Journal of 

Exploration, Vol. 

10, 

N o .  

2, 

pp. 

281-298, 1996 

0892-33 10196 

1996 

Society for Scientific Exploration 

REPORT 

Physiological  and Geomagnetic Correlates of Apparent 

Anomalous Phenomena Observed in the Presence of 

Brazilian 

S

T

AN

L

E

Institute, 450 

Ave., 3rd 

Francisco, California, USA 

University 

of 

Denver, Colorado, USA 

International Holistic University, Brasilia, Brazil 

Abstract 

An  interdisciplinary  team  of  researchers  met  with  a  Brazilian 

"sensitive" 20 times during eight days to observe and record the unusual phe- 

nomena that have occurred in his presence for several years.  These phenome- 
na were rated on a 5-point scale by three members of the research team, and 

those obtaining  a mean rating of  2.1 or higher were termed "apparent anom- 
alous  phenomena."  Readings  were  taken  of  his  pulse, blood  pressure,  and 
saliva  pH, as well as of  geomagnetic fluctuations  in the Brasilia area  where 
the sessions  took  place.  When  the  mean  ratings  per event  were correlated 

with the physiological and geomagnetic readings, 

of the 10 correlations at- 

tained statistical  significance, suggesting  that the "apparent anomalous phe- 
nomena" preceded an elevation in diastolic blood pressure and elevated geo- 
magnetic  activity.  When  the daily  ratio  per  hour  of  "apparent  anomalous 
events" was paired with the daily geomagnetic index for the Southern Hemi- 
sphere, a significant correlation was obtained (r 

0.93, p 

0.02).  Further re- 

search is recommended utilizing  a more systematic means of  data collection 
and more rigorous observations and controls. 

Introduction 

Although parapsychology has emphasized experimental research studies in re- 

cent decades, the literature contains several examples of  controlled observa- 

tions of  anomalous phenomena.  Research  participants for these studies have 
ranged from "mediums" to "psychic sensitives" to laypeople.  The observed 
effects  included  the  purportedly  anomalous  production of  raps,  voices,  and 
other sounds; movement of  furniture or small objects on a table or other sur- 
face,  alteration  of  photographic  film; and  appearance and  disappearance of 
objects, 

"apports" (Richards, 1982; Schmeidler, 1977, 

1990).  Interpreta- 

tions  of  the  reported  data  include  experimenter  fraud,  research  participant 

fraud, poorly controlled research conditions, misperceptions  of sensory cues, 

282 

S. Krippner 

et 

al. 

and  psychokinesis 

effects  of  mental  activity  on  distant  physical  objects 

(Schmeidler, 1977, 1990).  Psychokinesis  is considered  an example of 
phenomena 

interactions between organisms  and their environment,  in- 

cluding other organisms, that appear to circumvent  mainstream  science's  un- 
derstanding of  space,  time, and force).  These  phenomena are often  termed 

"anomalous" because the purported  effects can not be explained by conven- 

tional science's  models of force 

energy and activity). 

Because of the large number of reports of spontaneous PK in cultures other 

than the United States, Canada, and Western Europe, Giesler (1984) has called 

for a 

approach that would 

(1) focus more attention on the psi- 

relevant contexts in other cultures; 

(2) 

combine ethnographic and experimen- 

tal  methodologies  so that  the strengths of  one offset the  weaknesses  of  the 
other; 

(3)  incorporate  a 

method  into the field research  de- 

sign.  "With this approach, the researcher  may study ostensible psi processes 
and their relationship with  other variables in  the contexts of  cult rituals and 
practices such as divination, trance mediumship, and healing" (p. 315).  This 

would  allow for control of  the conditions  of  a task, and the results could be 

evaluated with a minimum of interference or disturbance of the psi-related ac- 

tivity.  Giesler concludes: 

By supplementing the psi-in-process data with relevant ethnographic information, and 
by  deriving  therefrom a measure of  the  reliability  of  the psi-in-process  approach to 
apply to each particular case of the context evaluated, a more complete and more holis- 
tic portrayal 

and the psychocultural conditions under which it occurs may be ad- 

vanced. (p. 

3 15) 

When given the opportunity to work with purportedly remarkable research 

participants in 

any 

culture, parapsychologists have been ambivalent.  Many of 

these individuals have been dubbed "PK stars," 

research participants who 

are said to manifest  dramatic psychokinetic phenomena.  The  possibility  of 
trickery is omnipresent, and these "stars," especially those attaining notoriety 
in North America and Europe, have earned a reputation for being "difficult," 
refusing to perform under controlled conditions or with magicians present, in- 

voking  demands  that  parapsychologists consider  unwarranted,  and  making 

outrageous claims about the "scientific verification" of their abilities once the 
research has been concluded.  Rush (1977) concluded that the PK demonstra- 
tions by "star  performers," even granting their  validity, "have  not advanced 
scientific understanding of the phenomena very much" (p.48). 

With  these  caveats  in  mind,  we  initiated  a  research  program  with  Amyr 

(AA), a  Brazilian "sensitive," in March, 1994.  One of  us (SK) had 

met  AA  in  February,  1993  while  visiting  the  City  of  Peace  Foundation  in 
Brasilia, accompanied by several members of the Institute of Noetic Sciences. 
After spending several hours with AA, members of the group witnessed sever- 
al  possible  anomalous phenomena including  polished stones  that seemed  to 

Investigation of a Brazilian "Sensitive" 

283 

fall nearby, the appearance of jewelry  with  no easily identifiable source, and 

the appearance of  a  blood-like  substance on 

forehead,  palms, and  the 

back of his hands. 

AA, a  man in  his 50s at the time of  our investigation, is a  workers'  union 

secretary who lives in Brasilia.  Of Syrian descent, AA was raised in the Mus- 
lim faith but now claims to find inspiration in all religions.  He is divorced and 
is the father of  a teenage son.  AA  told  us that his maternal grandfather was 
surrounded  by unusual events and exerted considerable control over many of 
them.  AA claimed  that "green  people" visited  him when  he was a child and 
that he was "transported" to their planet. 

The  setting  for  the  research  was  the  International  Holistic  University  in 

Brasilia.  Its director,  Pierre Weil  (PW), is  a transpersonal psychologist  who 
taught at the University  of  Minais Gerais until his retirement.  He was joined 
by  Stanley  Krippner (SK, an  American  psychologist  and  parapsychologist), 
Michael  Winkler (MW, an  American  graduate student in  psychology),  Amyr 

(AA, the research participant), Roberto Crema (RC, a Brazilian psy- 

chologist  and anthropologist), Ruth  Kelson (RK,  a  Brazilian  physician),  and 
Harbans 

Arora (HL, a Brazilian physicist).  The International Holistic Uni- 

versity (a branch of  the City of  Peace Foundation) and 

Institute (a 

graduate school  in San  Francisco, California)  were  the two institutional col- 
laborators in the project.  One of us (PW) had met AA in 1991, but the anom- 
alous phenomena surrounding him had been known in the local community for 

nearly a decade.  Four of us (RC, RK, SK, HL) had met AA in 1993, and one of 
us (MW) met him for the first time in 1994 at the time of  our investigation. 
Four staff  members of  the university  were present at some of  our sessions 

Lindalva  Barrios  (an  instructor),  Sonia  Sanchez  (an  instructor), 
Fontes  (a computer  specialist), and  Raimundo Arias (the foundation chauf- 
feur). 

Research Question and Methodology 

A research protocol was designed by SK and MW, and was approved by the 

Institute Review Board that monitors the protection of human sub- 

jects.  The research question,  as stated,  was, "Are  there geomagnetic 
physiological  correlates  of  the anomalous phenomena  that occur in the pres- 
ence of Amyr 

We  decided  to make  this  a  collaborative  research  investigation,  including 

AA in the planning and execution of the study as a co-researcher rather than as 
a "subject." We operated from a research paradigm that avoids treating human 
beings as "objects" of inquiry, preferring  the "cooperative inquiry group" de- 
scribed by Reason (1988) in which "people work together as co-researchers in 

exploring  and  changing  their  world" 

Several  parapsychological  re- 

search projects have been initiated in this manner, followed by controlled ob- 
servations 

experimental  studies once the parameters of  the phenome- 

non in question were better understood.  An example would be the dream-ESP 

284 

S. Krippner et 

al. 

studies at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, which were preceded by a 
series of collaborative research investigations, most notably with the celebrat- 
ed medium Eileen Garrett (Ullman 

Krippner,  with  Vaughan, 1989, pp. 66- 

69).  AA refused any remuneration for his collaboration.  No family member or 
close friend was present for any of the research sessions. 

One avenue of  the search for reliable correlates of  anomalous phenomena 

has centered around geomagnetic activity 

Radin, 

Cunning- 

ham, 1994).  Reports of ostensible PK have been linked  with solar flares and 
electrical 

as measured by magnetometers 

Persinger 

Cameron, 

1986); although associations have been found between ESP and subdued geo- 
magnetic activity,  PK performance has been linked with  heightened geomag- 
netic readings.  If a reliable association  were found between ostensible PK and 
measured geomagnetic activity, such data would be difficult to explain by con- 
ventional means.  Another approach to reliable correlates of ostensible PK has 
been  physiological  data  as  monitored  by  standard  medical  and  laboratory 
equipment 

Braud 

Schlitz, 

1988); 

physiological  activation  has  been 

coupled  with  PK  while  quiescence  has  been  associated  with  elevated  ESP 
scores.  Again, if a reliable association  were found between ostensible PK and 
measures of  involuntary  bodily  processes,  the data would  be difficult  to ex- 
plain by means of the fraud hypothesis. 

To measure geomagnetic activity, a magnetometer, on loan from the Univer- 

sity  of  Brasilia,  was placed  in an  outdoor shed where it was used  to monitor 
local  geomagnetic activity.  Every  two minutes during a session  with  AA, a 

reading was observed and the flux in milligauss were recorded by MW. 

The settings for our work varied, but most of them were held in 

office 

where we sat in comfortable  chairs  around a  table.  On  no occasion did  AA 

enter the room before the rest of  the group.  Several sessions  were held in the 
Meditation  House; SK investigated  this  site each  morning  to be sure it con- 

tained  no  unusual  objects  which  could  later  be  labeled  "materializations." 
When  the  restaurant  was  the setting,  AA  entered  and  left  with  other  group 
members.  Whenever there was a lull in the conversation, RK took readings of 
AA's  saliva pH with  acid sensitive  litmus  paper  (immediately  matched  to a 

standardized scale of acidity), as well as pulse (from the radial artery of AA's 

wrist), and blood pressure using a cuff, bulb, and sphygmomanometer (applied 
to the brachial  artery  of  AA's  right  wrist).  She also attempted to take  these 
readings when AA felt that an unusual event was about to occur.  One member 

of our group (usually SK) had AA under close observation at all times, watch- 
ing for  unusual or rapid  body  movements.  AA  was seated  at a  table during 
each  session  with  the  exception  of  strolls  to  the Meditation House  and  the 

restaurant. 

Periodically,  following  the  research  sessions,  three  members  of  the  team 

(SK, MW, PW) rated each unusual event on a 5-point "Anomaly  Observation 
Scale" constructed by SK and MW: 

Investigation of a Brazilian "Sensitive" 

285 

2)  slight degree of apparent anomaly, 
3) 

moderate degree of apparent anomaly, 

4)  high degree of apparent anomaly, 

5)  extraordinary degree of apparent anomaly. 

The  mean  of  each  set  of  ratings  was  used  for comparative  purposes.  At 

times, one or two of these three team members were not present when the pos- 
sible anomaly occurred; in these instances, the mean reflected two ratings in- 
stead of three, and in rare instances a single rating was used as the score.  The 
research design stated that an event would have to have 

mean rating of 2.1 or 

higher to be considered an "apparent anomaly." Even though we realized that 
the  ratings  only  utilized  integers,  we  used 

2.1  in  anticipation  of  variance 

among the judges.  Over a time span 

of  8 days, a total of 

20 sessions was held 

with  AA (Table 

and 91 of  the 

97 events  were  rated "apparent anomalies" 

(Table  2).  The number of 

anomalies" per hour  was computed  for 

each of  the 

8 days for comparative purposes (Table 3).  However, labeling an 

event an "apparent anomaly" does not involve an explanation; it only indicates 
that an explanation  was not immediately forthcoming and needs to be found. 
Such an explanation could involve ordinary mechanisms, but it could also cast 

TABLE 1 

Date 

Time 

Place of research session 

Participants 

PW's office at Foundation 
hallway near PW's  office 
on road to Fdn. restaurant 
Foundation restaurant 
road outside of Foundation 
Meditation House 
Brasilia Int'l  Airport 
PW's office at Foundation 
Foundation restaurant 
Foundation classroom 
PW's office at Foundation 
on road to Fdn. restaurant 
Foundation restaurant 
outside Fdn. restaurant 
PW's  office at Foundation 
PW's  office at Foundation 
PW's office at Foundation 
Meditation House 
PW's  office at Foundation 
Brasilia Int'  Airport 

AA, SK, MW, PW, LB, SS 
AA, PW, LB, SS 
AA, SK, MW, PW, LB, SS 
AA, SK, MW, PW, LB, SS 
AA, SK, MW, PW, LB, SS 
AA, SK, PW 
AA, HL, PW, LB 
AA, RC, RK, SK, HL, MW, PW, LB 
AA, HL, PW, LB 
AA, SK, HL, PW, LB 
AA, RC, RK, 

MW, PW, LB 

AA, RK, SK, HL, PW, RA 
AA, RK, SK, HL, PW 
AA, RK, SK, HL, PW 
AA, RC, RK, SK, HL, MW, PW 
AA, RC, RK, SK, HL, MW, PW 
AA, RC, RK, SK, 

PW 

AA, RC, RK, SK, PW, L F  
AA, RC, RK, SK, HL, PW, 
AA, SK, MW, PW 

Table  1 presents the date, time, place, and participants  involved in the research sessions with 

AA.  The sessions held on 

totaled 2 hours and  41 minutes; on 311 1/94, 4 5  minutes;  on 

minutes; on 

hours and 20 minutes; on 

hours and 45 minutes; on 

hours and 4 0  minutes; on 

hours and 20 minutes; on 

minutes. 

286 

S. Krippner 

et 

doubt upon the explanatory value of optical effects, misperceptions, measure- 
ment artifacts, sleight-of-hand, and coincidence. 

TABLE 2 

Unusual Phenomena Observed at Each Session With Means and Individual Ratings 

1) 3110194, in PW's office (2 apparently anomalous events). 

a) 

oil-like liquid formation appears in a formerly empty chalice, emitting a 

like odor (Mean rating: 4.00; N 

3; SK: 4, 

5, 

3). 

b) 

a film of  liquid  appears on a formerly  dry  crystal (3.67;  N 

3; SK:  3,  PW:  5, 

3). 

2) 3110194, in the hallway near PW's  office (2 apparently anomalous events). 

a) 

a stone is found on the office floor. (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW. 5). 

b) 

a stone is found on the carpeted floor in the hallway. 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

3) 3110194, on the road to the restaurant  (3 apparently anomalous events). 

a) 

a metal  brooch with a white stone in  its center is found on the road 

3; 

SK: 5, PW. 5, 

4). 

b) 

a metal ring is found on the road (4.67; N 

3; SK: 5, 

5, 

4). 

c) 

a small polished stone is found on the road (4.67; N 

3; SK: 5, PW: 5, MW. 4). 

4) 3110194, at the restaurant (4 apparently anomalous events). 

a)  8: 

a stone falls, then bounces across the floor (5.00; N 

3; SK: 5, 

5, 

5). 

b) 

a used napkin on the table is inspected and. is found to contain 32 folded sections, 

each containing a swirl 

3.00; 

3; SK: 3 

PW: 4, MW: 

2). 

c) 

a religious medallion drops on the floor (4.67; N 

3; SK: 5, PW: 5, MW: 4). 

d) 

AA opens his hand  disclosing  another  religious medallion (4.67; N 

3; SK: 5, 

5, 

4). 

5) 3110194, on the road from the restaurant and at PW's  office 

apparently anomalous events). 

a) 

a  bell-shaped  medallion  with  a  black  stone  in  its  center  is  found  on  the  road 

(4.67; N 

3; SK: 5, PW: 

4). 

b) 

a violet amethyst is found on the road (4.67; 

5, 

4). 

c) 

a small pink stone is found on the road (4.67; N 

3; 

PW. 5, 

d)  9: 

an amber-like stone is found on the road (4.67; N 

3; SK: 5, 

e) 

a small crystal sphere is found on the road (3.67; N 

3; 

a small stone is found on the road (3.67; N 

3; SK: 4, PW: 5, 

g) 

a green stone is found on the road (3.67; N 

3; SK: 4, PW: 5, 

2). 

h) 

a spill of oil-like liquid appears on the road that has a similar perfume-like odor to 

that earlier appearing 

in the chalice (3.67; N 

3; SK: 4, 

5, 

2). 

i) 

clouds in  the sky  disappear following 

attempts  to dissipate  them through 

concentration (2.67; N 

3; SK: 3, PW: 4, MW: 1). 

upon entering PW's  office, a lit candle emits an  odor similar to that earlier ap- 

pearing in the chalice and on the road (3.33; N 

3; SK: 3, PW. 5, MW: 2). 

6) 

1/94, inside and around the Meditation House (3 apparently anomalous events). 

a) 

AA states that he has two personalities, a "younger Amyr" and an "older Amyr" 

(1.67; N 

2; SK: 

2). 

b) 

a  small  white  and  blue  stone  is  found  outside  of  the  Meditation  House 

(5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

c) 

a 1975 Spanish 5 peseta coin picturing Juan Carlos 

I and a 1979 Italian 200 lira 

coin picturing the profile of a female representing the Italian Republic  are found outside of 
the Meditation House (5.00;  N = 2 ;  

5). 

d) 

a  smokey  triangular-shaped  crystal  drops  outside  of  the  Meditation  House 

(5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

7) 3/13/94, 

at the Brasilia International  Airport reception  area (9 apparently anomalous 

events). 

a)  about 

three  small  stones  drop  to  the  floor  of  the  reception  area 

(5.00; N 

5). 

Investigation 

of a Brazilian "Sensitive" 

b)  about 

a  rose-like  odor  emanates  from  the  rainwater  on  the  sidewalk 

(5.00; N 

PW: 5). 

c)  about 9: 

a tear-shaped white stone is found on the sidewalk (5.00; N 

1; 

PW: 5). 

d)  about 

a  metal  brooch,  apparently  the  setting  for  the  stone,  is  found  on  the 

sidewalk (5.00; 

PW: 5). 

e)  about 

a  telephone  token  (which  HL  can  not  use)  is  found  on  the  sidewalk 

1; 

5). 

about 9: 

a telephone token (which 

HL can use) is found on the sidewalk (5.00; N 

1; 

PW: 5). 

g)  about 

a strange sound emanates from a telephone booth just as 

HL is about to tele- 

phone  his  wife 

who  replied  that  she  was  just  about  to  attempt  a  call  to  him 

(4.00; 

PW:  4). 

h)  about 

a crumpled Brazilian  100 cruzeiro note  is  found  the floor, the final  serial 

number of which matches  the 

predicted  by AA and identified  moments 

before by 

LB as her "favorite number" (5.00; 

PW: 5). 

i)  about 

as predicted by AA, the only 100 cruzeiro note in PW's  possession is found 

to have similar final serial numbers 

135091 

as the bill that appeared to have 

dropped to the floor 

(3.00; N 

1; 

8) 3/14/94, at and around PW's  office 

1 apparently anomalous events). 

a) 

a sweet perfume-like substance  permeates the room, emanating from the oil-like 

liquid in the chalice (2.67; N 

3; SK: 2, PW: 5, MW: 

I ) .  

b)  3: 1 lpm: red, blood-like liquid is seen on the front and back of AA's  left hand (2.33; 

3; 

SK: 

PW. 5, 

1). 

c)  3: 

red, blood-like  liquid  is seen on the front and back of AA's  right hand (2.33; N 

3; SK: 

PW: 5, MW: 1). 

d) 

a small wad of  green paper held between the thumb and forefinger of  AA's  right 

hand is matched in size and color by a stone that appears between the thumb and forefinger 
of his left hand (3.67; N 

3; SK: 

5, PW: 5, 

e) 

the small wad of green paper and the small green stone suddenly switch positions, 

the  stone  now  appearing  between  the  thumb  and  forefinger  of  AA's  right  hand 
(3.67; 

3; SK: 5, 

5, 

AA states that he has the ability to observe the "aura

7

'  around the solar plexus of 

each  member  of  the  group  and  proceeds  to  describe  the  color  of  each  person's  "aura" 
(1.67; 

3; SK: 

1, PW: 3, MW: 

g) 

pm: a small wad of aluminum foil suddenly changes in shape and form into a diamond- 

like cone (3.33; 

3; SK: 4, PW: 5, MW: 1). 

h) 

a small polished stone suddenly appears on a piece of green note paper (4.67; N 

3; SK: 5, PW: 5, 

MW: 4). 

i) 

a medallion is found on the floor (4.67; 

3;  SK: 4, PW: 

5, MW: 4). 

a heart-shaped spray of an oil-like liquid with a perfume-like odor is observed on 

the wall of the hallway (4.67; N 

3; 

PW: 5, MW: 4). 

k) 

a spray of an oil-like liquid with a perfume-like odor is observed on 

bedroom 

wall near PW's  office (2.33; N 

3; SK: 2, PW: 4, MW: 1). 

1) 

HL displays a small metal plaque that he found on his bedroom floor (2.33; N 

3; 

SK: 2; PW: 4, 

MW: 1). 

m) 

12 dark markings are observed by HL on the door of PW's  bedroom (1.00; N 

3; 

SK:  I ,  

1, 

1). 

9) 3/14/94, at the restaurant and on the path from the restaurant (2 apparently  anomalous events). 

a) 

a diamond-like cone suddenly appears on the table (5.00; N 

PW: 5). 

b) 

a  medallion  drops  on  to  PW's  shoulder  and  from  there  falls  to  the  ground 

(5.00; N 

PW: 5). 

10) 3/14/94, at the second floor classroom (1 apparently anomalous event). 

a) 

a gold-colored ring  is found on  the floor (5.00;  N 

2; SK: 5; PW: 5). 

11) 3/15/94,  PW's  office 

apparently anomalous events). 

a) 

a cinnamon-like odor permeates the office (3.00; N 

3; SK: 3, 

5, MW: 

b) 

a  tiny  diamond-like  cone  suddenly  appears  on  a  fax  resting  on  the  table 

(3.67; N 

3; SK: 4, PW: 5, 

MW: 1). 

c) 

the light above the office table flickers twice while the other light in the room re- 

mains steady (2.00; 

3; SK: 2, PW: 3, MW: 1). 

288 

S. Krippner 

d) 

a smoky quartz crystal falls to the floor (3.67; 

e) 

a  bright  magenta  stripe  is  noticed  on  the  fax  that  had  not  been  observed 

previously (3.67; N 

3; 

PW: 5, 

a  small  ring  decorated  with  5  small  stones  is  found  on  the  floor 

(3.67; N 

3; SK: 4, 

5, MW: 2). 

g) 

a  bell-shaped  brooch  with  a  black  stone  in  its  center  is  found  on  the  floor 

(3.67; N 

3; SK: 4, 

5, MW: 2). 

h)  5: 

a piece of jewelry in the form of a pair of linked 

rings drops on to 

hand 

and from there to the floor (3.67; 

3; SK: 4, PW: 5, MW: 2). 

i) 

the chalice is inspected and  the amount of  the oil-like  liquid  seems to have in- 

creased 

3.33; 

3; SK: 3, PW. 5, MW: 2). 

j) 

a cinnamon-like odor emanates from a glass of mineral water resting on the table 

(3.00; N 

3; SK: 3, PW: 5, MW: 1). 

k) 

a  series of  static-like  blips  is  heard  when  a  radio  is  tuned  between  two  bands 

(3.00; N 

3; SK: 3, PW: 5, MW: I). 

12) 3/15/94,  in an automobile on the way to the restaurant (1 apparently anomalous event). 

a) 

a triangular-shaped metal brooch with a round black stone in its center strikes SK 

in his chest (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

13) 3/15/94, at and around the restaurant (16 apparently anomalous events). 

a)  about 

a metal ring 

is 

found on the sidewalk (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

b)  about 

a small stone appears on the sidewalk (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

c)  about 8:4  pm: a small stone falls to the restaurant floor (5.00; 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

d)  about 

a small stone falls to the restaurant floor (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

e)  about 

a small stone falls to the restaurant floor (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, 

PW: 5). 

f) 

about 

a small stone falls to the restaurant floor (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

g)  about 

a medallion falls to the restaurant floor (5.00; N 

2; 

h)  about 

a metal ring falls to the restaurant floor (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

i)  about 

a metal ring falls to the restaurant floor (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW. 5). 

j)  about 9: 

a medallion is found on the sidewalk (5.00; 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

k)  about 

a  small  stone  appears  to  have  fallen  on  to  the  sidewalk 

(5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

1)  about 

a small stone falls to the sidewalk (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, 

5). 

m)  about 9: 

a small stone falls to the sidewalk (5.00; N 

2; 

SK: 

5, 

5). 

n)  about 9: 

following a clap of thunder, a small stone hits an automobile and then falls 

to the sidewalk (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

o)  about 9: 

a small stone falls to the sidewalk (5.00; 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

p)  about 9: 

a small stone falls to the sidewalk (5.00; 

2; SK: 5, PW. 5). 

14) 3/15/94, on the road from the restaurant 

(6 apparently anomalous events). 

a) 

a small stone is found on the road (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

b) 

a small stone is found on the road (5.00; 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

c) 

a small stone is found on the road (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

d) 

a small stone is found on the road (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

e) 

a small stone is found on the road (5.00; N 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

small stone is found on the road (5.00; 

2; SK: 5, PW: 5). 

15) 3/15/94,  in PW's office (1 apparently anomalous event). 

a) 

red,  blood-like  liquid  is seen on the front and  back of 

right and  left hands 

(3.00: 

2: SK: 

PW: 5). 

16) 3/16/94, in and around PW's  office (6 apparently anomalous events). 

a) 

a religious medallion drops to the floor (5.00; N 

3; SK: 5, 

5, 

MW: 5). 

b)  3: 

another medallion drops to the floor (5.00; 

3; SK: 5, PW: 5, MW: 5). 

c) 

a metal ring  is found on the floor (5.00; 

3; SK: 5, 

5, MW: 5). 

d) 

a  metal  ring  with  a  black  stone  in  its  center  drops  to  the  floor  in  the  hall 

(5.00; 

3; SK: 5, PW: 5, MW. 5). 

e) 

a metal  ring with a black  stone in  its center is found on  the floor in PW's  office 

(5.00; 

3; SK: 4 PW. 5, MW: 2). 

f) 

a  series of  static-like  blips  is  heard  when  a  radio is  tuned  between  two  bands 

(3.67; 

3; 

PW: 5, MW: 2). 

17) 3/17/94, in PW's  office 

apparently anomalous event). 

Investigations of a Brazilian "Sensitive" 

289 

a) 

a  series  of  static-like  blips  is  heard  when  a  radio  is  tuned  between  two  bands 

(3.67; 

3; SK: 4, PW: 5, MW: 2). 

18) 3/17/94, in and around the Meditation House (3 apparently anomalous events). 

a) 

a  5  peseta  Spanish  coin  depicting 

is  found  on  the  ground  outside  the 

Meditation House (5.00; N 

2; SK: 

5, PW: 5). 

b) 

a blue and white stone is found on the ground outside the Meditation House (5.00; 

2; SK: 5, PW. 5). 

c) 

a pine-like odor permeates the Meditation House (5.00; 

2; SK: 5; 

5). 

19) 3/17/94, in 

office (no apparently anomalous events). 

a)  6: 

AA states that there usually are strange sensations in his neck and chest before un- 

usual phenomena occur (1.00; 

2; SK: 

PW: 1). 

20) 3120194, in the Brasilia International Airport reception area (no apparently anomalous events). 

a) 

a  perfume-like odor  permeates  the area, appearing  to emanate from AA's  body 

(1.67; N 

3; SK: 

PW: 3, MW: 

Table  2 indicates the times at which  unusual  phenomena  were observed during each of  the 20 

sessions, a brief description of each event, and the mean rating for each event on the Anomaly Ob- 
servation Scale. 

In  line  with 

(1984)  suggestions,  interview  data  were  collected 

from  AA  to  obtain 

about  his  cultural  milieu,  his  family  back- 

ground, and the phenomenology of his anomalous experiences.  Ongoing writ- 
ten accounts of these data were kept by 

RK and SK.  MW speaks some Spanish 

but little Portuguese; 

knowledge 

of 

Portuguese is adequate conversation- 

ally  but is limited.  However, all  the other members of  the team speak fluent 
English and took turns translating AA's  comments.  AA's suggestions were re- 
spected, and all observations and data were shared with him. 

In summary, the data available for quantitative analysis included the ratings 

on the Anomaly Observation Scale, the readings from the magnetometer, and 
the  readings  of  AA's  saliva  pH,  pulse,  and  blood  pressure.  The  qualitative 
data,  used  in  a  supplementary  manner,  included the interview  material 

TABLE 3 

Frequency of Occurence of Anomalous Events 

Date 

Interval Between  Anomalous Events in Minutes 

15 

10 
14 
3 7 

260 

No anomalous events. 

Table 3 depicts the number of minutes spent with AA each day divided by the number of events 

rated as "apparently anomalous." In this way, a ratio was computed for each day of the investiga- 
tion. 

290 

S. Krippner et al. 

TABLE  4 

Correlates of Apparent Anomalous Events 

Variable 

Mean 

SD 

values 

or 

rho 

df 

pH after 

pH 

before 

Pulse after 
Pulse before 
Diastolic after 
Diastolic before 
Systolic after 
Systolic before 

Geomag. after 

17 

23.79 

0.16 

23.665 124.098 

0.61 

0.01 

15 

Geomag. before 

15 

23.94 

0.16 

23.665 124.098 

0.35 

0.30 

13 

Geomag. 

S. Hemisphere  5 

56.60 

5.77 

47/62 

0.93 

0.02 

Geomag. S. America 

62.20 

5.54 

54/67 

0.8 

0.09 

Table 4 presents descriptive statistics and 

product-moment correlations  (above 

line) or Spearman  rank order correlations  (below line) (2-tailed)  between  apparently  anomalous 

events and physiological and geomagnetic  variables.  Although these statistics are unreliable due 

to the inconsistent  rate of  sampling,  it  provides  a  research  methodology  for future applications 
with AA. 

tained  from  AA  and  the  reflections  and  observations  obtained  from  other 
members of the collaborative research team. 

Quantitative Results 

Means of  the 97 unusual  events observed and recorded  by our group were 

computed (Table 2); 91 of  these means were above 2.1 and these events were 
designated as "apparently anomalous."  Each saliva pH, pulse, systolic and di- 
astolic  blood  pressure  readings,  as  well  as  each  geomagnetic  reading,  was 
paired with the "apparent anomalous event" immediately  preceding it and im- 
mediately following it.  Table 4 presents the correlations as well as a number of 
readings,  means, standard deviations,  and  ranges.  It will  be noted that many 
standard deviations are large, probably due  to the small  sample size and  the 
variability of AA's physiological readings. 

There were 17 saliva pH readings followed by apparently anomalous events 

(r 

-0.39, 

0.13, 

and 18 saliva pH readings preceded by apparently 

anomalous events ( r  

-0.28, 

0.36, 

The lower the pH reading, the 

higher  the concentration of  acid,  hence, there is a slight  non-significant ten- 
dency for more acid in the saliva to be associated with higher anomaly ratings. 

There  were  21  pulse  readings  followed  by  apparently  anomalous  events 

( r  

0.11, 

0.62, 

and 

22 pulse readings with  antecedent anomalous 

events ( r  

0.14, 

0.53, 

AA's pulse is considered rapid and sympto- 

matic of tachycardia. 

There  were  12  systolic  blood  pressure  readings  followed  by  apparently 

anomalous events ( r  

0.07, 

0.83, 

and  13 systolic  blood  pressure