming  includes  numerous  regulations  that 
are applicable to virtually all companies in the vapor 
industry.  The first regulations become enforceable 
on August 8, 2016 and various regulations become 
effective  at  differing  times  thereafter.    Moreover, 
the FDA has staggered some compliance deadlines 
for small-scale manufacturers.    
 
For  informational  purposes  only,  we  have  created 
thi

Deeming Compliance Calendar

 which provides 

you  an  overview  of  the  potentially  applicable 
regulatory  compliance  dates  included  in  the 
Deeming.   
 
You should consult with your own FDA attorney to 
determine which regulations are applicable to your 
company  and  when  you  must  comply  with  those 
regulations.   

DEADLINES 

OTHER CONCERNS & CONSIDERATIONS 

OTHER COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS