O R I G I N A L P A P E R

Does Greater Low Frequency EEG Activity in Normal
Immaturity and in Children with Epilepsy Arise
in the Same Neuronal Network?

L. Michels

K. Bucher

S. Brem

P. Halder

R. Lu¨chinger

M. Liechti

E. Martin

D. Jeanmonod

J. Kro¨ll

D. Brandeis

Received: 14 June 2010 / Accepted: 20 August 2010 / Published online: 5 September 2010
Ó Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Abstract

Greater low frequency power (\8 Hz) in the

electroencephalogram (EEG) at rest is normal in the
immature developing brain of children when compared to
adults. Children with epilepsy also have greater low fre-
quency interictal resting EEG activity. Whether these
power elevations reflect brain immaturity due to a devel-
opmental lag or the underlying epileptic pathophysiology is
unclear. The present study addresses this question by
analyzing spectral EEG topographies and sources for nor-
mally developing children and children with epilepsy. We
first compared the resting EEG of healthy children to that

of healthy adults to isolate effects related to normal brain
immaturity. Next, we compared the EEG from 10 children
with generalized cryptogenic epilepsy to the EEG of 24
healthy children to isolate effects related to epilepsy.
Spectral analysis revealed that global low (delta: 1–3 Hz,
theta: 4–7 Hz), medium (alpha: 8–12 Hz) and high (beta:
13–25 Hz) frequency EEG activity was greater in children
without epilepsy compared to adults, and even further
elevated for children with epilepsy. Topographical and
tomographic EEG analyses showed that normal immaturity
corresponded to greater delta and theta activity at fronto-
central scalp and brain regions, respectively. In contrast,
the epilepsy-related activity elevations were predominantly
in the alpha band at parieto-occipital electrodes and brain
regions, respectively. We conclude that lower frequency
activity can be a sign of normal brain immaturity or brain
pathology depending on the specific topography and fre-
quency of the oscillating neuronal network.

Keywords

Spontaneous EEG

 Theta  Alpha  Epilepsy 

Brain immaturity

 sLORETA

Abbreviations
BA

Brodmann area

BOLD

Blood oxygen level dependency

CE

Cryptogenic epilepsy

EEG

Electroencephalogram

ESM

Ethosuximide

FLAIR

Fluid attenuation inversion recovery

fMRI

Functional magnetic resonance imaging

GMV

Grey matter volume

HA

Healthy adults

HC

Healthy children

ICA

Independent component analysis

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this

article (doi:

10.1007/s10548-010-0161-y

) contains supplementary

material, which is available to authorized users.

L. Michels

 D. Jeanmonod

Functional Neurosurgery, University Hospital Zu¨rich, Zurich,
Switzerland

L. Michels (

&)  K. Bucher  E. Martin

MR Center, University Children’s Hospital,
Steinwiesstrasse 75, 8032 Zurich, Switzerland
e-mail: lars.michels@kispi.uzh.ch

S. Brem

 P. Halder  R. Lu¨chinger  M. Liechti  D. Brandeis

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,
University of Zu¨rich, Zurich, Switzerland

E. Martin

 D. Jeanmonod  D. Brandeis

Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP),
Zurich, Switzerland

J. Kro¨ll
Swiss Epilepsy Centre, Zurich, Switzerland

D. Brandeis
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health,
Mannheim, Germany

123

Brain Topogr (2011) 24:78–89

DOI 10.1007/s10548-010-0161-y

ILAE

International league against epilepsy

MEG

Magnetoencephalography

MRI

Magnetic resonance imaging

LEV

Levetiracetam

LTG

Lamotrigine

sLORETA

Standardized low resolution brain
electromagnetic tomography

TLE

Temporal lobe epilepsy

OXZ

Oxcarbazepine

VPA

Valproic acid

Introduction

In healthy subjects the low frequency EEG oscillations, i.e.
delta (1–3 Hz) and theta (4–7 Hz), decrease with matura-
tion in different brain regions (Gasser et al.

1988

Mato-

usek and Petersen

1973

; Whitford et al.

2007

). Specifically,

delta and theta oscillations dominate in childhood whereas
alpha (8–12 Hz) oscillations dominate during adolescence
(Benninger et al.

1984

; Matthis et al.

1980

; Clarke et al.

2001

). In contrast, faster oscillations, i.e. beta (13–30 Hz)

and gamma ([30 Hz) tend to become more prominent
during adulthood (Whitford et al.

2007

). Greater low fre-

quency activity in children compared to adults or in
younger compared to older children is a robust EEG mar-
ker of normal developmental immaturity (i.e., the opposite
of normal development), and thus a marker of develop-
mental lag within an age group.

However, low frequency activity is not only greater in

healthy children compared to adults but also in patients
suffering from a wide range of chronic functional brain
disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (Moazami-Goudarzi
et al.

2008

), pain (Sarnthein et al.

2006

Stern et al.

2006

;

Ray et al.

2009

; Walton et al.

2010

), tinnitus (Llinas et al.

1999

; Moazami-Goudarzi et al.

2010

), neuropsychiatric

disorders (Jeanmonod et al.

2003

), and epilepsy (Sarnthein

et al.

2003

; Clemens et al.

2000

; Clemens

2004b

; Sakkalis

et al.

2008

; Sterman

1981

Drake et al.

1998

; Miyauchi et al.

1991

; Gibbs et al.

1943

). Epilepsy is one of the most

common neurological diseases with typical abnormal pat-
terns in the EEG or MEG (magnetoencephalogram). EEG/
MEG changes in the period between seizure attacks (i.e.,
interictal state) are not accompanied by seizure symptoms
but can be dominated by spiking activity. However, both
spike-free and spike-dominated time windows of interictal
interval can reveal EEG/MEG abnormalities (Clemens et al.

2007a

; Lin et al.

2006

; Pataraia et al.

2008

; Hongou et al.

1993

; Sakkalis et al.

2008

). For example, spectral power

elevations in lower and higher frequency bands have been
reported in untreated children and adolescents with idio-
pathic generalized epilepsy and rare generalized spike-wave
paroxysms (Clemens et al.

2007a

; Clemens et al.

2000

).

EEG Studies of Patients with Cryptogenic Epilepsy

Few studies have been performed in epileptic patients
without radiological findings, i.e. in patients with crypto-
genic epilepsy (Sakkalis et al.

2008

Hongou et al.

1993

;

Gelety et al.

1985

). However, this is an important patient

population to study since over two-thirds of epilepsies are
of cryptogenic (or idiopathic) origin (Annegers et al.

1996

).

Spectral EEG analysis has shown greater alpha activity in
adult patients with generalized cryptogenic epilepsy when
compared to nonepileptic controls (Gelety et al.

1985

).

Sakkalis et al. (

2008

) reported in children with generalized

cryptogenic epilepsy and drug-controlled epileptic seizures
that the strongest resting EEG effects were in the alpha
band. Further it has been reported that low frequency
power was increased in children with cryptogenic partial
epilepsy as compared to age-matched nonepileptic controls
(Hongou et al.

1993

). Although the latter indicates that the

enhanced low frequency oscillatory activity might char-
acterize epilepsy and not normal brain immaturity it is
unclear whether this activity is linked to the same or to a
different neuronal network than for nonepileptic controls.

Aims of the Study

This study aims to address the question whether low fre-
quency oscillatory activity in normal children and in chil-
dren with epilepsy arises in identical neuronal networks. To
this end, this study systematically compared spectral EEG
topography and source localization differences between
children with generalized cryptogenic epilepsy and age-
and gender-matched nonepileptic controls. Our hypothesis
states that effects related to epilepsy (i.e., the comparison
of children with epilepsy versus healthy children) are
manifested in a different neuronal network than effects
related to brain development (i.e., the comparison of
healthy children versus healthy adults). This is because
epilepsy-related effects should be present in brain regions
linked to epilepsy, whereas developmental effects should
be present in regions where major maturational processes
are taking place. We specifically selected children with
generalized cryptogenic epilepsy, because we wanted to
test whether epilepsy-related effects can be differentiated
from effects related to brain development even in the
absence of a radiological diagnosis.

Materials and Methods

Subjects

Twenty four healthy children (HC from now on, 14
females, age ranges 9–11.2 years, average 10 years) and 15

Brain Topogr (2011) 24:78–89

79

123

healthy adults (HA from now on, 9 female, age ranges
20–30 years, average 26.3 years) participated in this study.
All subjects were right-handed and had normal or cor-
rected-to-normal vision. The study was approved by the
local ethics committee and was conducted in accordance
with the declaration of Helsinki. All participants gave
written informed consent prior to participation. The sub-
jects had no current or previous history of relevant physical
illness and they were not currently taking drugs or medi-
cation known to affect their EEG. All EEG recording
sessions were performed in the forenoon hours in order to
exclude an impact of circadian factors on the EEG. Sub-
jects were advised to abstain from caffeinated beverages on
the day of recording to avoid the caffeine induced theta
decrease in the EEG (Landolt et al.

2004

). For children, IQ

was estimated using the block design subtest of the
HAWIK-III intelligence test (Tewes et al.

2000

). Mean

intelligence score was 110 (range 85–130). In addition, the
children’s behaviour profile (Achenbach and Edelbrock
1983) was analyzed. The average score across different
subtests was normal (\60, mean value: 46.5 range
27.1–59.6). All parents filled out a questionnaire regarding
children’s handedness (Oldfield

1971

).

Patients

Each patient gave written informed consent prior to par-
ticipation. Ten right-handed children with generalized

cryptogenic epilepsy (CE from now on, 4 females; age
ranges 9–12 years, average 10.4 years; age ranges at onset
of disease: 4–11 years, average: 7.4 years) were studied.
Patients were right-handed and had normal or corrected-to-
normal vision. All children had at least one high-resolution
MRI (GE 3 Tesla scanner) of the head, according to the
high recommendation standards of the ILAE (Serles et al.

2003

), showing no epileptogenic lesion. MR images were

acquired for the following sequences: FLAIR, T2*, 3D
T1-weighted, and T2- weighted. For ethical reasons, PET
imaging was not performed since none of the patients
participated in a pre-surgical intervention program. Epi-
lepsy syndrome and seizures were classified according to
the ILAE recommendations (Engel

2001

). Seizure burden

and age of seizure onset are reported in Table

1

There

were no tonic-clonic seizures for at least a week prior to
EEG analysis. We focussed on spike-free EEG segments,
since the spike-distribution was multiregional ([1 epilep-
togenic focus) and the spike rate was generally low
(\0.5/min). Eight of the patients had been on pharmaco-
logical monotherapy or polytherapy, i.e. on multiple anti-
epileptic drugs (AEDs, Table

1

). On the day before the

study patients were all instructed to stop the treatment
(apart from anticonvulsive treatment). All patients showed
normal psychomotor development. IQ values differ (P =
0.041, unpaired t-test) between the HC group (mean IQ:
110.6 ± 10.3, range 85–130) and CE group (mean IQ
100.4 ± 12.8, range 83–120).

Table 1

Patients’ characteristics including gender, age, clinical status, weight and medication

Patient
Nr.

Gender Age at

EEG
(years)

Age at
seizure
onset
(years)

Seizure burden
during daytime
(n. of seizures
within 1/2 year
before the EEG)

Last seizure
prior to EEG
(in weeks)

Interictal
events
localization

Weight
(kg)

Hand-
edness

Etiology

Medication
and dose
(mg/d)

1

Female 10

6

*100

[1

Bifrontal

59

R

Cryptogen

LEV 3000

2

Female 11

10

100–130

[2

Multiregional 35

R

Cryptogen

OXZ 300,

ESM 750

3

Male

10

7

*2

[12

Bifrontal

45.2

R

Cryptogen

LEV 1750

4

Male

10

2

*24

[5

Bitemporal,

frontal

38.5

R

Mesial temp.

VPA 1000,

LTG 200,
LEV 2000

5

Female

9

2

*72

[3

Multiregional 37

R

Cryptogen

LTG 250

6

Male

12

11

*12

[1

Frontal

29.4

R

Cryptogen

LTG 225

7

Female

9

4

–(only during

sleep)

[24

Temporal left 23.5

R

Cryptogen

VPA 525,

LEV 1000

8

Female 10

8

*3

[15

Bifrontal

32

R

Cryptogen

LEV 2500,

LTG 200

9

Male

12

10

100-130

[1

Bifrontal

38.4

R

Cryptogen

No

10

Female 11

5

[24

Multiregional 46

R

Cryptogen

No

LEV levetiracetam, LTG lamotrigine, OXZ oxcarbazepine, ESM ethosuximide, VPA valproic acid, temp temporal

80

Brain Topogr (2011) 24:78–89

123

Data Acquisition

For HC and HA, resting EEG (eyes closed) was recorded
from 60 Ag/AgCl surface electrodes. All electrode posi-
tions of the 10–20 system plus the following 10–10 system
sites were used: Fpz, Afz, FCz, CPz, POz, Oz, Iz, F5/6,
FC1/2/3/4/5/6, FT7/8/9/10, C1/2/5/6, CP1/2/3/4/5/6, TP7/
8/9/10, P5/6, PO1/2/9/10, OI1/2. Electrode Fz served as
reference electrode. Additionally, data from two electro-
oculogram electrodes and two electro-cardiogram channels
were measured. For CE, resting EEG was recorded from
nineteen Ag/AgCl surface electrodes placed according to
the international 10–20 system and from one electro-car-
diogram channel. Common scalp electrodes were selected
for the between-group analysis, including the following
electrodes: FP1, FP2, F3, F4, F7, F8, Fz, T3, T4, T5, T6,
C3, C4, Cz, P3, P4, Pz, O1, and O2. During recording,
impedance was kept below 10 kX. A mean of 4.8 min
(±0.9 min) EEG was recorded across all participating
subjects.

Mean Spectral Analysis

EEG data were analyzed offline using the Brain Vision
Analyzer Software (Brainproducts, Munich, Germany).
Data were downsampled to 256 Hz and digitally lowpass
filtered (0.5–70 Hz, 24 dB/octave), and visually inspected
for eye movement-, muscle- and cardiac artefacts. After
artefact rejection, EEG was decomposed into independent
components for further removal of artefacts using an
independent component analysis (S. Enghoff,

http://www.

cnl.salk.edu

). Next, the EEG signal was reconstructed and

transformed to average reference (Lehmann and Skrandies

1980

). Since drowsiness may result in enhanced theta

power, the level of vigilance was regularly checked during
the recording by monitoring EEG parameters, such as
slowing of the alpha rhythm or appearance of sleep
spindles.

At least 38 2.5 s artefact-free EEG epochs reflecting

relaxed-waking state of the subject were selected for
spectral power analysis. No significant differences regard-
ing the artefact-free EEG data length was found between
the different groups (all P [ 0.8, two-tailed unpaired
t-tests). Only EEG epochs outside spiking periods were
considered, i.e. outside a time window of one-second
before and after the end of spiking activity. To check for a
potential contamination of slow wave activity (1–3 Hz)
following spikes discharges, we additionally analysed the
data for spike-free EEG segments 3 s earlier and after the
spike discharge (Supplementary Fig. 1).

Absolute spectral power across epochs was calculated

by fast fourier transform (zero padded data with 384 zeros)
for the following frequency bands: delta (1–3 Hz), theta

(4–7 Hz), lower alpha (8–10 Hz), higher alpha (10–12 Hz)
and beta (13–25 Hz).

Topographic Spectral Analysis

To investigate whether spectral band power EEG effects
were related to brain immaturity or epilepsy, we first cal-
culated the mean absolute spectral band power over all
nineteen scalp electrodes for HC, CE, and HA. Next, we
tested for significant topographic differences for the con-
trast CE-HC (i.e., effects related to epilepsy; one-tailed
t-tests with P \ 0.01, uncorrected) and for the contrast
HC-HA (i.e., EEG effects related to brain immaturity; one-
tailed t-tests with P \ 0.001, uncorrected) for each fre-
quency band. For the latter, a higher P-value was selected
to obtain meaningful topographical maps. Between-group
effects ((HC-HA)–(CE-HC)) were compared by t-tests
(P \ 0.01) and by a topographic analysis of variance
(TANOVA, P \ 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons)
(Strik et al.

1998

). To test quantitatively for effects of

different drug classes we calculated in a single-subject
analysis the contribution of any given medication on each
frequency band (for details see legend of Fig.

2

).

Spectral Source Localization

We used standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic
tomography (sLORETA), a distributed source solution
based on spatial smoothness constraints (Pascual-Marqui

2002

), to localize the generators of the scalp EEG power

spectra for the contrasts CE-HC and HC-HA. The sLO-
RETA solution space is restricted to the cortical gray
matter in the digitized MNI atlas with a total of 6,239
voxels at 5 mm spatial resolution. We calculated tomo-
graphic sLORETA images corresponding to the estimated
neuronal generators of brain activity within a given fre-
quency range (Frei et al.

2001

), i.e. in the range of

1–25 Hz. sLORETA images were statistically (P \ 0.05,
corrected for multiple comparisons) compared through
multiple voxel-by-voxel comparisons using a non-para-
metric test for functional brain imaging (Nichols and
Holmes

2002

).

Results

Mean Spectral Analysis

As a starting point for the EEG analysis, we first quanti-
tatively compared the spectral power for the three different
groups: CE, HC, and HA. For the CE group, we observed
the greatest absolute spectral power across all 19 electrodes
in the delta to beta band (Fig.

1

a, black curve). These

Brain Topogr (2011) 24:78–89

81

123

increases in spectral band power cannot be explained by
seizures, since the last seizure occurred at least a week
before the EEG recording. Also for the HC group (blue
curve) we found enhanced activity from delta to beta when
visually compared to the HA group (red curve). The single
subject data analysis revealed that the majority (8/10) of
CE patients showed elevated alpha band power when
compared to the HC group (Fig.

2

a). This analysis also

indicated that specific drug classes do not systematically
lead to increases in power (Fig.

2

b, c). The analysis for

spike free longer EEG segments (i.e., EEG segments ± 3 s
before and after spike occurrence) yielded no significant
differences in any of the investigated frequency bands
when compared to the above described spectral analysis
( t

 values

j

j\1, Supplementary Fig. 1). Therefore, topo-

graphical and source localization analysis will be reported
only for the original analysis.

Topographic Spectral Analysis

The topographical distribution of absolute spectral power is
shown in Fig.

3

for the three different groups. For the HC

group, absolute power was maximal in the delta and lower
alpha band at fronto-parieto-occipital (delta) and parieto-
occipital (lower alpha) electrodes (top panels). For the HA
group, the absolute power peaked in the alpha band at
parieto-occipital electrodes (middle panels). For the CE
group, the absolute power was generally higher than in the
two other groups (bottom panels). Specifically, the highest
absolute spectral power values were visible in the delta and
alpha band at parieto-occipital electrodes. To test for
topographical effects related to brain development, we
calculated an electrode-wise comparison for the contrast
HC-HA. This contrast revealed spectral increases at fronto-
central electrodes in delta and theta (P

 0.001, uncor-

rected) as shown in Fig.

3

(top panel). No significant

effects were observed in the alpha (except at one temporal
electrode) and beta band (not shown). To test for

topographical effects related to epilepsy, we calculated an
electrode-wise comparison for the contrast CE-HC. In
contrast to HC-HA, the greatest differences (P \ 0.001)
occurred in the upper alpha band (10–12 Hz). The effects
were most prominent at fronto-central and left parieto-
occipital contacts (Fig.

3

b, bottom panel). Additionally,

few occipital electrodes showed significant effects in the
delta and theta band (P \ 0.01) and therefore at different
locations than for the contrast HC-HA. No significant
effects occurred in the beta band (not shown). To clarify
whether developmental and epilepsy related effects are
preserved both individual group contrasts were compared
directly by calculating the contrast ((HC-HA)–(CE-HC)).
The TANOVA in Fig.

4

indicates the significant and non-

significant (grey bars) frequency points for this contrast.
For example, all frequency points \12 Hz reflect signifi-
cant (0.05 [ P [ 0.01) group differences. The topograph-
ical maps show the direction of these differences (Fig.

4

b).

Developmental effects (HC-HA [ CE-HC, red colour
code) occur in the delta and theta band at wide-spread
locations, including fronto-central electrodes, as shown in
the Fig.

4

b (left panels). In contrast, effects related to

epilepsy (CE-HC [ HC-HA, blue colour code) were
observed in the alpha band at fronto-parietal electrodes
(Fig.

4

b, right panels). This analysis therefore corroborates

the effects observed on the individual group comparison
level, namely that normal developmental immaturity
effects are reflected in greater activations in the delta and
theta band, whereas overactivations to epilepsy are mani-
fested in the alpha band.

Spectral Source Localization

Significant source localization differences for the contrasts
CE-HC and HC-HA are shown in Fig.

5

. For the contrast

HC-HA, delta and theta band activity increases occurred at
fronto-central brain regions (P \ 0.01, corrected for mul-
tiple comparisons). In contrast, differences for the CE-HC
occurred only in the alpha band (8–12 Hz) and were
manifested dominantly in parieto-occipital regions (all
P

\ 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). As for the

topographical spectral analysis, spectral source localization
demonstrates no differences in the beta band.

Discussion

Our study revealed greater low frequency oscillatory
activity in epileptic children (CE-HC) as well as in nor-
mally developing children compared to adults (HC-HA).
However, topographical analysis and source localization
demonstrated that these increases in spectral power origi-
nate from two different oscillatory neuronal networks.

spectr

al po

w

er [µV

2

]

[Hz]

beta

alpha

delta

theta

30

25

20

15

10

2

5

2

4

6

8

10

HA group

HC group

CE group

0

Fig. 1

Absolute spectral power averaged across all electrodes for

children with cryptogenic epilepsy (CE group, black curve) and the
healthy control groups: healthy children (HC group, blue curve) and
healthy adult (HA group, red curve). The grey-shaded areas on the
x-axis indicate the different frequency domains

82

Brain Topogr (2011) 24:78–89

123

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

18

1

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

healthy control group
epilepsy patient 2

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

healthy control group
epilepsy patient 1

healthy control group
epilepsy patient 3

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

1

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

healthy control group
epilepsy patient 4

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

1

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

healthy control group
epilepsy patient 6

0

5

10

15

20

25

1

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

15

17

19

21

23

9

11

13

5

7

1

3

healthy control group
epilepsy patient 5

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

18

20

1

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

healthy control group
epilepsy patient 7

healthy control group
epilepsy patient 8

healthy control group
epilepsy patient 9

healthy control group
epilepsy patient 10

9 y, girl
LTG 250 mg

10y, boy
VPA 1000 mg
LTG 200 mg
LEV 2000 mg

10y, boy
LEV 1750 mg

11y, girl
ESM 750 mg
OXZ 300 mg

12y, boy
LTG 225 mg

12y, boy
not medicated

10y, girl
LEV 2500 mg
LTG 200 mg

11y, girl
not medicated

9y, girl
VPA 525 mg
LEV 1000 mg

10y, girl
LEV 3000 mg

frequency [Hz]

frequency [Hz]

C

B

A

medication

delta

theta alpha 

beta

(nr. of patients)
LEV (5/10)

30%

40%

40%

20%

VPA (2/10)

10%

10%

10%

10%

LTG (4/10)

30%

40%

40%

10%

OXZ (1/10)

0%

10%

10%

0%

ESM (1/10)

0%

10%

10%

0%

(quotient: nr. of patients/total nr. of patients [%])

delta

theta alpha  beta

frequency [Hz]

contrib

ution [arbitrar

y units]

ESM

OXZ

LTG

VPA

LEV

Brain Topogr (2011) 24:78–89

83

123

We found a ‘‘developmental immaturity network’’ with
greater power in delta and theta frequencies in fronto-
central brain regions and an ‘‘epilepsy network’’ with
predominantly elevated power in alpha frequency located
in parieto-occipital brain regions.

The Role of Low Frequency Activity in Epilepsy

In general, our findings of greater low frequency power in
CE patients extend the results from EEG studies that found
predominantly increased low frequency activity for well-
defined forms of epilepsy (Clemens

2004a

,

b

; Clemens

et al.

2000

;

2007a

; Kobayashi et al.

2009

Guye et al.

2006

;

Drake et al.

1998

; Sterman

1981

) but also for cryptogenic

epilepsy (Hongou et al.

1993

Sakkalis et al.

2008

). Ini-

tially, we had expected to observe the strongest epilepsy
related effects in the delta-theta but not in the alpha band,
because some but not all of these studies observed pre-
dominantly elevated delta-theta band activity.

Why Did We Observe Spectral Power Increases
Predominantly in the Alpha Band in the CE Group?

It had been argued that the so called ‘‘posterior centre of
gravity’’-as visible from enhanced posterior alpha activity-
might be a marker for patients with idiopathic generalized
epilepsy (Clemens et al.

2007a

Rodin

1999

). It is impor-

tant to note that the study by (Clemens et al.

2007a

)

showed some similarities to our study: (1) they examined
only EEG segments without epileptiform potentials; (2)
patients had no generalized tonic–clonic seizures in a
period of 5 days before the EEG investigation; and (3) their
patients showed only rare spiking activity during the EEG
recordings. Our data disclosed that this centre of gravity

might be also a marker for children with generalized CE
(Figs.

4

,

5

). Additionally, our results extend prior findings

that demonstrated the existence of the posterior centre of
gravity in the early course of ictal generalized spike-wave
complex (Rodin

1999

Rodin and Cornellier

1989

; Ferri

et al.

1995

). We suggest that our findings indicate that this

region is hyperactive also in spike-free EEG epochs. One
open question is whether low frequency activity increases
in this region reflects the ictogenic property of the cortex,
i.e. whether the cortex is per se ictogenic (van Gelder et al.

1983

; Gloor et al.

1982

or whether there are other

underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that might
explain these overactivations.

One potential explanation for the dominance of alpha-

band power in our CE group could be that alpha power
elevations were induced by medications. Although some of
these drugs (e.g. VPA) have only limited or no effect on
spectral band power of patients with CE (Hongou et al.

1993

) and in patients with primary generalized epilepsy

(Benninger et al.

1985

), the attenuation of frontal (theta and

delta) activity is well documented (Clemens et al.

2007b

).

However, as the semi-quantitative single-subject analysis
demonstrated there was no systematic contribution of any
medication on the alpha band, i.e. none of the applied drugs
could explain the observed alpha band power increases
(Fig.

2

a, c). It might be possible that the spectral power

increases for the CE group do not directly reflect an
underlying pathological mechanism, but are rather a sign of
a developmental lag (e.g. a cognitive impairment). For
example, it has been shown in several studies that the
decrease of mean alpha frequency variability (by *0.5 Hz)
predicts a cognitive impairment in healthy persons and
epileptic patients as well (Frost et al.

1995

Salinsky et al.

2002

). However, we did not observe a slowing of the mean

alpha band power in the CE group (Fig.

1

). Although IQ

values differed between the CE and the HC groups, we
found no significant correlation between the alpha peak
power and IQ values (HC group: r

2

= 0.005, n.s.; CE

group: r = 0.11; n.s.; Pearson correlations) for both groups,
i.e. alpha band power was neither positively nor negatively
linked to IQ.

To conclude, it is important to note also that delta and

theta power was higher in the CE than in the HC group
(Figs.

1

,

3

,

5

). Thus, our results are not contradicting

previous studies. One reason why we observed weaker
effects in the delta and theta band than in the alpha band
may be that the antiepileptic medication suppressed the
low frequency increases. A second reason might be the
young age of our child patient and control groups [as
compared to Clemens et al. (

2000

) and Clemens et al.

(

2007a

)], since greater power and high inter-subject vari-

ability in low frequency bands (Fig.

2

is typical for this

age range.

Fig. 2 a

Average spectral power for the each of the patients with CE

(cryptogenic epilepsy) and for the HC (healthy children) group. No
systematic effect of a specific drug class on a specific frequency band
could be observed. For example, it is unlikely that the delta and alpha
band increases in patient four can be attributed to LEV or VPA,
because patient seven does not show increased EEG power in these
frequency bands (dashed arrow). In addition, patient 10 shows
increased alpha band power (solid arrow) although not receiving any
medication. b Overview of the medication distribution (%) for the
individual patients (left column). To explore whether a specific drug
class leads to increases in spectral power first mean band spectral
power was calculated for each patient and across the HC group.
Second, a quotient was calculated to express the spectral increase in
each frequency band across the patient group. For example, in three of
the five patients (30% of the whole patient group) that received LEV
mean delta power was increased when compared to the mean band
power for the HC group. c Contribution of drug classes on the
different frequency bands. For example, LEV (black bar) contributes
more to the beta band than to any other frequency bands, whereas
OXZ and ESM contribute only on the theta and alpha band. LEV
levetiracetam, LTG lamotrigine, OXZ oxcarbazepine, ESM ethosux-
imide, VPA valproic acid

b

84

Brain Topogr (2011) 24:78–89

123

Spike-Triggered Versus Non-Spike Driven Analysis

Many brain imaging studies focussed on the time window
at or around the onset of spiking activity. Lin et al. (

2006

)

found the strongest increase in the alpha band in children
with benign rolandic epilepsy during interictal spike
occurrence using MEG at the approximate timing they
observed an increase in 0.5–25 Hz oscillations over iden-
tical areas in the other hemisphere where no spike signals
were found. This finding indicates that alpha power
increases are not necessarily dependent on the presence of
spikes. Our data extend the findings by Lin and co-workers

in one aspect, namely that spike-unrelated alpha band
changes characterize also patients without any radiological
findings, i.e. with cryptogenic epilepsy. Our results are also
in line with recent findings that reported increased low
frequency activity -most prominent in the alpha band- in
children with medically controlled epileptic seizures which
show no neurophysiological abnormality (i.e., spikes) or
any signs of brain dysfunction (Sakkalis et al.

2008

).

EEG–fMRI recordings in patients with temporal lobe

epilepsy and rare spikes revealed that parieto-occipital
alpha band power showed negative correlations with the
BOLD (Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent) signal, whereas

Fig. 3 a

Topographic maps for

the HC-, HA- and CE group
between 1 and 12 Hz. The
colour code on the right of each
panel indicates spectral power
(light red: low absolute power,
dark red: high absolute power).
Please note the different scaling
for the CE group. b Results for
the statistical comparison
(t-maps) between HC-HA (top
panels) and CE-HC (bottom
panels). The short black arrow
indicates P \ 0.01
(uncorrected) and the long
black arrow indicates
P

\ 0.001 (uncorrected)

Brain Topogr (2011) 24:78–89

85

123

theta band power was positively correlated with the tha-
lamic BOLD signal (Tyvaert et al.

2008

). This indicates

that EEG-fMRI signal correlations in cortical and sub-
cortical areas are not exclusively dependent on the pres-
ence of spike epochs. In addition this EEG–fMRI study
demonstrates that the spike-dominant region (i.e. increased
temporal EEG power) does not necessarily overlap spa-
tially with the underlying epilepsy-related hemodynamic
changes. Recently, it has been reported that EEG–fMRI
interactions may occur long before (5 s) or after (6 s) the
spike onset (Jacobs et al.

2009

), suggesting that the tem-

poral coupling between spikes and hemodynamic responses
is highly variable. We suggest that it would be interesting
to use EEG–fMRI recordings in patients with cryptogenic
epilepsy, first to investigate whether (parieto-occipital)
alpha power is linked to hemodynamic changes and second
to study the link between spike-related and spike-unrelated
EEG epochs and hemodynamic changes, since this offers a
way to examine neurophysiological interactions in patients

with structurally unaffected cortical and sub-cortical
regions.

The Relationship of Our Findings to the Type
of Epilepsy

Deviations from other studies could be caused by the type of
epilepsy diagnosis. For example, some studies described an
increase in delta, theta, lower alpha (8–8.8 Hz), and beta but
not in upper alpha (9–12.8) power in idiopathic, non-lesional
and lesional partial epilepsy patients (Drake et al.

1998

;

Miyauchi et al.

1991

). In contrast, patients with generalized

cryptogenic epilepsy reveal predominately alpha band dif-
ferences as compared to healthy individuals (this study, but
see also Sakkalis et al.

2008

). Once again it is important to

note that delta and theta power was higher in the CE than the
HC group (Figs.

1

,

3

,

5

). However, we suggest that it is

difficult to compare our results to other studies, since this
would require a patient population with a similar diagnosis

Fig. 4

Illustration of the direct comparison of the ‘‘developmental

effect’’ and the ‘‘epilepsy effect’’: a Results of the topographical
analysis of variance (TANOVA) for the contrast ((HC-HA)–(CE-HC)).
Significant changes (P \ 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons)
occur at \12 Hz and between 17 and 24 Hz. b Statistical comparison
(t-test, P \ 0.01) show the direction of these changes: Developmental

effects (HC-HA [ CE-HC, red colour-code) are present in the delta
(1–3 Hz) and theta (4–7 Hz) band at widespread electrodes, including
fronto-central electrodes. Epilepsy effects (CE-HC [ HC-HA, blue
colour-code) are present in the alpha (8–12 Hz) band at frontal and
parieto-occipital electrodes

86

Brain Topogr (2011) 24:78–89

123

(i.e. patient with cryptogenic epilepsy and a similar multi-
regional spike distribution), age- and gender distribution,
behavioural values (e.g. IQ), medication, and a similar EEG
recording and analysis setting. Patients with symptomatic
epilepsy show altered EEG activity but this is related to
structural brain abnormalities (Nunez

1995

; Robinson et al.

2004

), i.e. the observed findings are per se not directly

comparable to our findings.

The Role of Oscillatory Activity During Development

For children compared to adults, we observed the greatest
spectral power in the delta–alpha bands, in line with other
studies (Whitford et al.

2007

; Benninger et al.

1984

). For

example, Benninger et al. (

1984

found that with devel-

opment theta band power diminished as alpha band power

increased, and that the speed of change in occipital regions
is nearly twice that of central areas. Indeed, we found that
the HC group showed enhanced alpha band power at
occipital more than at central regions (Fig.

3

a). A potential

reason for the presence of greater low frequency activity
during brain development might be that these frequencies
mediate the establishment of long-range cortico–cortical
connections, which are not fully developed during child-
hood (Fair et al.

2007

Supekar et al.

2010

). In adults it has

been shown that theta and alpha mediate long-range con-
nections in a variety of task including visual perception and
working memory (Sarnthein et al.

1998

von Stein and

Sarnthein 2000).

A recent study using MRI and resting EEG recordings

investigated the impact of maturation on both neuroanat-
omy and neurophysiology in the same healthy subjects

Fig. 5

Comparison of

topographical- and source
localization differences for the
contrasts: a HC-HA and b
CE-HC. For the topographical
maps (left panels in a and b) the
colour bar indicates statistical
power differences with a red
colour code for HC [ HA and
CE [ HC and a blue colour
code HC \ HA and CE \ HC.
For the source localization maps
(right panels in a and b), a
red–orange colour code
indicates HC [ HA and
CE [ HC and a blue colour
code indicates HC \ HA and
CE \ HC. L left hemisphere,
R right hemisphere, n.s. not
significant. The short black
arrow indicates P \ 0.01
(uncorrected) and the long
black arrow indicates
P

\ 0.001 (uncorrected)

Brain Topogr (2011) 24:78–89

87

123