BOOK REVIEWS—ISIS, 94 : 2 (2003)

397

Mach was prescient, for this age is in many ways
now upon us.

T

IM

M

EHIGAN

Stephen Jay Gould. The Structure of Evolu-
tionary Theory
. ix

Ⳮ 1,433 pp., illus., figs., bibl.,

index. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University
Press, 2002. $39.95 (cloth).

Stephen Jay Gould published this very large
book in March 2002. Two months later, he was
dead from cancer at the too-young age of sixty.
Although, as it happens, The Structure of Evo-
lutionary Theory 
was not Gould’s final book
(that was a collection of essays), it is obvious
that this book was intended to be his master-
work, that on which his reputation as a scientist
was to be judged. For Gould was not only the
most gifted popular science writer of his gener-
ation, but also a man with pretensions to serious
scholarship. Most particularly, with fellow pa-
leontologist Niles Eldredge, he was the author of
the claim that the fossil record is not, as gener-
ally interpreted, a smooth, gradual process ex-
plicable by conventional Darwinism—natural
selection promoting adaptation—but rather a
more jerky affair with stops and starts. Fa-
mously, he and Eldredge put forward their the-
ory of “punctuated equilibrium”; and although
the book under review contains much more
(very, very much more), it is this theory that is
the keystone to Gould’s mammoth-sized produc-
tion.

I will not presume to suggest that readers of

this journal have no interest in contemporary sci-
ence. Even if you are interested only tangentially
in modern thinking and achievements, I urge you
to get this work and (if not to read it straight
through) to dip into it judiciously, for there is
much of great worth here, and as a guide to the
way that today’s evolutionists think it is surely
destined to be a classic. But for readers of Isis
qua 
historians of science, there is a more press-
ing reason to pick up The Structure of Evolu-
tionary Theory. 
Gould was a thinker who be-
lieved that evolution pervades everything: in
order to understand the present in the realm of
ideas, no less than in the realm of organisms, one
must dig back into the past and try to find out
how things were then and how things then led
to things now. He did this before, most particu-
larly and successfully in his important Ontogeny
and Phylogeny 
(Belknap, 1977), where he ex-
plored how past scientists dealt with the issues
of paleontology and embryology and how this
throws light on the way that we should treat such

issues today. And he has done it again in this
book.

In fact, all told, Gould offers us the equivalent

of about five normal books, and of these the first
two (about six hundred pages in total) are his-
torical. Here we are offered a history—hardly a
potted history—of evolutionary theory from the
beginning to the present. There is much of value
in these chapters—Gould was deeply read in the
literature and obviously had pored over the origi-
nal sources in many languages (from comments
he made, it seems that he owned all of the origi-
nal sources in the many languages). One rather
regrets that this material was not prepared for
independent publication, but one can see that this
would not have suited Gould’s purposes. He
wanted to show that in opting for (what he would
have called extreme) Darwinism, evolutionary
biology had taken a wrong turn. With the history
he presents establishing this fact, he himself is
then ready to step into the breach with his own
theory (of punctuated equilibrium) that would
avoid the faults of the past and provide the an-
swers of the future. In other words, like the
works of other scientist/historians of evolution-
ary theory—notoriously Ernst Mayr—Gould’s
history was written to promote Gould’s science
and Gould’s claim to an honored place in pro-
fessional scientific history.

All history is of course written with an end in

view. Otherwise it is just a collection of facts.
But I have to say that Gould’s aims do rather
distort his material. His treatment of British
adaptationists of the early part of the twentieth
century (like R. A. Fisher) verges on the ludi-
crous, as their achievements are belittled and
their motives impugned. (In Fisher’s case,
Gould’s claims notwithstanding, there is cer-
tainly no conspiracy of silence about his eugen-
ics, and indeed much effort has gone to show
how Fisher’s science survives despite his odd
and somewhat repulsive views on race and
class.) Gould’s discussion is guided by his no-
torious metaphor that evolutionary thinking, in
becoming more adaptationist, “hardened” (a pro-
cess akin to the unfortunate degeneration of the
arteries). Gould’s facts are made to fit the meta-
phor, no matter what—rather like those unfor-
tunate visitors who stopped off for the night at
the B and B being run by Procrustes.

I liked Gould and admired him immensely. I

was on the other side in many debates, and it
never affected our relationship. I wish I could
say nicer things about the history in The Struc-
ture of Evolutionary Theory. 
But the best way I
can honor his memory is by being truthful. There

398

BOOK REVIEWS—ISIS, 94 : 2 (2003)

is much to commend this volume. I wish it were
better than it is.

M

ICHAEL

R

USE

Gerald Sullivan. Margaret Mead, Gregory Bate-
son, and Highland Bali: Fieldwork Photographs
of Bayung Gede´, 1936–1939
. x

Ⳮ 213 pp., fron-

tis., illus., app., bibl., index. Chicago: University
of Chicago Press, 1999. $45, £31.50.

This book consists of two essays on the field-
work photographs taken by Gregory Bateson
during his 1930s Bali expeditions with his wife
Margaret Mead. Gerald Sullivan’s first essay is
a textual commentary on photography and eth-
nography; the second, a photo-essay, is an origi-
nal compilation of selected photographs from
Mead’s and Bateson’s photo archives, some pre-
viously unpublished. In both essays Sullivan
concerns himself with the “problem of ethno-
graphic writing,” by which he means the field-
worker’s conscious goal of objectively recording
and writing about a culture. This book is a wel-
come addition to recent works on the photograph
as evidence, most of which grapple with this
question. Is the photograph an analogue of re-
ality or is it an analogue of culture-bound visual
experience?

Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson were not

the first anthropologists to photograph in the
field, but their Balinese still photos and cine-
matography may well be the most famous ex-
amples both because of the “methodological and
analytic importance” they assigned to the pho-
tographs as a means “for taking notes” and as
direct, albeit interpreted, evidence of human be-
havior. Indeed, the most interesting narrative
line of Sullivan’s text, which relies heavily on
the two fieldworkers’ unpublished writings, doc-
uments the shifting status and methodological
significance of the photograph, from the team’s
pre-expedition plans to their publication of Ba-
linese Character 
(New York Academy of Sci-
ences, 1942). It is clear that Bateson’s training
in the natural sciences and his theoretical con-
cerns with the fieldworker’s point of view sen-
sitized him to the phenomenological difficulties
of field recording. Mead and Bateson had origi-
nally intended to document only a small number
of photographic sequences. In fact, they shot
more than twenty-five thousand photos and thou-
sands of feet of movies. The two fieldworkers
improvised their methodology and altered their
objectives as they went along, finding, for ex-
ample, that Bateson’s photographing could not
always be synchronized with Mead’s note tak-
ing. While they originally conceptualized the

camera as a means to check their observational
bias or their selectivity in isolating data to fit
hypotheses, they came to understand Bateson’s
photo-documentation as a form of “note taking.”
As Sullivan points out, they saw almost none of
what they had photographed until they returned
to New York in 1939. Soon after viewing the
images, they changed their publication plans:
rather than a broad study of Balinese customs
and behavior, they produced a book establishing
the connections between Balinese child rearing
and personality structure. At this point, Sullivan
would argue, the photographs transformed from
“notes” to “signs”—that is, they became part of
the ethnographers’ argument.

In his photo-essay Sullivan uses the Batesons’

Balinese photo archive collection to survey the
complex and overlapping social identities of the
people of Bayung Gede´, along with the rich cer-
emonial life these villagers used to resolve and
placate the spirit world. The camera, Sullivan ar-
gues, can record only what is visible, but much
that is important to the Balinese—most notably
their encounters with a sometimes-unpredictable
spirit world—cannot be seen and therefore can-
not be recorded on film. Mead, Bateson, and Sul-
livan have this in common: each ethnographer
draws attention to what she or he wants viewers
of photos to see. By juxtaposing his own textual
commentary with archival photographs, Sulli-
van, himself an expert on Balinese culture, dem-
onstrates how field photos originally conceptu-
alized as equivalent to field notes can take on
different meanings when reinterpreted into an-
other ethnographer’s texts. He notes that Mead
and Bateson anticipated as much and that this
understanding underlaid their effort to experi-
ment with photography in the field.

V

IRGINIA

Y

ANS

-M

C

L

AUGHLIN

Matthew J. Raphael. Bill W. and Mr. Wilson:
The Legend and Life of A.A.’s Cofounder
. xvi

206 pp., index. Amherst: University of Massa-
chusetts Press, 2000. $24.95.

In 1935 two drunks, Dr. Robert Holbrook Smith
and William Griffith Wilson, met at the May-
flower Hotel in Akron, Ohio, to talk and keep
each other sober. The encounter between the
two, who later became known as Dr. Bob and
Bill W., marked the founding of Alcoholics
Anonymous (A.A.). An A.A. member, using the
pseudonym “Matthew J. Raphael,” tells the story
of their encounter in the opening of his book
Bill W. and Mr. Wilson: The Legend and Life of
A.A.’s Cofounder 
before beginning his explora-
tion of Bill W. His goal is to “rehumanize the