Fat mass- and obesity-associated genotype, dietary intakes and
anthropometric measures in European adults: the Food4Me study

Katherine M. Livingstone

1

†, Carlos Celis-Morales

1

†, Santiago Navas-Carretero

2,3

,

Rodrigo San-Cristobal

2,3

, Hannah Forster

4

, Clare B. O

’Donovan

4

, Clara Woolhead

4

, Cyril F. M. Marsaux

5

,

Anna L. Macready

6

, Rosalind Fallaize

6

, Silvia Kolossa

7

, Lydia Tsirigoti

8

, Christina P. Lambrinou

8

, George

Moschonis

8

, Magdalena Godlewska

9

, Agnieszka Surwi

łło

9

, Christian A. Drevon

10

, Yannis Manios

8

, Iwona

Traczyk

9

, Eileen R. Gibney

4

, Lorraine Brennan

4

, Marianne C. Walsh

4

, Julie A. Lovegrove

6

, J. Alfredo Martinez

2,3

,

Wim H. M. Saris

5

, Hannelore Daniel

7

, Mike Gibney

4

and John C. Mathers

1

* on behalf of the Food4Me study

1

Human Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK

2

Center for Nutrition Research, University of Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Spain

3

CIBER Fisiopatología Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERobn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain

4

UCD Institute of Food and Health, University College Dublin, Bel

field, Dublin 4, Republic of Ireland

5

Department of Human Biology, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University

Medical Centre, Maastricht 6229 HX, The Netherlands

6

Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition and Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, University of Reading,

Reading RG6 6AP, UK

7

ZIEL Research Center of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Biochemistry Unit, Technische Universität München, 85435 Freising,

Germany

8

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Kallithea 17671, Greece

9

National Food & Nutrition Institute (IZZ), Warsaw 02903, Poland

10

Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 0372 Oslo, Norway

(Final revision received 9 July 2015

– Submitted 22 September 2015 – Accepted 28 October 2015)

Abstract

The interplay between the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) gene variants and diet has been implicated in the development of obesity. The
aim of the present analysis was to investigate associations between FTO genotype, dietary intakes and anthropometrics among European adults.
Participants in the Food4Me randomised controlled trial were genotyped for FTO genotype (rs9939609) and their dietary intakes, and diet quality
scores (Healthy Eating Index and PREDIMED-based Mediterranean diet score) were estimated from FFQ. Relationships between FTO genotype,
diet and anthropometrics (weight, waist circumference (WC) and BMI) were evaluated at baseline. European adults with the FTO risk genotype had
greater WC (AA v. TT: +1

·4 cm; P = 0·003) and BMI (+0·9 kg/m

2

; P

= 0·001) than individuals with no risk alleles. Subjects with the lowest fried food

consumption and two copies of the FTO risk variant had on average 1

·4 kg/m

2

greater BMI (P

trend

= 0·028) and 3·1 cm greater WC (P

trend

= 0·045)

compared with individuals with no copies of the risk allele and with the lowest fried food consumption. However, there was no evidence of
interactions between FTO genotype and dietary intakes on BMI and WC, and thus further research is required to con

firm or refute these findings.

Key words:

Fat mass- and obesity-associated gene: BMI: Fried foods: Dietary intakes

Over the past 30 years, the prevalence of obesity has increased
markedly, with 17 % of European adults

(1)

and 9 % of adults

globally now being obese

(2)

. Obesity is a multifactorial condi-

tion that is in

fluenced by the complex interplay between diet,

physical activity (PA) and genetics

(3,4)

. Recent genome-wide

association studies in nearly 400 000 individuals have identi

fied

SNP in genes, including the fat mass- and obesity-associated gene
(FTO), which are strongly associated with the development of
obesity

(5

–7)

. A study of 38 759 individuals revealed that those

homozygous for the FTO (rs9939609) risk allele weighed on
average 3 kg more and had 1

·7-fold increased odds of being obese

compared with those homozygous for the lower-risk allele

(5)

.

* Corresponding author: Professor J. C. Mathers, fax +44 191 208 1101, email john.mathers@newcastle.ac.uk
† These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abbreviations: EI, total energy intake; FTO, fat mass- and obesity-associated gene; MD, PREDIMED-based Mediterranean diet score; PA, physical activity;

RCT, randomised controlled trial; WC, waist circumference.

British Journal of Nutrition, page 1 of 9

doi:10.1017/S0007114515004675

© The Authors 2015

The association between FTO and obesity has been attributed

to higher energy intake

(8,9)

, although

findings are equivocal

(10)

.

Furthermore, obese individuals may consume higher amounts of
energy-dense foods such as fried foods

(11)

. The obesogenic

in

fluence of FTO may be exacerbated by higher energy and fat

intakes

(12,13)

, although there is little information on links between

FTO genotype and total dietary intake, or dietary patterns

(14)

.

Interactions between obesity-susceptibility genes, intakes of fried
foods and sugar-sweetened beverages and measures of adiposity
have been reported among US adults

(15,16)

. Qi et al.

(15)

found that

BMI increased by 1

·1 (

SE

0

·2), 1·6 (

SE

0

·3) and 2·2 (

SE

0

·6) kg/m

2

per ten obesity-related risk alleles with increasing frequency of
fried food consumption (less than once, one to three times and
four or more times a week, respectively; P

for interaction

< 0·001).

Furthermore, Qi et al.

(16)

reported an interaction between

sugar-sweetened beverage intake and genetic predisposition to
obesity (P

for interaction

< 0·001). It is also evident that healthier

eating patterns

– for example, the PREDIMED-based Mediterra-

nean diet (MD) score

– may modulate the effect of FTO genotype

on adiposity

(17)

. However, few studies have investigated

relationships between FTO genotype, dietary intakes and
adiposity in European adults.

The present study investigated the associations of FTO geno-

type and BMI and waist circumference (WC) with dietary intakes
and potential interactions between FTO genotype, dietary intake
and adiposity (BMI and WC) in adults participating in the pan-
European Food4Me randomised controlled trial (RCT)

(18)

.

Methods

Study population

The Food4Me proof of principle study was a 6-month,
pan-European, RCT including 1607 adults

(18,19)

. Participants

were recruited between August 2012 and August 2013 across
seven European recruitment sites: University College Dublin
(Ireland); Maastricht University (The Netherlands); University of
Navarra (Spain); Harokopio University (Greece); University of
Reading (UK); National Food and Nutrition Institute (Poland);
and Technical University of Munich (Germany).

Dietary intakes

Habitual dietary intake was quanti

fied using an online FFQ and

food habits questionnaire, developed and validated for this
study

(20,21)

. The Food4Me FFQ included 157 food items con-

sumed frequently in each of the seven recruitment countries.
Intakes of foods and nutrients were computed in real time using
a food composition database based on McCance and
Widdowson

’s The Composition of Foods

(22)

. A

‘fried foods’ cate-

gory was created by summing the following foods: chips, spring
rolls, fried processed chicken or poultry, fried

fish in batter and

fish fingers/fish cakes. Additional information on fried food
consumption was obtained from a questionnaire on dietary
habits

(20)

, which asked how often participants consumed fried

food in the past month, with the following options:

‘never’, ‘1–3

times/month

’, ‘once a week’, ‘2–4 times/week’, ‘5–6 times/

week

’ or ‘once a day’. Responses to this question were

aggregated into three categories: low

= ‘never’ and ‘1–3 times/

month

’; medium = ‘once a week’ and ‘2–4 times/week’; and

high

= ‘5–6 times/week’ and ‘once a day’. Participants respon-

ded to questions on dietary habits including salt use (i.e. how
often do you add salt while cooking? and how often do you add
salt at the table?) and fat consumption (i.e. what do you do with
visible fat on meat?). Both questions relating to salt were scored
on a

five-point scale ranging from ‘never’ to ‘always’, which was

aggregated to a three-point scale (low

= ‘never’ and ‘rarely’;

medium

= ‘sometimes’; high = ‘usually’ and ‘always’). For fat

consumption, respondents could select whether they ate most,
some or as little as possible of visible fat on meat or that they
did not eat meat, and these responses were aggregated to
produce three groups: high

= ‘ate most or some of the fat’,

medium

= ‘ate as little as possible’ or low = ‘did not eat meat’.

Categories were also created for

‘sweets and snacks’ and ‘sugar-

sweetened beverages

’. ‘Sweets and snacks’ included sweet

biscuits, cakes,

flapjacks, muesli bars, buns, muffins, pastries,

waf

fles, pancakes, crêpes, fruit pies, tarts, crumbles, sponge and

milk puddings, ice cream, sorbets and jellies, chocolate and
chocolate snack bars, sweets, sugar added to tea/coffee/cereal
and crisps.

‘Sugar-sweetened beverages’ were restricted to fizzy

soft drinks and did not include low-energy content or diet
options. A Healthy Eating Index (HEI) was estimated according
to the consumption of total and whole fruits, total vegetables,
greens and beans, whole grains, dairy products, protein and
fatty acids

(23)

. The MD score was estimated based on an

adaptation of the PREDIMED fourteen-point criteria. In brief,
participants scored 1 if they met one of the following criteria
and 0 if they did not: higher intake of olive oil than other
culinary fat and of white meat than red meat, high intake of
fruits (including natural fruit juice) and vegetables, legumes,
nuts,

fish, wine and sofrito and a limited intake of red and

processed meats, fats and spreads, soft drinks and commercial
bakery goods, sweets and pastries

(24)

. Scores were summed and

ranged between 0 and 14

(25)

. Details of the MD scoring system

are provided in online Supplementary Table S1.

Assessment of anthropometric and lifestyle measures

Body weight (kg), height (m) and WC (cm) were self-measured
and self-reported. Participants were provided with information
sheets and online video instructions in their own language on
how to complete the measurements. BMI (kg/m

2

) was calcu-

lated using measures of body weight and height. Self-reported
measurements were validated in a sub-sample of the partici-
pants across seven European countries and showed a high
degree of reliability

(26)

. Physical activity level (PAL) and time

spent sedentary (min/d) were estimated from triaxial accel-
erometers (TracmorD; Philips Consumer Lifestyle). Participants
self-reported their current smoking status.

Genotyping

Participants collected buccal cell samples at baseline using
Isohelix SK-1 DNA buccal swabs and Isohelix dried capsules
and posted the samples to each recruiting centre for shipment
to LCG Genomics. LCG Genomics extracted DNA and geno-
typed speci

fic loci using KASP

TM

genotyping assays to provide

2

K. M. Livingstone et al.

bi-allelic scoring of FTO SNP

– rs9939609 and rs1121980. These

two SNP showed a high linkage disequilibrium (r

2

0

·96), and

therefore results for rs1121980 are not reported. No signi

ficant

deviation from the Hardy

–Weinberg equilibrium was observed

for rs9939609 (0

·51; P = 0·48).

Ethical approval and participant consent

This study was conducted according to the guidelines laid
down in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki, and all procedures
involving human subjects were approved by the Research
Ethics Committees at each University or Research Centre deli-
vering the intervention. All participants who expressed an
interest in the study were asked to sign online consent forms at
two stages in the screening process. These consent forms were
automatically directed to the local study investigators to be
counter-signed and archived

(18)

. The Food4Me trial was regis-

tered as a RCT (NCT01530139) at Clinicaltrials.gov.

Statistical analysis

Data were analysed using Stata (version 13; StataCorp LP). Only
baseline data were used for the present analyses. Results from
descriptive analyses are presented as means and standard
deviations for continuous variables or as percentages for
categorical variables. Multinomial logistic regression was used
to test for signi

ficant differences across categorical variables and

multiple linear regression was used for continuous variables.
Multiple linear regression analyses were used to test for
associations (P

trend

) between anthropometric measures (BMI

and WC) and FTO genotype, strati

fied according to tertiles of

dietary intakes or dietary scores, with the exception of
sugar-sweetened beverages, which was a dichotomous variable
due to high numbers of non-consumers (n 899). Interactions
between categories of dietary intakes and FTO genotype on
BMI and WC were investigated by including an interaction term
in the model. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, country, PAL
and smoking (smokers, non-smokers). Results were deemed
signi

ficant at P < 0·05. Sensitivity analyses were used to test the

effects of speci

fic foods within the fried food category (chips,

pizza and spring rolls; fried processed chicken and poultry; and
fried

fish in batter and fish products). Sensitivity analyses also

excluded participants who reported energy intake lower than
BMR

× 1·1

(27)

, where BMR was calculated using Oxford

equations

(28)

, and energy intakes

>18 828 kJ/d (>4500 kcal/d)

(29)

.

Adjustment for total energy intake (EI) was included in the
sensitivity analyses when investigating the relationship between
foods, FTO genotype and interactions with BMI and WC. In
addition, continuous variables for dietary intakes and anthropo-
metrics were used to test for interactions between dietary intakes
and FTO genotype.

Results

Participant characteristics

Of the 1607 individuals randomised into the Food4Me RCT, data
at baseline on FTO genotype, anthropometry and dietary intake

were available for 1277 participants. As summarised in Table 1,
30 % of individuals were overweight and 16 % were obese. In
addition, 22 % of males and 22 % of females had WC above
healthy limits (

>102 and >88 cm, respectively). Each additional

copy of FTO risk allele was associated with an increase in
weight, WC and BMI (P

trend

= 0·005, 0·003 and 0·001, respec-

tively). Furthermore, the percentage of participants who were
overweight or obese was higher in carriers of the FTO risk allele
(TT: 29 v. AA: 33 %; P

= 0·036 and 13 v. 18·4 %; P = 0·019,

respectively) than non-carriers. There were no signi

ficant

differences in sex distribution, age, PA, smoking prevalence and
EI:BMR ratio between FTO genotypes (Table 1).

Dietary intake and

FTO genotype

No signi

ficant differences in total energy and macronutrient

intakes were detected between FTO genotypes (Table 2).
However, individuals with two risk alleles for FTO consumed
more high-fat dairy products (P

= 0·001) and fewer crisps

(P

= 0·043) than individuals with no FTO risk alleles. No other

signi

ficant differences were observed (data not shown). Indi-

viduals with no copies of the FTO risk allele added salt less
frequently while cooking (P

= 0·032) than those with two copies

of the risk allele. MD and HEI scores did not differ between FTO
genotypes. The relationships between dietary intake and BMI
are presented in the online Supplementary Tables 2 and 3.

Dietary intakes,

FTO genotype and anthropometrics

On the basis of FFQ responses, individuals with the lowest fried
food consumption (

first tertile) and two copies of the FTO risk

variant had on average 1

·4 kg/m

2

greater BMI (P

trend

= 0·028)

and 3

·1 cm greater WC (P

trend

= 0·045) compared with indivi-

duals with no copies of the risk allele with the lowest fried food
consumption. Similarly, individuals with medium fried food
consumption (second tertile) and two copies of the FTO risk
variant had on average 1

·2 kg/m

2

greater BMI (P

trend

= 0·036)

compared with individuals with no copies of the risk allele with
the lowest fried food consumption. No signi

ficant relationships

were identi

fied in individuals with the highest fried food con-

sumption. WC did not differ between genotypes in medium or
highest fried food consumers and no signi

ficant interactions

were observed (Fig. 1). These results were consistent when
fried food consumption was estimated from the food habits
questionnaire: participants who rarely consumed fried foods
and had two copies of the risk allele had 1

·3 kg/m

2

higher BMI

compared with those with no risk alleles (P

trend

= 0·008). Simi-

larly, participants who frequently consumed fried foods and
had two copies of the risk allele had 5

·2 kg/m

2

higher BMI

compared with those with no risk alleles (P

trend

= 0·027). No

signi

ficant interactions were observed. BMI was higher in

individuals with two copies of the FTO risk genotype and
lowest sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (lowest con-
sumption; AA v. TT: +1

·4 kg/m

2

; P

trend

= 0·003) and highest

sweet and snack consumption (highest consumption; AA v. TT:
+1

·7 kg/m

2

; P

trend

= 0·009) compared with individuals with no

copies of the FTO risk genotype. BMI was higher in individuals
with two copies of the FTO risk genotype and moderate and

Genotype, dietary intakes and BMI

3

Table 1. Demographic characteristics of participants by fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO ) risk allele*
(Mean values and standard deviations; percentages)

FTO_rs9939609

All

TT

TA

AA

Mean

SD

Mean

SD

Mean

SD

Mean

SD

P†

Total (

n)

1277

405

641

231

Sex

– female (%)

58

·0

55

·1

59

·1

59

·7

0:089

Age (years)

40:4

13:0

40:2

13:1

41:0

13:0

39:2

12:9

0:166

Weight (kg)

74:8

15:8

73:9

15:2

74:9

16:0

76:1

16:3

0:005

Waist circumference (cm)

85:8

13:8

85:1

13:6

85:8

13:8

87:0

14:3

0:003

Central adiposity (%)

23

·3

21

·7

23

·6

25

·5

0:180

BMI (kg/m

2

)

25:5

4:8

25:0

4:6

25:6

5:0

26:1

4:8

0:001

Normal weight (%)

52

·7

59

·3

50

·8

46

·5

<0:001

Overweight (%)

30

·4

27

·4

31

·2

33

·8

0:039

Obese (%)

16

·8

13

·3

18

·0

19

·7

0:016

Physical activity

PAL

1:7

0:2

1:7

0:2

1:7

0:2

1:7

0:2

0:274

Sedentary (min/d)

746

75

742

73

747

75

746

81

0:882

Smoker (%)

11

·4

9

·9

12

·8

10

·4

0:801

Total energy intake:BMR ratio

1:7

0:7

1:6

0:6

1:7

0:7

1:6

0:5

0:990

PAL, physical activity level (ratio between total energy expenditure:BMR).
* Central adiposity was defined as waist circumference

>88 cm in women and >102 cm in men; normal: BMI 18·5–24·9 kg/m

2

; overweight: BMI 25

–29·9 kg/m

2

; obese: BMI

>30 kg/m

2

.

† Multinomial logistic regression and multiple linear regression were used to test for significant differences across categorical and continuous variables, respectively; P values were adjusted for age, sex, country and smoking habits.

Analyses were also adjusted for BMI with the exception of weight, waist circumference and BMI.

Table 2. Dietary intakes of participants by fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO ) risk allele
(Mean values and standard deviations)

FTO_rs9939609

TT

TA

AA

Mean

SD

Mean

SD

Mean

SD

P *

Total (

n)

463

721

260

Macronutrient intake

Total energy intake (kJ)

10 594

3975

10 868

4963

10 565

3699

0:927

Fat (% energy)

36:1

6:0

35:7

5:9

36:3

5:6

0:595

SFA (% energy)

14:2

2:9

14:0

3:3

14:4

3:0

0:923

Trans-fat (% energy)

0:5

0:2

0:5

0:2

0:5

0:2

0:760

MUFA (% energy)

13:8

3:2

13:6

3:0

13:9

3:3

0:450

PUFA (% energy)

5:8

1:5

5:8

1:5

5:7

1:3

0:753

n-3 Fatty acids (% energy)

0:7

0:3

0:7

0:3

0:7

0:2

0:246

Carbohydrates (% energy)

45:9

8:0

46:3

7:5

45:4

7:2

0:959

Sugars (% energy)

21:1

6:0

21:2

6:1

20:5

5:3

0:471

Protein (% energy)

16:9

3:6

17:1

3:8

17:3

3:8

0:339

Alcohol (% energy)

3:5

3:7

3:2

3:8

3:3

3:5

0:587

Salt (g/d)

7:3

3:3

7:5

4:0

7:3

3:3

0:758

Contribution from sweets and snacks

Total energy

15:3

9:3

14:9

10:0

15:5

9:7

0:802

% Energy from fat

18:5

11:6

17:7

11:4

18:3

11:8

0:583

% Energy from SFA

20:9

13:5

19:7

13:2

20:7

13:6

0:554

% Energy from sugars

24:7

15:1

23:9

15:5

25:5

15:7

0:944

* Multiple linear regressions were used to test for significant differences across genotypes. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, physical activity, BMI, country and smoking status.

4

K

.

M

.

Livingstone

et
al

.

highest percentage energy intake from fat (second tertile:
+1

·3 kg/m

2

; P

trend

= 0·043 and third tertile: +1·8 kg/m

2

; P

trend

=

0

·004, respectively) and lowest and highest percentage energy

intake from sugar (

first tertile: +1·3 kg/m

2

; P

trend

= 0·032 and

third tertile: +1

·9 kg/m

2

; P

trend

= 0·004, respectively) compared

with individuals with no copies of the FTO risk genotype
(Fig. 2). BMI was higher in individuals with two copies of the
FTO risk genotype and low and high MD scores (

first tertile:

+1

·5 kg/m

2

; P

trend

= 0·032 and third tertile: +1·8 kg/m

2

; P

trend

=

0

·007) and low HEI score (first tertile: +2·0 kg/m

2

; P

trend

=

0

·004), compared with individuals with no copies of the FTO

risk genotype (Fig. 2). With the exception of sugar-sweetened
beverages

(P

interaction

= 0·049), no significant interactions

between FTO genotype and dietary intakes on measures of
adiposity were observed.

There were no signi

ficant trends in fried food consumption or

percentage energy intake from total fat across FTO alleles when
strati

fied by BMI category. Moreover, interactions between fried

food consumption or percentage energy from total fat and FTO
genotype on BMI were not signi

ficant (online Supplementary

Fig. S1).

Sensitivity analyses

No signi

ficant interactions between specific sub-groups of fried

foods and FTO genotype on anthropometric outcomes were

observed. In addition, there were no signi

ficant interactions

between FTO genotype and dietary intakes on BMI or WC when
dietary intakes were included as continuous variables. Exclusion
of energy misreporters did not change the pattern of the results.
Adjustment for EI when investigating the relationship of food
intakes with FTO genotype, as well as any interactions with BMI
or WC, did not change the pattern of results (data not shown).

Discussion

Main

findings

Our main

finding is that individuals with the FTO risk genotype

and the highest intakes of sugar, fat and sweet and snacks had
the highest BMI. Furthermore, subjects with the lowest fried
food consumption and two copies of the FTO risk variant had
on average 1

·4 kg/m

2

greater BMI (P

trend

= 0·028) and 3·1 cm

greater WC (P

trend

= 0·045) compared with individuals with no

copies of the risk allele and with the lowest fried food con-
sumption. However, with the exception of sugar-sweetened
beverages, we did not detect any signi

ficant interactions

between dietary intakes and FTO genotype on BMI or WC. This
is the

first time that these relationships between genotype, diet

and adiposity have been investigated in a pan-European
population, and the link between

‘unhealthy’ dietary intakes

and higher BMI in subjects with the risk alleles for FTO geno-
type warrants further investigation. Thus, further studies are
required to con

firm or to refute these observations.

Comparison with other studies

Our

findings support the link between obesity and fried food

consumption

(11,30)

. A recent study in a US cohort reported that

individuals with high genetic risk of obesity and high fried food
consumption had 2

·4 kg/m

2

higher BMI than individuals with

low genetic risk and low fried food intake (P

for interaction

=

0

·005)

(15)

These

findings were replicated in two further cohorts

with similar results

(15)

. Although the diet

–gene interaction was

not signi

ficant, when only the highest fried food consumers

were considered, we demonstrated that European adults at
higher genetic risk of obesity had 1

·3 kg/m

2

higher BMI than

individuals without the risk allele. Furthermore, with the
exception of fried foods and sugar-sweetened beverages, we
observed that BMI was signi

ficantly higher in the ‘unhealthiest’

tertile of dietary intake or dietary score. This suggests that the
presence of the FTO risk allele may only increase BMI in
individuals with the poorest diets.

Although we identi

fied a significant interaction between

sugar-sweetened beverages and genetic predisposition to obe-
sity, this was the only signi

ficant interaction and may be a

chance

finding

(16)

. Importantly, our cohort of European adults

was smaller (1280) compared with the Nurse

’s Health Study

(9623), Health Professionals Follow-up Study (6379) and the
Women

’s Genome Health Study (21 421), which may have

impacted on our ability to detect signi

ficant interactions

(15,16)

.

Furthermore, we did not detect any signi

ficant differences in

macronutrient intakes or levels of PA between FTO genotypes,
despite

finding significant differences in BMI, WC and weight.

Nonetheless, as investigated in a recent systematic review and

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

1

2

3

BMI (kg/m

2

)

Tertile of fried food consumption

= 0.028

= 0.036

NS

74

76

78

80

82

84

86

88

90

92

94

1

2

3

Waist circumference (cm)

Tertile of fried food consumption

= 0.045

NS

NS

Fig 1. Anthropometric measures by tertile of fried food intake and fat mass-
and obesity-associated risk allele. Values represent least squares means, with
their standard errors adjusted for age, sex, country, physical activity
and smoking status; tertile fried food: (1) 0

−12·4 g/d; (2) 12·5−31·2 g/d,

(3) 31

·3−671 g/d.

,

TT;

,

TA;

,

AA.

Genotype, dietary intakes and BMI

5

meta-analysis, the role of EI in the relationship between FTO
and BMI remains unclear

(10)

and other measures of PA, such as

whether participants met PA recommendations, may have been
more informative but were not the focus of the present analysis.

Although there have been a number of investigations of

interactions between macronutrients intake, genotype and
anthropometric measures, Qi et al.

(15)

were one of the

first to

evaluate relationships between speci

fic food groups, genetic

risk and adiposity. Some diet

–gene interactions have been

supported by

findings from RCT

(31

–34)

; however, few large-scale

studies have identi

fied any significant interaction between

macronutrient intake and FTO genotype on BMI

(12,35

–40)

.

A recent meta-analysis did not detect any interactions between
protein intake and genetic predisposition to obesity on BMI,
WC or waist:hip ratio

(41)

. In contrast, a very recent study

reported a signi

ficant interaction between genetic risk score

(based on sixteen obesity-related SNP) and intakes of energy,
protein, total fat, SFA, PUFA and carbohydrate on BMI, body fat
mass and WC

(13)

. The inconsistency of current evidence for

interactions between macronutrients, FTO and adiposity, as
well as the limited research into effects of speci

fic food groups,

highlights the need for further research in this area.

Our results support the need for personalising nutritional

advice based on the rationale that diet and lifestyle behaviour

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

1

2

BMI (kg/m

2

)

Dichotomous sugar-sweetened

beverage consumption 

P

=

0.003

NS

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

1

2

3

BMI (kg/m

2

)

Tertile of sugar consumption

P

=

0.032

P

=

0.004

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

1

2

3

BMI (kg/m

2

)

Tertile of total fat consumption

NS

P

=

0.043

P

=

0.004

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

1

2

3

BMI (kg/m

2

)

Tertile of MD score

P

=

0.032

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

1

2

3

BMI (kg/m

2

)

Tertile of HEI

P

=

0.004

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

1

2

3

BMI (kg/m

2

)

Tertile of sweet and snack consumption

NS

P

=

0.009

NS

NS

P

=

0.007

NS

NS

NS

Fig 2. BMI by tertile or dichotomous food intake and tertile of dietary score and fat mass- and obesity-associated risk allele. Values represent least squares means,
with their standard errors adjusted for age, sex, country, physical activity and smoking status; sugar-sweetened beverages: (1) 0 g/d, (2) 6

·8−2191·5 g/d; sweets and

snacks: (1) 0

−55·1 g/d, (2) 55·3−105·6 g/d, (3) 105·8−693·9 g/d; percentage energy from sugars: (1) 5·1−18·3 %, (2) 18·3−23·0 %, (3) 23·0−47·9 %; percentage

energy from fat: (1) 13

·8−33·5 %, (2) 33·5−38·3 %, (3) 38·3−66·6 %; PREDIMED-based Mediterranean diet score (MD)

(24)

: 3, high score (6

–10), 2, intermediate score

(4

–6), 1, low score (0–4); Healthy Eating Index (HEI)

(23)

: 3, high index (11

–46), 2, intermediate index (46–54), 1, low index (54–77). Results were deemed significant at

P < 0·05. No significant interactions were observed.

,

TT;

,

TA;

,

AA.

6

K. M. Livingstone et al.

responses will be bigger when individuals are given more
accurate and relevant diagnostic feedback

(42)

. Focusing on

health risks in the provision of lifestyle-based recommendations
may facilitate long-term improvements in diet and PA

(4,15,16)

.

Potential mechanisms

Little is known about the mechanisms through which the FTO
allele enhances obesity risk

(6,43)

, although recent evidence

suggests that manipulation of a pathway for adipocyte ther-
mogenesis regulation may play an important role

(44,45)

. In

addition, there is little mechanistic explanation for the reported
interaction between speci

fic dietary components, FTO geno-

type and adiposity

(15)

. Intake of speci

fic foods may be a marker

for a less healthy diet and lifestyle

(11)

, and thus apparent rela-

tionships may not be causal.

The unhealthy food groups chosen for the present analyses

were typically energy-dense foods, with limited nutritional value,
low in

fibre and with low satiety index

(46)

but were highly pala-

table

(47)

. It has been speculated that the more attractive organo-

leptic properties generating through the frying process may drive
associations between fried foods and increased risk of obesity

(11)

.

These attributes may encourage higher ad libitum energy intake,
and thereby mediate their effects on obesity. Nonetheless, our
analyses were adjusted for EI, suggesting that the mechanism of
action on adiposity goes beyond higher energy intake alone. To
understand the mechanism(s) driving sustained surplus energy
intake, it will be important to investigate simultaneous effects on
energy expenditure.

Strengths and limitations

Strengths of our study include the relatively large number of
European adults (1280), broadly representative of the seven
countries in the Food4Me study in terms of diet and PA levels.
We assessed dietary intakes using a semi-quantitative FFQ,
enabling a more detailed appraisal of food groups and indivi-
dual foods. Furthermore, we included an analysis of overall
dietary healthfulness based on the MD score and on the HEI,
which improved the richness of our dietary data. In addition,
we evaluated the effect of diet

–gene interactions on two mea-

sures of adiposity, BMI and WC, which have different inter-
pretations and links with health outcomes.

A limitation of our study was that it was not powered to detect

diet

–gene interactions. In contrast, Qi et al.

(15)

included a much

larger sample size of n 37 423, which is likely to have contributed
to the statistically signi

ficant interactions observed. In addition, we

investigated the effect of only one obesity-related gene, although
FTO is the gene with the largest association with adiposity, and the
study would have been stronger if we had been able to use a risk
score based on multiple gene variants

(48)

. Although Qi et al.

(15)

studied effects of thirty-two SNP, the authors concluded that
FTO was primarily responsible for the genetic associations
observed. All FFQ-derived food intake data are subject to dietary
misreporting

(49)

, although we did not identify any differences in

dietary misreporting between FTO genotypes. As a sensitivity
analysis, effects of over- and under-reporting of dietary intakes
were minimised by excluding individuals with implausible energy

intakes, and this exclusion did not alter the

findings. Finally,

anthropometric measures were self-measured and self-reported,
which may introduce measurement errors. However, a validation
study embedded within the Food4Me study demonstrated a high
degree of correlation between self-reported and measured
anthropometric variables (interclass correlation coef

ficients: height

0

·990; weight 0·994; and BMI 0·983)

(26)

.

Conclusions

The present study has demonstrated that high consumption of
some, but not all, unhealthy foods and the presence of poor dietary
patterns in individuals with the FTO risk genotype are associated
with greater BMI compared with individuals with no risk alleles.
However, there was limited evidence of interactions between
FTO genotype and dietary intakes on BMI. Research in larger
cohorts is required to con

firm or to refute these findings, and RCT

will be needed to ascertain whether any associations are causal.

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the European Commission under
the Food, Agriculture, Fisheries and Biotechnology Theme of
the 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological
Development (265494).

The authors

’ contributions were as follows: Y. M., I. T.,

C. A. D., E. R. G., L. B., J. A. L., J. A. M., W. H. S., H. D., M. G. and
J. C. M. contributed to the research design. J. C. M. was the
Food4Me study leader. C. C.-M., C. F. M. M., H. F., C. B. O., C. W.,
A. L. M., R. F., S. N.-C., R. S.-C., S. K., L. T., C. P. L., M. G.,
A. S., M. C. W., E. R. G., L. B. and J. C. M. contributed to
developing the standardised operating procedure for the study.
C. C.-M., S. N.-C., R. S.-C., C. W., C. B. O., H. F., C. F. M. M.,
A. L. M., R. F., S. K., L. T., C. P. L., M. G., A. S., M. C. W. and J. C. M.
conducted the intervention. C. C.-M., C. F. M. M. and W. H. S.
contributed to physical activity measurements. K. M. L. and
C. C.-M. wrote the paper and performed the statistical analysis for
the manuscript and are joint

first authors. All the authors con-

tributed to a critical review of the manuscript during the writing
process. All the authors approved the

final version to be published.

None of the authors has personal or

financial conflicts of

interest.

Supplementary material

For supplementary material/s referred to in this article, please
visit http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1017/S0007114515004675

References

1.

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
(2012) Health at a Glance: Europe 2012. OECD Publishing.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264183896-en

2.

Ng M, Fleming T, Robinson M, et al. (2014) Global, regional,
and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children
and adults during 1980

–2013: a systematic analysis for the

Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. Lancet 384, 766

–781.

Genotype, dietary intakes and BMI

7

3.

van Vliet-Ostaptchouk JV, Snieder H & Lagou V (2012)
Gene

–lifestyle interactions in obesity. Curr Nutr Rep 1,

184

–196.

4.

Ahmad S, Rukh G, Varga TV, et al. (2013) Gene

× physical

activity interactions in obesity: combined analysis of 111,421
individuals of European ancestry. PLoS Genet 9, e1003607.

5.

Frayling TM, Timpson NJ, Weedon MN, et al. (2007) A
common variant in the FTO gene is associated with body mass
index and predisposes to childhood and adult obesity. Science
316, 889

–894.

6.

Locke AE, Kahali B, Berndt SI, et al. (2015) Genetic studies of
body mass index yield new insights for obesity biology.
Nature 518, 197

–206.

7.

Shungin D, Winkler TW, Croteau-Chonka DC, et al. (2015)
New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat
distribution. Nature 518, 187

–196.

8.

Speakman JR, Rance KA & Johnstone AM (2008) Poly-
morphisms of the FTO gene are associated with variation in
energy intake, but not energy expenditure. Obesity (Silver
Spring) 16, 1961

–1965.

9.

Corella D, Ortega-Azorín C, Sorlí JV, et al. (2012) Statistical
and biological gene-lifestyle interactions of MC4R and FTO
with diet and physical activity on obesity: new effects on
alcohol consumption. PLOS ONE 7, e52344.

10.

Livingstone KM, Celis-Morales C, Lara J, et al. (2015)
Associations between FTO genotype and total energy and
macronutrient intake in adults: a systematic review and meta-
analysis. Obes Rev 16, 666

–678.

11.

Guallar-Castillón P, Rodríguez-Artalejo F, Fornés NS, et al.
(2007) Intake of fried foods is associated with obesity in the
cohort of Spanish adults from the European prospective
investigation into cancer and nutrition. Am J Clin Nutr 86,
198

–205.

12.

Sonestedt E, Roos C, Gullberg B, et al. (2009) Fat and
carbohydrate intake modify the association between genetic
variation in the FTO genotype and obesity. Am J Clin Nutr 90,
1418

–1425.

13.

Goni L, Cuervo M, Milagro FI, et al. (2015) A genetic risk tool
for obesity predisposition assessment and personalized
nutrition implementation based on macronutrient intake.
Genes Nutr 10, 445.

14.

Brunkwall L, Ericson U, Hellstrand S, et al. (2013) Genetic
variation in the fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) in
association with food preferences in healthy adults. Food Nutr
Res 57, 10.3402/fnr.v57i0.20028.

15.

Qi Q, Chu AY, Kang JH, et al. (2014) Fried food consumption,
genetic risk, and body mass index: gene-diet interaction
analysis in three US cohort studies. BMJ 348, 1610.

16.

Qi Q, Chu AY, Kang JH, et al. (2012) Sugar-sweetened
beverages and genetic risk of obesity. N Engl J Med 367,
1387

–1396.

17.

Razquin C, Martinez JA, Martinez-Gonzalez MA, et al. (2010)
A 3-year intervention with a Mediterranean diet modi

fied the

association between the rs9939609 gene variant in FTO and
body weight changes. Int J Obes (Lond) 34, 266

–272.

18.

Celis-Morales C, Livingstone KM, Marsaux CFM, et al.
(2015) Design and baseline characteristics of the Food4Me
study: a web-based randomised controlled trial of personalised
nutrition in seven European countries. Genes Nutr 10, 450.

19.

Livingstone K, Celis-Morales C, Navas-Carretero S, et al. (2015)
Pro

file of European adults interested in internet-based

personalised nutrition: the Food4Me study. Eur J Nutr
(epublication 17 April 2015).

20.

Forster H, Fallaize R, Gallagher C, et al. (2014) Online dietary
intake estimation: the Food4Me food frequency questionnaire.
J Med Internet Res 16, e150.

21.

Fallaize R, Forster H, Macready LA, et al. (2014) Online dietary
intake estimation: reproducibility and validity of the Food4Me
food frequency questionnaire against a 4-day weighed
food record. J Med Internet Res 16, e190.

22.

Food Standards Agency (2002) McCance and Widdowson

’s

The Composition of Foods, 6th ed. Cambridge: Royal Society of
Chemistry.

23.

Guenther PM, Casavale KO, Reedy J, et al. (2013) Update of
the Healthy Eating Index: HEI-2010. J Acad Nutr Diet 113,
569

–580.

24.

Estruch R, Ros E, Salas-Salvadó J, et al. (2013) Primary pre-
vention of cardiovascular disease with a Mediterranean diet.
N Engl J Med 368, 1279

–1290.

25.

Martínez-González MÁ, Corella D, Salas-Salvadó J, et al.
(2012)

Cohort

pro

file: design and methods of the

PREDIMED study. Int J Epidemiol 41, 377

–385.

26.

Celis-Morales C, Livingstone KM, Woolhead C, et al. (2015)
How reliable is Internet-based self-reported identity, socio-
demographic and obesity measures in European adults? Genes
Nutr 10, 476.

27.

Goldberg GR, Black AE, Jebb SA, et al. (1991) Critical
evaluation of energy intake data using fundamental principles
of energy physiology: 1. Derivation of cut-off limits to identify
under-recording. Eur J Clin Nutr 45, 569

–581.

28.

Henry CJK (2005) Basal metabolic rate studies in humans:
measurement and development of new equations. Public
Health Nutr 8, 1133

–1152.

29.

Hébert JR, Peterson KE, Hurley TG, et al. (2001) The effect of
social desirability trait on self-reported dietary measures
among multi-ethnic female health center employees. Ann
Epidemiol 11, 417

–427.

30.

Schröder H, Fïto M & Covas MI (2007) Association of fast food
consumption with energy intake, diet quality, body mass
index and the risk of obesity in a representative Mediterranean
population. Br J Nutr 98, 1274

–1280.

31.

Fisher E, Meidtner K, Ängquist L, et al. (2012) In

fluence of

dietary protein intake and glycemic index on the association
between TCF7L2 HapA and weight gain. Am J Clin Nutr 95,
1468

–1476.

32.

Qi Q, Bray GA, Smith SR, et al. (2011) Insulin receptor
substrate 1 gene variation modi

fies insulin resistance response

to weight-loss diets in a 2-year randomized trial: the Pre-
venting Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS
LOST) trial. Circulation 124, 563

–571.

33.

Xu M, Qi Q, Liang J, et al. (2013) Genetic determinant for
amino acid metabolites and changes in body weight and
insulin resistance in response to weight-loss diets: the
Preventing

Overweight

Using

Novel

Dietary

Strategies

(POUNDS LOST) trial. Circulation 127, 1283

–1289.

34.

Mattei J, Qi Q, Hu FB, et al. (2012) TCF7L2 genetic variants
modulate the effect of dietary fat intake on changes in body
composition during a weight-loss intervention. Am J Clin Nutr
96, 1129

–1136.

35.

Grau K, Hansen T, Holst C, et al. (2009) Macronutrient-
speci

fic effect of FTO rs9939609 in response to a 10-week

randomized hypo-energetic diet among obese Europeans. Int
J Obes (Lond) 33, 1227

–1234.

36.

Moleres A, Ochoa MC, Rendo-Urteaga T, et al. (2012) Dietary
fatty acid distribution modi

fies obesity risk linked to the

rs9939609 polymorphism of the fat mass and obesity-
associated gene in a Spanish case

–control study of children.

Br J Nutr 107, 533

–538.

37.

Lappalainen T, Lindström J, Paananen J, et al. (2012)
Association of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene
variant (rs9939609) with dietary intake in the Finnish Diabetes
Prevention Study. Br J Nutr 108, 1859

–1865.

8

K. M. Livingstone et al.

38.

Corella D, Arnett DK, Tucker KL, et al. (2011) A high intake of
saturated fatty acids strengthens the association between the
fat mass and obesity-associated gene and BMI. J Nutr 141,
2219

–2225.

39.

Phillips CM, Kesse-Guyot E, McManus R, et al. (2012) High
dietary saturated fat intake accentuates obesity risk associated
with the fat mass and obesity-associated gene in adults. J Nutr
142, 824

–831.

40.

Ortega-Azorin C, Sorli J, Asensio E, et al. (2012) Associations
of the FTO rs9939609 and the MC4R rs17782313 polymorph-
isms with type 2 diabetes are modulated by diet, being higher
when adherence to the Mediterranean diet pattern is low.
Cardiovasc Diabetol 11, 137.

41.

Ankarfeldt MZ, Larsen SC, Ängquist L, et al. (2014) Interaction
between genetic predisposition to adiposity and dietary
protein in relation to subsequent change in body weight and
waist circumference. PLOS ONE 9, e110890.

42.

Martinez JA, Navas-Carretero S, Saris WHM, et al. (2014)
Personalized weight loss strategies

– the role of macronutrient

distribution. Nat Rev Endocrinol 10, 749

–760.

43.

Speakman JR (2015) The

‘fat mass and obesity related’ (FTO)

gene: mechanisms of impact on obesity and energy balance.
Curr Obes Rep 4, 73

–91.

44.

Claussnitzer M, Dankel SN, Kim KH, et al. (2015) FTO obesity
variant circuitry and adipocyte browning in humans. N Engl J
Med 373, 895

–907.

45.

Rosen CJ & Ingel

finger JR (2015) Unraveling the function of

FTO variants. N Engl J Med 373, 964

–965.

46.

Bludell JE, Lawton CL, Cotton JR, et al. (1996) Control of
human appetite: implications for the intake of dietary fat.
Annu Rev Nutr 16, 285

–319.

47.

Fillion L & Henry CJK (1998) Nutrient losses and gains during
frying: a review. Int J Food Sci Nutr 49, 157

–168.

48.

Wang T, Jia W & Hu C (2015) Advancement in genetic variants
conferring obesity susceptibility from genome-wide associa-
tion studies. Front Med 9, 146

–161.

49.

Johansson L, Solvoll K, Bjørneboe GE, et al. (1998)
Under- and overreporting of energy intake related to weight
status and lifestyle in a nationwide sample. Am J Clin Nutr 68,
266

–274.

Genotype, dietary intakes and BMI

9