P1: FIB

July 29, 2000

14:39

AR102

CHAP02

Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2000. 69:31–67

Copyright c

° 2000 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved

C

RYPTOCHROME

:

The Second Photoactive

Pigment in the Eye and Its Role
in Circadian Photoreception

Aziz Sancar

Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina School
of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7260; e-mail: Aziz Sancar@med.unc.edu

Key Words

blue-light photoreceptor, flavoprotein, retina, suprachiasmatic

nucleus, circadian blind mice, seasonal affective disorder

■ Abstract Circadian rhythms are oscillations in the biochemical, physiological,
and behavioral functions of organisms that occur with a periodicity of approximately
24 h. They are generated by a molecular clock that is synchronized with the solar day
by environmental photic input. The cryptochromes are the mammalian circadian pho-
toreceptors. They absorb light and transmit the electromagnetic signal to the molecular
clock using a pterin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as chromophore/cofactors,
and are evolutionarily conserved and structurally related to the DNA repair enzyme
photolyase. Humans and mice have two cryptochrome genes, CRY1 and CRY2, that
are differentially expressed in the retina relative to the opsin-based visual photorecep-
tors. CRY1 is highly expressed with circadian periodicity in the mammalian circadian
pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Mutant mice lacking either Cry1 or
Cry2 have impaired light induction of the clock gene mPer1 and have abnormally short
or long intrinsic periods, respectively. The double mutant has normal vision but is
defective in mPer1 induction by light and lacks molecular and behavioral rhythmicity
in constant darkness. Thus, cryptochromes are photoreceptors and central components
of the molecular clock. Genetic evidence also shows that cryptochromes are circadian
photoreceptors in Drosophila and Arabidopsis, raising the possibility that they may
be universal circadian photoreceptors. Research on cryptochromes may provide new
understanding of human diseases such as seasonal affective disorder and delayed sleep
phase syndrome.

CONTENTS

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32

CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33

PHOTORECEPTORS IN NATURE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

35

Photoactive Pigments

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

35

Photoreceptors

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37

CIRCADIAN PHOTORECEPTORS

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

43

0066-4154/00/0707-0031/$14.00

31

Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2000.69:31-67. Downloaded from www.annualreviews.org

by University of Waikato on 07/11/14. For personal use only.

P1: FIB

July 11, 2000

17:11

AR102

CHAP02

32

SANCAR

Action Spectra

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

43

Genetic Analysis

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

44

Novel Opsins

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

45

ANATOMY OF THE MAMMALIAN CIRCADIAN SYSTEM

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

46

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF MAMMALIAN CRYPTOCHROMES

. . . . . .

48

Physical and Biochemical Properties

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

48

Expression of Cryptochromes in the Retinohypothalamic Axis

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

50

Circadian Oscillation of Cryptochrome Expression

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

51

Cellular Localization of Cryptochromes

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

52

Interactions of Cryptochromes with Other Clock Proteins

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

53

GENETICS OF MAMMALIAN CRYPTOCHROMES

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

54

Phenotype of Cry Mutant Mice

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

54

Status of the Molecular Clock in Cryptochrome Mutant Mice

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

56

Cryptochrome Genetics in Other Animals

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

58

MOLECULAR MODEL FOR THE MAMMALIAN CIRCADIAN CLOCK

. . . . . .

59

CRYPTOCHROMES AND HUMAN HEALTH

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

60

Seasonal Affective Disorder

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

60

Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

61

Jet Lag (Syndrome of Rapid Change in Time Zone)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

61

Rotating Shift Work

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

61

Circadian Clock and Breast Cancer

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

62

CONCLUDING REMARKS

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

62

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

Rhodopsin, the photoreceptor for vision, was discovered in 1877 (1). Its mechanism
of action was elucidated by the work of many researchers over a period of more
than a century (2–4). In fact, the last landmark discovery in visual photoreception
was the cloning of human genes encoding the blue, green, and red opsins in 1986
(5). Because of the rich history of opsin research, the notion that all photosensory
responses mediated by the eye are initiated by opsins became widely accepted.
Thus, the recent discovery that in addition to the vitamin A–based opsins the eye
contains a second, vitamin B

2

–based pigment, cryptochrome, which is unrelated to

opsin and which regulates the circadian clock, was unexpected (6, 7), and initially
the idea was widely rejected (8).

The existence of a second class of photoreceptors in the eye might have been

predicted from recent research in circadian rhythms. Animals use light for vision as
well as to sense time of day and adjust their daily behavior (circadian rhythm) ac-
cordingly. Data that have been accumulating from circadian research over the past
30 years have revealed that the two photosensory systems differ from one another
with regard to the manner of integrating the light stimuli, the type of retinal cells
used for absorbing light, and the central nervous system location where the infor-
mation is processed. Visual information is processed in the cerebral cortex and used
to construct a three-dimensional representation of the outside world; in contrast,

Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2000.69:31-67. Downloaded from www.annualreviews.org

by University of Waikato on 07/11/14. For personal use only.

P1: FIB

July 11, 2000

17:11

AR102

CHAP02

CRYPTOCHROME CIRCADIAN PHOTORECEPTOR

33

photic input into the circadian system is processed in the circadian pacemaker in the
hypothalamus to tell the time of day. The issues and views on circadian photorecep-
tion have been reviewed recently (9–11) and the molecular aspects of the circadian
clock including the important developments of the past three years are covered in
two detailed reviews (12, 13). A recent review on cryptochromes (14) provides
a historical perspective on the discovery of these pigments as the photoreceptor
involved in morphogenesis in plants and circadian photoreception in animals.

CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS

Circadian rhythms are oscillations in the biochemical, physiological, and behav-
ioral functions of organisms with a periodicity of approximately 24 h (9, 13, 15).
The circadian (from Latin circa

= about and dies = day) rhythm is perhaps the

most widely observed biological rhythm in nature, conceivably because the ma-
jority of organisms are exposed to daily cyclic variation of light (day) and dark
(night) and it is advantageous to them to synchronize their physical and behavioral
activities with these cycles. Circadian rhythms are observed in organisms ranging
from cyanobacteria to humans, and their conservation during evolution suggests
that they confer a selective advantage. Indeed, it has been experimentally shown
that mutant cyanobacteria with an altered rhythm (16) and ground squirrels with
no rhythm (17) were overtaken by their wild-type counterparts either in the test
tube or in a simulated field condition. However, the circadian rhythm is not uni-
versal: the Archaea and most of the eubacteria display no circadian rhythm, and
several model organisms, including Escherichia coliSaccharomyces cerevisiae,
and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, lack circadian rhythms (13).

Circadian rhythms have three basic features. First, the rhythm is an innate prop-

erty of the organism and is maintained under constant environmental conditions. In
fact, the circadian rhythm was discovered in 1729 by the Frenchman Jean-Jacques
d’Ortous de Mairan, who found that the daily leaf movements of a heliotrope plant
persisted even when the plant was kept in the dark (18). The length of the innate cir-
cadian period varies among species but is quite precise for each species and ranges
from 22 to 25 h (e.g. Drosophila, 23.6 h; mice, 23.7 h; hamsters, 24.0 h; humans,
25.1 h). [A recent study of the period length in humans reports it as 24.2 h (19).]
Second, the period length is temperature compensated, so that it is maintained at a
constant value throughout the physiological range of external temperature. Third,
circadian rhythms are synchronized with the outside world by light. Although
heat (20, 21) and other environmental cues can synchronize the rhythm with the
environment under specific conditions, light is the predominant and perhaps the
only physiologically relevant environmental cue (or zeitgeber, from German zeit

=

time and geber

= giver) for synchronizing the circadian rhythm with the solar day.

Figure 1 shows the role of light and dark cycles in regulating activity cycles (pho-
toentrainment), and the changes that occur in activity when light is removed from
the cycle.

Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2000.69:31-67. Downloaded from www.annualreviews.org

by University of Waikato on 07/11/14. For personal use only.

P1: FIB

July 11, 2000

17:11

AR102

CHAP02

34

SANCAR

Figure 1

Circadian rhythms in mouse and human. This idealized figure shows the daily

oscillation of a physiological variable (melatonin secretion) and a behavioral variable (phys-
ical activity) as a function of a cycle of 12 h of light and 12 h of darkness (LD12:12). The
bar at the top shows the light and dark phases where light is turned on at 0600 and turned off
at 1800. (Top) Circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin concentration. Note that in both noc-
turnal (mouse) and diurnal (human) animals, melatonin levels increase during the night and
fall during the day. (Middle) Activity record for mouse. Traditionally the activity records
are double plotted such that the first line shows activity for the first day on the left side and
for the second day on the right side; the second line shows activity for the second day on
the left and the third day on the right, and so on. Plotting the data in this manner facili-
tates comparison of successive days both horizontally and vertically. Black bars indicate
locomotor activity. At the end of day 3 the light was turned off for the remainder of the
experiment (DD, indicated by arrow). Under DD, mouse locomotor activity “free-runs”
with an intrinsic period of 23.7 h, so the activity phase shifts forward (advances) by about
0.3 h each day. (Bottom) Wakefulness record for human. Black bars indicate wakefulness.
At the end of the third day the subject was switched to a DD condition. Under DD, human
circadian rhythm free-runs with a period of 25.1 h. As a consequence, upon transition from
LD12:12 to DD the wakefulness phase exhibits a 1-h delay on successive days.

Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2000.69:31-67. Downloaded from www.annualreviews.org

by University of Waikato on 07/11/14. For personal use only.

P1: FIB

July 11, 2000

17:11

AR102

CHAP02

CRYPTOCHROME CIRCADIAN PHOTORECEPTOR

35

The mechanism by which light is sensed has been a source of great interest in

the field of circadian research. Chronobiologists have searched for the circadian
photopigment using systems of varying complexities. This review includes a brief
survey of naturally occurring photoreceptors and a detailed analysis of past and
current research on circadian photoreceptors in mammals.

PHOTORECEPTORS IN NATURE

The eye is required for circadian photoreception in mammals (9), and until recently
the only known pigments in the eye were the opsin/retinal-based rhodopsin and
color opsins. Thus the circadian photoreceptor was assumed to be either an opsin
utilized for both vision and circadian entrainment or a special opsin used for circa-
dian entrainment only. However, other naturally occurring photoactive pigments
could function as circadian photoreceptors, especially in plants and protozoa. Al-
though there are many naturally occurring light-absorbing compounds, the number
of molecules that convert light energy into either chemical energy (ATP), or in-
formation via signal transduction is limited (22). The terms pigment, photoactive
pigment, and photoreceptor have been used interchangeably in the literature and
we have followed this common practice in the current review where the context
makes the meaning clear. Strictly speaking, however, these terms have different
meanings, detailed next.

Photoactive Pigments

A photoactive pigment is an organic molecule that absorbs in the near UV–visible
light range and upon absorption of a photon initiates a chemical reaction. It has
been argued that a photoactive pigment must fulfill three criteria in order to be
physiologically relevant (22, 23). First, the absorption spectrum of the pigment
should overlap with the wavelengths that are abundantly represented in sunlight.
Second, the pigment must have a high extinction coefficient so that it absorbs
light with high efficiency. Finally, the excited state of the photopigment (or the
photoreceptor) must have a long lifetime so that it initiates a photochemical reaction
before it returns to the ground state by radiationless decay. A list of the currently
known photopigments that satisfy one or more of these criteria follows; their
structures are in Figure 2.

Carotenoids

The carotenoids are photoantenna pigments in the photosynthetic

system and the catalytic pigments in animal and bacterial rhodopsins. Retinal is
the chromophore for the opsin-based visual pigments in animals, and for bacteri-
orhodopsin in Halobacteria, which use light energy for phototaxis and to create
a proton gradient across the cell membrane and convert light energy into ATP
by chemiosmotic coupling. Carotenoids are also found as photochemically inert
pigments in carrots, oranges, and pink flamingos.

Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2000.69:31-67. Downloaded from www.annualreviews.org

by University of Waikato on 07/11/14. For personal use only.

P1: FIB

July 11, 2000

17:11

AR102

CHAP02

36

SANCAR

Figure 2

Photoactive pigments (chromophores). The structures of the chromophores

found in most photosystems in nature are shown. Retinal-containing photoreceptors ab-
sorb in the 350- to 550-nm region. Bilins absorb both in the blue (400–500 nm) and red
(600–700 nm) regions. Chlorophylls absorb in the near UV (350–450 nm) and red (600–
700 nm) regions. The flavin has an absorption peak at 360 nm in two-electron reduced form;
two peaks at 370 and 440 nm in two-electron oxidized form; and peaks at 380, 480, 580,
and 625 nm in one-electron reduced (blue neutral radical) form. The unique form of pterin
(MTHF) found in the photolyase-cryptochrome family absorbs in the 360- to 420-nm range.

Bilins

The bilins are linear tetrapyrroles that function as photoantennas in the

light harvesting complex (LHC) of photosynthetic systems and as the chromophore
of the plant photoreceptor, phytochrome.

Chlorophylls

Chlorophylls are cyclic tetrapyrroles and are utilized both as pho-

toantennas in the LHC and as the primary photoinduced electron donors in the
reaction center (RC) of the photosynthetic systems.

Flavins

The flavins are redox-active compounds that are cofactors in many light-

independent enzymatic reactions. Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is the pho-
toactive cofactor for the photolyase/blue-light photoreceptor family of proteins
(24–30), and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is the chromophore of the phototropin
plant blue-light photoreceptor encoded by the NPH1 (nonphototropic hypocotyl)

Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2000.69:31-67. Downloaded from www.annualreviews.org

by University of Waikato on 07/11/14. For personal use only.

P1: FIB

July 11, 2000

17:11

AR102

CHAP02

CRYPTOCHROME CIRCADIAN PHOTORECEPTOR

37

gene in Arabidopsis (31, 32). Deazaflavin, despite its name, is chemically more
similar to NAD, which is an obligate one-electron donor/acceptor, than to flavin,
which can function as both a one- and a two-electron donor/acceptor (33). 5-
Deazariboflavin is found in photolyases from a few species including Cyanobac-
teria 
(34); it functions as a photoantenna in these enzymes (35, 36).

Pterins

A special form of pterin, 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF), is the

photoantenna in the majority of the photolyase/cryptochrome blue-light photore-
ceptor family of proteins (6, 29, 37).

Other Potential Photoactive Pigments

This list of photoactive pigments shows

that few molecules from the vast repertoire of naturally occurring compounds with
conjugated bonds and light-absorbing properties are used in photobiological reac-
tions. However, this is not necessarily a final list. A few other pigments may also
be photoactive, even within the narrow range of criteria applied in this article. For
example, parahydroxycinnamic acid may act as a photoactive pigment in associa-
tion with green fluorescent protein (GFP). The parahydroxycinnamic acid cofactor
of GFP is excited by either intermolecular energy transfer from aequorin or by di-
rect absorption, and it fluoresces in the 500-nm range concomitant with cis-trans
isomerization of the polypeptide backbone of GFP at the junction with the chro-
mophore. Because there is no evidence that this photocycle engenders a chemical
reaction (38), parahydroxycinnamic acid is not included in the list of photoactive
pigments. However, a recent report indicates that parahydroxycinnamic acid is the
photoactive pigment of the phytochrome of a photosynthetic bacterium (39).

Photoreceptors

A photoreceptor is an apoprotein containing one or more photoactive pigments
that convert light energy into chemical energy or information (i.e. an intracellular
signal). Although photoreceptor and photoactive pigment are often used synony-
mously, photoactive pigment is actually the chromophore of the photoreceptor.
The currently known photoreceptors are listed below.

Rhodopsin

Opsin/retinal photoreceptors, along with the photosynthetic system,

are the most completely characterized photosystems. Opsins are 30- to 40-kDa
transmembrane proteins attached to the chromophore via a Schiff base. In animals,
opsins are attached to retinal to form rhodopsin and color opsins, which are the pho-
toreceptors for vision. The absorption maxima are affected by the apoprotein se-
quence and range from 380 to 560 nm. Humans have four types of opsin/retinal pig-
ments in the eye: rhodopsin (

λ

max

= 500 nm), blue opsin (λ

max

= 426 nm), green

opsin (

λ

max

= 530 nm) and red opsin (λ

max

= 560 nm). In Halobacteria bacterio-

rhodopsin is attached to retininyl aldehyde, and the photoreceptor converts light
energy into an electrochemical gradient and ultimately into chemical energy in the
form of ATP. The primary photochemical reaction in this group of photoreceptors

Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2000.69:31-67. Downloaded from www.annualreviews.org

by University of Waikato on 07/11/14. For personal use only.

P1: FIB

July 11, 2000

17:11

AR102

CHAP02

38

SANCAR

is cis to trans isomerization of retinal, which in the visual system initiates a signal
transduction cascade through a G protein called transducin. The visual photocycle
(Figure 3A) is among the best-understood signal transduction systems.

Photosynthetic System

The photosynthetic system consists of the light harvest-

ing complex (LHC) plus the photosynthetic reaction center (RC), which contains
the redox-active special chlorophyll pair attached to the RC polypeptides (RC com-
plex). The LHC contains hundreds of molecules of antenna pigments including
chlorophylls, carotenoids, and bilins. Because of the multiple pigments involved,
photosynthesis employs photons of nearly the entire sunlight spectrum to har-
vest energy. The reaction mechanism of the photosynthetic system is known in
exquisite detail. A photon absorbed by one of the antenna pigments is transmitted
to the RC through the other pigments in the LHC via a series of dipole-dipole
interactions and eventually excites the special pair, causing photoinduced electron
transfer down one arm of the virtually symmetrical RC complex. This pathway
ultimately leads to the splitting of water and the generation of ATP (40).

Phytochrome

Phytochromes are cytosolic proteins made up of a homodimer of a

125-kDa polypeptide covalently linked to a linear tetrapyrrole (41). They regulate
many plant photoresponses including photomorphogenesis. Phytochromes absorb
in the red and far red as well as in the blue region. Light absorption causes cis to
trans isomerization and converts the photoreceptor from the red-light–absorbing
phytochrome (Pr) to the far-red-absorbing phytochrome (Pfr). The plant phy-
tochrome is a serine/threonine kinase (42), and the cyanobacterial phytochrome is
a histidine kinase (43, 44). Light absorption causes autophosphorylation as well
as phosphorylation of phytochrome kinase substrate 1 (PKS1), suppressor of phy
A (SPA1), and phyA-phyB-interacting protein (PIF3) in Arabidopsis (45–47). Re-
cently it was reported that red light stimulated the binding of phytochrome B to
PIF3 (47a) and that red light-activated phytochrome A bound specifically to nu-
cleoside diphosphate kinase2 (47b). However, the precise mechanism of signal
transduction by phytochromes is not known.

Phototropin

The NPH1 (nonphototropic hypocotyl) gene encodes the apopro-

tein for the photoreceptor for phototropism in Arabidopsis. It is a 120-kDa
protein kinase containing FMN and associated with the membrane. It regulates

−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−→

Figure 3

Two types of photocycles in nature. (A) Visual photocycle. The primary pho-

tochemical reaction is the cis-trans isomerization of retinal by light, which initiates the
signal transduction cascade through the G protein transducin (T). (B) Photolyase photo-
cycle. MTHF functions as a photoantenna, absorbing light and transferring the excitation
energy to flavin. The primary photochemical reaction is photoinduced electron transfer
from FADH

to the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (substrate), which initiates bond rear-

rangement in the dimer and results in generation of two canonical pyrimidines (product)
concomitant with restoration of FADH

o

to FADH

by back electron transfer.

Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2000.69:31-67. Downloaded from www.annualreviews.org

by University of Waikato on 07/11/14. For personal use only.

P1: FIB

July 11, 2000

17:11

AR102

CHAP02

CRYPTOCHROME CIRCADIAN PHOTORECEPTOR

39

Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2000.69:31-67. Downloaded from www.annualreviews.org

by University of Waikato on 07/11/14. For personal use only.

P1: FIB

July 11, 2000

17:11

AR102

CHAP02

40

SANCAR

phototropism in response to blue light and contains two light, oxygen, voltage
(LOV) motifs. The LOV repeats in other proteins mediate redox-status-dependent
responses to light, oxygen, and voltage (31, 48). Interestingly, a phytochrome from
the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris has sequence features of both phytochrome and
NPH1 (49); thus, it may function as a super-photoreceptor that regulates responses
to red and blue light. The LOV domains of both Arabidopsis and Adiantum pho-
totropins bind FMN stoichiometrically (32) and apparently function as blue-light
sensors.

Photolyase

Photolyase is a 55- to 65-kDa protein that repairs UV-induced DNA

damage in a reaction dependent on near UV to blue light (350–450 nm) (50).
There are two types of photolyases: one (called photolyase) repairs cyclobutane
dipyrimidines and the other [(6-4) photolyase] repairs pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-
4) photoproducts (51). The two types are found in various organisms and exhibit
20–30% sequence identity (52–54). The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase
is found in many bacteria, some Archaea, and some eukaryotes and a grasshopper
virus (50, 54a). The (6-4) photolyase has not as yet been found in bacteria or Ar-
chaea 
but has been found in DrosophilaXenopus, rattlesnake, fish and Arabidopsis
(54). Humans do not have either enzyme (6, 55). Both types of photolyases contain
two photoactive pigments (chromophores). One is invariably FAD in the form of
FADH

(24, 27, 28, 50, 54), and the other so-called second chromophore is a pterin,

methenyltetrahydrofolate (28, 37) in most species but 5-deazariboflavin in certain
rare species that synthesize this compound (25, 56).

Photolyase repairs DNA as follows (Figure 3B). The damage is recognized in a

light-independent manner by the enzyme, which forms a Michaelis complex with
the substrate. Upon exposure of this complex to light, the second chromophore
absorbs a photon and transfers the excitation energy to the flavin, which in turn
transfers an electron to the DNA photoproduct; the cyclobutane ring of the pyrimi-
dine dimer or the oxytane ring of the (6-4) photoproduct is broken to generate two
pyrimidines (28, 50). Back electron transfer restores the FADH

o

neutral radical to

the catalytically competent FADH

form, and the enzyme dissociates from DNA

to enter new cycles of catalysis (50, 57–59).

Photolyase has certain functional similarities to the photosynthetic system. First,

it contains a photoantenna whose sole function is to gather energy and thus increase
catalytic efficiency as measured by the extent of reaction per incident photon. Sec-
ond, the catalytic cofactor can be excited by nonradiative energy transfer from
the photoantenna or by direct absorption of a photon. Third, catalysis is initi-
ated by photoinduced electron transfer. Finally, both processes are very efficient
with a quantum yield (number of reaction products per absorbed photon) in the
range of 0.7 to 1.0. However, the two systems have significant differences as
well. First, the photosynthetic system is membrane-bound whereas photolyases
are soluble proteins. Second, the photosynthetic system contains hundreds of an-
tenna molecules per reaction center whereas photolyases have a single second
chromophore (photoantenna) and a single FAD (catalytic center) per monomeric

Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2000.69:31-67. Downloaded from www.annualreviews.org

by University of Waikato on 07/11/14. For personal use only.