This article was downloaded by: [University of Arizona]
On: 28 October 2014, At: 18:49
Publisher: Routledge
Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954
Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

International Journal of Clinical
and Experimental Hypnosis

Publication details, including instructions for authors and
subscription information:

http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/nhyp20

The Effects of Hypnosis on Heart
Rate Variability

Ramazan Yüksel 

a

 , Osman Ozcan 

a

 & Senol Dane 

a

a

 Fatih University , Ankara , Turkey

Published online: 21 Feb 2013.

To cite this article: Ramazan Yüksel , Osman Ozcan & Senol Dane (2013) The Effects of
Hypnosis on Heart Rate Variability, International Journal of Clinical and Experimental
Hypnosis, 61:2, 162-171, DOI: 

10.1080/00207144.2013.753826

To link to this article:  

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00207144.2013.753826

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE

Taylor & Francis makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of all the information
(the “Content”) contained in the publications on our platform. However, Taylor
& Francis, our agents, and our licensors make no representations or warranties
whatsoever as to the accuracy, completeness, or suitability for any purpose
of the Content. Any opinions and views expressed in this publication are the
opinions and views of the authors, and are not the views of or endorsed by
Taylor & Francis. The accuracy of the Content should not be relied upon and
should be independently verified with primary sources of information. Taylor and
Francis shall not be liable for any losses, actions, claims, proceedings, demands,
costs, expenses, damages, and other liabilities whatsoever or howsoever caused
arising directly or indirectly in connection with, in relation to or arising out of the
use of the Content.

This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes.
Any substantial or systematic reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-
licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly

forbidden. Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found at 

http://

www.tandfonline.com/page/terms-and-conditions

Downloaded by [University of Arizona] at 18:49 28 October 2014 

Intl. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 61(2): 162–171, 2013
Copyright © International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
ISSN: 0020-7144 print / 1744-5183 online
DOI: 10.1080/00207144.2013.753826

THE EFFECTS OF HYPNOSIS ON HEART

RATE VARIABILITY

Ramazan Yüksel, Osman Ozcan, and Senol Dane

1

Fatih University, Ankara, Turkey

Abstract:

Uslu et al. (2012) suggested that hypnotic status can mod-

ulate cerebral blood flow. The authors investigated the effects of
hypnosis on heart rate variability (HRV). In women, HRV decreased
during hypnosis. Posthypnotic values were higher compared to pre-
hypnotic and hypnotic values. Women had highest HRV parameters in
the posthypnotic condition. It appears that hypnosis can produce car-
diac and cognitive activations. Hypnotherapy may be useful in some
cardiac clinical conditions characterized by an autonomic imbalance
or some cardiac arrhythmias.

Temporal fluctuations in cardiac cycles are mainly determined by

the activity of sympathetic and parasympathetic systems innervating
the heart. Heart rate variability (HRV) is defined as fluctuations of the
sinus rhythm that are affected by internal and external factors of body
(Kristal-Boneh, Raifel, Froom, & Ribak, 1995). Furthermore, these fluc-
tuations in heart rate can be determined with a straightforward and
noninvasive technique called HRV analyzing the interaction between
sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems that provides infor-
mation about the autonomic nervous system.

Nasal cycle is a phenomenon of the alternating congestion-

decongestion response in both nostrils (Shannahoff-Khalsa, Boyle,
& Buebel, 1991). It manifests as greater or lesser airflow in one
nostril compared to the other, with a pattern of alternating domi-
nance ranging from 25 minutes to 8 hours, with the peak interval
between 1.5–4 hours. Nasal cycle is regulated by the autonomic ner-
vous system, such that unilateral sympathetic activity in one nostril
mucosa causes vasoconstriction and decongestion, while synchronous
parasympathetic activity in the other nostril causes vasodilatation and
congestion.

Manuscript submitted June 1, 2012; final revision accepted June 27, 2012.

1

Address correspondence to Ramazan Yüksel, Fatih Üniversitesi Tip Fakültesi,

Fizyoloji AD, Çamlica Mah. Anadolu Bulvari 16

/A Gimat Kampüsü, 06200, Yenimahalle,

Ankara, Turkey. E-mail: ryuksel38@hotmail.com

162

Downloaded by [University of Arizona] at 18:49 28 October 2014 

THE EFFECTS OF HYPNOSIS ON HEART RATE VARIABILITY

163

Breathing solely out of one nostril or the other is referred to as

unilateral forced nostril breathing (UFNB). It has been reported that
UFNB may affect cognitive ability. UFNB through the left nostril is
associated with enhanced spatial abilities, whereas breathing through
the right nostril is associated with enhanced verbal abilities (Jella &
Shannahoff-Khalsa, 1993; Klein, Pilson, Prosser, & Shannahoff-Khalsa,
1986).

Diamond, Davis, and Howe (2008) have investigated the relation-

ships between hypnotic depth and some HRV parameters. They found
a significant linear relationship between hypnotic depth and the high-
frequency (HF) component of HRV. They have suggested that the
reactivity of the parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous sys-
tem reflected in HRV could become part of a real-time, quantitative
measure of hypnotic depth.

One of the recent studies suggested that the neural mechanisms

of hypnotic conditions remain considerably unknown but that hyp-
nosis has a genuine effect on brain functioning (Uslu et al., 2012).
A measure of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) response to hyp-
nosis can be obtained from HRV (Diamond et al., 2008). According
to the literature, hypnosis has been generally considered a condition
that is characterized by a decreased sympathetic tone and an increased
parasympathetic activity, or a physiological state that is comparable to
relaxation response (DeBenedittis, Cigada, Bianchi, Signorini, & Cerutti,
1994). In addition, the nature of underlying mental activity during hyp-
nosis can be studied by using heart rate to measure actual, underlying
effort (Sadler & Woody, 2006). Furthermore, autonomic cardiac tone
is significantly modified during hypnosis by shifting the balance of
the sympatho-vagal interaction toward an enhanced parasympathetic
modulation, accompanied by a reduction of the sympathetic tone and
a decreased short-range similarity but without a concomitant change in
heart rate (Aubert, Verheyden, Beckers, Tack, & Vandenberghe, 2009).
In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of hypnosis on cardiac
health by assessing prehypnotic, during hypnosis, and posthypnotic
changes on heart rate.

Method

Subjects

Twenty-five healthy adult subjects (13 women, 12 men, M

age

= 35.2,

SD

= 6.3) participated in this study. In addition, exclusion criteria were

health problems, such as psychiatric, respiratory, metabolic, cardiac, or
ANS diseases that might change the heart rate. The Ethical Committee
of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Fatih approved this
study.

Downloaded by [University of Arizona] at 18:49 28 October 2014 

164

RAMAZAN YÜKSEL ET AL.

Hypnotic Conditions

In Condition I, the subjects were alert and sitting in a comfortable

armchair in a quiet room. After resting 10 minutes, an electrocardiogra-
phy (ECG) monitored for 5 minutes prior to a hypnotic induction.

Condition II (hypnotic state) commenced after inducing hypnosis,

using a hypnotic procedure. The subjects were guided by the hypno-
tist to respond to suggestions (Green, Barabasz, Barrett, & Montgomery,
2005). Subjects were considered hypnotized when roving eye move-
ments were observed and if the subject responded by a hand movement
that he or she felt hypnotized.

In Condition III (hypnotic imagination), the participants were under

hypnosis and invited to imagine pleasant life experiences. Imagery
could be initiated by the subjects and is defined as a dynamic psy-
chophysiologic process in the absence of external stimuli. This pro-
cess is an alteration in perception, sensation, emotion, thought, or
behavior through imagination and

/or suggestion (Menzies & Taylor,

2004).

In Condition IV, subjects were monitored for 5 minutes after the

completion of hypnosis.

The Recording ECG

Subjects rested for 10 minutes without recording ECG in order to

stabilize autonomic parameters and then the hypnotic induction was
started. The room was darkened to encourage relaxation and noise was
reduced to a minimum.

ECG was recorded using PowerLab 26T (ADInstruments, Australia),

a device used for multimodal monitoring of biosignals. According to
the standard Einthoven Triangle, three self-adhesive ECG electrodes
were applies to the right wrist and right and left legs, respectively. The
digital signals were then transferred to a laptop and analyzed using
LabChart

®

software (MLS310

/7 HRV Module). A full continuous ECG

could be viewed and saved for later analysis, and software-based fil-
ters were used to exclude movement artifacts and ectopic beats prior
to HRV analyses. In addition, the subjects’ were documented with a
video camera for detailed analysis after recording ECG (Sony DCR-
SR290).

Statistical Analyses

Measured values are given as a mean and standard deviation.

Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS for Windows (version
16.0) statistical program (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL). A Friedman test of
multiple comparisons was used to compare four conditions. A value
less than .05 was considered significant.

Downloaded by [University of Arizona] at 18:49 28 October 2014 

THE EFFECTS OF HYPNOSIS ON HEART RATE VARIABILITY

165

Results

Males

The standard deviation of the NN intervals (SDNN) and the stan-

dard deviation of the averages of NN intervals in all 5-minute seg-
ments of the entire recording (SDANN) decreased from Condition I to
Conditions II and III, but it was higher in Condition IV compared to
Condition II (see Table 1). However, these changes were not statistically
significant,

χ

2

= 3.8 and 1.1, respectively.

Square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences

between adjacent NN interval (RMSSD) and the percent of differ-
ence between adjacent NN intervals that are greater than 50 ms
(pNN50) decreased from Condition I to II and III, but in Condition IV
it was approximately similar to Condition II. However, these changes
were not statistically significant,

χ

2

= 1.1 and 0.7, respectively.

Very low frequency (VLF;

0.003–0.04 Hz), low frequency power

(LF; 0.04–0.15 Hz), and high frequency power (HF; 0.15–0.4 Hz)
decreased from Condition I to Condition II but were approximately sim-
ilar or higher in Condition III compared to Condition II. On the other
hand, VLF was the lowest value in Condition IV and also LF and HF
was higher in Condition IV compared to Conditions II and III. However,
these changes were not statistically significant,

χ

2

= 7.5, 5.5, and 3.1,

respectively.

The ratio of low-high frequency power (LF

/HF) decreased from

Condition I to II and III, but in Condition IV it was approximately
similar to Condition II,

χ

2

= 3.3.

Generally, all parameters of HRV increasingly decreased from

Condition I to Conditions II and III but in Condition IV increased

Table 1

Means and Standard Deviations (SD) of the Different HRV Parameters in Healthy
Men During Hypnotic Conditions

Condition I

Condition II

Condition III Condition IV

Mean

SD

Mean

SD

Mean

SD

Mean

SD

χ

2

p

SDNN

49.32

16.93

46.31

9.52

43.14

9.33

47.85

18.69 3.8 ns

SDANN

34.40

25.22

31.84

15.0

30.74

16.11

35.73

25.58 1.1 ns

RMSSD

34.34

25.17

31.82

14.99

30.69

16.08

31.69

25.53 1.1 ns

pNN50

11.47

15.44

10.93

13.83

9.95

13.66

10.56

13.72 0.7 ns

VLF

10.07

4.52

7.37

3.86

7.55

3.62

6.83

4.27 7.5 ns

LF

8.21

5.02

6.25

2.09

6.34

2.85

7.38

6.09 5.5 ns

HF

6.74

1.21

4.39

4.71

4.97

5.83

5.39

9.29 3.1 ns

LF

/HF

3.20

2.33

2.85

2.22

2.44

2.04

2.88

2.92 3.3 ns

Downloaded by [University of Arizona] at 18:49 28 October 2014 

166

RAMAZAN YÜKSEL ET AL.

back compared to previous conditions in men (see Table 1). Moreover,
the effects of hypnotic conditions in healthy men were not statistically
significant on all of HRV parameters.

Females

SDNN, which was approximately similar in Conditions I and II, also

decreased in Condition III but it was the highest in Condition IV. The
effects of hypnosis on SDNN were statistically significant,

χ

2

= 8.72,

p

= .03.

SDANN and RMSSD decreased from Conditions I to II and were the

same in Conditions II and III. In addition, they were the highest value in
Condition IV. However, the effects of hypnosis on SDANN and RMSSD
were statistically significant,

χ

2

= 10.4, = .02 and χ

2

= 10.39, = .02,

respectively.

The pNN50 decreased from Condition I to Conditions II and III but

was the highest in Condition IV. The effects of hypnosis on pNN50 were
statistically significant,

χ

2

= 9.37, = .03.

In contrast to previous HRV parameters, VLF increased from

Condition I to Condition II and decreased in Condition III but increased
to the similar value of Condition II again. The effects of hypnosis on VLF
were not statistically significant,

χ

2

= 1.89.

HF increased from Condition I to Conditions II and III and decreased

in Condition IV, which was approximately similar to Condition II.
Anyway, the effects of hypnosis on VLF were not statistically significant
like VLF,

χ

2

= 2.62.

LF and LF

/HF decreased from Condition I to Condition II then

increased in Condition III; they were highest in Condition IV.
Eventually, the effects of hypnosis on LF and LF

/HF were statistically

significant,

χ

2

= 16.85, = .001 and χ

2

= 12.23, = .007, respectively.

In general, HRV parameters, except VLF and HF, were unsteady in

Conditions I, II, and III. Also, in Condition IV, all of HRV parameters
were the highest value compared to the other conditions in women (see
Table 2). Therefore, in healthy women, the effects of hypnotic conditions
on HRV were statistically significant.

Discussion

In the present study, all HRV parameters changed during and after

hypnosis compared to the prehypnotic condition in both men and
women. The changes in women were significant, but not in men.

In women, all HRV parameters except VLF in the prehypnotic

condition decreased during hypnosis (Conditions II and III). Also,
posthypnotic values were higher compared to prehypnotic and

Downloaded by [University of Arizona] at 18:49 28 October 2014 

THE EFFECTS OF HYPNOSIS ON HEART RATE VARIABILITY

167

Table 2

Means and Standard Deviations (SD) of the Different HRV Parameters in Healthy
Women During Hypnotic Conditions

Condition I Condition II Condition III Condition IV

Mean

SD

Mean

SD

Mean

SD

Mean

SD

χ

2

p

SDNN

50.07 11.91 50.51 16.62 46.99 17.70 55.28

20.48

8.72 .03

SDANN

37.16 13.18 36.44 21.86 36.45 24.49 39.80

26.36 10.40 .02

RMSSD

37.11 13.16 36.41 21.84 36.41 24.45 39.75

26.32 10.39 .02

pNN50

16.90 13.52 14.89 17.90 14.17 19.35 17.30

17.15

9.37 .03

VLF

9.03

6.89 12.76 12.60

8.32

7.82 12.65

14.94

1.89 ns

LF

5.27

2.42

4.29

3.12

4.94

4.25

8.05

5.36 16.85 .001

HF

6.15

4.94

7.72

1.21

7.96

1.34

7.77

1.11

2.62 ns

LF

/HF

1.27

0.80

0.95

0.55

1.08

0.69

1.82

1.10 12.23 .007

hypnotic values. That is to say, women had the highest HRV parameters
in the posthypnotic condition.

A hypnotized person sees, feels, smells and otherwise perceives in

accordance with the hypnotist’s suggestions. Therefore, it can be stated
that hypnosis can result in metabolic, cardiac, and cognitive activations.
Uslu et al. (2012) compared cerebral blood flow in normal waking (alert,
relaxed mental imagery) and hypnotic states. In that study, flow veloc-
ity in the middle cerebral artery was increased during hypnosis from
5 minutes before hypnotic induction and decreased during hypnotic
imagination. According to that study, only highly hypnotizable per-
sons’ overall cerebral blood flow increased. However, it suggested that
hypnosis requires cognitive effort and so hypnotic status can modulate
cerebral blood flow.

Cardeña, Milz, Pascual-Marqui, and Kochi (2012) evaluated depth

reports and EEG activity during both voluntary and hypnotically
induced left-arm lifting. The hypnotic condition was associated with
higher activity in fast EEG frequencies in anterior regions and slow EEG
frequencies in central-parietal regions, all left-sided. Hypnotic depth
was correlated with left hemisphere increased anterior slow EEG and
decreased central fast EEG activity.

Peter, Schiebler, Piesbergen, and Hagl (2012) reported that during

hypnotic arm levitation, the total muscle activity was lower than while
holding it up voluntarily. Therefore, it can be stated that it is possible to
reduce strain and to objectively measure muscle activity in an uplifted
arm through hypnotic arm levitation.

Our results suggest that hypnosis causes an increase in cardiac

effort or activity. It has been shown that the cognitive effort or activity
increases during hypnosis (Sadler & Woody, 2006). These results show
that both heart and brain but not skeletal muscles are active in hypnosis.

Downloaded by [University of Arizona] at 18:49 28 October 2014 

168

RAMAZAN YÜKSEL ET AL.

Some HRV parameters, such as decreased SDNN and increased

LF

/HF ratio, are associated with an increased cardiac mortality in

almost all clinical conditions characterized by an autonomic imbalance
(Durmaz et al., 2009). Therefore, hypnotherapy can be used in some
cardiac clinical conditions characterized by an autonomic imbalance or
some cardiac rhythm disturbances.

The LF component is modulated by both the sympathetic and

parasympathetic nervous systems. The HF component is generally
defined as a marker of vagal modulation. The LF

/HF ratio reflects the

global sympatho-vagal balance and can be used as a measure of this
balance. In a normal adult in resting conditions, the ratio is generally
between 1 and 2 (Sztajzel, 2004).

Nasal cycle is a phenomenon of the alternating congestion-

decongestion response in both nostrils (Shannahoff-Khalsa et al., 1991).
It manifests as greater or lesser airflow in one nostril compared to the
other, with a pattern of alternating dominance ranging from 25 min-
utes to 8 hours, with the peak interval between 1.5 and 4 hours. Nasal
cycle is regulated by the autonomic nervous system, such that unilateral
sympathetic activity in one nostril mucosa causes vasoconstriction and
decongestion, while synchronous parasympathetic activity in the other
nostril causes vasodilatation and congestion.

Breathing solely out of one nostril or the other is referred to as uni-

lateral forced nostril breathing (UFNB). It has been reported that UNFB
may affect cognitive ability. UNFB through the left nostril is associated
with enhanced spatial abilities, whereas breathing through the right
nostril is associated with enhanced verbal abilities (Jella & Shannahoff-
Khalsa, 1993; Klein et al., 1986). The cognitive and cardiac effects of
hypnosis may be due to its modulator effects on nostril breathing
dominance or nasal cycle.

Dane, Caliskan, Karasen, and Oztasan (2002) investigated the effects

of UFNB on systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rate.
In men, both the right and left UFNB significantly increased the sys-
tolic blood pressure and heart rate but had no effect on the diastolic
blood pressure. In women, the right UFNB increased, but the left UFNB
slightly decreased the systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Also Chen,
Brown, and Schmid (2004) reported that there was a tendency for left
UFNB to produce a greater decrease in arterial blood pressure in sub-
jects with higher baseline blood pressure levels. Dane (2004) suggested
that the effects of UFNB on the autonomic nervous system were sex
related. Also, research has established some relationships between nos-
tril dominance and some psychiatric disease such as schizophrenia
(Yildirim et al., 2010) and affective disorders (Ozan et al., 2012).

It can be stated that the cardiac effects of hypnosis, like UFNB, are

also sex specific. These results suggest that hypnosis may be helpful in
cardiac autonomic disturbances, especially in women.

Downloaded by [University of Arizona] at 18:49 28 October 2014 

THE EFFECTS OF HYPNOSIS ON HEART RATE VARIABILITY

169

References

Aubert, A. E., Verheyden, B., Beckers, F., Tack, J., & Vandenberghe, J. (2009). Cardiac

autonomic regulation under hypnosis assessed by heart rate variability: Spectral
analysis and fractal complexity. Neuropsychobiology60, 104–112.

Cardeña, E., Milz, P., Pascual-Marqui, R., & Kochi, K. (2012). EEG sLORETA functional

imaging during hypnotic arm levitation and voluntary arm lifting. International Journal
of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
60, 31–53.

Chen, J. C., Brown, B., & Schmid, K. L. (2004). Effect of unilateral forced nostril breath-

ing on tonic accommodation and intraocular pressure. Clinical Autonomic Research14,
396–400.

Dane, S. (2004). Review of some sex-related effects of forced unilateral nostril breathing

on the autonomic nervous system. Perceptual and Motor Skills98, 736–738.

Dane, S., Caliskan, E., Karasen, M., & Oztasan, N. (2002). Effects of unilateral nos-

tril breathing on blood pressure and heart rate in right-handed healthy subjects.
International Journal of Neuroscience112, 97–102.

DeBenedittis, G., Cigada, M., Bianchi, A., Signorini, M. G., & Cerutti, S. (1994). Autonomic

changes during hypnosis: A heart rate variability power spectrum analysis as a marker
of sympatho-vagal balance. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis,
42, 140–152.

Diamond, S. G., Davis, O. C., & Howe, R. D. (2008). Heart-rate variability as a quantitative

measure of hypnotic depth. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis,
56, 1–18.

Durmaz, T., Ozdemir, O., Keles, T., Akar, B. N., Akcay, M., Yeter, E.,

. . . Bozkurt, E. (2009).

Association between mean platelet volume and autonomic nervous system functions:
Increased mean platelet volume reflects sympathetic overactivity. Turkish Journal of
Medical Sciences
39, 259–265.

Green, J. P., Barabasz, A. F., Barrett, D., & Montgomery, G. H. (2005). Forging ahead:

The 2003 APA definition of hypnosis. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental
Hypnosis
53, 259–264.

Jella, S. A., & Shannahoff-Khalsa, D. S. (1993). The effects of unilateral forced nostril

breathing on cognitive performance. International Journal of Neuroscience73, 61–68.

Klein, R., Pilson, D., Prosser, S., & Shannahoff-Khalsa, D. S. (1986). Nasal airflow

asymmetries and human performance. Biological Psychology23, 127–137.

Kristal-Boneh, E., Raifel, M., Froom, P., & Ribak, J. (1995). Heart rate variability in health

and disease. Scandinavian Journal of Work Environment & Health21, 85–95.

Menzies, V., & Taylor, A. G. (2004). The idea of imagination: A concept analysis of

imagery. Advances in Mind-Body Medicine20, 4–10.

Ozan, E., Yildirim, S., Tatar, A., Canpolat, S., Yazici, A. B., Yüksel, S.,

. . . Dane, S. (2012).

Sex- and diagnosis-related differences in nostril dominance may be associated with
hemisphere dysfunction in affective disorders. Turkish Journal of Medical Sciences42(1),
25–30.

Peter, B., Schiebler, P., Piesbergen, C., & Hagl, M. (2012). Electromyographic investivation

of hypnotic arm levitation: Differences between voluntary arm elevation and invol-
untary arm levitation. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis60,
88–110.

Sadler, P., & Woody, E. Z. (2006). Does the more vivid imagery of high hypnotizables

depend on greater cognitive effort?: A test of dissociation and social-cognitive theories
of hypnosis. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis54, 372–391.

Shannahoff-Khalsa, D. S., Boyle, M. R., & Buebel, M. E. (1991). The effects of unilat-

eral forced nostril breathing on cognition. International Journal of Neuroscience57,
239–249.

Sztajzel, J. (2004). Heart rate variability: A noninvasive electrocardiographic method to

measure the autonomic nervous system. Swiss Medical Weekly134, 514–522.

Downloaded by [University of Arizona] at 18:49 28 October 2014