Bioelectromagnetics 28:463 ^ 470 (2007)

Electrical Stimulation of the Growth Plate:

A Potential Approach to an Epiphysiodesis

George R. Dodge,

1

* J. Richard Bowen,

1

Chang-Wug Oh,

1

Keti Tokmakova,

1

Bruce J. Simon,

2

Alaric Aroojis,

1

and Kristen Potter

1

1

Bone & Cartilage Research Laboratory, Nemours Biomedical Research,

& Department of Orthopaedics, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children,

Nemours Children’s Clinic,Wilmington, Delaware

2

EBI, L.P., Parsippany, New Jersey

Epiphysiodesis is an operative procedure that induces bony bridges to form across a growth plate of a
bone to stop longitudinal growth. This is a very common orthopedic procedure to correct
disproportional long-bone growth discrepancies; however, present techniques require an operation
and anesthesia. Our study was designed to develop a minimally invasive method of epiphysiodesis by
using electrical stimulation with DC current. In a rabbit model, a thin titanium electrode was inserted
into a single location of the distal femoral growth plate in three groups: one without current (control),
one group with a constant 10 mA (low current, LC), and one group with a 50 mA (high current, HC). The
current was delivered for 2 weeks. The nontreated femur served as a control for each animal. Femur
lengths were measured and comparisons were made between operated (left) and nonoperated (right)
femurs. Digitized histomorphometric and volumetric analyses were performed on each growth plate,
and detailed assessments were made of any morphological changes. Using length measurements, the
difference in femur length was significantly larger in the HC group and not in the LC or control groups,
showing bone growth inhibition at the higher current. In the HC group, bony bridges and disorganized
growth plates were observed. This study shows that delivery of an electrical current of 50 mA for as
little as 2 weeks can markedly affect bone growth as evidenced by changes in epiphyseal plate volume
and architectural organization, and the study supports the use of this minimally invasive approach as a
potential method of achieving an epiphysiodesis. Bioelectromagnetics 28:463–470, 2007.



2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Key words: bone; cartilage; limb-length discrepancies; animal model of epiphysiodesis

INTRODUCTION

Epiphysiodesis is a common orthopedic proce-

dure used to stop growth in a selected growth plate of a
long bone [Stephens et al., 1978; Stanitski, 1999]. This
procedure is very effective in correcting mild limb-
length inequality in children by inhibiting growth in the
longer limb [Dahl, 1996]. The first description of an
epiphysiodesis technique was reported by Phemister
[1933] more than 70 years ago. With the Phemister
technique, incisions of about 2

00

are placed medially and

laterally on the involved extremity in the area of the
growth plate. The growth plate is operatively exposed
and destroyed at its peripheral margins so that bony
bridges form across the growth plate and inhibit
longitudinal growth. This operation has an excellent
success rate and became a standard of care in treating
minor limb-length discrepancies for approximately
25 years. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, per-
cutaneous methods of epiphysiodesis were developed
[Bowen and Johnson, 1984]. The percutaneous tech-
niques involve small incisions in which radiographic

image intensification is used to guide ablation of the
selected growth plate. Other approaches include
stapling, an operative procedure to limit growth in a
selected growth plate. In this stapling procedure,
metallic staples are placed across the growth plate to
temporally inhibit longitudinal growth, and, after the
desired growth inhibition is achieved, the staples may
be removed to allow growth resumption [May and



2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

—————

Grant sponsors: EBI and Nemours.

*Correspondence to: George R. Dodge, Bone & Cartilage
Research Laboratory, Nemours Biomedical Research, Alfred I.
duPont Hospital for Children, P.O. Box 269, 1600 Rockland Road,
Wilmington, DE 19899. E-mail: gdodge@nemours.org

Received for review 16 January 2006; Final revision received 11
January 2007

DOI 10.1002/bem.20329
Published online 9 May 2007 in Wiley InterScience
(www.interscience.wiley.com).

Clements, 1965; Frantz, 1971]. All of these techniques
have the disadvantages of an operative procedure
including anesthesia risk, intraoperative risk, post-
operative complications, and high cost. The potential
advantage of this newly proposed method over most
existing methods is that once developed, it could be
implanted using image enhancement through a small
incision with local anesthesia. The electrode could be
placed percutaneously, and the power source would
remain on the dermis. This procedure would reduce all
the standard risks of surgical procedures done under
general anesthesia. The time required to perform this
procedure would be greatly reduced, and it could likely
be done as an outpatient. Some risks of infection are still
present but could be minimized with precautions that
are commonly taken with all orthopedic procedures
with external fixators and pins.

Direct current (DC) bone growth stimulators have

been used for at least 30 years to stimulate bone
formation in spine fusions, fractures, and pseudarth-
rosis (an area of bone that fails to heal) [Goh et al., 1988;
Brighton et al., 1995]. DC stimulators enhance bone
formation in the vicinity of the electronegative cathode,
which is placed in the fusion mass or at the fracture site.
The optimal current range for DC stimulators to induce
new bone formation is in the range of 10–50 mA
depending on cathode length and material and anatom-
ical placement site [Bozic et al., 1999; Dejardin et al.,
2001; France et al., 2001]. There has been no reported
change in the growth plate of children when DC
electrical stimulators of 20 mA are applied for the
purposes of fracture healing or bone fusion. The
rationale for using the electrode device included the
fact that titanium electrodes pass higher currents than
stainless steel without causing tissue necrosis, and that
this cathode material is the material currently used in an
FDA-approved implantable bone growth stimulator. To
be as clinically relevant as possible in this animal
model, we also used constant current because it is the
component of the only implantable device approved by
the FDA.

On the basis of the known bone-forming capacity

of electrical current, we postulated that elevation of the
electrical current could result in formation of bone
bridges across the growth plate cartilage and affect an
epiphysiodesis. We theorized that increasing the current
several fold would result in exuberant bone formation,
potentially causing the closure of the growth plate or
necrosis, which would result in the arresting of growth.
The purpose of this study was to develop a simple and
reliable method of arresting bone growth that could be
used to achieve an epiphysiodesis; we believe this can
be achieved through growth plate/bone electrical
stimulation.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Animal Model

The study was approved by the Institutional

Animal Care and Use Committee and conducted in
compliance with all the relevant safeguards and
adherence to the Institutional Animal Care and Use
Committee-approved

protocol.

This

study

was

designed to produce a rabbit model for epiphysiodesis
of the left femur using a percutaneously implantable
electrode in the distal femoral physis (Fig. 1) and
electrical stimulation to produce physeal closure. We
had three groups of animals (four New Zealand white
rabbits of 10 weeks of age for each group): a control
group that underwent a sham operation implanted with
an inactive electrode, a low-current (LC) group
implanted with a 10-mA stimulator, and a high-current
(HC) group implanted with a 50-mA stimulator. Each
device was secured internally with suture to the fascia,
with particular attention to securing the electrode at the
point of exit and to the wire to the power source.

Electrical Current Delivery Device

The constant-current delivery system consisted of

an implantable generator, which housed the battery and
electronics and served as the anode, connected via an
insulated lead to a thin titanium cathode. The device
was an electrical bone-growth stimulator that is
currently available for clinical use (Osteogen, EBI,
Parsippany, NJ) that was modified and tested by the
company for this study. The cathode consists of a triple-
stranded, pure titanium wire with a diameter of 0.5 mm.
The electrical stimulator delivered a constant current of
either 10 or 50 mA during the 2 weeks. The amplitude of
current was confirmed using an implant tester, which
measured an RF signal produced by the implanted
generator whose frequency was proportional to the in
vivo current. A previous animal study determined that
the cathode–anode potential required to deliver 50 mA
in this model was 2.2–2.4 V.

Surgical Technique and Postoperative Care

After a preanesthetic injection of xylazine (4 mg/

kg IM) followed 10 min later with ketamine (50 mg/kg
IM), the electrical stimulation device was implanted.
Under image intensifier control, a fine needle (24 G)
was directed from laterally to medially for a depth of
10 mm into the distal femoral physis, and the needle was
withdrawn. Then, a fine wire electrode was placed
tightly into the ‘‘needle tract’’ from laterally to medially
in the distal femoral physis of the left lower extremity.
The electrode wire was connected to the electrode
stimulation package, which was placed subcutaneously
on the upper thigh and buttock. The surgical wound was

464

Dodge et al.

closed with absorbable sutures and dressed with sterile
iodine. After surgery, the rabbits were housed in an
approved animal facility, where all three groups were
given identical diet and water supplies. On the 14th day,
the animals were euthanized using a commercial
veterinary euthanasia product (Sleepaway

1

, 0.4 ml/

lb IM; Ft. Dodge Laboratories, Inc., Ft. Dodge, Iowa).

Macroscopic Studies

After the animals were euthanized, both the right

(nonoperated) and the left (operated) femurs were
extracted and cleared of ligaments or muscles. Femur
lengths were measured with electronic digital calipers
at the medial (femoral head to medial condyle), middle
(piriformis fossa to intercondylar notch), and lateral
(the tip of greater trochanter to lateral femoral condyle)
areas. Each measurement was taken three times and
averaged. The difference (i.e., change) in length

between the right (nonoperated) and left (operated)
femurs in each group was plotted as was the average
growth in length from combined measurements for each
group. Student’s t-test was performed on the data, and
significance was assessed comparing treatment groups.

Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were

obtained, and the findings in the electrode-inserted area
and growth plate were described.

Histologic Studies

All specimens were fixed in formalin (10% neutral

buffered formalin), and decalcification was performed
with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) using the
following solution: 37.22 g of EDTA was dissolved in
1 L of distilled water, then 70 ml of a concentrated
hydrochloric acid (HCl) was added. Histological
sections of 4 mm in an anterior to posterior sagittal
direction of the distal femur were stained with H&E. To

Fig. 1. Panel A shows the difference between the length of the right (nonoperated) and the left
(operated) femurs of the three treatment groups. The length of the femurs was measured at three
anatomicalareasincludingmedial, middle, andlateralareas.The differenceinfemorallengthswaslarger
in the high-current group (50

mA, High) when compared with the control and low-current groups (10 mA,

Low). Data are presented as mean and SEM (n

¼ 4); high versus control or low group are significantly

different where indicated (*) P

 0.05. Panel B represents the average difference of all three anatomical

pointspresentedin distance (mm).Data are presented asmean and SEM (n

¼ 4); high versus controlor

low group are significantly different where indicated (*) P

 0.05 determined by ANOVA.

Electrical Current on Growth Plate

465

reduce the variance in histological sections, similar
regions of the growth plate from both the medial and
lateral undulated ridges were evaluated. We studied the
narrowing of the growth plate and its possible closure,
bony bridges, and the regular or irregular cellular
arrangement of various layers in the growth plate. We
performed histology on all animals in each group (four),
and three sections of each were analyzed.

Histomorphometric Studies

Histomorphometric analysis of the dimensions of

the growth plate was done with a Spot CCD camera and
microscope integrated with image analysis software
(Image Pro Plus 4.5

1

, Media Cybernetics, Yorktown,

VA). Equivalent areas from digital micrographs stained
with H&E in full size at a magnification of 10

 were

analyzed. Each zone was delineated and the analysis
was performed on the outlined region of interest (each
resting, proliferative, and hypertrophic zones). The area
was determined using analysis tools within the program
to capture all the stained region. The data collected are
given in pixel area, and the results are obtained by
comparing the difference in each group and each side
(operated and unoperated). This analysis was per-
formed on three sections of each animal and was done
blindly without knowledge of group assignment.

RESULTS

Macroscopic Results

Gross examination of the femurs showed extra

bone formation at the supracondylar region of the
lateral side of the left femurs in the HC group; however,
no extra bone formation was seen in the left femurs of
the control or LC groups. Also, in all three groups, the
fine wire electrodes were appropriately placed and there
were no signs of infection.

The difference between the length of the right

(nonoperated) and the left (operated) femurs of the three
treatment groups was consistently larger in the HC
group than in the control and LC groups, which
demonstrates a retardation of growth in the HC group
(Fig. 1). This retardation of growth was more than
twofold (200%) in comparison with the control and the
LC groups. There was no difference in growth between
the control and the LC groups. Comparison of the
difference between the right (nonoperated) and the left
(operated) femurs at the three different anatomical
locations showed that the area of the physis near the
electrode had the greatest inhibition of growth.
Statistical analysis of the data demonstrates signifi-
cance (P

 0.05) in the comparison of the high versus

control or the high versus the low group except with the
comparison between the medial measurements. This

was due to the variation of the small sample size;
however, the trend for a marked inhibition of growth in
the high group could be seen in Figure 1B when the
three measurements were combined.

Radiographs of the femoral specimens before

decalcification showed a large amount of new bone
formation at the site of electrode insertion in the HC
group and a small amount in the LC group (Fig. 2). No
new bone formation was seen at the electrode insertion
site in the control group. There were no radiographic
differences observed in the growth plates or the
medullary bone between the three groups. These
radiographic findings were consistent with the obser-
vations of the gross specimens.

Microscopic Results

The most obvious histological finding was the

appearance of bony bridges and distorted internal
structure (fissuring) of the growth plate in the HC
group (Fig. 3). The HC group also showed disorganized
columnar arrangement of the cartilage cells. We could
not detect bony bridges or the same degree of
disorganization in the LC or control groups as in the
HC group. The resting and proliferative zones of the
growth plate in the HC group were of less height than in
the LC or control groups. The resting zone showed
irregularity of the cells compared with the LC or control
groups. No cellular necrosis was observed in any group.
The zone of Ranvier of the HC group had an increased
number of hypertrophic cells close to the electrode, but
only a few hypertrophic cells were observed in the other
groups (Fig. 4).

Histomorphometric Results

Histomorphometric measurements showed that

the overall height of the growth plate was shortened in
the HC and LC groups compared with the control group
(Figs. 5 and 6). In the HC group, the area of the whole
growth plate, the resting and proliferative zones, and the
hypertrophic zone to a lesser extent, were smaller than
those of the other groups (control or LC). The ratio
(operated femur/nonoperated femur) shows the most
shrinkage in the dimensions of resting and proliferative
zones. While there is a consistent decrease in all the
zones of the growth plate dimensions as a result of
50 mA, performing an ANOVA with a limited sample
size (n

¼ 4) was not sufficient to achieve statistical

significance. There appears to be an electrical dose
response, with the HC group having the greatest
response and the LC group having a lesser response.
These findings were more prominent on the lateral side
of the growth plate that was near the side of the
electrode than that of the medial side. Also, in the LC
group, the dimensions of each zone were smaller than

466

Dodge et al.

those of the control group (Fig. 6). While the results
were consistent within each group and the inhibition
reliably determined within the zones as described, the
limited number of animals tested did not result in
enough data for the HC group to achieve statistical
significance.

DISCUSSION

The effects of DC electrical stimulation for bone

healing have been extensively studied, and it is
currently an approved method of treatment in patients
undergoing spinal fusions or for treatment of nonun-
ions; however, the effects of stimulation on the growth
plate are less well understood [Sato and Akai, 1990].
We focused on the growth plate as a target for the effects
of electrical current since it is such a dynamic structure
and is made of subsections each with various roles in
growth and bone elongation [Abad et al., 2002].
Electrical stimulation for use in bony injuries gained
attention in the 1950s when Yasuda began to publish
reports on the piezoelectric effects of bone [Yasuda,
1953; Yasuda et al., 1955]. It has been widely studied
with regard to its effect on bone healing and has an
established role in the treatment of long-bone nonun-

ions and spinal fusions [Brighton et al., 1995]. Direct
electrical current on growth cartilage has also been
studied, and growth could be altered by varying the
amount of electrical current [Armstrong and Brighton,
1986; Okihana and Shimomura, 1988; Sato and Akai,
1990]. The thickening of the growth plate in a rabbit
model demonstrated accumulation of hypertrophic
cells in the group stimulated with under 8 mA for 2
weeks. Forgon et al. [1985] also reported the stimula-
tion of growth with an electrical current of 20 mA. A
number of different approaches have been used to
achieve an epiphysiodesis, including electrocautery
[Rosen et al., 1990] or lasers [Morein et al., 1978] to
destroy cells of the growth plate. In our study, we show
evidence of growth retardation or partial epiphysiodesis
using a level of electrical current of 50 mA applied
directly to the epiphyseal plate. This growth retardation
was observed with 50 mA but not with 10 mA or the
electrode alone, and this was similar to the retardation
reported from other operative epiphysiodesis methods

Fig. 3. Photomicrograph of representative growth plate of the
high-current group showing the distorted cellular columnization,
fissuring, and an area of bone bridge formation (left, original
magnification 10

). Higher magnification shows the extent of

the cellular distortion (right, original magnification 20

).

Bars

¼ 50 mM.

Fig. 4. Photomicrograph of a representative zone of Ranvier. The
number of hypertrophic cells was noticeably increased in the
high-current group (HC, C,D) compared with the control group
(CTL, A,B). Top panels are low power (original magnification 4

);

bottom panels

are original magnification 10

. Arrow indicates

typical area with increase in hypertrophic-appearing cells. Bars in
B and D

¼ 50 mM.

Fig. 2. Photographs and radiograph of the femur. The radiograph of the femur in the high-current
group (left) shows bone formation at the electrode-implanted area; the electrode is placed appro-
priatelyand the growth plate appearsto be normal.Grossinspection of the femur in the high-current
group (right) also shows extra bone formation on the supracondylar area of the lateral side and no
bone formation in the control group (middle).

Electrical Current on Growth Plate

467

Fig. 5. Photomicrographs of the growth plates of the control group (CTL, left) and the high-current
group (HC, right).The width of the total growth plate as shown here was smaller in the HC group than
the control group.Bars

¼ 50 mM.

Fig. 6. Zonal changes in growth plates in control, low-current, and
high-current groups.A:Example ofhow thezoneswere delineated.
B

: The ratio of left to right femur (stimulated: no treatment) within

the three growth plate zones comparing treatment to the sham
control (no current), and (C) the area of the combined zones of the
growth plate.The data presented are from the lateral portion of the
growth plate.The area isin square microns and shown asthe mean
of all four animals. Data were collected from digitized images and
as described in the Materials and Methods Section. The bounda-

riesofeach zonewere delineatedusingtheright andleft edge ofthe
image view as the boundary, and the distal and proximal margins
based on cell and matrix characteristics.The mean and SD ofthree
sections analyzed are presented. The ratio (operated femur/non-
operated femur) shows the most shrinkage of the dimensions of
resting zone and proliferative zones. While there is a consistent
decrease in all the zones of the growth plate dimensions as a result
of 50

mA, performing an ANOVAwith a limited sample size (n

¼ 4)

was not sufficient to achieve statistical significance.

468

Dodge et al.

[Morein et al., 1978; Rosen et al., 1990]. In this study,
our histology was consistent with the findings of
shrinkage of the growth plate with distinct morpho-
logical changes such as local clusters of chondrocytes
and loss of columnar arrangement, which were similar
to findings in epiphyseal stapling [Karbowski et al.,
1989]. In an in vitro study, Okihana and Shimomura
[1988] reported the devitalization of cells with DC over
10 mA; however, in this study with rabbits, there was no
devitalization at the cellular level. The currents used in
this study are similar to those described previously in a
rabbit tibia model in which a 1-cm stainless steel
cathode was placed in the medullary canal [Brighton
et al., 1981]. In that study, bone formation around the
cathode was optimal at 20 mA, but tissue necrosis
occurred at higher currents up to 50 mA. The necrosis
was due to the HC density, electrode potential, and
resulting hydrolysis that occurs over a small region
between the cathode and the insulation. This occurs in
response to the formation of an insulating protein layer
that forms over the bare stainless steel cathode in vivo. It
has been previously shown that this effect does not
occur with titanium cathodes, which distribute current
uniformly over their surface using 50 mA [Dejardin
et al., 2001] nor in another study using 100 mA [Toth
et al., 2000]. Thus, in our study, 50 mA was expected to
produce changes in bone formation without concom-
itant necrosis and there was no evidence of necrosis
found.

Gross measurements and histomorphometry are

methods that have been used in multiple articles to
verify growth plate function or inhibition. In this study,
gross measurements of the femoral length demon-
strated restricted growth in the HC group, which is
evidence of growth inhibition. Histomorphometry is
reported also to be an accurate study to confirm delayed
growth [Weise et al., 2001], and the measurement of the
height of the growth plate or individual cell layer is a
good quantitative method [Glickman et al., 2000;
Arriola et al., 2001]. Shrinkage of dimension in the
whole growth plate was observed in the HC group in this
study. The dimension of the zones within the growth
plate was comparable between the groups in our study.
We observed a decrease in the volume of the resting
zone in the HC group in comparison with the other
groups. Glickman et al. reported difficulty in determin-
ing an accurate border between the proliferative and
hypertrophic zones, and, for this reason, we combined
the two zones into one dimension for measurement.
This measurement was decreased in the HC group
compared with the other groups, which is evidence of
growth inhibition. Our study cannot rule out the
possibility that the growth plate at the proximal end of
the femur could have affected the results. In fact, in one

possible scenario, the electrical stimulation may have
had an even greater effect than our data demonstrate due
to the compensatory growth at the growth plates at the
proximal end as a result of decreased growth velocity at
the distal (experimental) femoral growth plate.

Electrical stimulation has been widely studied

with regard to its effect on bone healing and has an
established role in the treatment of long-bone nonun-
ions. It has been reported that a constant current of
20 mA resulted in the greatest amount of bone formation
with no signs of necrosis, but a higher current showed
the changes of cellular necrosis or destruction [Brighton
et al., 1995]. More recent studies with titanium
electrodes rather than the stainless steel electrodes used
by Brighton demonstrated that new bone formation
occurred without necrosis with currents up to 50 mA
[Bozic et al., 1999; Dejardin et al., 2001]. We also could
observe a large amount of newly formed bone on the
area of the electrode in the 50 mA group, but signs of
necrosis of bone were not seen. In the HC group, bone
bridges that crossed the growth plate were found. Based
on preclinical and clinical experiences with devices
such as those used in our model, they will not produce
any thermal changes around the electrode, thus the
potential pathways that may be affected promoting
changes in bone growth are likely through mechanisms
such as the promotion of cell differentiation and/or
growth factor and cytokine production.

Our data support the hypothesis that fine wire

electrodes with increased current above that used for
bone healing can cause premature closure of the growth
plates, resulting in an epiphysiodesis. Hypothetically, a
percutaneously implantable electrode could be placed
under local anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance,
thereby reducing the cost of operative procedures and
the risk of general anesthesia. Also, for clinical
applications, a percutaneously implantable electrode
would cause minimal soft tissue injury and would not
weaken the bone as is currently seen from a surgical
epiphysiodesis. The electrical generator could be
externally attached to the electrodes.

SUMMARY

These data support the idea that an epiphysiodesis

could be achieved by electrical stimulation of the
growth plate. Electrical current made a marked change
in the growth plate volume and characteristics in this
rabbit model. Interestingly, the results demonstrated
that after just 2 weeks of electrical treatment, the
physical length could be measured as arrested in the HC
group (50 mA). Results were reproducible and con-
sistent between physical length measurements and
morphometric analyses. Our findings support the use of

Electrical Current on Growth Plate

469

electrical current to arrest growth and produce bony
bridges across the growth plate in long bones with
potential to achieve an epiphysiodesis.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors thank Jennifer DiCesare, Stuart

Mackenzie, and Aaron Littleton for expert technical
assistance, Jeff Kraft for performing the statistical
analyses, and Theresa Michel for editorial assistance
with the manuscript.

REFERENCES

Abad V, Meyers JL, Weise M, et al. 2002. The role of the resting

zone in growth plate chondrogenesis. Endocrinology 143:
1851–1857.

Armstrong PF, Brighton CT. 1986. Failure of the rabbit tibial growth

plate to respond to the long-term application of a capaci-
tively-coupled electrical field. J Orthop Res 4:446–451.

Arriola F, Forriol F, Canadell J. 2001. Histomorphometric study of

growth plate subjected to different mechanical conditions
(compression, tension and neutralization): An experimental
study in lambs. Mechanical growth plate behavior. J Pediatr
Orthop B 10:334–338.

Bowen JR, Johnson WJ. 1984. Percutaneous epiphysiodesis. Clin

Orthop 190:170–173.

Bozic KJ, Glazer PA, Zurakowski D, et al. 1999. In vivo evaluation

of coralline hydroxyapatite and direct current electrical
stimulation in lumbar spinal fusion. Spine 24:2127–2133.

Brighton CT, Friedenberg ZB, Black J, et al. 1981. Electrically

induced osteogenesis: Relationship between charge, current
density, and the amount of bone formed: Introduction of a
new cathode concept. Clin Orthop Rel Res 161:122–132.

Brighton CT, Shaman P, Heppenstall RB, et al. 1995. Tibial

nonunion treated with direct current, capacitive coupling, or
bone graft. Clin Orthop 321:223–234.

Dahl MT. 1996. Limb length discrepancy. Pediatr Clin North Am

43:849–865.

Dejardin LM, Kahanovitz N, Arnoczky SP, Simon BJ. 2001. The

effect of varied electrical current densities on lumbar spinal
fusions in dogs. Spine J 1:341–347.

Forgon M, Vamhidy V, Kellenyi L. 1985. Bone growth accelerated

by stimulation of the epiphyseal plate with electric current.
Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 104:121–124.

France JC, Norman TL, Santrock RD, McGrath B, Simon BJ. 2001.

The efficacy of direct current stimulation for lumbar
intertransverse process fusions in an animal model. Spine
26:1002–1008.

Frantz CH. 1971. Epiphyseal stapling: A comprehensive review.

Clin Orthop 77:149–157.

Glickman AM, Yang JP, Stevens DG, Bowen CV. 2000. Epiphyseal

plate transplantation between sites of different growth
potential. J Pediatr Orthop 20:289–295.

Goh JC, Bose K, Kang YK, Nugroho B. 1988. Effects of electrical

stimulation on the biomechanical properties of fracture
healing in rabbits. Clin Orthop 233:268–273.

Karbowski A, Camps L, Matthiass HH. 1989. Histopathological

features of unilateral stapling in animal experiments. Arch
Orthop Trauma Surg 108:353–358.

May VR, Jr., Clements EL. 1965. Epiphyseal stapling: With

special reference to complications. South Med J 58:1203–
1207.

Morein G, Gassner S, Kaplan I. 1978. Bone growth alterations

resulting from application of CO2 laser beam to the
epiphyseal growth plates. An experimental study in rabbits.
Acta Orthop Scand 49:244–248.

Okihana H, Shimomura Y. 1988. Effect of direct current on cultured

growth cartilage cells in vitro. J Orthop Res 6:690–694.

Phemister DB. 1933. Operative arrestment of longitudinal growth of

bones in the treatment of deformities. J Bone Joint Surg
15:1–15.

Rosen MA, Beer KJ, Wiater JP, Davidson DD. 1990. Epiphysiodesis

by electrocautery in the rabbit and dog. Clin Orthop 256:
244–253.

Sato O, Akai M. 1990. Effect of direct-current stimulation on the

growth plate. In vivo study with rabbits. Arch Orthop Trauma
Surg 109:9–13.

Stanitski DF. 1999. Limb-length inequality: Assessment and

treatment options. J Am Acad Orthop Surg 7:143–153.

Stephens DC, Herrick W, MacEwen GD. 1978. Epiphysiodesis for

limb length inequality: Results and indications. Clin Orthop
October(136):41–48.

Toth JM, Seim HB III, Schwardt JD, Humphrey WB, Wallskog JA,

Turner AS. 2000. Direct current electrical stimulation
increases the fusion rate of spinal fusion cages. Spine 25:
2580–2587.

Weise M, De-Levi S, Barnes KM, et al. 2001. Effects of estrogen on

growth plate senescence and epiphyseal fusion. Proc Natl
Acad Sci USA 98:6871–6876.

Yasuda I. 1953. Fundamental aspects of fracture treatment. J Kyoto

Med Soc 4:395–406.

Yasuda I, Noguchi K, Sata T. 1955. Dynamic callus and electric

callus. J Bone Joint Surg Am 37:1292.

470

Dodge et al.