Perception and modulation of pain in waking and hypnosis: functional

significance of phase-ordered gamma oscillations

Vilfredo De Pascalis*, Immacolata Cacace, Francesca Massicolle

Department of Psychology, University of Rome, ‘La Sapienza’, 5, Piazzale Aldo Moro, Via dei Marsi 78, 00185 Rome, Italy

Received 31 January 2004; received in revised form 3 May 2004; accepted 6 July 2004

Abstract

Somatosensory event-related phase-ordered gamma oscillations (40-Hz) to electric painful standard stimuli under an odd-ball paradigm

were analyzed in 13 high, 13 medium, and 12 low hypnotizable subjects during waking, hypnosis, and post-hypnosis conditions. During
these conditions, subjects received a suggestion of Focused Analgesia to produce an obstructive hallucination of stimulus perception;
a No-Analgesia treatment served as a control. After hypnosis, a post-hypnotic suggestion was given to draw waking subjects into a deep
hypnosis with opened eyes. High hypnotizables, compared to medium and low ones, experienced significant pain and distress reductions for
Focused Analgesia during hypnosis and, to a greater extent, during post-hypnosis condition. Correlational analysis of EEG sweeps of each
individual revealed brief intervals of phase ordering of gamma patterns, preceding and following stimulus onset, lasting approximately six
periods. High and medium hypnotizable subjects showed significant reductions in phase-ordered gamma patterns for Focused Analgesia
during hypnosis and post-hypnosis conditions; this effect was found, however, more pronounced in high hypnotizable subjects. Phase-
ordered gamma scores over central scalp site predicted subject pain ratings across Waking-Pain and Waking-Analgesia conditions, while
phase-ordered gamma scores over frontal scalp site predicted pain ratings during post-hypnosis analgesia condition. During waking
conditions, this relationship was present in high, low and medium hypnotizable subjects and was independent of stimulus intensity measures.
This relationship was unchanged by hypnosis induction in the low hypnotizable subjects, but not present in the high and medium ones during
hypnosis, suggesting that hypnosis interferes with phase-ordered gamma and pain relationship.

q

2004 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords: Pain; Hypnosis; Analgesia; Subjective experience; EEG gamma oscillations; 40-Hz

1. Introduction

The present study examined the relationship between

pain perception and EEG responses within the gamma band
(38–42 Hz) by measuring stimulus evoked phase-ordered
gamma patterns with a correlational method recently
developed by

Maltseva et al. (2000)

.

Gamma activity is thought to play an integral role in

information processing (

Karakas and Basar, 1998

). Among

different types gamma activity: spontaneous, evoked,
induced and emitted (

Galambos, 1992

), the evoked

gamma activity has been widely studied. This activity
occurs after stimulus presentation as a phase-locked activity

in the early time window of 0–150 ms. It is thought to reflect
early processing of stimulus information (e.g.

Basar et al.,

1987; Basar and Demiralp, 1995; Galambos et al., 1981;
Llinas and Ribary, 1992; Pantev et al., 1991

). But there is

experimental evidence that synchronized gamma activity is
also involved in selective attention. Evoked gamma activity
(peaking at about 30 and 100 ms) was also found to increase
during task requiring to direct attention to tones presented in
one ear while ignoring tones being presented to the other ear
(

Tiitinen et al., 1993, 1997

).

Recently, spatio-temporal dynamics of the event-related

oscillations in different EEG bands between painful and
non-painful somatosensory stimulation was studied by

Chen

and Hermann (2001)

Later,

Babiloni et al. (2002)

, using

fine spatial-analysis of the EEG oscillations, has evidenced
that galvanic painful stimulation, compared to non-painful
stimulation, increased phase-locked theta to gamma band

0304-3959/$20.00 q 2004 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
doi:10.1016/j.pain.2004.07.003

Pain 112 (2004) 27–36

www.elsevier.com/locate/pain

* Corresponding author. Tel.: C39-6-4991-7643; fax: C39-6-4991-7652.

E-mail address: v.depascalis@caspur.it (V. De Pascalis).

responses in the contralateral hemisphere and decreased the
phase-locked beta band response in the ipsilateral hemi-
sphere.

Tecchio et al. (2003)

, using somatosensory neuro-

magnetic fields, provided experimental evidence that neural
synchronization in somatosensory cortex (S1) may vary in
frequency as a function of the stimulated finger (i.e.
increments of beta (20–32 Hz) event-related coherence
after little finger stimulation and of gamma (36–44 Hz) after
the thumb stimulation).

Croft et al. (2002)

conducted a study in which EEG

spectral power (8–100 Hz range) was measured to painful
electric stimuli delivered using an odd-ball paradigm.
Gamma activity (32–100 Hz) over prefrontal scalp sites
predicted subject pain ratings in the control condition. This
relation was found unchanged by hypnosis in low
hypnotizables while it was lacking during hypnosis and
hypnotic analgesia in high hypnotizable subjects,
suggesting that hypnosis interferes with this pain-gamma
relationship.

In the present study, measures of phase-ordered gamma

patterns, evoked by painful standard electric stimuli, and
perceived stimulus intensity were obtained while subjects
were engaged in a somatosensory oddball task. The study
used a Focused Analgesia protocol requiring to produce an
obstructive image of incoming stimuli that, in previous
studies, was proved to be effective in pain relief (

De Pascalis

et al., 1999, 2001; Zachariae and Bjerring, 1994

). This

treatment was suggested in waking, hypnosis and a post-
hypnotic suggestion conditions. Aim of the study was to
determine whether: (1) phase-ordered gamma oscillation is
a reliable indicator of pain sensation; (2) individual
differences in hypnotic susceptibility reliably account for
more pronounced pain reduction during hypnotic analgesia;
(3) pain reduction is paralleled by reduction in the degree of
phase-ordered gamma responses.

2. Methods

2.1. Subjects

The subjects were 38 right-handed undergraduate

students (20 women and 18 men; age range 19–30 yr) pre-
selected for high (NZ13; 7 women and 6 men), medium
(NZ13; 7 women and 6 men), and low (NZ12; 6 women
and 6 men) levels of hypnotic susceptibility. The subjects
were tested using the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility
Scale, Form C (SHSS:C;

Weitzenhoffer and Hilgard, 1962

).

The participants were categorized as being high hypnotiz-
able subjects (NZ13, MZ9.9, SDZ0.86) when their scores
on SHSS:C were 1 SD above the group mean of a larger
sample of 78 subjects tested in our department (NZ48
women and 30 male, MZ6.0, SDZ2.96); an equivalent but
opposite deviation designated the low hypnotizable subjects
(NZ12, MZ2.8, SDZ1.47). The moderately hypnotizable
group

was

formed

with

subjects

who

showed

hypnotizability scores 1 SD within the group mean (NZ
13, MZ6.1, SDZ0.9). Three different female hypnotists
and one male hypnotist carried out the assessment of
hypnotic susceptibility about 1 month prior to the second
session. During this session, hypnosis was induced by one of
the four hypnotists who did not know the hypnotizability
level of the subject. All subjects were unacquainted with
their hypnotic ability and care was taken to ensure that they
had no awareness of the relevance of hypnotic ability to
their participation in the experiment. Women who were in a
menstrual period were invited for EEG recordings in
another occasion, because menstrual cycle has been
known to affect EEG activity (e.g.

Glass, 1968

). Subjects

were admitted to participate in the experiment only if they
reported an absence of medication use (e.g. psychoactive
drugs, antihistamines, and anti-inflammatory medications)
or medical conditions that might interfere with pain
sensitivity (e.g. high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus,
heart diseases, asthma, Raynaud’s syndrome, frostbite,
arthritis, post trauma to hands).

2.2. Procedure

The subjects were seen individually in the lab and upon

arrival they were informed about the nature of the painful
electric stimulation. Written consent was obtained if they
agreed to continue with the study that was conducted
according to the ethical norms of the Italian Association of
Psychology (AIP). On this occasion, hypnosis was induced
for the second time using the Stanford Hypnotic Clinical
Scale (SHSC;

Morgan and Hilgard, 1978–1979

). The

subjects were all naı¨ve volunteers and not informed about
their hypnotizability level during the EEG recording
session.

2.2.1. Pain treatment conditions

The subjects were engaged in five pain treatment

conditions: (1) Awake-Pain; (2) Focused Analgesia in
waking state; (3) Hypnosis-Pain; (4) Focused Analgesia in
hypnosis; and (5) Post-hypnosis suggestion of analgesia. At
the end of hypnosis condition, the subject received a
suggestion that during waking state after hypnosis, he/she
will enter again in hypnosis with opened eyes after that the
experimenter will have knocked two times on the wall. Both
waking and the hypnosis conditions were counterbalanced
across subjects in order to avoid possible sequence effects or
habituation. However, within waking and hypnosis con-
ditions, task order was not varied and painful condition was
always administered first. Between waking and hypnosis
conditions a resting period of 15 min was given. In each
treatment condition (lasting about 5 min), painful stimuli
were applied to the subjects and, at the end of each
condition, they were asked to rate any pain and distress
experienced for standard stimuli on two separate 10 point
numeric rating scales (NRS;

Jensen et al., 1986

). On the left

and right sides of the NRS-sensory scale, there were,

V. De Pascalis et al. / Pain 112 (2004) 27–36

28

respectively, the descriptors ‘0Zno pain sensation’ and
‘10Zthe most pain sensation imaginable’. Similarly, on the
left and right sides of the NRS-distress scale, there were,
respectively, the descriptors ‘0Znot at all distressful and
the most distressful imaginable’. An involuntariness
measure of pain reduction effect was obtained at the end
of Post-Hypnosis-Analgesia condition by requiring partici-
pants to rate on the NRS how much they experienced pain
reduction as occurring as involuntarily (0Zquite voluntarily
and 10Zabsolutely involuntarily). The suggestions used in
the experimental session were as follows:

(1) Waking-Pain (W-Pain)—No suggestions attempting to

reduce pain were given, it was only required to detect
target painful stimuli (eyes-open);

(2) Waking-Analgesia (W-Analgesia)—Suggestions to

enter into a relaxed condition accompanied by a
suggestion ‘to focus on sensation in the finger and
hand and to experience that all sensations of the
stimulated finger will be attenuated ‘as if it was a
glove’ that was covering the finger and the hand’ (eyes-
open);

(3) Hypnosis-Pain (Hy-Pain)—Following hypnotic induc-

tion, painful stimuli were delivered without suggestions
attempting to reduce pain (eyes-closed);

(4) Hypnosis-Analgesia (Hy-Analgesia)—During hypnosis

a Focused Analgesia suggestion, as in (2), was given
(eyes-closed);

(5) Post-hypnosis-Analgesia (P.Hy-Analgesia)—After

hypnosis condition subject was suggested to enter
again in a state of hypnosis with eyes-open wherein a
Focused Analgesia suggestion, as in (2), was
administered.

In each condition, the subject was asked to count the

number of delivered target stimuli.

2.2.2. Measure of sensory and pain tolerability thresholds

The electric stimulus was applied using two silver–silver

chloride cup electrodes to a target area on the centers of
palmar surfaces of the distal and medial phalanges of the
middle finger of the right hand. Palmar surface of the finger
was prepared by rigorously rubbing with an alcohol swab.
Electrode cup (1 cm in diameter) was filled by an
electroconductive ipoallergic cream and impedance was
checked before EEG recording and kept below 30 kU.
Stimuli consisted of unipolar electrical pulses of 2 ms
duration, generated by a constant current stimulator
(Digimiter, Mod DS7A). For each subject, before each
experimental condition, measures of sensory threshold and
of pain threshold were obtained. The sensory threshold was
defined as the intensity of current stimulation (mA) that the
subject perceived as a ‘detectable pin-prick’, and the pain
threshold as a ‘distinct sharp painful pin-prick’. Sensory
threshold was established by delivering a number of stimuli
of increasing intensity using steps of 0.05 mA. The first

stimulus was of 0.05 mA and the others were delivered in
ascending levels of stimulation with an interstimulus
interval of approximately 10 s. The subject was required
to indicate the stimulus in which he/she perceived the pin-
prick as the minimum detectable pin-prick. Pain tolerability
threshold was determined (just after the measure of sensory
threshold) by delivering stimuli of increasing intensity,
using steps of 0.5 mA, as the maximum perceptible painful
pin-prick. After this level, stimulus intensity was then
increased until the subject reported the delivered stimulus as
very painful, above which there would be the greatest pain
sensation imaginable. This value was considered as the pain
intolerability threshold and stimulus intensity used through-
out all experimental conditions was kept 0.5 mA under the
individual pain intolerability threshold. Pain and sensory
thresholds were determined just before the EEG recordings.

2.2.3. Electric pulse stimulation

For each experimental condition the subjects completed

a block of 70 electrical stimuli delivered using an oddball
paradigm. Infrequent targets (14.5%) were interspersed
among frequently occurring standard stimuli (85.5%).
Target presentation order was pseudorandomized and met
the criteria that two targets were not presented in succession.
The inter-stimulus interval was set at a constant time of 3 s.
Each standard stimulus consisted of one unipolar pulse with
a duration of 2 ms. Target stimulus was formed by pairing
two standard stimuli with an inter-pulse interval of 25 ms.

2.3. EEG data acquisition and processing

EEG recordings were made using an Electro-cap (

Blom

and Anneveldt, 1982

with pure tin electrodes placed on

frontal (F3, F4), parietal (P3, P4) and midline (Fz, Cz, Pz)
sites. Linked earlobes served as reference with a forehead
ground. Electrode impedance was kept below 3 kU and raw
EEG signals were recorded (0.3 s time constant) using an
eight-channel EEG machine (‘ERA-9’—OTE Biomedica
Italiana, 75 Hz cutoff). Eye movement (EOG) was recorded
in a bipolar arrangement, superior orbit referenced to the
outer canthus of the left eye. The EEG was acquired in
digital form, using an IBM-compatible computer, by
sampling at 1024 Hz per channel with a 12-bit resolution
(Metrabyte Dash-16). For each instruction condition, 70
epochs (60 for standard and 10 for target stimuli) were
digitized and stored on hard disk, using a time period of
500 ms prior and 500 ms after stimulus onset. Trials with
artifacts due to scalp muscle or stimulus contamination,
head or electrode movement, or eye-movement slow
potential variations (EEG O100 mV) were a posteriori
eliminated. For further off-line analysis only EEG sweeps
corresponding to standard stimuli were analyzed. This was
done since there is experimental evidence that standard
stimuli are more probable to elicit a ‘pain-specific’ event-
related response that is more dependent from nociceptive
component of the stimulus less influenced by the cognitive

V. De Pascalis et al. / Pain 112 (2004) 27–36

29

information processing not intrinsic to pain (

Becker et al.,

1993, 2000

).

The EEG was digitally filtered without phase shift (FIR

filter) in the gamma band (38–42 Hz). To control for
electromiographic (EMG) contamination from scalp
muscle, the EEG signal for each electrode was filtered
offline into a 62–75 Hz band (EMG) and the EEG-gamma
values were corrected by using a linear regression of the
EEG-gamma on EMG values. The following correction was
used: (Corrected EEG-gamma) ZyK ð

P

xy

=

P

x

2

Þx where

x equals measured EMG activity and y equals measured
EEG-gamma activity. For determination of phase-ordered
gamma patterns, a correlation analysis method, developed
by

Maltseva et al. (2000)

for alpha oscillations, was used to

estimate the similarity of the dynamics of the specificity of
phase-ordered oscillations with stimulus onset (for more
details, see

Maltseva et al., 2000

). The data of each subject

contained four sets of 15 sweeps for each experimental
condition and each channel.

2.4. Statistical evaluation

Correlation analysis was used for statistical estimation of

the covariance of gamma oscillations within each subset
of 15 sweeps. The covariance of oscillations in each subset
of 15 sweeps was estimated within a 150 ms time window
which was shifted along the time axis in steps of 15 ms. For
example, the interval from K375 to K225 ms for each of
15 sweeps was presented by a discrete time series at the
amplitudes A

t

, tZ1,2,3,.,150. Correlation coefficients

were computed for each pairwise combination of such
time series. That means that 105 correlation coefficients
were obtained. They were converted into Fisher’s Z-values
Z

nk

Z 1=2 ln½ð1C r

nk

Þ

=ð1Kr

nk

Þ and then averaged. The

mean of Z values was used as a measure of similarity of
gamma oscillation responses in the time interval of analysis.
The same procedure was applied to intervals from K225 to

K

75 ms, from K75 to 75 ms, etc. up to the last interval

from 345 to 495 ms. From this analysis 59 estimates of
mean Z values were obtained for each subset of sweeps.
These values reflect the dynamic of intersweep relationships
for gamma oscillations as a function of time. This method is
illustrated in

Fig. 1

wherein Z values are plotted against the

onset of the painful stimulus (tZ0). The figure shows that
when the oscillations are phase-aligned the mean Z values
increase, while Z values near to 0 indicate that oscillations
have an accidental behavior in the part of superimposed
sweeps. For further analyses, one set of sweeps for each
experimental condition was selected for each subject. Visual
inspection of phase-ordered gamma patterns disclosed that
the most pronounced significant phase ordered gamma
oscillations were across Fz and Cz sites. Thus, the set of
sweeps showing the highest peak of mean Z values to at
least in one of the midline recording sites (Fz, Cz, Pz), was
considered to be the set with the most marked phase tuning.
This set of sweeps was considered for comparison with

the behavioral data. The relationship between phase-ordered
gamma oscillations between sweeps can be considered as
significant if the Z value obtained in the 150 ms interval
exceeded the critical Z value of ZZ0.211, that is
corresponding to the critical Pearson correlation coefficient
of rZ0.208, for nZ150 and PZ0.01. In

Fig. 1

it can clearly

seen that phase-aligned oscillations are apparent before
stimulus onset and by reaching a maximum peak at around
stimulus onset. For each experimental condition, the
maximum peak value of the Z curve in the time interval
of analysis were collected and used as dataset for further
analyses. For these data scores repeated measures ANOVAs
were performed using the following design: three groups of
‘Hypnotizability’ (high, medium, low) !3 ‘Location’ (Fz,
Cz, Pz) !5 ‘Levels of condition’ (Awake-Pain, Waking-
Analgesia, Hypnosis-Pain, Hypnosis-Analgesia, Post-hyp-
notic-Analgesia). Similar ANOVAs were performed for
behavioral data scores.

Significant levels of F tests were adjusted using the

Greenhouse–Geisser epsilon in cases where the sphericity
was violated. Post-hoc comparisons were performed using a
t-test procedure. Finally, multiple regression analyses were
performed to evaluate the relationship between phase-
ordered gamma scores and pain intensity ratings.

Fig. 1. Correlational method of estimation of intersweep congruence. Mean
correlation coefficients between sweeps (Z

1

, Z

2

, Z

3

) are computed after

Fisher’s Z-transform in a time window of 150 ms shifted with steps of 15 ms.

V. De Pascalis et al. / Pain 112 (2004) 27–36

30

3. Results

3.1. Pain and distress ratings

Both pain and distress rating scores displayed a main

effect for ‘Condition’ (F

4,140

Z7.18, pZ0.0005; F

4,140

Z

8.29, pZ0.0002; for pain and distress scores, respectively).
This effect indicated that during Hy-Analgesia and, even
more, P.Hy -Analgesia conditions there were significant
reductions in pain and distress levels compared with W-Pain
and Hy-Pain conditions (t-test, p!0.05). The interaction of
‘Hypnotizability’!‘Condition’ was also significant for pain
ratings (F

8,140

Z2.78, pZ0.0214) and distress ratings

(F

8,140

Z2.60, pZ0.0280). This interaction indicated that,

compared with moderately and low hypnotizable subjects,
the high hypnotizable subjects obtained more pronounced
decreases in pain and distress sensations during Hy-
Analgesia and, in a more pronounced way, during P.Hy-
Analgesia treatment. These effects are clearly displayed
in

Fig. 2

.

3.2. Stimulus settings and involuntariness ratings

Separate ANOVAs were performed for sensory threshold,

pain and distress thresholds, stimulus intensity and

involuntariness rating scores. With the exception of involun-
tariness scores, each of these analyses failed to evidence
differences among hypnotizability groups (pO0.05).

The ANOVA for involuntariness ratings found a main

effect for hypnotizability (F

2,35

Z5.52, pZ0.0083). This

effect indicated that high hypnotizable individuals reported
higher involuntariness scores for pain reduction during
P.Hy-Analgesia than did medium and low hypnotizable
subjects (7.3, 4.4, and 4.0, respectively).

3.3. Phase-ordered gamma scores

The ANOVA for Z peak values of phase-ordered gamma

patterns evidenced the following effects: (1) Location
(F

2,70

Z48.47, p!0.0001); (2) Condition (F

4,140

Z9.25,

p!0.0001); (3) Hypnotizability (F

2,35

Z10.42, pZ0.0003);

(4) Condition!Location (F

8,280

Z3.40, pZ0.0038); (5)

Hypnotizability!Location (F

4,70

Z4.22, pZ0.0045); (6)

Hypnotizability!Condition (F

8,140

Z4.48, pZ0.0002); (7)

Hypnotizability!Location!Condition (F

16,280

Z3.94,

p!0.0001).

The first effect indicated that there were more pronounced

Z peak scores of phase ordered gamma patterns over the
recording sites of Fz and Cz as compared to Pz (0.25, 0.31,
and 0.18, respectively). The second effect displayed that
during W-Analgesia, Hy-Analgesia, and P.Hy-Analgesia
conditions there were smaller peaks of phase ordered gamma
patterns as compared to W-Pain and Hy-Pain conditions
(0.24, 0.22, and 0.20 vs. 0.30 and 0.28, respectively). The last
three effects indicated that high hypnotizable subjects, across
Fz and Cz leads, during Hy-Analgesia and P.Hy-Analgesia
conditions, produced significant peak reductions of phase-
ordered gamma patterns as compared to the remaining
conditions. The W-Analgesia condition also displayed a
significant reduction, but it was less pronounced compared to
analgesia treatment conditions. Medium hypnotizable sub-
jects, during analgesia treatments conditions, also showed
similar patterns of phase-ordered gamma reductions over Fz
and to a less extent over Cz leads, but, for these subjects, the
W-Analgesia treatment showed a more pronounced
reduction as compared to Hy-Analgesia condition. Low
hypnotizable subjects, in contrast to the other groups, did not
display parallel patterns of phase-ordered gamma reductions
over Fz and Cz sites during experimental conditions. Midline
phase ordered gamma patterns across conditions for each
hypnotizability group are displayed in

Fig. 3

.

3.4. Pain intensity and phase-ordered gamma scores

Stepwise multiple regression was used to determine if

phase-ordered gamma scores over any of the seven regions
of the scalp was related to pain ratings. This involved one
regression for each experimental condition, where seven
scalp regions served as predictor variables and pain ratings
the criterion variable. A significance level of 0.05 for
inclusion and a significance level of 0.10 for exclusion in

Fig. 2. Mean sensory pain and distress ratings (GSE) to standard stimuli in
13 high, 13 moderately, and 12 low hypnotizable subjects (high, medium,
and low). Measures were obtained during the following conditions:
Waking-Pain, Waking-Analgesia, Hypnosis-Pain, Hypnosis-Analgesia,
Post-Hypnosis-Analgesia

V. De Pascalis et al. / Pain 112 (2004) 27–36

31

the model were used for each regression. Phase-ordered
gamma scores over Cz scalp site predicted pain intensity
across the two waking conditions (W-Pain: BZ18.81,
F

1,36

Z52.44, p!0.0001; W-Analgesia: BZ13.63, F

1,36

Z

41.92, p!0.0001). The Hy-Pain and Hy-Analgesia con-
ditions failed to evidence any gamma predictor of pain
intensity (pO0.05). In contrast, during P.Hy-Analgesia
condition (subject with eyes-open) gamma scores over Fz
scalp site predicted pain ratings (BZ7.46, F

1,36

Z14.86, pZ

0.0005).

To determine whether this gamma/pain relationship was

independent of stimulus perception and pain/distress
thresholds, for each condition separate multiple regression
analyses were used. Predictor variables were ‘phase-ordered
gamma scores’ (at Cz for waking conditions and at Fz for
P.Hy-Analgesia condition), ‘sensory threshold’, ‘pain
threshold’, ‘distress threshold’, and ‘stimulus intensity’
(mA). Criterion variable was ‘pain intensity ratings’.
Independently of the other variables, phase-ordered
gamma score at Cz scalp location was the best predictor
of ‘pain ratings’ for waking conditions (W-Pain: BZ11.02,
tZ6.17, p!0.0001; W-Analgesia: BZ11.42, tZ5.81,

p!0.0001). No significant predictors were found for
Hy-Pain and for Hy-Analgesia (t!2.03, pO0.05). Frontal
gamma score was the best predictor of pain rating during
P.Hy-Analgesia (BZ5.91797 tZ2.67 pZ0.0118) and none
of the other variables independently predicted pain ratings
(t!1.85, pO0.07).

To determine the internal consistency of the relationship

between pain ratings and phase-ordered gamma scores and
whether this relationship held during waking and hypnosis
conditions, simple regressions were performed for high,
medium, and low hypnotizable subjects separately for each
experimental condition, where phase-ordered gamma score
was the predictor and pain rating the criterion variable. As
can be seen in

Fig.4

central gamma scores predicted

pain ratings similarly across high, medium, and low
hypnotizables for W-Pain condition (High-hypnotizables:
BZ13.92, tZ4.22, pZ0.0014; Medium-hypnotizables: BZ
12.59, tZ3.82, pZ0.0028; Low-hypnotizables: BZ12.37,
tZ4.20, pZ0.0018). Similar relationships were obtained
across hypnotizability groups for W-Analgesia condition
(High-hypnotizables: BZ13.98, tZ3.7, pZ0.00333;
Medium-hypnotizables: BZ11.02, tZ2.45, pZ0.032;

Fig. 3. Dynamics of averaged intersweep correlations of phase-ordered gamma patterns at Fz, Cz and Pz recording sites in high, medium, and low hypnotizable
subjects during waking (W-Pain, W-Analgesia) and hypnosis (Hy-Pain, Hy-Analgesia, P.Hy-Analgesia) conditions.

V. De Pascalis et al. / Pain 112 (2004) 27–36

32

Low-hypnotizables: BZ18.80, tZ6.73, p!0.0001). Impor-
tantly, during Hy-Pain and Hy-Analgesia conditions, high
and medium hypnotizables failed to evidence any signifi-
cant relationship (t!1.5, pO0.15). However, during P.Hy-
Analgesia gamma scores at Fz predicted pain ratings
for t values that were near the significance levels (High-
hypnotizables: BZ4.80, tZ2.02, pZ0.068; Medium-hyp-
notizables: BZ6.89, tZ1.97, pZ0.074). For low hypnotiz-
ables gamma scores at Cz predicted pain ratings during
Hy-Pain (BZ8.98, tZ8.49, p!0.0001) and Hy-Analgesia
(BZ19.15, tZ2.86, pZ0.017), while frontal (Fz) gamma
scores predicted pain during P.Hy-Analgesia (BZ7.17,
tZ2.66, pZ0.024) conditions.

4. Discussion

Results from the present study have evidenced patterns

of phase-ordered gamma activity across experimental pain
conditions associated to the delivering of painful stimu-
lation. These patterns represent the similarity (or covariance
of wave shape) over EEG segments of approximately six
periods of gamma rhythm. The phase-tuning mechanism of
gamma activity was observed to start before the onset of
painful stimulation (see

Fig. 1

). Considering that a fixed

interstimulus interval was used, this anticipation-related
change of activity can be attributable to the interplay of
different processes such as coping with the impending
stimulus and sustained attention mechanisms. Furthermore,
this study has evidenced that the most pronounced gamma-
tuning effects were over midline frontal (Fz) and central

(Cz) scalp locations and that phase-ordered gamma activity
over central scalp site (Cz) is the best predictor of subjective
experience of pain. Importantly, this relationship was
independent of stimulus parameters measures, suggesting
that the relation was not due to increased general arousal
following more painful stimulation, nor merely due to the
stimulus intensity changes among subjects. Rather the
gamma synchronization seems to reflect the engagement of
a selective neural network including the central region of the
cortex which is more linked to the activity for stimulus
perception of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). This
interpretation appears consistent with a number of brain
imaging findings. For example, anterior cingulate cortex
(ACC) metabolism has been found to vary with within-
subject pain report (

Porro et al., 1998; Rainville et al.,

1997

); functional connectivity between midcingulate

cortex and a number of cortical (insular, pregenual and
frontal regions) and subcortical structures (brain stem,
thalamus, and basal ganglia) has been found as responsible
for hypnosis-related alteration of sensory and affective
components of pain (

Faymonville et al., 2003

). The

anticipation of phase tuning of gamma activity, observed
in this study with painful stimulation, may imply that
endogenous processes manifested by phase reordering of the
gamma waves are strongly associated with cortical stimulus
representation and probably reflect operations on memory
traces of impending stimulation. This finding appears
consistent with functional magnetic resonance imaging
(fMRI) reports that expectation of pain activates cingulate
and insular cortex (

Ploghaus et al., 1999

) and primary

somatosensory cortex (

Porro et al., 2002

).

Fig. 4. The relationship between subject’s central phase-ordered gamma scores and their reported pain levels are shown during waking pain (W-Pain) condition
for the high (solid line), medium (dashed line) and low (dotted line) hypnotizable subjects separately.

V. De Pascalis et al. / Pain 112 (2004) 27–36

33

Further, that phase-ordered gamma band is related to

pain perception is in line with research implicating
gamma with subjective experience of pain. For example,
gamma is reduced when people are anesthetized (

Kulli

and Koch, 1991

) and gamma is increased in amplitude

across prefrontal lobes (

Croft et al., 2002

), over

somatosensory and prefrontal/parietal regions (

Chen and

Hermann, 2001

), gamma synchronizes with electrical

stimulation of the thumb in human primary somatosen-
sory cortex as revealed by somatosensory evoked
neuromagnetic fields (

Tecchio et al., 2003

), phased-

locked gamma band responses are increased in the
contralateral hemisphere during painful stimulation,
compared to a nonpainful stimulation (

Babiloni et al.,

2002

).

For the overall hypnotizability group, the relation

between pain ratings and gamma over Cz scalp site was
significant during waking treatments, while it was not
present in both Hy-Pain and Hy-Analgesia conditions.
Noteworthy, during post-hypnosis condition this relation-
ship was found over Fz scalp site. That the relation between
pain ratings and gamma was not present in both Hy-Pain and
Hy-Analgesia conditions was mainly due to the contribution
of high and medium hypnotizable individuals who, for these
treatments, failed to evidence a significant gamma/pain
relation. However, the fact that during Hy-Analgesia
condition gamma/pain relation was not significant, while
during P.Hy-Analgesia this relation was significant, may be
seen as an apparent paradox given that both hypnosis
conditions produced analgesia in high hypnotizables. These
findings are not paradoxical since during P.Hy-Analgesia
condition over Cz scalp site the gamma/pain relation, for the
overall hypnotizability group, was also lacking as in the
hypnosis condition, but it appeared to be significant over Fz
scalp site. Separate regressions across hypnotizability
groups indicated that this significant relation was due to
the fact that for both high and medium hypnotizables the
gamma/pain relationship for Fz scalp site was near to reach
the significance levels, while for low hypnotizables was
quite significant. Thus, the significant gamma/pain relation
at Fz site, found during P.Hy-Analgesia, could indicates that
in post-hypnosis condition the frontal lobe plays a new role
in pain perception. In this condition, high hypnotizable
individuals yielded the greatest reduction of gamma
synchronization over frontal region, indicating that this
region is more inhibited, a result which appears in line with
the highest involuntariness levels and with the lower pain
sensations observed in high hypnotizable individuals.
Another reason of the frontal gamma/pain relationship
during post-hypnosis treatment may lay in the fact that, in
this condition, subjects had their eyes open during
obstructive hallucination. Thus, a higher information input
occurred simultaneously from internal and external sources
while subjects experienced a higher level of involuntariness
in pain reduction. This experience can be seen as the product
of the inhibition of executive prefrontal functions (

Hobson,

2000

), an altered state of consciousness that is seen

during hallucinations induced by hallucinogenic drugs
(

Farthing, 1992

).

In sum, the present results support the view that hypnosis

involves the suspension of high order attention system and
other anterior executive functions (

Crawford and Gruzelier,

1992; Woody and Bowers, 1994

). This is because gamma

synchronization decreased in the high and medium
hypnotizable individuals during hypnosis, but it was no
longer related to their subjective experience of pain. The
pattern of our gamma/pain relationships appears quite
similar to that evidenced by

Croft et al. (2002)

for prefrontal

spectral gamma (32–100 Hz) amplitude. However, in the
present study the most linked region to painful stimulation
was in the central region of the scalp, a region more linked
to the activity of primary somatosensory area. This is
consistent with ERP results of

Kakigi et al. (1996)

who

found negative components (N240 and N300) maximal at
vertex in response to laser stimulation, a result that these
researchers have seen as reflecting the activity of cingulate
and subcortical areas. Similar conclusions were derived in
terms of the N140 ERP component by

Ray et al. (2002)

using a dense array EEG procedure. The view that primary
somatosensory cortex is important for the discrimination
and modulation of various aspects of pain has been
supported by lesions in animal and human findings
(

Bushnell et al., 1999

). Furthermore, our gamma results

indicate that hypnotic suggestions in high susceptible
individuals modulate the activity of frontal and central
areas of the cortex. It can be advanced that the mechanisms
of this modulation for hypnotic analgesia suggestions
includes inhibition of the sensory areas mediated by
cortico-thalamic top-down projections. These early effects
may be mediated by the level of activity of arousal
structures such as the parts of the ascending reticular
system or the thalamic intralaminar nuclei (

Kinomura et al.,

1996; Robbins, 1997

).

There have been a number of experimental studies

reporting that somatosensory ERPs following electrical
stimulation of the medium nerve were markedly modified
by voluntarily active movements of the fingers (‘gating
effect’) that produce suppression of neural activity in
sensory areas and reduced levels of conscious sensation
(e.g.

Haggard and Whitford, 2004; Giblin, 1964; Kakigi

et al., 1995

). Unfortunately, we did not monitor muscle tone

in the district adjacent to the stimulated finger, thus we are
unable to evaluate if pain application might have provoked a
‘sensory gating’ effect. However, considering that gamma/
pain relation was independent from stimulus parameter
measures and that there are no logical reasons to assume that
‘gating effect’ should be more pronounced in high
hypnotizable individuals during hypnosis-analgesia con-
ditions, we excluded that ‘gating effect’ may have caused
the observed responses in this study.

Finally, ANOVA results of the present study have

evidenced that high hypnotizable, but not medium and

V. De Pascalis et al. / Pain 112 (2004) 27–36

34

low hypnotizable individuals, produced significant
reductions of phase-ordered gamma scores over both frontal
and central scalp sites during Hy-Analgesia and P.Hy-
Analgesia conditions as compared to painful control
conditions. Moreover, in high hypnotizables these
reductions were found to be paralleled by significant
reductions in pain and distress ratings. These and correla-
tional results shed light not only on neural mechanisms
involved in pain processing, but also on hypnosis processes.
In particular, both support the view that hypnosis involves
the suspension of a high order attention system (

Crawford

and Gruzelier, 1992; Woody and Bowers, 1994

and other

executive functions (

Croft et al., 2002; Gruzelier and

Warren, 1993; Kallio et al., 2001; Nordby et al., 1999;
Woody and Farvolden, 1998

). These findings are also

consistent with a number of psychophysiological studies
reporting that perceptual alteration in hypnosis, as those of
obstructive hallucination blocking the view of a visual
stimulus (

De Pascalis, 1994; Spiegel and Barabasz, 1988;

Spiegel et al., 1985

or reducing the perception of noxious

somatic stimulation (

De Pascalis et al., 1999, 2001; Ray

et al., 2002; Spiegel et al., 1989

), is the product of a global

inhibitory process involving not only late, but also early
processes in the brain. Results from the present study appear
in line with dissociated-control theory of hypnosis predict-
ing that hypnotic analgesia responses are occurring to a
more pronounced degree of involuntariness in hypnosis.

References

Babiloni C, Babiloni F, Carducci F, Cincotti F, Rosciarelli F, Arendt-

Nielsen L, Chen AC, Rossini PM. Human brain oscillatory activity
phase-locked to painful electrical stimulations: a multi-channel EEG
study. Human Brain Mapp 2002;15:112–23.

Basar E, Demiralp T. Fast rhythms in the hippocampus are a part of the

diffuse gamma response system. Hippocampus 1995;5:240–1.

Basar E, Rosen B, Basar-Eroglu C, Greitschus F. The association between

40-Hz EEG and middle latency response of the auditory evoked
potential. Int J Neurosci 1987;33:103–17.

Becker DE, Yingling CD, Fein G. Identification of pain, intensity and P300

components in the pain evoked potential. Elec Clin Neurophysiol 1993;
88:290–301.

Becker D, Haley DW, Urena VM, Yingling CD. Pain measurement with

evoked potentials: combination of subjective ratings, randomized
intensities, and long interstimulus intervals produces a P300-like
confound. Pain 2000;84:37–47.

Blom JL, Anneveldt M. An electrode cap tested. Elec Clin Neurophysiol

1982;54:591–4.

Bushnell MC, Duncan GH, Hofbauer RK, Ha B, Chen J, Carrier B. Pain

perception: is there a role for primary somatosensory cortex? Proc Natl
Acad Sci USA 1999;96:7705–9.

Chen AC, Hermann CS. Perception of pain coincides with the spatial

expansion of electroencephalographic dynamics in human subjects.
Neurosci Lett 2001;297:183–6.

Crawford HJ, Gruzelier J. A midstream view of the neuropsychophysiology

of hypnosis: recent research and future directions. In: Fromm W,
Nash M, editors. Research developments and perspectives. New York:
Guilford Press; 1992. p. 227–66.

Croft RJ, Williams JD, Haenschel C, Gruzelier JH. Pain perception,

hypnosis and 40 Hz oscillations. Int J Psychophysiol 2002;46:101–8.

De Pascalis V. Event-related potentials during hypnotic hallucination. Int

J Clin Exp Hyp 1994;1:39–55.

De Pascalis V, Magurano M, Bellusci A. Pain perception, somatosensory

event-related potentials and skin conductance responses to painful
stimuli in high, mid, and low hypnotizable subjects: effects of
differential pain reduction strategies. Pain 1999;83:499–508.

De Pascalis V, Magurano M, Bellusci A, Chen A. Somatosensory event-

related potential and autonomic activity to varying pain reduction
cognitive strategies in hypnosis. Clin Neurophys 2001;112:1475–85.

Farthing GW. The psychology of consciousnes. Englewood Cliffs, NJ:

Prentice-Hall; 1992.

Faymonville ME, Roediger L, Del Fiore G, Delgueldre C, Phillips C,

Lamy M, Luxen A, Maquet P, Laurey S, et al. Increased cerebral
functional connectivity underlying the antinociceptive effects of
hypnosis. Cogn Brain Res 2003;17:255–62.

Galambos R. A comparison of certain gamma band (40-Hz) brain rhythms

in cat and man. In: Basar E, Bullock TH, editors. Induced rhythms in the
brain. Boston: Birkhauser; 1992. p. 201–16.

Galambos R, Makeig S, Talmachoff PJ. A 40-Hz auditory potential

recorded from the human scalp. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1981;78:
2643–7.

Giblin DR. Somatosensory evoked potentials in healthy subjects and in

patients with lesions of the nervous system. Ann NY Acad Sci 1964;
112:93–142.

Glass A. Intensity of attenuation of alpha activity by mental arithmetic in

females and males. Physiol Beh 1968;3:217–20.

Gruzelier JH, Warren K. Neuropsychological evidence of left frontal

inhibition with hypnosis. Psychol Med 1993;23:93–101.

Haggard P, Whitford B. Supplementary motor area provides an efferent

signal for sensory suppression. Cogn Brain Res 2004;19:52–8.

Hobson JA. Dreaming and brain: toward a cognitive neuroscience of

conscious state. Behav Brain Sci 2000;23:793–842.

Jensen MP, Karoly P, Braver S. The measurement of clinical pain intensity:

a comparison of six methods. Pain 1986;27:117–26.

Kakigi R, Koyama S, Hoshiyama Watanabe M, Shimojo MS, Kitamura Y.

Gating of somatosensory evoked responses during active finger
movements: magnetoencephalographic studies. J Neurol Sci 1995;
128:195–204.

Kakigi R, Koyama S, Hoshiyama M, Kitamura Y, Shimojo M, Watanabe S.

Pain-related brain responses following CO

2

laser stimulation: magne-

toencephalographic studies. Elec Clin Neurophysiol 1996;47:111–20.

Kallio S, Revonsuo A, Hamalainen H, Markela J, Gruzelier J. Changes in

anterior attentional functions and word fluency associated with
hypnosis. Int J Clin Exp Hyp 2001;49:95–108.

Karakas S, Basar E. Early gamma response is sensory in origin: a

conclusion based on cross-comparison of results from multiple
experimental paradigms. Int J Psychophysiol 1998;31:13–31.

Kinomura S, Larsson J, Gulyas B, Roland PE. Activation by attention of the

human reticular formation and thalamic intralaminar nuclei. Science
1996;271:512–5.

Kulli J, Koch C. Does anesthesia cause loss of consciousness? Trends

Neurosci 1991;14:6–10.

Llinas RR, Ribary U. Rostrocaudal scan in the human brain: a global

characteristic of the 40 Hz response during sensory input. In: Basar E,
Bullock TH, editors. Induced rhythms in the brain. Boston: Birkhauser;
1992.

Maltseva I, Geissler HG, Basar E. Alpha oscillations as an indicator of

dynamic memory operations—anticipation of omitted stimuli. Int
J Psychophysiol 2000;36:185–97.

Morgan AH, Hilgard JR. The Stanford hypnotic clinical scale for adults.

Am J Clin Hyp 1978-79;21:134–47.

Nordby H, Hugdahl K, Jasiukaitis P, Spiegel D. Effects of hypnotisability

on performance of a Stroop task and event-related potentials. Perc Mot
Skills 1999;88:819–30.

V. De Pascalis et al. / Pain 112 (2004) 27–36

35

Pantev C, Makeig S, Hoke M, Galambos R, Hampson S, Gallen C. Human

auditory evoked gamma band magnetic fields. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA
1991;88:8996–9000.

Ploghaus A, Tracey I, Gati JS, Clare S, Menon RS, Matthews PM,

Rawlins JN. Dissociating pain from its anticipation in the human brain.
Science 1999;284:1979–81.

Porro CA, Baraldi P, Pagnoni G, Serafini M, Facchin P, Maieron M,

Nichelli P. Does anticipation of pain affect cortical nociceptive
systems? J Neurosci 2002;22:3206–14.

Porro C, Cettolo V, Francescato MP, Baraldi P. Temporal and intensity

coding of pain in human cortex. J Neurophysiol 1998;80:3312–20.

Rainville P, Duncan GH, Price DD, Carrier B, Bushnell MC. Pain affect

encoded in human anterior cingulate but not somatosensory cortex.
Science 1997;277:968–71.

Ray WJ, Keil A, Mikuteit A, Bongartz W, Elbert T. High resolution EEG

indicators of pain responses in relation to hypnotic susceptibility and
suggestion. Biol Psychol 2002;60:17–36.

Robbins TW. Arousal systems and attentional processes. Biol Psychol

1997;45:57–71.

Spiegel D, Barabasz AF. Effects of hypnotic instructions on P300 event-

related-potential amplitudes: research and clinical implications. Am
J Clin Hyp 1988;31:11–17.

Spiegel D, Bierre P, Rootenberg J. Hypnotic alteration of somatosensory

perception. Am J Psychiat 1989;146:749–54.

Spiegel D, Cutcomb S, Ren C, Pribram K. Hypnotic hallucination alters

evoked potentials. J Abnorm Psychol 1985;94:249–55.

Tecchio F, Babiloni C, Zappasodi F, Vecchio F, Pizzella V, Romani GL,

Rossini PM. Gamma synchronization in human primary somatosensory
cortex as revealed by somatosensory evoked neuromagnetic fields.
Brain Res 2003;986:63–70.

Tiitinen H, Sinkkonen J, Reinikainen K, Alho K, Lavikainen J, Naatanen R.

Selective attention enhances the auditory 40-Hz transient response in
humans. Nature 1993;364:59–60.

Tiitinen H, May P, Naatanen R. The transient 40 40-Hz response, mismatch

negativity, and attentional processes in humans. Prog Neuro-Psycho-
pharmacol Biol Psychiat 1997;21:751–71.

Weitzenhoffer AM, Hilgard ER. Stanford hypnotic susceptibility scale:

form C. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologist Press; 1962.

Woody EZ, Bowers KS. A frontal assault on dissociated control. In:

Lynn SJ, Rhue JW, editors. Dissociation: clinical, theoretical and
research perspectives. New York: Guildford Press; 1994. p. 52–79.

Woody EZ, Farvolden P. Dissociation in hypnosis and frontal executive

function. Am J Clin Hypn 1998;40:206–16.

Zachariae R, Bjerring P. Laser-induced pain-related brain potentials and

sensory pain ratings in high and low hypnotizable subjects during
hypnotic suggestions of relaxation, dissociated imagery, focused
analgesia, and placebo. Int J Clin Exp Hypn 1994;XLII:56–80.

V. De Pascalis et al. / Pain 112 (2004) 27–36

36