Minireview

Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression

Chia-Chi Hsu

1

, Ling-Ming Tseng

2,3,4

and Hsin-Chen Lee

1

1

Department and Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan;

2

Department of

Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan;

3

Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming

University, Taipei 112, Taiwan;

4

Taipei-Veterans General Hospital Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Taipei 112, Taiwan

Corresponding author: Hsin-Chen Lee. Email: hclee2@ym.edu.tw

Abstract

Deregulated cellular energetics was one of the cancer hallmarks. Several underlying mechanisms of deregulated cellular ener-

getics are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations, mitochondrial enzyme defects, or

altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors. In this review, we summarize the current understanding about the role of mitochondrial

dysfunction in cancer progression. Point mutations and copy number changes are the two most common mitochondrial DNA

alterations in cancers, and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by chemical depletion of mitochondrial DNA or impairment of

mitochondrial respiratory chain in cancer cells promotes cancer progression to a chemoresistance or invasive phenotype.

Moreover, defects in mitochondrial enzymes, such as succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and isocitrate dehydrogen-

ase, are associated with both familial and sporadic forms of cancer. Deregulated mitochondrial deacetylase sirtuin 3 might

modulate cancer progression by regulating cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. These mitochondrial defects during onco-

genesis and tumor progression activate cytosolic signaling pathways that ultimately alter nuclear gene expression, a process

called retrograde signaling. Changes in the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species, Ca

, or oncometabolites are important

in the mitochondrial retrograde signaling for neoplastic transformation and cancer progression. In addition, altered oncogenes/

tumor suppressors including hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and tumor suppressor p53 regulate mitochondrial respiration and cellular

metabolism by modulating the expression of their target genes. We thus suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical

role in cancer progression and that targeting mitochondrial alterations and mitochondrial retrograde signaling might be a promis-

ing strategy for the development of selective anticancer therapy.

Keywords: Cancer, carcinogenesis, medicine/oncology, metabolism, mitochondrial, DNA

Experimental Biology and Medicine 2016; 0: 1–15. DOI: 10.1177/1535370216641787

Introduction

Based on the increased understanding in the past few dec-
ades, deregulated cellular energetics was recently added as
one of the cancer hallmarks.

1

Otto Warburg first proposed

that tumor cells, unlike normal cells, exhibit increased
glycolytic activity and reduced mitochondrial respiration
even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon is
known as the ‘‘Warburg effect.’’ Several underlying mech-
anisms of deregulated cellular energetics are associated
with mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mitochondrial
DNA (mtDNA) mutations, mitochondrial enzyme defects,
or altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors.

2–5

Mitochondria are intracellular organelles in eukaryotic

cells that participate in bioenergetic metabolism and cellular
homeostasis, including the generation of ATP through elec-
tron transport and oxidative phosphorylation in conjunc-
tion with the oxidation of metabolites by tricarboxylic acid
(TCA) cycle and catabolism of fatty acids by b-oxidation, the

production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the initi-
ation and execution of apoptosis.

6,7

Mitochondria contain

multiple copies of mtDNA. Human mtDNA is a 16.6-kb
double-stranded, circular DNA molecule that encodes 13
respiratory enzyme complex polypeptides, 22 transfer
RNAs, and 2 ribosomal RNAs required for mitochondrial
protein synthesis.

8

Because mtDNA is essential for the

maintenance of functionally competent organelles, the accu-
mulation of mtDNA mutations or decreased mtDNA copy
number is expected to affect energy production and
enhance ROS generation and cell survival, and these pro-
cesses may be involved in aging, mitochondrial diseases, or
cancer.

4,9–11

Although mitochondria have their own genome, most of

the proteins and enzymes that reside in mitochondria are
nuclear gene products. The enzymes of the TCA cycle are
encoded by nuclear DNA and are located in the mitochon-
drial matrix or embedded in the inner mitochondrial mem-
brane. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial

ISSN: 1535-3702

Experimental Biology and Medicine 2016; 0: 1–15

Copyright

ß 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Exp Biol Med (Maywood) OnlineFirst, published on March 27, 2016 as doi:10.1177/1535370216641787 

 at Gazi University on March 31, 2016

ebm.sagepub.com

Downloaded from 

protein deacetylase that regulates the function of sev-
eral mitochondrial proteins involved in oxidative phos-
phorylation

and

intermediate

metabolism.

12

Mitochondrial dysfunction, caused by mtDNA mutations
or mitochondrial enzyme defects, not only perturbs cellular
bioenergetics, supporting the metabolic reprogramming of
cancer cells, but also triggers tumor-promoting changes
mediated by the ROS, Ca

, or small molecule metabolites

released by mitochondria. Moreover, some oncogenes or
tumor suppressors including hypoxia-inducible factor 1
(HIF-1) and tumor suppressor p53 (TP53) have been
shown to regulate mitochondrial respiration and cellular
metabolism. Altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors thus
provide a direct link between mitochondrial dysfunction
and tumorigenesis. In this review, we discuss the role of
mitochondrial dysfunction caused by either mtDNA muta-
tions, mitochondrial enzyme defects, or altered oncogenes/
tumor suppressors in initiating a complex cellular repro-
gramming that supports the formation and progression of
cancers.

Somatic mutations and decreased copy
number of mtDNA in tumor cells may lead to
mitochondrial dysfunction and cancer
progression

Several types of mtDNA alterations, such as point muta-
tions, large-scale deletions, insertions, and copy number
changes, have been identified in human cancers.

13

Point

mutations and copy number alterations are the two most
common mtDNA alterations in cancers.

9

Point mutations

According to an analysis based on a total 859 patients with
20 different types of cancer, 66% of cancers carried at least
one somatic point mutation of mtDNA,

14

suggesting that

somatic point mutation in mtDNA is a common event in
human cancer progress. Among these identified mutations,
51% occurred in the D-loop region of mtDNA, 40% were
found in the protein-coding region, 5% were located in the
rRNA genes, and 4% were observed in the tRNA genes
(Figure 1).

14

The D-loop region of mtDNA is the most frequent site of

somatic mutation in cancers. The mononucleotide repeat
region of the poly-cytosine (poly-C) sequence at nucleotide
positions (np) 303–309 (D310) in mtDNA is a hot spot for
somatic mutation.

15

Because the D-loop region contains the

major regulatory sites for mtDNA replication and transcrip-
tion, mutations near these sites might affect mtDNA copy
number

and

its

transcription

in

cancer

cells.

13,16

Importantly, clinical correlation analyses in various cancers
showed that cancer patients with mtDNA D-loop mutation
in their cancer tissues exhibited poorer prognoses than
those who were free of the mtDNA mutations.

17–19

Among the identified mutations in the protein-coding

regions, 25% were missense, nonsense, or frame-shift muta-
tions that have high potential to cause mitochondrial dys-
function. Several mutations identified in the mtDNA
protein-coding region and tRNA genes of cancer tissues

were pathogenic or have been reported to be associated
with mitochondrial diseases (Table 1). These mutations
include frame-shift mutations, e.g. 11032delA in the
NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene

20,28,29

and

12418insA in the ND5 gene,

20,21,26,27,30

which result in trun-

cated polypeptides, and tRNA mutations (e.g. T1659C in
the tRNA

Val

gene,

20

G5650A in the tRNA

Ala

gene,

20

and

7472insC the tRNA

Ser(UCN)

gene

27

that potentially alter

tRNA structure).

The 11032delA mutation was reported to be identified in

prostate cancer,

28

renal oncocytoma tissues,

29

and hepato-

cellular carcinoma (HCC).

20

The 11032delA mutation is an

‘‘A’’ nucleotide deletion in the mononucleotide repeat of a
poly-adenosine (poly-A) sequence at np 11032–11038 in
mtDNA. The mutation causes a frame-shift and premature
termination of the ND4 gene, thereby resulting in a trun-
cated ND4 subunit protein. Moreover, the 11032delA muta-
tion is correlated with a loss of Complex I activity in renal
oncocytomas.

29

The 12418insA mutation was also identified in several

types of cancer, including the rotenone-resistant VA2B cell
line,

30

colorectal cancer,

26

HCC,

20

gastric cancer,

27

and

breast cancer specimens.

21

The 12418insA mutation is an

‘‘A’’ nucleotide insertion in the mononucleotide repeat of
a poly-A sequence at np 12418–12425 in mtDNA. The muta-
tion causes a frame-shift and premature termination of the
ND5 gene, thereby resulting in a truncated ND5 subunit
protein. Using a cybrid cell model, a heteroplasmic
12418insA mutation was demonstrated to reduce oxidative
phosphorylation and increase ROS production in human
cancer cells and promotes tumor growth in nude mice, sug-
gesting

that

this

mtDNA

mutation

contributes

to

tumorigenesis.

22

The T1659C transition in the tRNA

Val

gene and the

G5650A transition in the tRNA

Ala

gene were identified in

two independent HCC tissues.

20

Clinically, the two

Figure 1

The location distribution of somatic mutations in mtDNA of human

cancers analyzed in a total 859 patients with 20 different types of cancer.
Source: Data adapted from Lee et al.

14

2

Experimental Biology and Medicine

..........................................................................................................................

 at Gazi University on March 31, 2016

ebm.sagepub.com

Downloaded from 

Table

1

Somatic

mutations

of

mitochondrial

DNA

in

human

cancers

Nucleotide

position

at

mtDNA

Cancer

type

Mutation

Gene

Amino

acid

change

Correlated

function

References

956

H

epatocellular

carcinoma

Poly-C

12s

rRNA

20

1499

Breast

cancer

T

!

C/T

12S

rRNA

21

1659

Hepatocellular

carcinoma

T

!

C/T

tRNA

Val

20

1913

Breast

cancer

G

!

A

16S

rRNA

21

3409

Breast

cancer

A

3

!

A3/2

ND1

Frame

shift

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

I

d

ysfunction

(truncated

ND1)

21

3697

Gastric

cancer

G

!

A

ND1

Gly

(GGC)

!

Ser

(AGC)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

I

d

ysfunction

(mutation

in

highly

c

onserved

residue)

22

3842

Hepatocellular

carcinoma

G

!

A/G

ND1

Trp

(TGA)

!

Stop

(TAA)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

I

d

ysfunction

(truncated

ND1)

20

3894–3960/3901–3967

Hepatocellular

carcinoma

66

bp

del

ND1

Frame

shift

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

I

d

ysfunction

(truncated

ND1)

20

4561

Breast

cancer

T

!

TT/T

ND2

Frame

shift

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

I

d

ysfunction

(truncated

ND2)

21

4605

Breast

cancer

A

7

!

A7/8

ND1

Frame

shift

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

I

d

ysfunction

(truncated

ND2)

21

4996

Gastric

cancer

G

!

A

ND2

Arg

(CGC)

!

His

(CAC)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

I

d

ysfunction

(mutation

in

highly

c

onserved

residue)

22

5112

Breast

cancer

G

!

A/G

ND2

Ala

(GCA)

!

Thr

(ACA)

21

5522

Breast

cancer

G

!

A/G

tRNA

Trp

21

5650

Hepatocellular

carcinoma

G

!

A/G

tRNA

Ala

Decreased

Complex

I

a

nd

IV

activity

20,

23

5809

Breast

cancer

G

/A

!

A/G

tRNA

Cys

21

5895

Gastric

cancer

C

19/n

!

C

18/n

Non-coding

nucleotides

22

6384

Breast

cancer

G

!

A/G

COI

Ala

(GCC)

!

Thr

(ACC)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

IV

dysfunction

(mutation

in

highly

c

onserved

residue)

21

6768

Breast

cancer

G

!

A/G

COI

Ala

(GCA)

!

Thr

(ACA)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

IV

dysfunction

(mutation

in

highly

c

onserved

residue)

21

6787

Hepatocellular

carcinoma

T

!

C

COI

Val

(GTA)

!

Ala

(GCA)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

IV

dysfunction

(mutation

in

highly

c

onserved

residue)

20

(continued)

Hsu et al.

Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression

3

..........................................................................................................................

 at Gazi University on March 31, 2016

ebm.sagepub.com

Downloaded from 

Table

1

Continued

Nucleotide

position

at

mtDNA

Cancer

type

Mutation

Gene

Amino

acid

change

Correlated

function

References

7293

Breast

cancer

G

!

A

COI

Ala

(GCA)

!

Thr

(ACA)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

IV

dysfunction

(mutation

in

highly

conserved

residue)

21

7472

Gastric

cancer

insC

tRNA

Ser(UCN)

Decreased

Complex

I

activity,

lower

oxygen

consumption

rate,

and

higher

lactic

acid

production

22,

24,

25

7976

Hepatocellular

carcinoma

G

!

A

COII

Gly

(GGC)

!

Ser

(AGC)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

IV

dysfunction

(mutation

in

highly

conserved

residue)

20

9263

Hepatocellular

carcinoma

A

!

G

COIII

Thr

(ACA)

!

Thr

(ACG)

20

9267

Hepatocellular

carcinoma

G

!

A

COIII

Ala

(GCC)

!

Thr

(ACC)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

IV

dysfunction

(mutation

in

highly

conserved

residue)

20

9412

Breast

cancer

G

!

A/G

COIII

Gly

(GGC)

!

Asp

(GAC)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

IV

dysfunction

(mutation

in

highly

conserved

residue)

21

9545

Hepatocellular

carcinoma

A

/G

!

G

COIII

Gly

(GGA)

!

Gly

(GGG)

20

9774

Breast

cancer

G

!

A/G

COIII

Asp

(GAC)

!

Asn

(AAC)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

IV

dysfunction

(mutation

in

highly

conserved

residue)

21

9901

Breast

cancer

A

!

C/A

COIII

His

(CAC)

!

Pro

(CCC)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

IV

dysfunction

(mutation

in

highly

conserved

residue)

21

9986

Gastric

cancer

C

!

A

COIII

Gly

(GGG)

!

Gly

(GGA)

22

10599

Breast

cancer

G

!

A/G

ND4L

Ala

(GCT)

!

Thr

(ACT)

21

11032

Prostate

cancer

Renal

oncocytomas

Hepatocellular

carcinoma

A7

!

A6/7

ND4

Frame

shift

Loss

o

f

Complex

I

activity

20,

28,

29

11708

Hepatocellular

carcinoma

A

!

G

ND4

Ile

(ATC)

!

Val

(GTC)

20

12405

Gastric

cancer

C

!

T

ND5

Leu

(CTC)

!

Leu

(CTT)

22

12418

Colorectal

cancer

Hepatocellular

carcinoma

Breast

cancer

Gastric

cancer

A8

!

A8/9

ND5

Frame

shift

Defective

mitochondrial

respiratory

function,

higher

lactate

production

and

increased

tumorigenesis

20,

21,

22,

26,

27

13015

Gastric

cancer

T

!

C

ND5

Leu

(TTA)

!

Leu

(CTA)

22

13878

Breast

cancer

A

!

G/A

ND5

Lys

(AAA)

!

Lys

(AAG)

21

13980

Breast

cancer

G

!

C/G

ND5

Leu

(CTG)

!

Leu

(CTC)

21

15416

Breast

cancer

T

!

C/T

CytB

Tyr

(TAC)

!

His

(CAC)

Potential

to

cause

mitochondrial

Complex

III

dysfunction

(mutation

in

highly

conserved

residue)

21

4

Experimental Biology and Medicine

..........................................................................................................................

 at Gazi University on March 31, 2016

ebm.sagepub.com

Downloaded from 

mutations have been previously reported to be associated
with distinct mitochondrial disorders.

23,31,32

The T1659C

transition was found at a very high level of heteroplasmy
in the blood, and skeletal muscle from a young girl with
learning difficulties, hemiplegia, and a movement disorder,
as well as an increased lactate level in the cerebrospinal
fluid.

32

The G5650A transition was reported at a high

level of heteroplasmy in the muscle and blood of a patient
with a stereotypic clinical presentation of cerebral auto-
somal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and
leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) and myopathy with
ragged-red fibers.

31

The mtDNA mutation was also found

in a family with a predominantly proximal myopathy and
was associated with a large number of cytochrome c oxi-
dase-deficient fibers and a marked decrease in the activities
of both Complex I and Complex IV.

23

The 7472insC was identified in a gastric cancer patient

27

and was a ‘‘C’’ nucleotide insertion in the mononucleotide
repeat of a poly-C sequence at np 7466–7472 in mtDNA,
which could alter the structure of the TcC loop in the
clover leaf secondary structure of tRNA

Ser(UCN)

. The muta-

tion was reported to be associated with maternally inher-
ited hearing loss, ataxia and myoclonus syndrome,

24,25

rapidly progressive neurodegeneration,

33

and progressive

myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) and a
MERRF-like phenotype.

34,35

It has been shown that the

cybrids carrying homoplasmic 7472insC mutant mtDNA
exhibited decreased Complex I activity, low oxygen con-
sumption rate and high lactic acid production.

24,25

Another pathogenic mutation T8993G in the ATP syn-

thase subunit 6 (ATPase 6) gene of mtDNA was introduced
into the PC3 prostate cancer cell line by a cybrid transfer
technique, and the mtDNA mutation exhibited enhanced
tumorigenesis in nude mice.

36

Moreover, using cybrids con-

taining the T8993G or T9176C mutation in the ATPase 6
gene in the HeLa cell line, these mtDNA mutations were
also shown to confer an advantage in tumor growth in nude
mice by preventing apoptosis.

37

These findings suggest that most mtDNA point muta-

tions identified in cancer tissues have a high potential to
result in mitochondrial dysfunction. Some point mutations
were shown to contribute to tumorigenesis. However, it is
unclear whether the different mtDNA point mutations play
similar role in cancer progression. The cybrid transfer tech-
nique provides a strategy to approach this issue for specific
mtDNA mutation.

Copy number changes

A decrease in mtDNA copy number was frequently
detected in cancer tissues compared with corresponding
noncancerous tissues. Alterations in mtDNA copy number
of cancers appear to be tissue specific.

13,15

A decreased

mtDNA copy number is frequently found in the majority
of HCC, gastric cancers, and breast cancers.

16,19,38

In HCC, a decrease in mtDNA copy number was found

to more frequently occur in females than in males, indicat-
ing that the change of mtDNA copy number might contrib-
ute to the differences in clinical manifestations including
tumorigenesis,

cancer

progression,

metastasis,

and

prognosis.

39

HCC patients with lower mtDNA content

exhibited poorer 5-year survival than patients with higher
mtDNA content.

40

In gastric cancer, a decrease in mtDNA

copy number was reported to be correlated with patients
with ulcerated and infiltrating or diffusely thick types,
which were associated with poor prognoses and lower 5-
year survival rates after gastric resection.

38

An analysis of a

different set of patients revealed that increased mtDNA
copy number is associated with worse survival in patients
with late-stage tumors.

41

In breast cancer, a decrease in

mtDNA copy number was correlated with higher histo-
logical grade, poorer disease-free survival, and lower over-
all survival.

42

In colorectal cancer, patients with lower

mtDNA copy number showed higher TNM stages and
poorer differentiation.

43

On the other hand, in head and neck cancers, an increase

in mtDNA copy number was positively correlated with the
histopathological grade, and mtDNA copy number in
saliva from patients with head and neck squamous cell car-
cinoma was higher than controls and was associated with
advanced tumor stage.

44,45

In ovarian cancer, the mtDNA

copy number in patients with pathologically high-grade
tumors was higher than in patients with low-grade
tumors.

46

Similarly, in esophageal squamous cell carcin-

oma, the mtDNA copy number in the cancers of metastatic
lymph nodes is higher than that in noncancerous tissue.

47,48

The factor involving in the tissue-specific changes of

mtDNA copy number in cancers is still unclear. Based on
the clinicopathological correlations with changes of
mtDNA copy number, these mtDNA copy number changes
can potentially be used as a molecular prognostic marker of
some types of cancer.

These findings suggest that somatic point mutations or

decreased copy number of mtDNA in cancers may result in
mitochondrial dysfunction. It needs to further evaluate
whether these somatic mtDNA alterations might contribute
to cancer progression or might be bystanders during cancer
progression.

Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by somatic mtDNA
alterations promotes cancer progression

Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by somatic mtDNA
alterations in cancers might provide a mechanism to trigger
the energy metabolism change of tumor cells from oxidative
phosphorylation to glycolysis. It was thus hypothesized
that mitochondrial dysfunction might contribute to cancer
progression. To examine this hypothesis, several strategies,
including chemical depletion of mtDNA, chemical impair-
ment of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and cybrid trans-
fer

technique,

were

adopted

to

evaluate

whether

mitochondrial dysfunction promotes cancer progression
to an apoptosis-resistant/chemo-resistant and/or invasive
phenotype and to dissect the underlying mechanism.

It was demonstrated that depletion of mtDNA in HeLa

cells prevents activation of adriamycin in the cells through
impairing mitochondrial Complex I activity and subse-
quently results in resistance to this drug.

49

Moreover, deple-

tion of mtDNA in human hepatoma SK-Hep1 cells results in
an adaptive increase in the expression of manganese

Hsu et al.

Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression

5

..........................................................................................................................

 at Gazi University on March 31, 2016

ebm.sagepub.com

Downloaded from 

superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and other antioxidant
enzymes that enabled the cancer cells to counteract oxida-
tive stress or chemotherapeutic agents.

50

The depletion of

mtDNA was also shown to increase the expression of the
multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene and hence to exhibit
higher tolerance to anti-cancer agents in human colon
cancer HCT-8 cells,

51

osteosarcoma 143B cells,

52

and hepa-

toma

cells.

53

Chloramphenicol-induced

mitochondrial

stress in human hepatoma HepG2 cells and non-small cell
lung cancer H1299 cells increases p21 expression and pre-
vents mitomycin-induced apoptosis through a p21-depen-
dent pathway.

54

Down-regulation of the a subunit of ATP

synthase and low ATP synthase activity in human colon
cancer

cells

exhibits

resistance

to

5-fluorouracil.

55

Mitochondrial respiration defects in cancer cells cause acti-
vation of the Akt survival pathway and contribute to drug
resistance through a redox mediated mechanism.

56

We also

found that chemical impairment of the mitochondrial
respiratory chain enhances cisplatin-resistance in human
HepG2 cells through up-regulated expression and secretion
of amphiregulin

57

and in human gastric cancer cells

through a ROS-mediated regulation.

58

In addition, mtDNA copy number might affect hormone

dependence in prostate cancer cells

59

and breast cancer

cells.

60

It was demonstrated that the depletion of mtDNA

in androgen-dependent LNCaP cells results in a loss of
androgen dependence.

61

The depletion of mtDNA in

MCF-7 cells exhibits resistance to hydroxytamoxifen and
ICI182780.

62

These findings suggest that mtDNA defects

may play an important role in the development of hormone
independence, which may contribute to the progression of
these cancers.

It was demonstrated that partial chemical depletion of

mtDNA and impairment of mitochondrial respiratory chain
in human lung cancer A549 cells induce an invasive pheno-
type.

63

It was also reported that the mitochondrial dysfunc-

tion-modulated

invasive

phenotype

is

induced

by

transcriptional regulation of extracellular matrix-remodel-
ing genes.

61

Moreover, depletion of mtDNA in LNCaP and

MCF-7 cells exhibits an invasive phenotype by promoting
epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

62

Depletion of mtDNA

in breast cancer cells by expressing mutant mitochondrial
DNA polymerase g increases Matrigel invasion.

64

In add-

ition, chemical impairment of the mitochondrial respiratory
chain in HepG2 cells enhances their migratory phenotype
through the overexpression and secretion of amphiregulin
by an autocrine or paracrine loop,

57

and overexpression of

peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coacti-
vator 1 alpha (PGC-1a) to promote mitochondrial biogen-
esis in HepG2 cells can markedly repress cell migration
through the upregulation of E-cadherin expression.

65,66

We also found that chemical impairment of the mitochon-
drial respiratory chain in human gastric cancer cells
enhances cell migration through ROS-induced integrin b5
expression.

58

To rule out the toxic effects of chemical treatments, the

cybrid transfer technique for replacement of mtDNA in
tumor cells was used to demonstrate that mtDNA muta-
tions may promote tumorigenesis and contribute to cancer
progression. It was demonstrated that the heteroplasmic

12418insA mutation,

22

the T8993G mutation,

36,37

and the

T9176C mutation

37

promotes tumor growth in nude mice.

Moreover, ROS-generating mtDNA mutations were found
to enhance the metastatic potential of tumor cells.

67

These findings together suggest that mitochondrial dys-

function may enhance tumor growth or promote cancer
progression

to

an

apoptosis-resistant/chemo-resistant

and/or invasive phenotype through various mechanisms.

Defects in mitochondrial enzyme in tumor
cells may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction
and cancer progression

In addition to somatic mtDNA alterations, deregulated cel-
lular energetics in cancer cells might result from defects in
the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial enzymes, including
several enzymes of the TCA cycle and mitochondrial dea-
cetylase SIRT3.

Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)

The SDH (also known as respiratory Complex II) is a het-
erotetrameric protein complex that is located on the mito-
chondrial inner membrane, and contains two catalytic
subunits (SDHA and SDHB) and two integral subunits
(SDHC and SDHD).

68

The four subunits are encoded by

nuclear genes and two assembly factors, SDH assembly
factor 1 (SDHAF1) and SDHAF2, are essential for the
assembly and activity of the SDH protein complex.

69,70

In

the TCA cycle, the SDH complex converts succinate into
fumarate in a reaction that is coupled to the reduction of
flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) to FADH

2

, and electrons

are transferred to coenzyme Q. Inactivating mutations in
the genes of the SDH subunits and assembly factors have
been identified in pheochromocytoma (PCC),

71

paragan-

glioma

(PGL),

71–74

gastrointestinal

stromal

tumors

(GISTs),

75

renal carcinoma,

76,77

thyroid tumors, testicular

seminoma, neuroblastomas, and breast cancer.

78

The oncogenic activity of SDH defects has been attribu-

ted to succinate accumulation. Defects in SDH have been
shown to result in the accumulation of extra-mitochondrial
succinate and are linked to the inhibition of prolyl hydro-
xylases and hence the stabilization and activation of HIF-1a
under normoxic conditions.

79–81

The SDH defects thus

establish a tumorigenic ‘‘pseudo-hypoxic’’ state. In add-
ition, SDH mutations have been reported to trigger ROS
production, which might result in HIF activation through
the inactivation of prolyl hydroxylases

68,82

or might lead to

genomic instability.

83

Moreover, the accumulation of suc-

cinate was found to result in epigenetic changes in gene
expression by the inhibition of a-ketoglutarate-dependent
histone and DNA demethylases.

68,84,85

Fumarate hydratase

Fumarate hydratase (also known as fumarase) is a nuclear-
encoding mitochondrial matrix enzyme, which is involved
in the TCA cycle for converting fumarate to malate. Loss of
functional fumarate hydratase lead to low respiratory rate
and increased glucose addition and lactate production in a
UOK262 kidney cancer cell line derived from a metastasis in

6

Experimental Biology and Medicine

..........................................................................................................................

 at Gazi University on March 31, 2016

ebm.sagepub.com

Downloaded from 

a patient with hereditary leiomyomatosis renal cell carcin-
oma (HLRCC).

86,87

The altered mitochondrial respiration

and cellular metabolism in the fumarase-deficient cells
might result from ROS-dependent stabilization and activa-
tion of HIF-1a and lower expression of TP53.

86,88

Fumarate hydratase mutations have been found in uter-

ine leiomyomas and renal cell cancer,

89

dominantly inher-

ited uterine fibroids, skin leiomyomata and papillary renal
cell cancer,

90

clear cell renal cancer,

91

and PGL/PCC.

92

Similar to SDH, the tumorigenic activity of fumarate hydra-
tase defects is attributed to the abnormal accumulation of
fumarate and the stabilization and activation of HIF-1a by
inhibition of prolyl hydroxylases.

80,93

Moreover, it was

found that fumarate covalently binds to cysteine residues
in protein, a process called succination, and modulates the
enzyme activity. The accumulation of intracellular fumarate
can result in the succination of Kelch-like ECH-associated
protein 1 (Keap1) and abrogates Keap1-mediated degrad-
ation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2
(NRF2).

94

The increased NRF2 activates several antioxidant

genes and supports tumor formation.

94

In addition, the

accumulation of fumarate might promote tumorigenesis
by inhibiting a-ketoglutarate-dependent genome-wide his-
tones and DNA methylations, hence resulting in epigenetic
alterations in gene expression,

84

or by increasing ROS-

dependent signaling via glutathione succination.

95

Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)

There are three isozymes of IDH in mammalian cell: IDH1,
IDH2, and IDH3. IDH1 and IDH2 are homodimeric
NADP

þ

-dependent enzymes located in the cytosol and

mitochondrial matrix, respectively. IDH3 is a heterotetra-
meric NAD

þ

-dependent enzyme (consist of two alpha sub-

units, one beta subunit, and one gamma subunit) located in
the mitochondrial matrix. The IDHs can oxidatively decarb-
oxylate isocitrate to a-ketoglutarate. Mutations in IDH1 and
IDH2 frequently occur in glioma (>75%)

96

and secondary

glioblastoma (GBM) (70–75%) and are rarely detected in
primary glioblastoma (5%).

97,98

Mutations in IDH1 and

IDH2 have also been found in various human cancers
with different frequencies, including acute myeloid leuke-
mia (AML),

99

angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma,

100

cholangiocarcinoma,

101,102

chondrosarcoma,

103

colon

cancer,

104

giant cell tumor of bone,

105

melanoma,

106

prostate

cancer,

107

and osteosarcoma.

108

Most IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in cancers are often het-

erozygous with a wild-type allele,

96,97,109

and the mutations

have been found to result in a neomorphic enzyme activity
that converts a-ketoglutarate into the R-enantiomer of 2-
hydroxyglutarate.

110–113

2-Hydroxyglutarate inhibits the

enzymatic activity of Complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase)
and Complex V (ATP synthase)

114,115

and alters the gene

expression of TCA cycle enzymes in cancer cells.

116

These

findings suggest that the accumulation of 2-hydroxygluta-
rate contributes to the alterations in energy metabolism in
IDH-mutant cancer cells.

2-Hydroxyglutarate is considered a major contributor to

the oncogenic activity of IDH mutations and is thus identi-
fied

as

an

‘‘onco-metabolite’’

that

promotes

tumorigenesis.

112

The increased 2-hydroxyglutarate levels

were shown to be associated with DNA hypermethylation
and a broad epigenetic change, which results in epigenetic
alterations of gene expression.

113,117,118

The oncogenic

activity of 2-hydroxyglutarate has been attributed to its
accumulation and the inhibitory effect on various a-keto-
glutarate-dependent dioxygenases, including the prolyl
hydroxylases, histone demethylase KDM4C, and 5-methyl-
cytosine hydroxylase TET2.

113,117,119,120

However, the effects

of 2-hydroxyglutarate on HIF-1a and prolyl hydroxylases
could be controversial. Some studies reported that 2-HG
leads to inhibition of HIF-1a via activation of prolyl hydro-
xylases, whereas other studies showed that 2-hydroxyglu-
tarate inhibits prolyl hydroxylases and induces HIF-1a
expression.

100,113,121,122

These findings imply that the effects

of 2-hydroxyglutarate on HIF-1a signaling might be cell
type dependent and the role of IDH mutants in tumorigen-
esis by HIF-1a signaling needs further investigation.

SIRT3

SIRT3 is one of the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial protein
deacetylases. SIRT3 regulates the function of several mito-
chondrial proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation,
fatty acid oxidation, the urea cycle, and the antioxidant
response system.

123–131

SIRT3 is thought to play a tumor

suppressor role in various cancers, including breast, colo-
rectal, HCC, lung and gastric cancers.

132–137

Loss of SIRT3

was found to increase intracellular ROS levels and result in
the stability and activation of HIF1a and the Warburg effect
phenotype, which promote tumorigenesis.

133

These findings together suggest that mitochondrial dys-

function induced by these defects in several nuclear-
encoded enzymes of the TCA cycle, such as SDH, fumarate
hydratase, and IDH, and the down-regulation of mitochon-
drial deacetylase SIRT3 results in mitochondrial dysfunc-
tion, and enhances tumor growth, as well as promotes
cancer progression.

Altered oncogene/tumor suppressor gene
represses mitochondrial respiratory
function in cancers

Alterations in oncogene/oncosuppressor including HIF-1
and TP53 have been shown to regulate mitochondrial res-
piration and cellular metabolism.

HIF-1

HIF-1 is a heterodimeric protein consisting of HIF-1a and
HIF-1b subunits, both of which are members of the basic
helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors, that modu-
lates the cellular response to hypoxia in normal and tumor
cells.

138

Although HIF-1b is a constitutively expressed

nuclear protein, HIF-1a is tightly regulated by oxygen avail-
ability. Under normoxia, HIF-1a subunit is rapidly hydro-
xylated on the oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD)
domain by prolyl hydroxylases and degraded through
von Hippel–Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL)-
mediated

proteasome

degradation

pathway.

139,140

In

tumor

cells,

HIF-1a

plays

a

crucial

role

in

Hsu et al.

Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression

7

..........................................................................................................................

 at Gazi University on March 31, 2016

ebm.sagepub.com

Downloaded from 

angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis.

138,141

Overexpressed HIF-1a is associated with malignancy in
many types of tumor including bladder, brain, breast,
colon, oral, liver, lung, pancreas, skin, stomach, uterus,
and leukemia.

142

Several factors have been reported to

increase HIF-1a expression, including inhibition of SDH
and fumarate hydratase, or activation of phosphoinositide
3-kinase

(PI3K)

and

viral

transforming

genes.

29,143

Moreover, HIF1a plays a critical role in the regulation of
mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism.

144,145

The activation of HIF1a in tumor can alter energy metabol-
ism from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis through
the expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1),
which inhibits the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA as
the substrate for the TCA cycle by phosphorylation of pyru-
vate dehydrogenase. The inhibition of pyruvate dehydro-
genase leads to repression of mitochondrial oxidative
metabolism. Moreover, HIF-1a increases glycolysis by up-
regulation the gene expressions of the glucose transporters,
glycolytic

enzymes,

and

lactate

dehydrogenase

A

(LDHA).

143

HIF-1a is thought to contribute to reprogram-

ming energy metabolism in tumor cells from oxidative
phosphorylation to glycolysis. In addition, HIF-1a induces
the expression of mitochondrial LON protease, which is
important in the degradation of the COX4-1 subunit of the
cytochrome c oxidase complex (COX), and the increased
expression of COX4-2, a downstream target gene of HIF-
1a, is used to substitute COX4-1. It was found that the
replacement of COX4-1 with COX4-2 in cancer cells
increases the efficiency of electron transfer to oxygen and
continued respiration and decreases the ROS production
under limited oxygen availability.

146

A recent study also

showed that the expression of mitochondrial chaperone
TRAP1 is increased in cancer cells, and the chaperone inter-
acts with and inhibits SDH. The interaction between TRAP1
and SDH results in the accumulation of succinate and the
stabilization of HIF-1a and hence induces metabolic repro-
gramming and promotes tumorigenesis.

147

These findings

suggest that HIF-1a plays a crucial role in the cellular
metabolism and tumorigenesis of cancer cells.

TP53

TP53 is well known for the functions in DNA damage
response (DDR), cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Loss or
inactive mutations of p53 were often observed in several
types of tumor (approximately 60%) (TP53 website).
Moreover, animals lacking TP53 have been shown to exhibit
the spontaneous development of tumors.

148,149

In addition,

TP53 was found to be important for maintenance of the
mitochondrial respiration and regulation of cellular metab-
olism. TP53 defects are thought to contribute to the
Warburg effect in cancer cells.

TP53 can repress the transcription of glucose transporter

(GLUT) isoform 1 (GLUT1) and GLUT4 and reduce the
expression of GLUT3 through an IKK/nuclear factor-kB
(NFkB)-dependent manner.

150,151

These glucose trans-

porters are important in glucose uptake, and the loss of
TP53 can increase glucose consumption in cancer cells.
Moreover, TP53 was found to modulate glycolytic enzymes

through several mechanisms.

149

TP53 can stimulate the

expression of the TP53-induced glycolysis and the apop-
tosis regulator (TIGAR) and repress glycolysis by degrad-
ing fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, which is an activator of
phosphofructokinase 1.

152

In addition, TP53 can promote

the degradation of phosphoglycerate mutase and hence
can repress glycolysis.

153

TP53 defects can result in an

increase in glycolytic flux by reduced TIGAR and increased
phosphoglycerate mutase.

On the other hand, T53 was found to transcriptionally

induce the expression of subunit I of cytochrome c oxi-
dase

154

and the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, which is

important in the maintenance of mitochondrial Complex
I)

155,156

and the synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2

(SCO2, which is essential to the assembly of the cytochrome
c

oxidase complex)

157

and glutaminase 2 (GLS2, which cata-

lyzes glutamine to glutamate for fuel for the TCA
cycle).

158,159

These findings suggest that TP53 defects can

result in down-regulation of mitochondrial respiration and
oxidative metabolism.

In addition, TP53 could transcriptionally inactivate the

expression of malic enzymes ME1 and ME2, which are
involved in recycling of malate to pyruvate, and hence inhi-
bits the intermediates of the TCA cycle entering biosyn-
thetic pathways.

160

Moreover, TP53 was reported to

increase the expression of ribonucleotide reductase subunit
TP53R2 for maintaining mtDNA integrity.

161

TP53 was also

shown to interact with mitochondrial DNA polymerase g
and play an important role in mtDNA maintenance in
response to oxidative damage.

162

These findings indicate

that TP53 is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial
respiration and cellular metabolism, and a loss function of
TP53 can contribute to the Warburg effect in tumor cells.

Activation of mitochondrial retrograde
signaling contributes to mitochondrial
dysfunction-induced tumorigenesis and
cancer progression

Because of the roles of HIF-1a and TP53 in both mito-
chondrial function and tumorigenesis, they might directly
link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the formation
and progression of cancer. Unlike HIF-1a and TP53, mito-
chondrial dysfunction caused by mtDNA mutations and
the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial enzyme defects might
contribute to the formation and progression of cancer by
triggering cytosolic signaling pathways that ultimately
alter nuclear gene expression, a process called retrograde
signaling. Recent studies revealed that changes in the
intracellular levels of ROS, Ca

, and oncometabolites that

are released from mitochondria might be important in the
mitochondrial

retrograde

signaling

for

neoplastic

transformation.

Increased low levels of mitochondria-derived ROS can

function as signaling messengers by reversibly oxidizing
protein thiol groups, thereby modifying protein structure
and function. Higher levels of ROS can nonspecifically
damaging DNA, proteins, and lipids, which could result
in disruption of mitochondrial electron transfer chain and

8

Experimental Biology and Medicine

..........................................................................................................................

 at Gazi University on March 31, 2016

ebm.sagepub.com

Downloaded from 

consequently collapse of mitochondrial function and threa-
ten cell survival. Accumulating evidence has shown that
hypoxia, activation of oncogenes, loss of tumor suppres-
sors, and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by mtDNA
mutations or mitochondrial enzyme defects increase pro-
duction of mitochondrial ROS.

163

Recent evidence revealed

that tumor cells can enhance glutathione and thioredoxin
antioxidant systems to drive cancer initiation and progres-
sion by preventing increased ROS from reaching cytotoxic
levels.

164

This range of ROS might be capable of increasing

tumorigenesis and/or promoting cancer progression by
activating signaling pathways that regulate cellular prolif-
eration, metabolic adaptation, antioxidant systems, apopto-
sis-resistance, chemoresistance, and cellular migration/
invasion.

163

In cytoplasmic hybrids for replacement of mtDNA in

tumor cells, ROS-generating mtDNA mutations have been
found to increase tumorigenesis

22

and to enhance the meta-

static potential of tumor cells.

67

Loss of SDHB

81

and mutations

in SDHC

165

were also shown to increase tumorigenesis by

enhancing mitochondrial ROS levels. Fumarase-deficient
cancer cells were found to increase mitochondrial ROS and
HIF-1a stabilization.

86

Moreover, mitochondrial dysfunctions

caused by various respiration inhibitors have been shown to
promote cell migration via ROS-enhanced b5-integrin

expression in gastric cancer SC-M1 cells

58

or ROS-mediated

upregulation of amphiregulin in human hepatoma HepG2
cells.

57

In addition to ROS, Ca

was found to up-regulate

amphiregulin and induce chemo-resistance and migration
of human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

57

Moreover, elevated

cytosolic Ca

was found in cancer cells with mtDNA

depletion by ethidium bromide

166

and was involved in

the mtDNA depletion-induced expression of the invasive
markers, cathepsin L and TGFb1 as well as the invasive
phenotype.

61

Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and cal-

cineurin-induced signaling might mediate the mtDNA
depletion-induced invasive phenotype.

166

It was further

demonstrated that calcineurin can stimulate IkBb-depen-
dent NFkB and nuclear translocation of cRel-p50, which
results in the changes in the malignant characteristics
including metabolic reprogramming, invasive behavior,
and resistance to apoptosis.

167

These findings suggest that

increased cytosolic Ca

induced by mitochondrial dys-

function can activate signaling pathways that regulate
metabolic alterations, cell invasion, and apoptosis-resis-
tance to promote cancer progression.

As mentioned above, defects in SDH, fumarate hydra-

tase, and IDH can result in the accumulation of metabolites
that are released from mitochondria; these metabolites,

Figure 2

Mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, mitochondrial enzyme defects, or altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors

might contribute to the formation and progression of cancer. Somatic alterations in mtDNA and defects in mitochondrial enzymes, such as succinate dehydrogenase
(SDH), fumarate hydratase (FH), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) were found to be associated with both familial and sporadic forms of cancer. Deregulated
mitochondrial deacetylase sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) might modulate cancer progression by regulating cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. These mitochondrial alterations
during oncogenesis and tumor progression activate cytosolic signaling pathways that ultimately alter nuclear gene expression, a process called retrograde signaling.
Changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS), Ca

, or oncometabolites are involved in the mitochondrial retrograde signaling for neoplastic transformation by inhibiting

prolyl hydroxylases and stabilizing hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (HIF-1a) or by modulating a-ketoglutarate-dependent genome-wide histone and DNA methylations,
resulting in epigenetic alterations of gene expression. In addition, altered oncogene/oncosuppressor including HIF-1 and tumor suppressor p53 (TP53) not only
regulates mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism but also promote the formation and progression of cancer

Hsu et al.

Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression

9

..........................................................................................................................

 at Gazi University on March 31, 2016

ebm.sagepub.com

Downloaded from 

such as succinate, fumarate, and 2-hydroxyglutarate, have
been found to be important for tumorigenesis activity of
these mitochondrial enzyme defects. These metabolites
are thus considered oncometabolites. The accumulation of
oncometabolites can promote tumorigenesis by inhibiting
prolyl hydroxylases and stabilizing HIF-1a.

92,168

Moreover,

the accumulation of these oncometabolites might affect
a

-ketoglutarate-dependent

genome-wide

histone

and

DNA methylations and hence might result in epigenetic
alterations of gene expression, which contribute to
tumorigenesis.

83

In addition, mitochondrial dysfunctions were found to

repress the protein synthesis, trans-activation activity, and
targeting gene expressions of HIF-1a through an energy
sensor, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-depend-
ent pathway.

169

This provides another mechanism for the

communication between the mitochondria and the nucleus.
We further found that loss of this communication renders
HCC cancer cells to exhibit drug resistance.

170

These find-

ings suggest that the mitochondrial retrograde signaling
pathway might regulate the sensitivity of cancer cells to
anti-cancer agents.

Interestingly, a recent study found that pyruvate

dehydrogenase complex (PDC), which is originally found
to be located in mitochondria and catalyzes the pyruvate to
acetyl-CoA reaction, can be translocated from the mito-
chondria to the nucleus and can generate acetyl-CoA in
the nucleus to be used for histone acetylation under condi-
tions of mitochondrial dysfunction. The nucleus transloca-
tion of PDC was found to be important for cell cycle G1-S
phase progression in response to exposure of serum and
growth factor (such as EGF), suggesting a potential role in
cancer with proliferative signals or mitochondrial dysfunc-
tion.

171

These findings suggest that the communication

between the nucleus and the mitochondria might play an
important role in tumorigenesis.

Summary

We have shown several lines of evidence that suggest
that the underlying mechanisms of deregulated cellular
energetics are associated with mitochondrial dysfunc-
tion caused by mtDNA mutations, mitochondrial enzyme
defects,

or

altered

oncogenes/tumor

suppressors.

Mitochondrial dysfunction can promote cancer progression
to an apoptosis-resistant/chemo-resistant and/or invasive
phenotype through various mechanisms. These mitochon-
drial alterations during oncogenesis and tumor progression
can activate cytosolic signaling pathways from mitochon-
dria to the nucleus and ultimately alter nuclear gene expres-
sion for neoplastic transformation (Figure 2). However, it is
still largely unclear how specific mtDNA mutations regu-
late the formation and progression of cancer. Elucidation of
the detailed molecular mechanisms for the mitochondrial
retrograde signaling still requires further investigation.
Based on these findings that mitochondrial dysfunction
may contribute to cancer progression, we suggest that tar-
geting mitochondrial alterations and mitochondrial retro-
grade signaling might be a promising strategy for the
development of selective anticancer therapy.

Authors’ contributions:

CCH reviewed the literature and

wrote the first draft; LMT and HCL edited the final draft.
All authors participated in the writing of this manuscript.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This work was partly supported by the grants from the Center
of Excellence for Cancer Research at Taipei Veterans General,
the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW103-TD-B-111-02;
MOHW104-TDU-B-211-124-001;

MOHW105-TDU-B-211-

134003), Executive Yuan; the grant from the Ministry of
Education, Aim for the Top University Plan; and the grants
MOST101-2320-B-010-068-MY3,

MOST101-2314-B-075-015-

MY3, and MOST 104-2320-B-010-031 from the Ministry of
Science and Technology, Taiwan.

DECLARATION OF CONFLICTING INTERESTS

The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with
respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this
article.

REFERENCES

1. Hanahan D, Weinberg RA. Hallmarks of cancer: the next generation.

Cell

2011;144:646–74

2. Chen Z, Lu W, Garcia-Prieto C, Huang P. The Warburg effect and its

cancer therapeutic implications. J Bioenerg Biomembr 2007;39:267–74

3. Cairns RA, Harris IS, Mak TW. Regulation of cancer cell metabolism.

Nat Rev Cancer

2011;11:85–95

4. Wallace DC. Mitochondria and cancer. Nat Rev Cancer 2012;12:685–98
5. Upadhyay M, Samal J, Kandpal M, Singh OV, Vivekanandan P. The

Warburg effect: insights from the past decade. Pharmacol Ther
2013;137:318–30

6. Wallace DC, Fan W, Procaccio V. Mitochondrial energetics and thera-

peutics. Annu Rev Pathol 2010;5:297–348

7. Galluzzi L, Kepp O, Kroemer G. Mitochondria: master regulators of

danger signalling. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 2012;13:780–8

8. Anderson S, Bankier AT, Barrell BG, de Bruijn MH, Coulson AR,

Drouin J, Eperon IC, Nierlich DP, Roe BA, Sanger F, Schreier PH,
Smith AJ, Staden R, Young IG. Sequence and organization of the human
mitochondrial genome. Nature 1981;290:457–65

9. Lee HC, Chang CM, Chi CW. Somatic mutations of mitochondrial DNA

in aging and cancer progression. Ageing Res Rev 2010;9 Suppl 1:S47–58

10. Schon EA, DiMauro S, Hirano M. Human mitochondrial DNA: roles of

inherited and somatic mutations. Nat Rev Genet 2012;13:878–90

11. Wallace DC. A mitochondrial bioenergetic etiology of disease. J Clin

Invest

2013;123:1405–12

12. Chen Y, Fu LL, Wen X, Wang XY, Liu J, Cheng Y, Huang J. Sirtuin-3

(SIRT3), a therapeutic target with oncogenic and tumor-suppressive
function in cancer. Cell Death Dis 2014;5:e1047

13. Lee HC, Yin PH, Lin JC, Wu CC, Chen CY, Wu CW, Chi CW, Tam TN,

Wei YH. Mitochondrial genome instability and mtDNA depletion in
human cancers. Ann NY Acad Sci 2005;1042:109–22

14. Lee HC, Huang KH, Yeh TS, Chi CW. Somatic alterations in mito-

chondrial DNA and mitochondrial dysfunction in gastric cancer pro-
gression. World J Gastroenterol 2014;20:3950–9

15. Lee HC, Wei YH. Mitochondrial DNA instability and metabolic shift in

human cancers. Int J Mol Sci 2009;10:674–701

16. Lee HC, Li SH, Lin JC, Wu CC, Yeh DC, Wei YH. Somatic mutations in

the D-loop and decrease in the copy number of mitochondrial DNA in
human hepatocellular carcinoma. Mutat Res 2004;547:71–8

17. Matsuyama W, Nakagawa M, Wakimoto J, Hirotsu Y, Kawabata M,

Osame M. Mitochondrial DNA mutation correlates with stage pro-
gression and prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer. Hum Mutat
2003;21:441–3

10

Experimental Biology and Medicine

..........................................................................................................................

 at Gazi University on March 31, 2016

ebm.sagepub.com

Downloaded from