Brain correlates of hypnotic paralysis

—a resting-state fMRI study

M. Pyka

a

,

1

, M. Burgmer

b

,

1

, T. Lenzen

c

R. Pioch

d

, U. Dannlowski

c

B. P

fleiderer

e

A.W. Ewert

e

,

G. Heuft

b

, V. Arolt

c

, C. Konrad

a

,

a

Section BrainImaging, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany

b

Department of Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University of Münster, Münster, Germany

c

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Münster, Münster, Germany

d

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hypnose, Münster, Münster, Germany

e

Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany

a b s t r a c t

a r t i c l e i n f o

Article history:
Received 3 September 2010
Revised 23 March 2011
Accepted 28 March 2011
Available online 8 April 2011

Keywords:
Functional magnetic resonance imaging
Functional connectivity analysis
Default mode network
Hypnosis
Paralysis

Hypnotic paralysis has been used since the times of Charcot to study altered states of consciousness; however,
the underlying neurobiological correlates are poorly understood. We investigated human brain function
during hypnotic paralysis using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), focussing on two
core regions of the default mode network and the representation of the paralysed hand in the primary motor
cortex. Hypnotic suggestion induced an observable left-hand paralysis in 19 participants. Resting-state fMRI
at 3 T was performed in pseudo-randomised order awake and in the hypnotic condition. Functional
connectivity analyses revealed increased connectivity of the precuneus with the right dorsolateral prefrontal
cortex, angular gyrus, and a dorsal part of the precuneus. Functional connectivity of the medial frontal cortex
and the primary motor cortex remained unchanged. Our results reveal that the precuneus plays a pivotal role
during maintenance of an altered state of consciousness. The increased coupling of selective cortical areas
with the precuneus supports the concept that hypnotic paralysis may be mediated by a modi

fied

representation of the self which impacts motor abilities.

© 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Introduction

In recent years, hypnosis has become a new promising tool to

investigate normal and pathological mental conditions in cognitive
neuroscience (

Oakley and Halligan, 2009

). Induction of hypnosis

provokes an altered state of consciousness, characterized by a
subjective

“increase in absorption, focused attention, disattention to

extraneous stimuli and a reduction in spontaneous thought

” (

Lynn et

al., 1996

). Speci

fic instructions in the hypnotic state can influence the

mental self-representation of the subject leading to e.g. altered
sensory experience or motor control. Depending on the responsive-
ness of the subject, suggestions in the hypnotic state can even evoke
the illusion of a paralysed body part. Based on the observation that
both hypnotic paralysis as well as hysterical paralysis are not
explained by neurological lesions and are not intentionally produced,

Oakley (1999)

hypothesized that both types of paralysis may be

explained by a common model involving a central executive structure
acting outside self-awareness, which can be directly in

fluenced by

internal and external sources. Blakemore and Frith demonstrated the
presence of such an internal self-representation which is only partly
available to awareness and further argued that a distortion of this
system may induce psychopathological symptoms such as delusions
(

Blakemore et al., 2002; Blakemore, 2003a; Blakemore, 2003b

).

Nevertheless, it remains poorly understood to date which neurobio-
logical mechanisms are involved when cognitive alterations produce a
motor paralysis. Therefore, the present study was performed to
examine the neurobiological correlates of hypnotic paralysis.

Hypnotic paralysis has so far only been investigated in three

imaging studies.

Halligan et al. (2000)

reported a single-case PET

study of a 25-year-old man with hypnotically induced paralysis of his
left leg. When the participant attempted but failed to move the left
leg, activation of right orbito-frontal (Brodman area [BA] 10/11) and
anterior cingulate (BA 32) cortex, but not of the motor cortex, was
demonstrated. Ward et al. investigated 12 subjects with hypnotically
induced paralysis of their left legs, again using PET. They observed
relative increases in brain activation in the right orbito-frontal cortex,
right cerebellum, left thalamus, and left putamen compared to
intentionally simulated paralysis. In contrast to Halligan et al., they
did not detect activation of the right anterior cingulate cortex (

Ward

et al., 2003

). Finally, Cojan et al. reported a functional magnetic

resonance imaging (fMRI) study in 12 healthy volunteers who

NeuroImage 56 (2011) 2173

–2182

⁎ Corresponding author at: Department of Psychiatry, University of Marburg Rudolf-

Bultmann-Str. 8, D-35039 Marburg, Germany. Fax: +49 6421 58 939.

E-mail addresses:

martin.pyka@med.uni-marburg.de

(M. Pyka),

markus.burgmer@ukmuenster.de

(M. Burgmer),

thomas.lenzen@gmx.de

(T. Lenzen),

reginapioch@web.de

(R. Pioch),

dannlow@uni-muenster.de

(U. Dannlowski),

p

fleide@uni-muenster.de

(B. P

fleiderer),

ada.ewert@gmx.de

(A.W. Ewert),

heuftge@mednet.uni-muenster.de

(G. Heuft),

arolt@uni-muenster.de

(V. Arolt),

carsten.konrad@med.uni-marburg.de

(C. Konrad).

1

Contributed equally.

1053-8119/$

– see front matter © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

doi:

10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.03.078

Contents lists available at

ScienceDirect

NeuroImage

j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w. e l s e v i e r. c o m / l o c a t e / y n i m g

performed a go/nogo task while their left hand was hypnotically
paralysed. The authors observed preparatory activation in right motor
cortex indicating preserved motor intentions, but with associated
increases in the precuneus and enhanced functional connectivity
between the precuneus and the right motor cortex. Their results
suggest that hypnotic paralysis does not primarily act through direct
motor inhibition, but that

“hypnosis induces the control of action by

internal representations generated through suggestion and imagery,
mediated by precuneus activity, and recon

figures the executive

control of the task implemented in the frontal lobes

” (

Cojan et al.,

2009b

). Interestingly, these conclusions parallel those of our group

concerning patients with conversion paralysis. As Cojan et al., we did
not observe a direct inhibitory mechanism preventing motor action in
conversion paralysis, but reported a dysfunction of motor represen-
tation during passive movement observation (

Burgmer et al., 2006

).

The motor task used by

Cojan et al.(2009b)

highlighted an increased

coupling between the primary motor cortex (M1) and the left dorsal
part of the precuneus and the right angular gyrus during hypnosis.
Whether functional connectivity of M1 is also altered in the resting
state remains unclear so far.

As previous studies emphasized the contributory role of medial

prefrontal areas (

Halligan et al., 2000; Ward et al., 2003

and the

precuneus (

Cojan et al., 2009b

)

– both belong to the so-called default

mode network (DMN)

– during experimental conditions in hypnotic

paralysis, we were interested in functional alterations of these areas
during the resting-state. The DMN is the most considered and stable
resting-state network which can be reliably measured by correlation
based analyses (

Greicius et al., 2003; Nir et al., 2006; Shehzad et al.,

2009; Waites et al., 2005; Yan et al., 2009

), independent component

analysis (

Beckmann et al., 2005; DeLuca et al., 2006; Greicius et al.,

2004; Kim et al., 2009; Meindl et al., 2009

) and by contrasting rest and

task conditions (

Binder et al., 1999; Mason et al., 2007; Singh and

Fawcett, 2008; Tamás Kincses et al., 2008; Vuontela et al., 2009

). The

DMN involves a highly correlated network in the low-frequency range
(

b0.1 Hz) of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal,

including the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), dorsolateral frontal
regions, the medial parietal cortex, particularly the posterior cingulate
cortex and precuneus (PCC/PCu), and the bilateral inferior parietal
cortex. Besides performance-dependent deactivation during a task
(

Broyd et al., 2009; Giambra, 1995; Gusnard et al., 2001; Mason et al.,

2007; McKeown et al., 1998; McKiernan et al., 2003

), DMN activity at

rest seems to be affected by preceding events as well (

Pyka et al.,

2009; Schneider et al., 2008

). For example, DMN activity during rest is

increased after a preceding working-memory task with increased
cognitive load (

Pyka et al., 2009

). The degree of self-relatedness to

presented images is correlated with the activation of the ventro- and
dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex in
the subsequent rest phase (

Schneider et al., 2008

). Furthermore,

subjects shifting from a pure resting state to a movement-readiness
condition revealed a stronger functional coupling of the lower part of
the precuneus with an upper area of the precuneus and motor related
cortices (

Treserras et al., 2009

). Considering that further studies found

the precuneus to be involved in motor execution and imagery
(

Hanakawa et al., 2003; Hanakawa et al., 2008; Meister et al., 2004;

Wager et al., 2004

) and functionally connected with motor areas in

hysterical conversion paralysis (

Cojan et al., 2009a

), the DMN, and in

particular the precuneus, appears to be the controlling unit when
prospective thoughts and self-referential processes include motor
related actions.

Neuroanatomically, the MPFC and the medial parietal cortex,

especially the PCC/PCu, are the core regions of the DMN. The MPFC has
been suggested to integrate emotional and cognitive processes (

Bush

et al., 2000; Gusnard and Raichle, 2001; Simpson et al., 2001a;
Simpson et al., 2001b

) and is involved with the regulation of complex

emotional behaviours such as decision making and calculating the
value of rewards, also in social contexts (

Bechara et al., 2000; Hare

et al., 2010; Marco-Pallarés et al., 2010

). Furthermore, MPFC is active

during mentalization of actions (

Marsh et al., 2010; Spunt et al., in

press

). Beyond that, evidence from resting-state studies suggests a

role of the MPFC for self-referential processes (

Rameson et al., 2009;

van Buuren et al., in press

). The PCC/PCu encompasses several highly

interconnected regions which have traditionally received little
attention (

Cavanna and Trimble, 2006; Margulies et al., 2009

).

These regions are involved in highly integrated tasks such as visuo-
spatial imagery, episodic memory retrieval, self-referential processes
and consciousness (

Cavanna and Trimble, 2006; Cavanna, 2007;

Rameson et al., 2009; van Buuren et al., in press

). Thus, MPFC and PCC/

PCu functions have been roughly characterized, pointing to different
functional roles of the DMN.

In order to further characterize the neurobiological correlates of

hypnotic paralysis, we performed resting-state fMRI both during
hypnotic suggestion of left-arm paralysis and in the wake state. We
assumed that the suggestion of hypnotic paralysis,

first using

metaphors such as

“the left hand feels weak, heavy, adynamic,”

“any energy leaves the hand” and then using direct instructions like
“the left hand is paralysed, you cannot move the hand anymore,”
modulates the perception of the self, which is represented in the
resting brain. More speci

fically, we assumed that an altered state of

self-perception in hypnotic paralysis particularly affects the percep-
tion of the subjects own motor abilities, represented in connected
motor, memory and action controlling areas. Therefore, we performed
connectivity analyses for the bilateral MPFC, PCC/PCu and M1 to
explore if cerebral coupling of these regions is altered during
hypnosis. Based on previous literature, we speci

fically assume an

involvement of the precuneus in the maintenance of hypnotic
paralysis.

Materials and methods

Subjects

Healthy student volunteers recruited by advertisement were

enrolled in the study. The subjects were carefully screened prior to the
study and only participated in the experimental fMRI procedure if they

- were right-handed according to the Edinburgh handedness scale

(

Old

field, 1971

)

- reported no neurological illness or impairment
- did not ful

fil any psychiatric disorder according the SCID-I

interview (

Wittchen et al., 1997

)

- were not taking regular medication or drugs
- furthermore did not show signs of psychiatric illness or mental

burden in self rating questionnaires including the Spielberger State
Anxiety Index (

Laux et al., 1981

), Beck Depression Inventory (

Beck

et al., 1996

), SF-36 (

Bullinger and Kirchberger, 1998

), a German

adaptation of the Dissociative Experience Scale (DES) (

Freyberger

et al., 1999

)

- and showed a score greater than 7 (out of maximal 12) in an

individual screening procedure testing the hypnotic susceptibility
in accordance with the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale
(SHSS) (

Weitzenhoffer and Hilgard, 1959

performed by an

experienced clinical hypnotherapist (R.P.) (mean score = 9.5 +
−1.2). The SHSS consists of 12 hypnotic procedures to test the
hypnotic susceptibility of subjects. Test items include suggestions
of e.g. taste hallucination, arm rigidity, arm immobilization or
hallucinated voices. The SHSS score re

flects the number of

successful hypnotic suggestions.

Full written consent was obtained from all subjects in accordance

with the declaration of Helsinki and in agreement with the local ethics
committee of the University Hospital of Münster, Germany. A total of
21 subjects (mean age = 22.6 years, range = 2.2 years; 16 female and
5 male) were included in the study. However, due to technical

2174

M. Pyka et al. / NeuroImage 56 (2011) 2173

–2182

dif

ficulties during the fMRI acquisition, only datasets of 19 subjects

entered the analyses. All subjects, if

finally included or not, received a

financial compensation of 9 EUR per hour.

Procedure

All participants performed two sessions of fMRI, one under the

hypnotic suggestion of a left-arm paralysis (hypnosis session) and the
other session while the subjects were in a normal state (no hypnosis
session). The order of the sessions was pseudorandomized and
counterbalanced between the subjects (10 of 19 subjects started with
the hypnosis session). Each session started with a resting-state
measurement of 5 min. Subjects were instructed to lay with eyes open
and let the thoughts emerge and disappear without focusing on
anything in particular and without performing a cognitive task.
Subsequently, subjects performed an executional task paradigm
(lasting 8 min) which we used in this study as a localizer task to
determine the coordinates of the motor network M1 at the
representation level of the hand. The stimulation was performed as
previously described (

Burgmer et al., 2006

) and is under current

analysis. However, we decided to use the data of the motor task in the
non-hypnotic state to localize the functional representation of the left
and right hand in M1. In brief, videos of 12 s duration of either a left
(=

“l”) or a right hand (=“r”) were presented. In the control

condition, subjects were instructed to carefully watch a foto of a
resting hand without performing any movement (

“c”= control

condition, observation of the resting hand). In condition

“o,” they

were instructed to observe a moving hand that opened and closed at
1 Hz (

“o”=observation of the moving hand). In condition “i,” subjects

viewed the same video of an opening and closing hand, but were
instructed to imitate the movement with their identical hand, i.e. left
hand in video results in own left hand moving (

“i”=imitation and

observation). The beginning of condition

“i” was triggered by a

“START” signal of 500 ms, a “STOP” display signalled the end of the
movement. The blocks were presented in a

fixed order (“c” – “o” – “i”)

for each hand and were repeated 6 times in a pseudo-randomised
manner for each hand. Four intermediate

“blocks” of a blank screen

for 12 s each were included, resulting in a video of 8 min total for each
session. After the executional task, fMRI acquisition was interrupted
for 15

–30 min until the second session started with resting state. For

the hypnosis session, an eyes-closed hypnotic induction was carried
out before scanning to suggest left-hand paralysis. After testing the
hypnotic depth according to a levitation procedure, the scanning took
place. At the end of the hypnosis session the paralysis was dissolved
by reversing the suggestion. After ending the experimental sessions,
subjects were asked about possible side effects of the hypnosis
procedure which none of the subjects reported.

MRI data acquisition

All MRI data were acquired on a 3.0 T whole body scanner (Intera

T30, Philips, Best, NL) equipped with master gradients (nominal
gradient strength 30 mT/m, maximal slew rate 150 mT/m/ms). For
spin excitation and resonance-signal acquisition, a circularly polarized
transmit/receive birdcage head coil with a HF re

flecting screen at the

cranial end was used. One hundred functional images were acquired
during each session using a T2* weighted single shot echo-planar
(EPI) sequence covering the whole brain (TE = 50 ms, TR = 3000 ms,
flip angle 90°, slice thickness 3.6 mm without gap, matrix 64 × 64, FOV
230 mm, in-plane resolution 3.6 × 3.6 mm). Thirty-six transversal
slices oriented parallel to the AC-PC line were taken.

Functional data analysis

Functional images were analyzed using the general linear model

(

Friston et al., 2007

) for blockdesigns in SPM5 (Welcome Department

of Imaging Neuroscience, London, UK;

www.

fil.ion.ucl.ac.uk/spm

).

First, resting-state data were corrected for slice timing. Subsequently,
fMRI data from the resting state and the executional task were
separately realigned, normalized to an EPI-template (resulting voxel
size of 2 mm), spatially smoothed (8 mm FWHM kernel), and high-
pass

filtered (128 s).

De

finition of ROIs

The regions of interest (ROI) for default mode areas were selected

according to previously reported

findings. PCC/PCu and MPFC

coordinates were extracted from four studies that fairly consistently
reported the spatial distribution of these main components of the
default mode network, using different tasks or modalities to
characterize the DMN: a) as task-related decrease (

Greicius et al.,

2003

), b) in a data-driven resting-state analysis using independent

component analysis (ICA) (

DeLuca et al., 2006

), c) as F-contrast of

slow-signal oscillations (

Fransson, 2006

and d) as cross-validated

coordinates (

Yan et al., 2009

). The maximal distance between the

coordinates of the reported PCC/PCu and MPFC did not exceed 15 mm.
We extracted the mean coordinates of the PCC/PCu and MPFC from
these articles and converted them from the Talairach space to the
standard space of SPM (Montreal Neurological Institute [MNI]) using
the tal2mni conversion routine by Matthew Brett (

http://imaging.

mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk/imaging/MniTalairach

). To avoid overlap with the

contralateral hemisphere, the computed coordinates for the PCC/PCu
[±5,

−54, 32] and MPFC [±2, 48, −2] were laterally shifted to x=

±7. The computed coordinates were [±7,

−54, 32] PCu (BA 31) for

the PCC/ and [±7, 48,

−2] (BA 32) for the MPFC and fit to the overall

distribution of the default mode network that has been characterized
in numerous reviews and studies (e.g.

Gusnard and Raichle, 2001;

McKiernan et al., 2006; Tamás Kincses et al., 2008; Damoiseaux and
Greicius, 2009

).

Fig. 1

depicts the selected ROIs in the context of a

DMN template by

Greicius et al.(2004)

. Thus, we assume that, despite

the Talairach to MNI-conversion inaccuracies and the inter-study
variability of the selected coordinates, our computed ROIs are in
strong agreement with the common notion of the core regions of the
DMN.

Coordinates of the primary motor cortex associated with left and

right hand movement were determined by the localizer task

Fig. 1. Position of seed regions. Position of the functional regions of interest (functional
ROIs) for the seed-regression analysis, superimposed on a DMN template (

Greicius et al.

2004

). Green = position of the PCC/PCu and the MPFC reported in four previous studies

(

Greicius et al. 2003

;

DeLuca et al., 2006; Fransson, 2006; Yan et al. 2009

).

Blue = spherical ROIs in the PCC/PCu (central MNI coordinates x = ± 7, y =

−54,

z = 32, radius 2.5 mm) and MPFC (central MNI coordinates x = ± 7, y = 48, z =

−2,

radius 2.5 mm) which were selected as seed regions of the default mode network.

2175

M. Pyka et al. / NeuroImage 56 (2011) 2173

–2182

conducted in the non-hypnotic state. For each subject, a general linear
model was generated including six explanatory variables (regressors)
comprising each task type for both hand sides (cl, cr, ol, or, il, ir). To
account for residual movement artefacts after realignment, move-
ment parameters derived from realignment corrections were entered
as covariates of no interest. To identify the functional localizers,
contrast maps for imitation vs. control condition were computed for
each subject and entered in a one-sample t-test for each hand side
separately. The group analysis for the contrast imitation vs. control
condition was computed using correction for family-wise error,
p

b0.05. The coordinates of the peak activation in M1 for the left

and right hand served as center for the ROI mask for M1. The
observation condition was analyzed separately (Burgmer et al., in
preparation) and not used for localization of M1.

Calculation of functional connectivity maps

The

first eigenvariate of the signal of all voxels inside a spherical

(radius = 2.5 mm) PCC/PCu, MPFC and M1 ROI was bilaterally
extracted from both resting-state sessions and adjusted for head
movement and nuisance regressors, i.e. global brain mean, white
matter and cerebrospinal

fluid mean (

Esslinger et al., 2009

). For each

of the four ROIs, a general linear model with two sessions (non-
hypnosis and hypnosis) was generated using the time course of each
ROI as regressor. Contrasts on the single subject level were calculated
for the conditions non-hypnosis (NHYP), hypnosis (HYP) and the
contrasts hypnosis vs. non-hypnosis (HvsN) and non-hypnosis vs.
hypnosis (NvsH) and transferred to the second level. The contrasts
correspond to two one-sided t-tests asking for an increase of
connectivity from non-hypnosis to hypnosis and vice versa. HYP
and NHYP conditions were explored at the group level using one-
sample t-tests at p

b0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons using

family-wise error correction (FWE). To minimize false positive
findings, the contiguity threshold was set at 20 voxels.

Comparison of functional connectivity maps between hypnosis and non-
hypnosis

To assure that an increase in functional connectivity from NHYP to

HYP (and vice versa) is only reported for those areas which are also
signi

ficantly correlated in the HYP condition itself (in the NHYP

condition, respectively), the second-level connectivity maps for the
NHYP- and HYP-condition derived above were used as intrinsic masks
for the inter-session contrasts NvsH and HvsN at the group level. To
account for high intersubject-variability, which is typical for resting-
state studies (

McKiernan et al., 2006; Waites et al., 2005

), the inter-

session contrasts of HvsN and NvsH were thresholded at p

b0.05,

corrected with false-discovery rate (FDR)-criterion, k

N20. We regard

these six tests for functional connectivity differences as necessary to
account for the lateralized task and for the differential roles that DMN
areas might play in the maintenance of the hypnotic paralysis. However,
in case of signi

ficant connectivity differences between HYP and NHYP,

we also report which cluster survive correction for multiple compari-
sons (p

b0.0083, FDR-corrected, kN20) to provide the most conservative

measure for functional connectivity differences.

Functional connectivity of control regions

Alterations in functional connectivity could represent a general

(possibly physiological) effect of hypnosis. In this case, the reported
connectivity changes of the main analysis would not be a speci

fic

property of the default mode, but merely a side effect of a general
alteration of the human brain. To exclude this possibility, we repeated
the functional connectivity analysis for an auditory [±62,

−18, −5]

(BA 42) and a visual [±20,

−99, −5] (BA 17, also known as primary

visual cortex [V1]) network, as described above. For this analysis, we
hypothesize that functional connectivity of the control regions, which
process mainly perceptual information, is not modi

fied by hypnosis.

Furthermore, for the regions reported to be stronger coupled with

DMN or M1 areas in the main analysis, we computed the contrast
estimates for HvsN in the control regions.

Results

Functional localizer task

Statistical analysis of the motor task in the non-hypnotic state

revealed during imitation of a hand movement increased activity of
the contralateral M1, the medial supplementary motor area, bilateral
visual cortex (V5) and a cluster in the ipsilateral cerebellum.

Fig. 2

depicts clusters of increased BOLD activity in the primary motor
cortex during imitation of a moving hand (versus the control
condition). Left-hand movement during the non-hypnotic state
caused the greatest response in M1 around [40,

−22, 60] and at

[

−41, −17 60] for the right hand, respectively. Hence, we chose these

coordinates to generate ROIs in M1 for functional connectivity
analyses in the resting-state data.

Functional connectivity maps

Whole-brain functional connectivity maps from both seed regions

bilaterally were obtained without a priori hypothesis concerning
correlated areas (

Fig. 3

).

Functional connectivity of the MPFC

The left and right MPFC in the wake state, the NHYP condition, is

functionally connected with areas around the seed region (BA 10/32),
dorsal posterior cingulate cortex (BA 31) and precuneus (BA 23).
During hypnotic paralysis, in the HYP condition, correlated areas
largely overlapped with those areas that were correlated in the NHYP
condition. Notably, the correlated cluster in the medial parietal area
involved a part of the posterior cingulate cortex that extends to the
dorsal ACC. Correlations of a unilateral seed region with areas of the
same hemisphere were slightly higher than correlations with areas on
the contralateral hemisphere.

Functional connectivity of the PCC/PCu

In the NHYP condition, the left and right PCC/PCu is signi

ficantly

connected with a superior area of the precuneus (BA 7), with the
inferior parietal cortex (IPC) (BA 39), and left and right prefrontal
areas (BA 8 and 9), including the dorsal ACC (BA 24, 32). The
correlated areas largely re

flect the default mode network as it has

been previously reported (

Gusnard and Raichle, 2001

).

In summary, connectivity maps of the seed regions in the PCC/PCu

mainly re

flect the functional anatomy of the DMN (see

Fig. 3

), as it has

been reported before. The MPFC and PCC/Pcu regions can also be
found in the correlation analysis of the other region, but the seeds in
the PCC/PCu are stronger correlated with higher cognitive areas in the
prefrontal lobe. No conspicuous lateralization effect could be observed
from the depiction of the single functional connectivity maps, but
largely spatially robust functional networks.

Functional connectivity of the primary motor cortex

Functional connectivity maps for the left and right M1 area in

hypnosis and non-hypnosis illustrate that the functionally de

fined

ROIs (hand area of the primary motor cortex) are mainly connected to
bilateral regions of the primary motor cortex. Ipsilateral regions
around the ROI and, slightly weaker, clusters on the contralateral
primary motor cortex are functionally connected with the ROI. From a
descriptive perspective, the connectivity maps of the hypnotic
condition appear to be less pronounced.

2176

M. Pyka et al. / NeuroImage 56 (2011) 2173

–2182

Differences between hypnosis and non-hypnosis

The main interest of this study was to investigate functional

connectivity changes caused by the hypnotic induction of left-hand
paralysis. Therefore, we computed the statistical differences between
the functional connectivity maps of the NHYP and HYP condition for
all seed regions.

Hypnosis-speci

fic differences of MPFC connectivity maps

Differences of MPFC functional connectivity maps between

hypnosis and non-hypnosis were investigated. There was no voxel
detected surviving the de

fined threshold at pb0.05 FDR-corrected or

an explorative analysis at p

b0.001 uncorrected. This leads to the

conclusion that functional connectivity of the MPFC is not modi

fied

under hypnosis compared to the control condition. Furthermore, no
differences could be found for the contrast NvsH neither on the
de

fined threshold nor in the exploratory analysis.

Hypnosis-speci

fic differences of PCC/PCu connectivity maps

Signi

ficant differences of functional connectivity between hypno-

sis and non-hypnosis were found for the left and right PCC/PCu seed
regions in the HvsN contrast (

Fig. 4

). During the HYP condition, an

upper bilateral part of the PCC/PCu was signi

ficantly more correlated

with the PCC/PCu areas. Furthermore, a stronger coupling of the left
and right seed regions was observed with areas in the right
hemisphere that belong to the cytoarchitectonically de

fined regions

BA 8, and 9 (

Table 1

). From a functional point of view, these areas are

part of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), which are
mainly engaged in the cognitive control of action, action planning and
complex task processing. Additionally, a cluster in the right angular
gyrus, an area implicated in action-awareness (

Farrer et al., 2008

),

was also signi

ficantly more correlated in hypnosis than in the normal

state. The differential correlation maps were basically overlapping for
both the right and the left PCC/PCu seed. As mentioned before, these
regions are not only signi

ficantly correlated in the contrast HvsN, but

are also part of the robust functional network that has been computed
for the HYP condition itself. No differences could be found for the
contrast NvsH neither on the de

fined threshold nor in the exploratory

analysis. Functional connectivity between the left upper part of the
PCC/PCu survived correction for multiple comparisons with height
threshold t = 5.00 ([

−8, −62, 56], k=101 for left seed region and

[

−8, −62, 58], k=90 for right seed region). The remaining clusters

exceeding this t-value had a cluster size of k

b20.

Hypnosis-speci

fic differences between connectivity maps of the primary

motor cortex

Although connectivity maps of the hypnotic and non-hypnotic

condition show slightly different patterns of correlation, no such

correlation surpassed our level of signi

ficance (pb0.05, FDR cor-

rected), neither for HvsN nor for NvsH. On an exploratory level
(p

b0.001), smaller clusters were found for the contrast HvsN

distributed over the whole brain and not exceeding 40 voxels. For
the left M1 region clusters were present in right BA 18 and left BA 37.
Clusters for the right M1 region were located in right BA 48.

Hypnosis-speci

fic differences of control connectivity maps

Functional connectivity analyses of four control regions located in

the bilateral auditory (BA 42) and bilateral visual (V1) cortices
revealed no signi

ficant differences between hypnosis and the wake

state (HvsN and NvsH at p

b0.05, FDR-corrected). To illustrate

connectivity changes between the regions that are stronger correlated
with the PCC/PCu area and the control regions, we extracted the
contrast estimates for the reported clusters from the HvsN-connec-
tivity maps (

Fig. 5

). Although some of the contrast estimates indicate

increased connectivity during NHYP compared to HYP (e.g. rM1 for
the upper precuneus or lV1 for the DLPFC area), a more liberal t-test
(p

b0.001, uncorrected) for NvsH showed only for rV1 increased

connectivity during NHYP in an adjacent region of the upper
precuneus cluster.

Discussion

We performed a resting-state study to further characterize the

neurobiological correlates of hypnotic paralysis, exploring functional
connectivity of two regions of the default mode network (DMN) and
M1 on the representation level of the left and right hand. While MPFC
and M1 connectivity did not reveal any changes in the hypnotic
condition, connectivity of the PCC/PCu with a bilateral superior area of
the PCC/PCu and the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was
signi

ficantly increased during hypnosis. Additionally, increased

correlation between the left PCC/PCu and the right angular gyrus
and the left somatosensory cortex were found. As expected, functional
connectivity analyses of bilateral BA 42 and V1 did not show changes
comparable to those of the PCC/PCu areas.

Connectivity of the medial prefrontal cortex

The MPFC is a core region of the DMN. It is anatomically connected

to the limbic system, e.g. amygdala, ventral striatum, hypothalamus
(

Carmichael and Price, 1995; Gusnard et al., 2001

), suggesting that the

ventral MPFC plays an integrative role in the processing of cognitive
and visceromotor aspects of emotion (

Bush et al., 2000; Gusnard and

Raichle, 2001; Simpson et al., 2001a; Simpson et al., 2001b

). As shown

previously, perception of emotional pictures exerts an in

fluence on

the functional anatomy of the DMN including the MPFC in depressed
patients (

Sheline et al., 2009

), and also on the subsequent rest phase

Fig. 2. Motor activation of left and right hand movement. Areas of increased activation during imitation of the hand movement compared to the control condition (IvsC), corrected for
family-wise error, p

b0.05. Coordinates of the peak activation in the primary motor cortex were taken for subsequent functional connectivity analysis.

2177

M. Pyka et al. / NeuroImage 56 (2011) 2173

–2182

(

Schneider et al., 2008

). Furthermore, MPFC is involved in decision

making and calculating the value of rewards. Concerning motor tasks,
MPFC activation was found to be related to the mentalization of

actions (

Marsh et al., 2010; Spunt et al., in press

). Evidence from

resting-state studies suggests a role of the MPFC for self-referential
processes (

Rameson et al., 2009; van Buuren et al., in press

).

Fig. 3. Functional connectivity maps of seed regions. Areas revealing signi

ficant functional connectivity with the left and right MPFC (upper row), PCC/PCu (middle row) and M1

(lower row) are colour-coded (p

b0.05 (FEW-corrected), kN20). Numbers next to the slices denote the z-value of the slice in the MNI space. NHYP: non-hypnosis, HYP: hypnosis. Red

to yellow colour codes represent t-values.

Table 1
Areas displaying increased correlation with the left and right PCC/PCu area during hypnosis compared to non-hypnosis (p

b0.05 (FDR-corrected), kN20).

Area

Left PCC/PCu

Right PCC/PCu

x(mm)

y(mm)

z(mm)

k

T

score

x(mm)

y(mm)

z(mm)

k

T

score

Left precuneus

−8

−62

58

1267

5.19

−8

−62

56

1168

4.66

−12

−56

52

4.38

−8

−70

50

4.35

Right BA 8/9

34

20

52

151

3.18

38

18

48

281

3.90

Right BA 9

30

36

36

93

4.30

26

36

32

51

3.68

BA 39/40

46

−52

54

65

3.44

44

−54

44

61

3.20

32

−56

28

23

3.26

Coordinates are given in MNI space. BA: Brodmann area, PCC: posterior cingulate cortex, PCu: precuneus.

2178

M. Pyka et al. / NeuroImage 56 (2011) 2173

–2182

Concerning hypnosis, a recent study described the involvement of the
medial part of the DMN in hypnosis (

McGeown et al., 2009

). After

hypnotic induction without suggestion of neurological symptoms,
activation of the anterior part of the DMN decreased. McGeown et al.
suggest that this decrease might be due to a suspension of
spontaneous cognitive activity, possibly related to a reduction of
inferences from self-referential thoughts under hypnosis. The present
investigation revealed that resting-state connectivity maps of the
right and left MPFC areas were virtually identical in hypnosis and the
non-hypnotic state. In consideration of the results reported by
McGeown et al., the frontal DMN area may re

flect a functional

correlate of the hypnotic state itself, but does not seem to exert a
functional in

fluence on other areas as far as this can be detected with

fMRI. In accordance with our investigation, a recent study on
conversion paralysis also showed that the MPFC was not functionally
connected to areas of the motor system (

de Lange et al., 2010

).

Moreover, the

findings underline the notion that direct inhibitory or

control processes are possibly not necessary to maintain the mental
representation of a paralysed hand at rest, which is in line with a
recent study on hypnotic paralysis using a go-nogo task (

Cojan et al.,

2009b

).

Connectivity of the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus

As main result of this study, we found that several regions

contralateral to the left hand were signi

ficantly stronger correlated

with the PCC/PCu in the hypnotic state than in the non-hypnotic state,
when hypnotic paralysis was maintained. This includes the DLPFC (BA
8, 9), right angular gyrus (BA 39) and the medial parietal cortex
(BA 7). The functional properties of the regions will

first be discussed,

before these

findings are aggregated to form a coherent picture of

potential functional correlates of hypnosis at rest.

In the frontal region of the right hemisphere, a cluster in the DLPFC

extending over the areas BA 8 and 9 was strongly correlated with the

Fig. 4. Functional connectivity differences of PCC/PCu. Areas demonstrating signi

ficant differences in functional connectivity with the PCC/PCu seed region between hypnosis and

non-hypnosis (HvsN) (p

b0.05 (FDR-corrected), kN20). Connectivity differences concerning the left PCC/PCu seed region are displayed in the upper row; connectivity differences

concerning the right PCC/PCu seed region in the lower row. Numbers next to the slices denote z-value of the slice in the MNI space. Blue dot: approximate location of the seed region,
NHYP: non-hypnosis, HYP: hypnosis.

Fig. 5. Contrast estimates for control regions. For the main clusters found to be stronger correlated with the PCC/PCu areas, connectivity maps have also been computed for four control
regions (left and right BA 42 and V1). The contrast estimates display the mean difference between connectivity in hypnosis vs. non-hypnosis. Gray bars: mean contrast estimates, red lines:
90% con

fidence interval, DLPFC: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, MPFC: medial prefrontal cortex, PPC: posterior cingulated cortex and precuneus, M1: primary motor cortex, BA 42:

Brodmann area 42, V1: primary visual cortex.

2179

M. Pyka et al. / NeuroImage 56 (2011) 2173

–2182

PCC/PCu time course. The correlated area is part of a more extended
network associated with working memory (

Schöning et al., 2008;

Wagner and Sauer, 2006; Wager and Smith, 2003

and executive

control of behaviour (

Badre and Wagner, 2004; Cohen and Servan-

Schreiber, 1992; Dehaene and Changeux, 1995

). These functions were

attributed to the DLPFC according to speci

fic tasks used to demon-

strate the functional involvement of this area. In this context,
“cognitive control” refers to cognitive mechanisms that e.g. influence
action and response selection by maintaining the task context and
suppressing affective actions, as it can be demonstrated in the Stroop
task (

Banich et al., 2000; Bench et al., 1993; Pardo et al., 1990

). To the

best of our knowledge, activation of the DLPFC during hypnosis has
only been mentioned in the context of pain reception (

Faymonville

et al., 2000; Raij et al., 2009

).

Egner et al. (2005)

investigated DLPFC

activity during cognitive control in the Stroop task but did not

find a

signi

ficant interaction with hypnotic susceptibility on a corrected

threshold level. The increased coupling of the right DLPFC with the
PCC/PCu observed here may be related to cognitive control and action
selection processes (

Frith 2000

), supporting the idea that hypnotic

paralysis of the left hand is maintained by mental control processes
represented in the contralateral DLPFC. Participants under hypnotic
suggestion felt unable to move their left hand. Our results suggest that
hypnotically altered representation of one's own motor abilities may
be represented in a modi

fied coupling between PCC/PCu and the

DLPFC as a cognitive control and action selection area. As functional
connectivity was rather strong, we assume that the PCC/PCu-DLPFC
connection plays a signi

ficant role in the maintenance of the altered

representation of the self by the DMN in rest.

Furthermore, a cluster in the right angular gyrus (BA 39) was

strongly correlated with the left PCC/PCu in the hypnotic state. The
bilateral angular gyrus is part of the lateral parietal areas of the DMN
(

Fransson, 2006

Mazoyer et al., 2001;

McKiernan et al., 2006

). The

right area has been found to be involved in the awareness of action
authorship and the detection of differences between intended and
realized movements (

Farrer et al., 2003; Farrer et al., 2008

). As

Farrer

et al. (2008)

stated, this region shows increased activation with

increasing divergence between the intended movement and the
movement observed, leading to the assumption that the right angular
gyrus compares expected with actual signals of movement action. A
neighbouring region in the bilateral parietal operculum (~[54,

−32,

22]) has been found to be activated when active movements are
attributed to an external source in the hypnotic state (

Blakemore,

2003b

). The authors suggest that activation in this area may re

flect an

increased focus on sensory information of the expected passive
movement contributing to the misattribution of the action and to the
actual active movement. The speci

fic role of the angular gyrus in the

mental maintenance of the paralysis during rest remains unclear in
our correlation analysis and, to the best of our knowledge, the
functional role of the right angular gyrus in rest is unexplored so far.
However, our

findings support the fact that areas which are associated

with the detection of action-awareness during attention demanding
tasks might have a contributory role even in pure rest when a
dissociation has to be maintained.

The biggest cluster of correlated areas was found in an upper area

of the medial parietal cortex (BA 7) that also belongs to the precuneus.
The functional role of this area is closely related to the properties of
the PCC/PCu seed region, as BA 7 represents the upper end of the
parietal part of the DMN and has also been implicated in self-re

flective

processes in the social, verbal, spatial and motor domain (

Northoff

et al., 2006

). Concerning the motor domain, this upper PCC/PCu area

appears to be involved in motor imagery, visuo-spatial imagery
(Cavanna et al., 2006;

Hanakawa et al., 2003; Malouin et al., 2003

) and

learning of sequential movements (

Meister et al., 2004; Oishi et al.,

2005

). Furthermore, it is more active when attentional demands are

needed to perform motor actions from information stored in working
memory (

Luo et al., 2004; Wager et al., 2005

).

Treserras et al. (2009)

found that the DMN and the motor network are functionally
connected through the medial superior parietal cortex in the upper
precuneus (BA 7) during movement readiness. Based on the model of
motor control developed by (

Brooks, 1986

), they suggest that

overlapping areas of the motor and default mode network are
activated in the preparatory state before movement execution,
possibly allowing a transfer of information from one network to the
other. This transfer might occur between the lower PCC/PCu area,
which belongs to the DMN, and the upper PCC/PCu area involved in
motor imagery (BA 7) (

Treserras et al., 2009

). Furthermore, activation

of this area increases and is more strongly coupled with M1 when the
execution hand is paralysed by hypnosis (

Cojan, et al., 2009b

) or by

hysterical conversion paralysis (

Cojan, et al., 2009a

). Cojan et al.

argued that self-monitoring processes, generally associated with the
DMN and with the precuneus, dominate the control of the paralysed
hand due to an altered internal representation of the self, caused by
hypnotic suggestion or to certain memories related to the self (

Cojan

et al., 2009a; Cojan et al., 2009b

). Our observations of an increased

functional connectivity between PCC/PCu and the upper part of BA 7
during hypnosis are perfectly in line with those of Cojan et al. and
Treserras et al. (

Cojan et al., 2009a; Cojan et al., 2009b; Treserras et al.,

2009

). Our observation suggests that movement representation is

altered in hypnotic paralysis, and that this alteration is closely related
to the self-referential function of the PCC/PCu.

Interestingly, the supplementary motor area (medial BA 6) was

not signi

ficantly correlated with the PCC/PCu. This is of particular

relevance, as

Kasess et al. (2008)

recently proposed a suppressive

in

fluence of the SMA on M1 during motor imagery. The lack of SMA

connectivity changes related to hypnosis underlines the notion that
hypnotically induced paralysis at rest does not rely on inhibitory
processes (see discussion of MPFC above), but relies on an alteration
of self-perceived movement abilities and self-related movement
representations.

Overall, functional connectivity changes due to hypnotic paralysis

occurred between PCC/PCu and cerebral areas that are part of a
network involved in cognitive control (

Banich et al., 2000; Cohen and

Servan-Schreiber, 1992; Pardo et al., 1990

). We believe that the

suggestions given during induction of hypnosis, which started with
metaphors such as

“the left hand feels weak, heavy, adynamic,” “any

energy leaves the hand,

” and continued with direct instructions like

“the left hand is paralysed, you cannot move the hand anymore,”
induced an altered self-perception of the participants and their motor
abilities. The PCC/PCu area is known to be related to self-monitoring
processes and consciousness of self (Cavanna et al., 2006;

D'Argembeau

et al., 2005; Gusnard and Raichle, 2001; Luo et al., 2004; Rameson et al.,
2009; van Buuren et al., in press

). The increased connectivity between

PCC/PCu and the right DLPFC at rest may represent the functional
correlate of altered internal movement representation (

Cojan et al.,

2009b; Treserras et al., 2009

). As the DLPFC is related to cognitive

control, including self-control processes (

Badre and Wagner, 2004;

Dehaene and Changeux, 1995; Hare et al., 2009

), the increased PCC/

PCu-DLPFC connectivity may be a neurobiological correlate of self-
control processes maintaining hypnotic paralysis. Finally, we would like
to stress that our study did not reveal hypnotically induced connectivity
changes with known inhibitory areas. Thus, in line with other
observations (

Cojan et al., 2009b

), the previously postulated direct

movement inhibition by hypnotic paralysis (

Halligan et al., 2000

does

not seem to hold true for resting state.

Connectivity of the primary motor cortex

There is broad consensus that M1 represents a functional area in

the human brain involved in planning and execution of motor action
(

Graziano, 2006; Stinear et al., 2009

). A previous study, using a go-

nogo task, reported an increased coupling between the M1 region
corresponding to the left hand and the upper precuneus and angular

2180

M. Pyka et al. / NeuroImage 56 (2011) 2173

–2182

gyrus during hypnotic paralysis of the left hand (

Cojan et al., 2009b

).

The authors interpret this as a physiological correlate of self-
monitoring processes (usually associated with the precuneus) taking
control over the motor area. We did not

find a similar pattern in our

resting-state data. But interestingly, the network coupled with M1 in
Cojan et al. resembles those areas highly connected with the PCC/PCu
seed region in our investigation. As Cojan et al. did not compute
connectivity maps for PCC/PCu, it is unclear whether the remaining
variance in the time course of the precuneus and angular gyrus in
their data could also be explained by the time course of the PCC/PCu
region we chose. However, the results of both studies lead to the
assumption that the conceptual understanding and maintenance of
the left-hand paralysis involves a network comprising the precuneus
and the angular gyrus, while the conscious preparation of a
movement (

Treserras et al., 2009

and the actual attempt to move

the hand (

Cojan et al., 2009b

) extends this network by the

corresponding M1 region.

Lateralization

The left and the right seed of the PCC/PCu area revealed similar

functional networks. The correlation map of the left seed seems to be
slightly more pronounced than the corresponding map of the right
PCC/PCu seed. This tendency is in line with other authors who
described a tendency for a more left-sided hemispheric dominance in
the precuneus in motor imagery (

Asta

fiev et al., 2003; Meister et al.,

2004; Sirigu et al., 1996

). However, differences between both

correlation maps did not reach a level of signi

ficance.

Limitations

It is important to keep in mind that only subjects who are to a

certain degree susceptible for hypnosis were included in this study.
Thus, it is unclear whether the reported functional coupling can only
be attributed to the neurofunctional impact of hypnosis or also to the
selection of the subjects. Furthermore, respiration and cardiac rhythm
were not measured during fMRI data acquisition and therefore cannot
be excluded as confounding factor in the data analysis. The in

fluence

of hypnosis on heart rate is still controversially discussed (

Aubert

et al., 2009; Emdin et al., 1996; Santarcangelo et al., 2008; VandeVusse
et al., 2010

). However, heart rate affects widely distributed areas of

the brain (

Birn et al., 2006; Shmueli et al., 2007

) while effects

observed here were rather circumscribed.

Conclusion

In conclusion, functional connectivity analysis on the resting state

revealed that hypnotic suggestion of a left-hand paralysis leads to an
increased coupling of the PCC/PCu with areas of cognitive control and
motor representation, while MPFC and M1 connectivity remained
unchanged by hypnotic paralysis. Our study suggests that induction of
a hypnotic paralysis is neurobiologically paralleled by strengthened
couplings between different anatomical areas, based on complex
network properties, thereby modifying the cerebral representation of
the self and its motor abilities.

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by a scholarship to M.P. by the Otto

Creutzfeld Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Münster,
Germany, and by a young investigator grant to C.K. by the
Interdisciplinary Centre for Clinical Research of the University of
Münster, Germany (IZKF FG4).

References

Asta

fiev, S.V., Shulman, G.L., Stanley, C.M., Snyder, A.Z., Van Essen, D.C., Corbetta, M.,

2003. Functional organization of human intraparietal and frontal cortex for
attending, looking, and pointing. J. Neurosci. 23, 4689

–4699.

Aubert, A.E., Verheyden, B., Beckers, F., Tack, J., Vandenberghe, J., 2009. Cardiac

autonomic regulation under hypnosis assessed by heart rate variability: spectral
analysis and fractal complexity. Neuropsychobiology 60, 104

–112.

Badre, D., Wagner, A.D., 2004. Selection, integration, and con

flict monitoring; assessing the

nature and generality of prefrontal cognitive control mechanisms. Neuron 41, 473

–487.

Banich, M.T., Milham, M.P., Atchley, R., Cohen, N.J., Webb, A., Wszalek, T., et al., 2000.

fMri studies of Stroop tasks reveal unique roles of anterior and posterior brain
systems in attentional selection. J. Cogn. Neurosci. 12, 988

–1000.

Bechara, A., Tranel, D., Damasio, H., 2000. Characterization of the decision-making de

ficit of

patients with ventromedial prefrontal cortex lesions. Brain 123, 2189

–2202.

Beck, A.T., Steer, R.A., Brown, G.K., 1996. Manual for Beck Depression Inventory-II.

Psychological Corporation, San Antonio: TX.

Beckmann, C.F., DeLuca, M., Devlin, J.T., Smith, S.M., 2005. Investigations into resting-

state connectivity using independent component analysis. Philos. Trans. R Soc.
Lond. B Biol. Sci. 360, 1001

–1013.

Bench, C., Frith, C., Grasby, P., Friston, K., Paulesu, E., Frackowiak, R., et al., 1993.

Investigations of the functional anatomy of attention using the Stroop test.
Neuropsychologia 31, 907

–922.

Binder, J.R., Frost, J.A., Hammeke, T.A., Bellgowan, P.S., Rao, S.M., Cox, R.W., 1999.

Conceptual processing during the conscious resting state: a functional MRI study.
J. Cogn. Neurosci. 11, 80

–93.

Birn, R.M., Diamond, J.B., Smith, M.A., Bandettini, P.A., 2006. Separating respiratory-

variation-related

fluctuations from neuronal-activity-related fluctuations in fMRI.

Neuroimage 31, 1536

–1548.

Blakemore, S.J., 2003a. Deluding the motor system. Conscious. Cogn. 12 (4), 647

–655.

Blakemore, S.J., 2003b. Delusions of alien control in the normal brain. Neuropsychologia

41, 1058

–1067.

Blakemore, S.J., Wolpert, D.M., Frith, C.D., 2002. Abnormalities in the awareness of

action. Trends Cogn. Sci. 6, 237

–242.

Brooks, V.B., 1986. The Neural Basis of Motor Control. Oxford University Press, USA. 344 p.
Broyd, S.J., Demanuele, C., Debener, S., Helps, S.K., James, C.J., Sonuga-Barke, E.J., 2009.

Default-mode brain dysfunction in mental disorders: a systematic review.
Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 33, 279

–296.

Bullinger, M., Kirchberger, I., 1998. SF-36. Fragebogen zum Gesundheitszustand.

Handanweisung. Hogrefe, Göttingen.

Burgmer, M., Konrad, C., Jansen, A., Kugel, H., Sommer, J., Heindel, W., et al., 2006.

Abnormal brain activation during movement observation in patients with
conversion paralysis. Neuroimage 29, 1336

–1343.

Bush, G., Luu, P., Posner, M., 2000. Cognitive and emotional in

fluences in anterior

cingulate cortex. Trends Cogn. Sci. 4, 215

–222.

Carmichael, S.T., Price, J.L., 1995. Limbic connections of the orbital and medial prefrontal

cortex in macaque monkeys. J. Comp. Neurol. 363, 615

–641.

Cavanna, A.E., Trimble, M.R., 2006. The precuneus: a review of its functional anatomy

and behavioural correlates. Brain 129, 564

–583.

Cavanna, A.E., 2007. The precuneus and consciousness. CNS Spectr. 12, 545

–552.

Cohen, J.D., Servan-Schreiber, D., 1992. Context, cortex, and dopamine: a connectionist

approach to behavior and biology in schizophrenia. Psychol. Rev. 99, 45

–77.

Cojan, Y., Waber, L., Carruzzo, A., Vuilleumier, P., 2009a. Motor inhibition in hysterical

conversion paralysis. Neuroimage 47, 1026

–1037.

Cojan, Y., Waber, L., Schwartz, S., Rossier, L., Forster, A., Vuilleumier, P., 2009b. The brain

under self-control: modulation of inhibitory and monitoring cortical networks
during hypnotic paralysis. Neuron 62, 862

–875.

D'Argembeau, A., Collette, F., Van der Linden, M., Laureys, S., Del Fiore, G., Degueldre, C.,

et al., 2005. Self-referential re

flective activity and its relationship with rest: a PET

study. Neuroimage 25, 616

–624.

Damoiseaux, J.S., Greicius, M.D., 2009. Greater than the sum of its parts: a review of

studies combining structural connectivity and resting-state functional connectiv-
ity. Brain Struct. Funct. 213, 525

–533.

De Lange, F.P., Toni, I., Roelofs, K., 2010. Altered connectivity between prefrontal and

sensorimotor cortex in conversion paralysis. Neuropsychologia 48, 1782

–1788.

DeLuca, M., Beckmann, C.F., De Stefano, N., Matthews, P.M., Smith, S.M., 2006. fMRI

resting state networks de

fine distinct modes of long-distance interactions in the

human brain. Neuroimage 29, 1359

–1367.

Dehaene, S., Changeux, J.P., 1995. Neuronal models of prefrontal cortical functions. Ann.

N.Y. Acad. Sci. 769, 305

–319.

Emdin, M., Santarcangelo, E., Picano, E., Racity, M., Pola, S., Macerata, A., Michelassi, C., l'Abbate,

A., 1996. Hypnosis effect on RR interval and blood pressure variability. Clin. Sci. 91, 33.

Egner, T., Graham, J., Gruzelier, J., 2005. Hypnosis decouples cognitive control from

con

flict monitoring processes of the frontal lobe. Neuroimage 27, 969–978.

Esslinger, C., Walter, H., Kirsch, P., Erk, S., Schnell, K., Arnold, C., et al., 2009. Neural

mechanisms of a genome-wide supported psychosis variant. Science 324, 605.

Farrer, C., Franck, N., Georgieff, N., Frith, C.D., Decety, J., Jeannerod, M., 2003. Modulating

the experience of agency: a positron emission tomography study. Neuroimage 18,
324

–333.

Farrer, C., Frey, S.H., Van Horn, J.D., Tunik, E., Turk, D., Inati, S., et al., 2008. The angular

gyrus computes action awareness representations. Cereb. Cortex 18, 254

–261.

Faymonville, M.E., Laureys, S., Degueldre, C., DelFiore, G., Luxen, A., Franck, G., et al., 2000.

Neural mechanisms of antinociceptive effects of hypnosis. Anesthesiology 92,
1257

–1267.

Fransson, P., 2006. How default is the default mode of brain function? Further evidence

from intrinsic BOLD signal

fluctuations. Neuropsychologia 44, 2836–2845.

2181

M. Pyka et al. / NeuroImage 56 (2011) 2173

–2182

Freyberger, H.J., Spitzer, C., Stieglitz, R.D., 1999. Fragebogen zu Dissoziativen Sympto-

men (FDS). Hogrefe, Göttingen Bern.

Friston, K., Ashburner, J., Kiebel, S., 2007. Statistical Parametric Mapping. The Analysis of

Functional Brain Images Academic Press. .

Frith, C., 2000. The role of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in the selection of action as

revealed by functional imaging. In: Monsell, S., Driver, J. (Eds.), Control of cognitive
processes: Attention and performance XVIII. MIT Press, pp. 549

–565.

Giambra, L.M., 1995. A laboratory method for investigating in

fluences on switching

attention to task-unrelated imagery and thought. Conscious. Cogn. 4, 1

–21.

Graziano, M., 2006. The organization of behavioral repertoire in motor cortex. Annu.

Rev. Neurosci. 29, 105

–134.

Greicius, M.D., Krasnow, B., Reiss, A.L., Menon, V., 2003. Functional connectivity in the

resting brain: a network analysis of the default mode hypothesis. Proc. Natl. Acad.
Sci. USA 100, 253

–258.

Greicius, M.D., Srivastava, G., Reiss, A.L., Menon, V., 2004. Default-mode network

activity distinguishes Alzheimer's disease from healthy aging: evidence from
functional MRI. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 4637

–4642.

Gusnard, D.A., Akbudak, E., Shulman, G.L., Raichle, M.E., 2001. Medial prefrontal cortex

and self-referential mental activity: relation to a default mode of brain function.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 4259

–4264.

Gusnard, D.A., Raichle, M.E., 2001. Searching for a baseline: functional imaging and the

resting human brain. Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 2, 685

–694.

Halligan, P.W., Athwal, B.S., Da, Oakley, Frackowiak, R.S., 2000. Imaging hypnotic

paralysis: implications for conversion hysteria. Lancet 355, 986

–987.

Hanakawa, T., Immisch, I., Toma, K., Ma, Dimyan, Van Gelderen, P., Hallett, M., 2003.

Functional properties of brain areas associated with motor execution and imagery.
J. Neurophysiol. 89, 989

–1002.

Hanakawa, T., Ma, Dimyan, Hallett, M., 2008. Motor planning, imagery, and execution in

the distributed motor network: a time-course study with functional MRI. Cereb.
Cortex 18, 2775

–2788.

Hare, T.A., Camerer, C.F., Rangel, A., 2009. Self-control in decision-making involves

modulation of the vmPFC valuation system. Science 324, 646

–648.

Hare, T.A., Camerer, C.F., Knoep

fle, D.T., Rangel, A., 2010. Value computations in ventral

medial prefrontal cortex during charitable decision making incorporate input from
regions involved in social cognition. J. Neurosci. 30, 583

–590.

Kasess, C.H., Windischberger, C., Cunnington, R., Lanzenberger, R., Pezawas, L., Moser, E.,

2008. The suppressive in

fluence of SMA on M1 in motor imagery revealed by fMRI

and dynamic causal modeling. Neuroimage 40, 828

–837.

Kim, D.I., Manoach, D.S., Mathalon, D.H., Ja, Turner, Mannell, M., Brown, G.G., et al.,

2009. Dysregulation of working memory and default-mode networks in schizo-
phrenia using independent component analysis, an fBIRN and MCIC study. Human
Brain Mapp. 30, 3795

–3811.

Laux, L., Glanzmann, P., Schaffner, P., Spielberger, C.D., 1981. Das State-Trait-

Angstinventar (Testmappe mit Handanweisung, Fragebogen STAI-G Form X 1
und Fragebogen STAI-G Form X 2). Weinheim, Beltz.

Luo, J., Niki, K., Ding, Z., Luo, Y., 2004. Precuneus contributes to attentive control of

finger movement. Acta Pharmacol. Sin. 25, 637–643.

Lynn, S.J., Martin, D.J., Frauman, D.C., 1996. Does hypnosis pose special risks for negative

effects? A master class commentary. Int. J. Clin. Exp. Hypn. 44, 7

–19.

Malouin, F., Richards, C.L., Jackson, P.L., Dumas, F., Doyon, J., 2003. Brain activations during

motor imagery of locomotor-related tasks: a PET study. Human Brain Mapp. 19, 47

–62.

Marco-Pallarés, J., Mohammadi, B., Samii, A., Münte, T.F., 2010. Brain activations re

flect

individual discount rates in intertemporal choice. Brain Res. 1320, 123

–129.

Margulies, D.S., Vincent, J.L., Kelly, C., Lohmann, G., Uddin, L.Q., Biswal, B.B., et al., 2009.

Precuneus shares intrinsic functional architecture in humans and monkeys. Proc.
Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 106, 20069

–20074.

Marsh, A.A., Kozak, M.N., Wegner, D.M., Reid, M.E., Yu, H.H., Blair, R.J., 2010. The neural

substrates of action identi

fication. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 5, 392–403.

Mason, M., Norton, M., Van Horn, J., Wegner, D.M., 2007. Wandering minds: the default

network and stimulus-independent thought. Science 315, 393

–395.

McGeown, W.J., Mazzoni, G., Venneri, A., Kirsch, I., 2009. Hypnotic induction decreases

anterior default mode activity. Conscious. Cogn. 18, 848

–855.

McKeown, M.J., Makeig, S., Brown, G.G., Jung, T.P., Kindermann, S.S., Bell, A.J., et al.,

1998. Analysis of fMRI data by blind separation into independent spatial
components. Human Brain Mapp. 6, 160

–188.

McKiernan, K., Kaufman, J.N., Kucera-Thompson, J., Binder, J.R., 2003. A parametric

manipulation of factors affecting task-induced deactivation in functional neuro-
imaging. J. Cogn. Neurosci. 15, 394

–408.

McKiernan, K., D'Angelo, B., Kaufman, J., Binder, J.R., 2006. Interrupting the

“stream of

consciousness

”: an fMRI investigation. Neuroimage 29, 1185–1191.

Meindl, T., Teipel, S., Elmouden, R., Mueller, S., Koch, W., Dietrich, O., et al., 2009. Test-

retest reproducibility of the default-mode network in healthy individuals. Human
Brain Mapp. 31, 237

–246.

Meister, I.G., Krings, T., Foltys, H., Boroojerdi, B., Müller, M., Töpper, R., et al., 2004.

Playing piano in the mind

—an fMRI study on music imagery and performance in

pianists. Brain Res. Cogn. Brain Res. 19, 219

–228.

Nir, Y., Hasson, U., Levy, I., Yeshurun, Y., Malach, R., 2006. Widespread functional

connectivity and fMRI

fluctuations in human visual cortex in the absence of visual

stimulation. Neuroimage 30, 1313

–1324.

Northoff, G., Heinzel, A., de Greck, M., Bermpohl, F., Dobrowolny, H., Panksepp, J., 2006.

Self-referential processing in our brain

—a meta-analysis of imaging studies on the

self. Neuroimage 31, 440

–457.

Oakley, D.A., 1999. Hypnosis and conversion hysteria: a unifying model. Cogn.

Neuropsychiatry 4, 243

–265.

Oakley, D.A., Halligan, P.W., 2009. Hypnotic suggestion and cognitive neuroscience.

Trends Cogn. Sci. 13, 264

–270.

Oishi, K., Toma, K., Bagarinao, E.T., Matsuo, K., Nakai, T., Chihara, K., et al., 2005.

Activation of the precuneus is related to reduced reaction time in serial reaction
time tasks. Neurosci. Res. 52, 37

–45.

Old

field, R.C., 1971. The assessment and analysis of handedness: the Edinburgh

inventory. Neuropsychologia 9, 97

–113.

Pardo, J., Pardo, P., Janer, K., Raichle, M., 1990. The anterior cingulate cortex mediates processing

selection in the Stroop attentional con

flict paradigm. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87, 256.

Pyka, M., Beckmann, C.F., Schöning, S., Hauke, S., Heider, D., Kugel, H., et al., 2009.

Impact of working memory load on FMRI resting state pattern in subsequent
resting phases. PLoS One 4 (9), e7198.

Raij, T.T., Numminen, J., Närvänen, S., Hiltunen, J., Hari, R., 2009. Strength of prefrontal

activation predicts intensity of suggestion-induced pain. Human Brain Mapp. 30,
2890

–2897.

Rameson, L.T., Satpute, A.B., Lieberman, M.D., 2009. The neural correlates of implicit and

explicit self-relevant processing. Neuroimage 50, 701

–708.

Santarcangelo, E.L., Balocchi, R., Scattina, E., Manzoni, D., Bruschini, L., Ghelarducci, B.,

Varanini, M., 2008. Hypnotizability-dependent modulation of the changes in heart
rate control induced by upright stance. Brain Res. Bull. 75, 692

–697.

Schneider, F., Bermpohl, F., Heinzel, A., Rotte, M., Walter, M., Tempelmann, C., et al.,

2008. The resting brain and our self: self-relatedness modulates resting state neural
activity in cortical midline structures. Neuroscience 157, 120

–131.

Schöning, S., Zwitserlood, P., Engelien, A., Behnken, A., Kugel, H., Schiffbauer, H., et al.,

2008. Working-memory fMRI reveals cingulate hyperactivation in euthymic major
depression. Human Brain Mapp. 2756, 2746

–2756.

Shehzad, Z., Kelly, A.M., Reiss, P.T., Gee, G., Gotimer, K., Uddin, L.Q., et al., 2009. The

resting brain: unconstrained yet reliable. Cereb. Cortex 19, 2209

–2229.

Sheline, Y.I., Barch, D.M., Price, J.L., Rundle, M.M., Vaishnavi, S.N., Snyder, A.Z., et al.,

2009. The default mode network and self-referential processes in depression. Proc.
Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 106, 1942

–1947.

Shmueli, K., van Gelderen, P., de Zwart, J.A., Horovitz, S.G., Fukunaga, M., Jansma, J.M.,

Duyn, J.H., 2007. Low frequency

fluctuations in the cardiac rate as a source of

variance in the resting-state fMRI BOLD signal. Neuroimage 38, 306

–320.

Simpson, J.R., Snyder, A.Z., Gusnard, D.A., Raichle, M.E., 2001a. Emotion-induced

changes in human medial prefrontal cortex: I. During cognitive task performance.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 683

–687.

Simpson, J.R., Drevets, W.C., Snyder, A.Z., Gusnard, D.A., Raichle, M.E., 2001b. Emotion-

induced changes in human medial prefrontal cortex: II. During anticipatory
anxiety. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 688

–693.

Singh, K.D., Fawcett, I.P., 2008. Transient and linearly graded deactivation of the human

default-mode network by a visual detection task. Neuroimage 41, 100

–112.

Sirigu, A., Duhamel, J.R., Cohen, L., Pillon, B., Dubois, B., Agid, Y., 1996. The mental

representation of hand movements after parietal cortex damage. Science 273,
1564

–1568.

Spunt, R.P., Satpute, A.B., Lieberman, M.D., 2010. Identifying the What, Why, and How of

an Observed Action: An fMRI Study of Mentalizing and Mechanizing during Action
Observation. J. Cogn. Neurosci. 23, 63

–74.

Stinear, C.M., Coxon, J.P., Byblow, W.D., 2009. Primary motor cortex and movement

prevention: where Stop meets Go. Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 33, 662

–673.

Tamás Kincses, Z., Johansen-Berg, H., Tomassini, V., Bosnell, R., Matthews, P.M.,

Beckmann, C.F., 2008. Model-free characterization of brain functional networks for
motor sequence learning using fMRI. Neuroimage 39, 1950

–1958.

Treserras, S., Boulanouar, K., Conchou, F., Simonetta-Moreau, M., Berry, I., Celsis, P., et

al., 2009. Transition from rest to movement: brain correlates revealed by functional
connectivity. Neuroimage 48, 207

–216.

van Buuren, M., Gladwin, T.E., Zandbelt, B.B., Kahn, R.S., Vink, M., 2010. Reduced

functional coupling in the default-mode network during self-referential processing.
Human Brain Mapp. 31, 1117

–1127.

VandeVusse, L., Hanson, L., Berner, M.A., White Winters, J.M., 2010. Impact of self-

hypnosis in women on select physiologic and psychological parameters. J. Obstet.
Gynecol. Neonatal Nurs. 39, 159

–168.

Vuontela, V., Steenari, M., Aronen, E.T., Korvenoja, A., Aronen, H.J., Carlson, S., 2009.

Brain activation and deactivation during location and color working memory tasks
in 11

–13-year-old children. Brain Cogn. 69, 56–64.

Wager, T.D., Jonides, J., Reading, S., 2004. Neuroimaging studies of shifting attention: a

meta-analysis. Neuroimage 22, 1679

–1693.

Wager, T.D., Smith, E.E., 2003. Neuroimaging studies of working memory: a meta-

analysis. Cogn. Affect. Behav. Neurosci. 3, 255

–274.

Wager, T.D., Jonides, J., Smith, E.E., Nichols, T.E., 2005. Toward a taxonomy of attention

shifting: individual differences in fMRI during multiple shift types. Cogn. Affect.
Behav. Neurosci. 5, 127

–143.

Wagner, G., Sauer, H., 2006. Assessing the working memory network: studies with

functional magnetic resonance imaging and structural equation modeling.
Neuroscience 139, 91

–103.

Waites, A.B., Stanislavsky, A., Abbott, D.F., Jackson, G.D., 2005. Effect of prior cognitive

state on resting state networks measured with functional connectivity. Human
Brain Mapp. 24, 59

–68.

Ward, N.S., Oakley, D.A., Frackowiak, R.S., Halligan, P.W., 2003. Differential brain

activations during intentionally simulated and subjectively experienced paralysis.
Cogn. Neuropsychiatry 8, 295

–312.

Weitzenhoffer, A.M., Hilgard, E.R., 1959. Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scales, Forms

A & B. Consulting Psychologists Press, Palo Alto.

Wittchen, H.U., Wunderlich, U., Gruschwitz, S., Zaudig, M., 1997. SKID I, Strukturiertes

Klinisches Interview für DSM-IV. Hogrefe, Göttingen, Germany.

Yan, C., Liu, D., He, Y., Zou, Q., Zhu, C., Zuo, X., et al., 2009. Spontaneous brain activity in

the default mode network is sensitive to different resting-state conditions with
limited cognitive load. PLoS One 4 (5), e5743.

2182

M. Pyka et al. / NeuroImage 56 (2011) 2173

–2182