UNIVERSAL PERIODIC REVIEW 

ZIMBABWE 

2016 

 
 

Joint Stakeholder Submission 

 
 

Freemuse  is  an  independent  international  membership  organization  advocating  and  defending  the  right  to 
artistic  freedom  worldwide.  Freemuse  has  held  Special  Consultative  Status  with  the  United  Nations 
Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) since 2012.  
 
Jemtelandsgade 1 
DK-2300 Copenhagen S 
Denmark 
Tel: (+45) 3332 1027 
Email: ole.reitov@freemuse.org 
Web: www.freemuse.org / www.artsfreedom.org 
 
Nhimbe  
is a non-profit arts advocacy organization based in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Through legislative and 
grassroots action, Nhimbe advocates for national policies that recognize, enhance and foster the contribution 
the arts make to national development.  
 
84 Fort Street 
Between L. Takawira and 6 Avenue, Canberra Building 
Bulawayo 
Zimbabwe 
Tel: +263 (0) 9 60002 
Email: joshnyap@nhimbe.org 
Web: www.nhimbe.org 
 
 
Freemuse and Nhimbe welcome the opportunity to contribute to the Second Cycle of the Universal Periodic 
Review  (UPR)  process  of  Zimbabwe.  Our  organizations’  focus  is  on  Zimbabwe’s  compliance  with  its 
commitments  under  international  human  rights  instruments  relating  to  freedom  of  expression,  creativity 
and  the  arts
,  as  well  as  guarantees  under  its  own  constitution,  and  to  recommendations  accepted  by 
Zimbabwe  during  the  first  cycle  of  the  UPR  in  2011.  This  submission  in  based  on  interviews  with  local 
artists and a legal analysis facilitated by Nhimbe and qualified through a workshop held in Harare in October 
2015 with local artists, journalists and human rights advocates.    

 
SUMMARY  
 

1.  Zimbabwe’s  constitution  guarantees  the  right  to  “freedom  of  artistic  expression”.  The  right  is  further 

protected by Zimbabwe being a signatory to the main international conventions guaranteeing the right to 
freedom of expression including artistic freedom. 

 

2.  However, several laws including the Censorship  Act  and the Criminal Law (Codification and Reform) 

Act  limit  artistic  expressions,  and  the  practices  of  the  police  and  other  government  agencies  creates  an 
environment of fear and self-censorship. 

 
 
THE UNIVERSAL RIGHT TO ARTISTIC FREEDOM 
 

3.  The freedom to create art is increasingly recognized as an important human right under international law. 

In a 2013 report, “The Right to Artistic Freedom and Creativity”, the UN Special Rapporteur in the field 
of cultural rights, Ms Farida Shaheed, observed that the “vitality of artistic creativity is necessary for the 
development  of  vibrant  cultures  and  the  functioning  of  democratic  societies.  Artistic  expressions  and 
creations are an integral part of cultural life, which entails contesting meanings and revisiting culturally 
inherited ideas and concepts.”

1

 

 

4.  The  right  to  artistic  freedom  and  creativity  is  explicitly  guaranteed  by  international  instruments:  most 

importantly,  Article  15(3)  of  the  International  Covenant  on  Economic,  Social,  and  Cultural  Rights 
(ICESCR), under which state parties to the treaty “undertake to respect the freedom indispensable for . . . 
creative  activity”  and  in  International  Covenant  on  Civil  and  Political  Rights  (ICCPR)  Article  19(2), 
which provides that the right to freedom of expression includes the freedom to seek, receive and impart 
information and ideas of all kinds “in the form of art”. 

 

5.  Furthermore,  artistic  freedom  is  protected  by  other  fundamental  rights,  chiefly:  liberty  and  security  of 

persons; freedom of association, assembly, and movement; freedom of thought, conscience, and religion; 
and  equal protection  of the  law. The  exercise  of artistic freedom supports these fundamental rights and 
freedoms  by  witnessing  their  violation  and  by  engendering  cultures  that  affirm  the  inherent  and  equal 
dignity of the person. 

 

6.  At the Human Rights Council’s 30

th

 session an oral statement joined by 57 states reaffirmed the right to 

freedom of expression including creative artistic expressions.

2

   

 
 
NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL LEGAL FRAMEWORK 
 

7.  Section 61 of Zimbabwe’s constitution provides that “every person has the right to freedom of 

expression, which includes … freedom of artistic expression and scientific research and creativity”. The 

                                                

1

 Farida Shaheed, UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights,  “The Right to Artistic Freedom and Creativity,” 

http://artsfreedom.org/?p=5311 

2

 https://geneva.usmission.gov/2015/09/18/hrc-statement-reaffirms-right-to-freedom-of-expression-including-creative-

and-artistic-expression/

  

constitution was adopted in 2013 and is a significant step in the direction of securing the right to freedom 
of expression in law.   

 

8.  The on-going law reform and revision (informally referred to as legislative alignment) as a government 

initiative is a sign of state commitment to bringing all legislation that predated the 2013 constitution into 
line  with  the  supreme  law.  However,  whether  as  a  result  of  lack  of  capacity  or  political  will,  the 
government continues “to ignore human rights provisions in the constitution, neither enacting laws to put 
the  constitution  into  effect  nor  amending  existing  laws  to  bring  them  in  line  with  the  constitution  and 
Zimbabwe’s international and regional human rights obligations.”

3

  

 

9.  The  main  international  covenants  that  relate  to  freedom  of  expression,  including  artistic  freedom,  to 

which  Zimbabwe  is  a  party,  are  the  Universal  Declaration  of  Human  Rights  (UDHR),  the  African 
Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR), the International Covenant on Economic, Social and 
Cultural  Rights  (ICESCR),  the  International  Covenant  on  Civil  and  Political  Rights  (ICCPR),  the 
Convention  on  the  Rights  of  the  Child  (CRC),  and  the  Convention  on  the  Rights  of  Persons  with 
Disabilities (CRPD).  

 
 
RECOMMENDATIONS AND IMPLEMENTATION 
 

10. During its First Cycle Universal Periodic Review that took place on 10 October 2011, Zimbabwe  only 

expressed  support  for  one  recommendation  on  freedom  of  expression.  Zimbabwe  accepted  Japan’s 
recommendation  to  “make  improvements  to  ensure  the  freedom  of  expression,  including  for  the  mass 
media.” 
 

11. Zimbabwe noted recommendations to repeal or significantly reform the Criminal Law (Codification and 

Reform)  Act  and  the  Public  Order  and  Security  Act  (POSA)  provisions  that  restrict  freedoms  of 
expression and assembly as proposed by the United States, Australia, Canada, Austria and Mexico. 

 

12. Zimbabwe further noted five broader recommendations by Australia, Czech Republic, Norway, Slovakia 

and Switzerland on ensuring the right to freedom of expression.  

 

13. However, articles remain within the Criminal Law (Codification and Reform) Act and the Public Order 

and  Security  Act  (POSA)  that  severely  hamper  the  practice  of  freedom  of  expression,  as  illustrated  in 
cases  detailed  below.  Theatre  performances,  movies  and  exhibitions  have  been  censored,  while  artists 
self-censor due to fear of repression. These continuing problems lead us to conclude that Zimbabwe has 
not  adhered  to  the  recommendations  to  protect  and  promote  freedom  of  expression  made  in  the  First 
Cycle of the UPR in 2011. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

                                                

3

 https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2016/country-chapters/zimbabwe  

THE CENSORSHIP ACT 
 
General statement: 

14. The  Censorship  and  Entertainment  Control  Act  provides  the  circumstances  and  standards  under  which 

the Censorship Board is authorized to censor artistic works, thus limiting artistic expression. The Act is 
enacted  “to  regulate  and  control  the  public  exhibition  of  films;  the  importation,  production, 
dissemination and possession of undesirable or prohibited video and film material, publications, pictures, 
statues and records, and the giving of public entertainments; to regulate theatres and like places of public 
entertainment.”

4

 

 

15. Artistic  expressions can be censored  if they are  deemed undesirable; indecent or obscene;  offensive  or 

harmful  to  public  morals;  or  contrary  to  the  interest  of  defence,  public  safety,  public  order,  and  the 
economic interests of the state or public health. The standards, however, have  not been clearly  defined, 
leaving  room  for  abuse  and  arbitrary  decisions  by  the  Censorship  Board.  ICCPR article  19(3)  provides 
that  permissible  restrictions  on  freedom  of  expression  must  be  “necessary”  and  “provided  by  law.” 
Clarifying these provisions, General Comment No. 34 states that a permissible restriction must be, inter 
alia,  “the  least  intrusive  instrument”  that  achieves  the  state’s  purpose  and  “must  be  formulated  with 
sufficient  precision  to  enable  an  individual  to  regulate  his  or  her  conduct  accordingly  and  it  must  be 
made accessible to the public.”  

 

16. Artists  face  a  difficult  situation  when  trying  to  deal  with  the  arbitrary  standards  of  censorship  in 

Zimbabwe.  Any  song,  play  or  writing  dealing  with  social  issues  has  the  possibility  of  being  linked  to 
government  actions  and,  as  a  result,  faces  reprisals  in  the  form  of  censorship.  Arts  activist  Tongai 
Makawa  (artist  name:  Outspoken)  of  Magamba  Network  notes,  “all  topics  are  controversial  in 
Zimbabwe because if you are tackling any societal ill or problem there is always a way of tracing it back 
to a government or political situation, even though you are tackling things of a social nature. ”  

 

17. Violations of the Censorship Act will result in the individual being liable to a fine or imprisonment. The 

Censorship Board also has powers under section 25 of the act to seize any articles for examination by the 
board. 

 

18. The  Censorship  Board’s  composition  and  process  for making  censorship  decisions  are  not  transparent. 

Artists  have  stated  they  have  no  way  of  knowing  who  is  appointed  to  the  board  or  what  happens  to  a 
piece  of  art  after  it  has  been  submitted  for  review.  The  website  of  the  Ministry  of  Home  Affairs  only 
explains the functions of the Board, but does not provide a list of the Board’s membership.

5

 

 

19. The  Censorship  Board’s  decisions  are  in  principle  appealable  to  the  Censorship  Appeal  Board.

6

 The 

relevant minister can override the decision of “the Appeal Board or to any court to which any decision, 
order or proceedings of the Board or the Appeal Board has or have been brought on review or appeal” if 
the minister believes the decision is not in the public interest.

7

 

 
 

                                                

4

 The Censorship and Entertainment Control Act http://www.parlzim.gov.zw/acts-list/censorship-and-entertainments-

control-act-10-04  

5

 http://www.moha.gov.zw/index.php/2014-03-26-06-08-11/2014-05-14-09-19-25/2014-03-26-06-24-01 

6

 The Censorship and Entertainment Control Act, section 19.  

7

 Ibid. section 21.

 

Supportive examples: 

20. A case illustrating the lack of transparency and arbitrariness of the Censorship Board's decisions is the 

ban  on  the  play  No  Voice  No  Choice.  In  2012, the  Censorship  Board  issued  a  notice  that  the  play  had 
been banned in Zimbabwe. The director and producer, Tafadzwa Muzondo, had undertaken to perform at 
the Intwasa Arts Festival  on 18 September 2012. Because of the ban, the play  could  not be performed. 
The director had approached the Censorship Board seeking a censorship certificate to enable his play to 
be  performed  to  public  audiences.  He  was  advised  to  pay  $25.00  for  the  application  fee  and  the 
certificate fee, as the assessors at the Board had first assured him that his play would not be prohibited. 
Tafadzwa Muzondo was not given the opportunity to appeal before the Appeals Board. He subsequently 
resorted to challenging the failure of the Minister to convene the Appeal Board as a violation of his right 
to a fair hearing within a reasonable time by taking the  matter to the High Court. However, High Court 
Judge, Justice Gurainesu Mawadze, ruled that the urgent chamber application filed to lift the ban before 
the Intwasa Arts Festival could not be treated as urgent.

8

  

 

21. In 2015, the Censorship Board denied certification to screen the international film 50 Shades of Grey in 

its  original  form.  Cinemas  decided  not  to  show  a  heavily  censored  version  of  the  film  according  to 
SterKinekor,  a  local  film  distribution  company.  The  cinemas  argued  that  the  heavy  censorship  would 
compromise  the  integrity  of  the  film.  Shortly  after  the  global  release  of  the  film,  pirated  copies  of  the 
film were widely available on the black market.  

 
 
THE CRIMINAL LAW (CODIFICATION AND REFORM) ACT 
 
General statement: 

22. Being the premier criminal statute in Zimbabwe, the Criminal Law (Codification and Reform) Act

9

 has 

been  interpreted  consistently  to  criminalize  artistic  expression  that  is  viewed  as  critical  of  political 
leadership and other state institutions and actors, such as the police.   
 

23. Section  31  of  the  Criminal  Law  (Codification  and  Reform  Act)  criminalizes  the  publishing  of  or 

communicating false statements prejudicial to the state and provides for the imposition of a fine of up to 
$5000  or  imprisonment  of  up  to  20  years.  The  elements  of  this  crime  include,  “inciting  or  promoting 
public  disorder  or  public  violence  or  endangering  public  safety;  or  adversely  affecting  the  defence  or 
economic  interests  of  Zimbabwe  or  undermining  public  confidence  in  a  law  enforcement  agency,  the 
Prison  Service  or  the  Defence  Forces  of  Zimbabwe;  or  interfering  with,  disrupting  or  interrupting  any 
essential service”. The police often refer to section 31 in connection with the detention of an artist or the 
ban of an act of artistic expression, according to artists interviewed for this report.  

  

24. Section  33  of  the  law  criminalizes  artistic  and  other  expressions  “undermining  the  authority  of  or 

insulting the President”. 

 

                                                

8

 See Tafadzwa Muzondo & EDZAI ISU Theatre Arts Project v Board of Censors & Co-Ministers of Home Affairs HC 

10 024/12 and 
http://archive.kubatana.net/html/archive/artcul/121025tm.asp?sector=ARTCUL&year=2012&range_start=1 

9

 Criminal Law (Codification and Reform Act), 

https://www.unodc.org/res/cld/document/zwe/2006/criminal_law_codification_and_reform_act_html/criminal_law_cod
ification_and_reform_act.pdf

 

25. It is important to note that in many cases, the prosecutions before the courts have been unsuccessful, and 

the  Constitutional  Court  has  ruled  that  the  provisions  used  contravene  the  constitutional  freedom  of  a 
person to express themselves. However, censorship remains, and has had a chilling  effect on the ability 
of  artists  to  develop  material  on  political  and  civic  affairs  due  to  the  risk  of  action  being  taken  against 
them by the State. 

 

26.  According to artists interviewed for this report, the police  intimidate or harass artists from  expressing 

dissent on social, economic and political concerns of citizens. The use of criminal law to censor art has 
resulted in significant self-censorship by many artists. 

 

27. Section  96  of  the  Criminal  Law  (Codification  and  Reform)  Act  establishes  the  offence  of  “criminal 

defamation”.  The  section  establishes  that  any  person  who  publishes  a  false  statement  about  another 
person,  intentionally  or  with  the  likelihood  that  their  reputation  would  be  injured,  will  be  guilty  of 
criminal defamation and liable to a fine and imprisonment for a period of up to two years. 

 

28. The Constitutional Court in 2016 ruled that Section 96 of the Criminal Law (Codification and Reform) 

Act  was unconstitutional, as it did  not comply  with the rights to freedom  of  expression and freedom of 
media, as well as access to information, protected in Sections 61 and 62 of the constitution. The ruling 
came  in  relation  to  an  application  filed  in  2015  by MISA (The  Media  Institute  of  Southern  Africa) 
Zimbabwe. 

 
Supportive example: 

29. In 2015, the Supreme Court upheld the ban  on artist Owen Maseko’s installations that were  originally 

removed in 2010 from the National Gallery of Zimbabwe in Bulawayo. Maseko's exhibition consisted of 
various  artistic  expressions  depicting  mass  atrocities  committed  by  government  forces  in  Matabeleland 
in  the  1980s.  Maseko  was  subsequently  arrested  by  Central  Intelligence  Officers  and  detained  for  six 
days  in  Bulawayo’s  Central  Police  Station.  The  State  used  sections  31  and  33  of  the  Criminal  Law 
(Codification and Reform) Act to prosecute the artist for staging the exhibition. 
 

30. “Writers  have  resorted  to  social  themes,  such  as  domestic  violence  and  religion,  for  fear  of  being 

labelled  anti-government  if  they  chose  topics,  such  as  politically  motivated  human  rights  violations, 
corruption  by  high  ranking  government  or  public  officials,  and  police  brutality,  given  the  politically 
charged  environment  currently  obtaining  in  Zimbabwe,”  according  to  Beaven  Tapureta  from  Writers 
International Zimbabwe. 

 

 
THE BROADCASTING SERVICES ACT 
 
General statement: 

33. The Broadcasting Services Act (BSA) is being used to maintain a state monopoly of the airwaves. The 

Act establishes a Broadcasting Authority whose function, among others, is “to encourage diversity in the 
control  of  broadcasting  services”  and  “preservation  of  the  national  security  and  integrity  of 
Zimbabwe”.

10

  

 

                                                

10

 Broadcasting Services Act 2001 Section 3, http://www.wipo.int/edocs/lexdocs/laws/en/zw/zw036en.pdf  

34. Numerous provisions of the Act breach the right to freedom of expression as guaranteed by international 

instruments.  These  include  provisions  seriously  limiting  the  independence  of  the  broadcast  regulator 
(Part  II  of  the  Act),  provisions  granting  the  Minister  vast  direct  powers  in  the  area  of  broadcast 
regulation (Section 46 of the Act), provisions restricting, rather than promoting, pluralism and  diversity 
in  broadcasting,  and  provisions  imposing  unrealistic  or  unwarranted  restrictions  on  the  content  of  what 
may be broadcast. 

 

35. The  Act  has  not  promoted  freedom  of  artistic  expression  and  diversity.  Instead  it  has  led  to  the 

monopolization of the airwaves resulting in pre-censorship  of artistic expressions. Artistic content risks 
being excluded from broadcasting if it is viewed as against the vested interests of the ruling party. 

 

 

36. Amnesty  International  on  20  May  2015

 

stated  that  “not  only  have  the  government  supporters  been  the 

only ones to receive licences, but those attempting to set up independent services have been arrested and 
targeted  simply  for  trying  to  educate,  inform  and  offer  a  platform  for  debate.  This  is  a  violation  of 
freedom of expression.”

11

 

 

37. The Broadcasting Services Act under Section 10(1)(a) states that a community radio or television station 

“shall  not  broadcast  any  political  matter.”  This  clause  aims  at  restricting  community  radios  to  non-
political  programming  only.  The  definition  is  overbroad  and  risks  limiting  artistic  and  other  legitimate 
expressions. 

 
 
PUBLIC ORDER AND SECURITY ACT (POSA) 
 
General statement: 

38. The Public Order and Security Act (POSA) was adopted to implement the constitutional provisions on 

freedom of assembly and association. The State, represented by the police, has abused this legislation to 
ban artistic and theatrical presentations on account of the fact that people would gather to participate in 
such exhibitions or performances.  
 

39. The  police,  working  together  with  other  security  agents,  such  as the  Central  Intelligence  Organisation 

(CIO)  and  the  President’s  Office,  have  continuously  restricted  freedom  of  artistic  expression,  largely 
relying  on  statutes  that  provide  for  related  offences,  such  as  POSA,  which  stipulates  that  police  should 
be notified of a public gathering, or any form of gathering, falling under the purview of the POSA. 

 
Supporting examples: 

40. The film Kumasowe concerns the violent clashes in May 2014 between members of an apostolic sect and 

Zimbabwean  police.  In  August  2014  the  police  banned  the  premiere  of  the  film  because  it  dealt  with  a 
“sensitive  issue”.

12

 The  day  before  the  scheduled  premiere,  the  police  “advised”  the  filmmaker  to 

approach  the  Censorship  Board,  which  in  practical  terms  equalled  a  ban  because  the  dysfunctional 
Censorship Board would not be able to issue a decision in time.  
 

                                                

11

 https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2015/05/zimbabwe-radio-stranglehold-gagging-freedom-of-expression/  

12

 http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/236634.pdf  

41. Many of the cases that involve the police detaining artists or banning exhibitions or screenings are never 

reported  by  artists,  who  will  often  have  an  interest  in  not  creating  more  negative  attention  around  their 
person or artistic expressions. Many cases are therefore neither publically known nor registered.  

 
 
 
 
RECOMMENDATIONS 
 

51. In  accordance  with  international  standards  and  respecting  the  2013  constitution,  Zimbabwe  should 

abolish  the  Censorship  Act  and  any  prior-censorship  bodies  or  systems  where  they  exist  and  use 
subsequent  imposition  of  restrictions  only  when  permitted  under  article  19  (3)  and  20  of  ICCPR. Such 
restrictions should be imposed exclusively by a court of law. 
 

52. Replace  the  Censorship  Board  and  other  bodies  censoring  or  regulating  artistic  expressions  with  a 

classification board mandated to issue age recommendations to protect children.  

 

53. Repeal section 31 (criminalizes the publishing of, or communicating, false statements prejudicial to the 

State), section 33 (criminalizes insulting the office of the president) and section 96 (criminal defamation) 
of the Criminal Law (Codification and Reform) Act.  

 

54. Reconstitute the Broadcasting Authority of Zimbabwe (BAZ) with new appointees taking oath of office 

in  line  with  public  leadership  and  governance  principles  in  chapter  9  of  the  constitution.  The 
independence of the  new BAZ board  must be  guaranteed and respected to  eliminate, as far as possible, 
executive interference on political grounds. 

 

 

55. Improve  efforts  to  issue  licences  to  community  radio  stations  as  these  small  broadcasters  have 

substantial influence  on the  exercise of freedom  of artistic expression by granting local artists access to 
showcase talents. BAZ must decrease the fees for licences to ease the financial burden to applicants for 
community  broadcasting  services.  The  exorbitant  fees  required  are  perceived  as  a  deliberate  move  to 
prevent new entrants into the sector. 

 

 

56. Repeal  or  significantly  reform  the  Criminal  Law  (Codification  and  Reform)  Act  and  the  Public  Order 

and  Security  Act  (POSA)  provisions  that  restrict  freedoms  of  expression  and  assembly  as  proposed  by 
the United States, Australia, Canada, Austria and Mexico during Zimbabwe’s 2011 UPR.     
 

57. Take measures, including training of national and local police, to ensure the Criminal Law (Codification 

and  Reform)  Act  and  the  Public  Order  and  Security  Act  (POSA)  are  not  abused  by  the  police  to  limit 
artistic  freedom  of  expression  in  violation  of  the  2013  constitution  and  Zimbabwe’s  international 
obligations.