THE  JOURNAL  OF  ALTERNATIVE  AND  COMPLEMENTARY  MEDICINE

Volume 10, Number 2, 2004, pp. 261–268

© Mary Ann Liebert,  Inc.

Effects of Hatha Yoga and Omkar Meditation  on

Cardiorespiratory  Performance, Psychologic  Profile, and

Melatonin  Secretion

KASIGANESAN HARINATH, M.Sc.,

1

ANAND SAWARUP MALHOTRA, B.Sc.,

1

KARAN PAL, B.Sc.,

1

RAJENDRA PRASAD, B.Sc.,

1

RAJESH KUMAR, M.Sc.,

1

TRILOK CHAND KAIN, M.Sc.,

1

LAJPAT RAI, Ph.D.,

2

and RAMESH CHAND SAWHNEY, Ph.D.

1

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To evaluate effects of Hatha yoga and Omkar meditation on cardiorespiratory performance, psy-

chologic profile, and melatonin secretion.

Subjects and methods: Thirty healthy men in the age group of 25–35 years volunteered for the study. They

were randomly divided in two groups of 15 each. Group 1 subjects served as controls and performed body flex-
ibility exercises for 40 minutes and slow running for 20 minutes during morning hours and played games for
60 minutes  during evening hours daily for 3 months. Group 2 subjects  practiced selected  yogic asanas  (pos-
tures)  for  45 minutes  and pranayama for  15 minutes  during  the  morning, whereas  during the  evening hours
these subjects performed preparatory yogic postures for 15 minutes, pranayama for 15 minutes, and meditation
for 30 minutes daily, for 3 months. Orthostatic tolerance, heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, dynamic
lung function (such as  forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced expiratory volume
percentage, peak expiratory flow rate, and maximum voluntary ventilation), and psychologic profile were mea-
sured before and after 3 months of yogic practices. Serial blood samples were drawn at various time intervals
to study effects of these yogic practices and Omkar meditation on melatonin levels.

Results: Yogic practices for 3 months resulted in an improvement in cardiorespiratory performance and psy-

chologic profile. The plasma melatonin also showed an increase after three months of yogic practices. The sys-
tolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and orthostatic tolerance did not show any
significant  correlation  with  plasma  melatonin.  However, the  maximum  night  time  melatonin  levels  in  yoga
group showed a significant correlation (5 0.71, , 0.05) with well-being score.

Conclusion: These  observations suggest  that yogic practices  can  be  used  as  psychophysiologic stimuli  to in-

crease endogenous secretion of melatonin, which, in turn, might be responsible for improved sense of well-being.

261

INTRODUCTION

Y

oga, an ancient culture of Indian heritage, when adopted
as  a  way of life is claimed to bestow the practitioner

with ideal physical, mental, intellectual, and spiritual health.
As a result, yoga is fast emerging as a new discipline for in-
tegrating mind and body into harmony. Regular yogic prac-
tices have been shown  to cause profound improvement in

cardiorespiratory  (Udupa  et  al.,  1975),  thermoregulatory
(Selvamurthy et  al.,  1983a), body flexibility, and psycho-
logic functions such as mental performance, improvement
of memory, and creation of a sense  of well-being (Ray et
al., 2001). Yogic practices have been also found to be most
useful  in  alleviating  stress-induced  disorders  such  as  in-
somnia,  anxiety,  depression  (Selvamurthy  et  al.,  1983b,
1998),  hypertension  (Murugesan  et  al.,  2000),  bronchial

1

Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Timarpur, Delhi, India.

2

Morarji Desai National Institute for Yoga, New Delhi, India.

asthma  (Sathyaprabha  et  al.,  2001),  diabetes  (Telles  and
Naveen, 1997), and coronary artery disease (Manchanda et
al., 2000; Ornish et al., 1998). Normal healthy subjects prac-
ticing yoga for a short period without rigorous discipline of
yogic life have been demonstrated to show an improvement
in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism (Joseph et al., 1981),
cardiorespiratory performance (Nayar et al., 1975), and psy-
chologic function (Ray et al., 2001). These effects of yogic
practices appear to be mediated through an interaction be-
tween the autonomic nervous system and endocrine system,
wherein  pineal secretion  of  melatonin may  be  playing an
important role. Melatonin is known not only to synchronize
the organism to changing day and night cycle but has been
also demonstrated to cause sleep-induced relaxation (James
et al., 1987; Waldhauser et al. 1990), lowers cholesterol lev-
els  (Hoyos  et  al.,  2000),  prevents  platelet  aggregation 
(Kornblihtt et al., 1993), stimulates immune system (Akbu-
lut et al., 2001), and is one of the most potent antioxidant
hormone (Gitto  et  al.,  2001). Administration of melatonin
has been also shown to decrease blood pressure and influ-
ence  central cardiovascular regulatory mechanism such as
lowering of baroreflex set point (Kitajima et al., 2001). It is
possible that yogic practices might be influencing pineal se-
cretion of melatonin, which in turn may be responsible for
some of the effects of yoga and meditation. Therefore, the
present study has been undertaken to evaluate effects of yoga
and  meditation on  cardiorespiratory function, psychologic
profile, and melatonin secretion.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Thirty  (30)  healthy  normotensive  male  volunteers,  of

25–35  years  of  age,  mean 6 standard  error  of  the  mean
(SEM), 29.6 6 0.89, were randomly selected for the study.
It  was  ensured  that  none  of  the  subject  selected  had  any
metabolic or endocrine disease and were not having previ-
ous experience of yoga and meditation. All were army sol-
diers  working  in  the  same  unit  receiving  identical  diet
(3000–3500 kcal). The study was approved by the institute’s
ethical committee and informed consent was obtained from
all the subjects.

The  subjects were  randomly  divided in  2  groups of  15

each  using  a  table  of  random  numbers.  Group  1  subjects
served as control and performed routine army physical train-
ing (PT) exercise daily for 1 hour in the morning and 1 hour
in the evening. These exercises consisted of body flexibil-
ity exercises for 40 minutes and slow running for 20 min-
utes  during  morning  hours  and  games  for  1  hour  in  the
evening. Group 2 subjects performed only yoga and medi-
tation,  consisting  of  selected  yogic  asanas  (yogic  pos-
tures/exercises)  for  45  minutes  and  pranayama  (yogic
breathing exercises) for 15 minutes in the morning whereas
during the evening hours these subjects practiced prepara-

tory yogic postures for 15 minutes, pranayama for 15 min-
utes, and meditation for 30 minutes daily for 3 months un-
der the supervision of two qualified instructors from Morarji
Desai National Institute of Yoga, New Delhi (Table 1A, B).
The  yogic  asanas,  pranayama,  and  meditation  were  per-
formed as described earlier from this laboratory (Joseph et
al., 1981; Ray et al., 2001; Selvamurthy et al., 1983). The
sequence of practice of the yogasanas is listed in Table 1A.
The posture of each asana was maintained for approximately
2  minutes. The  shavasana was  intermittently practiced for
about  2  minutes  after  completing  four  asanas  in  this  se-
quence. Subjects were instructed to perform these asanas in
a relaxed state of mind, being fully conscious of the physi-
cal movements. During the morning hours subjects practiced
Bhastrika  and  Bhrahmari  pranayama  whereas  during  the
evening hours  they  performed  Sheetali,  Sheetkari,  Bhrah-
mari, and Nadi Shodhan pranayama. The ratio of inhalation,
retention,  and  exhalation  of  breath  in  Nadi  Shodhan
pranayam was 1:2:2. The evening meditation schedule con-
sisted of preparatory yogasanas for 15 minutes, pranayama
for 15 minutes, and Omkar meditation for 30 minutes (Table
1B). The pranayama and meditation were performed in pad-

HARINATH  ET AL.

262

T

ABLE

1. D

ETAILS OF

Y

OGIC

P

RACTICES

A. Morning yogic schedule:
Yogasanas:

1. Yogic prayer (Chanting of mantra)
2. Kapal bhati (Rapid shallow breathing)
3. Surya namaskar (Sun salutation in 12 different postures)

4. Savasan (Relaxed supine posture)
5. Suptadasan (Hands & legs stretched in supine posture)
6. Paschimotanasan (Bending forward in supine posture)

7. Ushterasan (The camel posture)
8. Shushankasan (The hare posture)
9. Veerasan (The posture of an archer)

10. Shithilasan (Relaxed prone posture)
11. Bhujangasan (Cobra posture)
12. Dhanurasan (Posture of bow)

13. Pavanmuktasan (Folding the body in supine posture)
14. Singh garjana (The lion posture)
15. Aathas (Laughing loudly)

Pranayama: 

1. Bhastrika (Forceful expulsion of breath)
2. Bhrahmari (Producing buzzing sound of bee with closed

ears and lips)

B. Evening meditation schedule:

Yogasanas:

1. Suptadasan (Hands & legs stretched in supine posture)
2. Viprit karani mudra (The inverted posture)

3. Yog nidra (Conscious sleep)

Pranayama

4. Sheetali (Breathing air through folded tung)

5. Sheetkari (Breathing air through teeth)
6. Bhrahmari (Producing buzzing sound of bee with closed

ears and lips)

7. Nadi shodhan (Alternate nostril breathing)

Meditation

1. Omkar meditation (Om Chant)

HATHA  YOGA AND  OMKAR  MEDITATION

263

T

ABLE

2. S

ELF

“W

ELL

-B

EING

” I

NVENTORY

Name

Profession

Age

Weight

Height

Marital

Food habits

Drinking

Smoking habits

status

habits

Yrs.

Kg.

Ft.

Married

Vegetarian

Alcohol

Cigarettes daily

Single

Non-vegetarian

Pegs

Widower

Tea/Coffee

cups daily

The questions given below are aimed to see what attitudes and interests you currently have. There are no “right” and “wrong” answers

because everyone has the right to his or  her own  feelings and views. Your reactions will not be used for any other purpose except
research. So please give the first natural answer as it comes to you.

1

2

3

4

5

Usually

Often

Sometimes

Rarely

Never

1. My appetite is good:
2. Noise awakens me:
3. I am troubled by constipation:
4. I find hard to keep my mind on a task:
5. I feel fatigued:
6. My sleep is fitful and disturbed:
7. I enjoy good physical health:
8. I feel happy:
9. I experience forgetfulness:

10. I dream about things that are best kept to myself:
11. I feel like crying:
12. I feel useless and unworthy:
13. I feel frustrated:
14. Criticism or scolding hurts me terribly:
15. I worry about catching disease:
16. I brood a great deal:
17. I have spells of headache and high fever:
18. I go to sleep without thoughts or ideas bothering me:
19. I lack self-confidence:
20. I enjoy mixing with others:
21. I find difficult to start a thing:
22. I work under great deal of tension:
23. I am troubled by attacks of vomiting and nausea:
24. I feel nervous:
25. I really feel fresh in the morning after sleep:
26. Domestic problems worry me:
27. I experience isolation and boredom:
28. I suffer from cold and cough:
29. I get along well with others:
30. I find it difficult to concentrate on the job I do:
31. I think over trivial troubles again and again and have to make a real

effort to put them out of mind:

32. Obstacles do not deter me from my goals:
33. Changes in weather affect my  efficiency and mood:

(continued)

masan (sitting) posture. During meditation the subjects were
asked  to  concentrate on  the  Agya  Chakra  presumably lo-
cated near the prefrontal area and then on Sahasrar Chakra
near the location of pineal gland for each breath of expira-
tion while they chanted “OM” in a soft voice.

All  the  physiologic parameters  were  monitored  in  the

morning between 6:00 

AM

and 8:00 

AM

under thermoneu-

tral conditions (24 6 2°C and 45%–55% RH) before and af-
ter  3  months of  yogic training in  both of  the  groups. The
subjects reported to the laboratory at 6:00 

AM

and rested in

a supine position for approximately 10 minutes before phys-
iologic measurements were carried out. The heart rate (HR)
was monitored from the standard configuration of limb lead
electrocardiogram (ECG) (lead II) for 5 minutes using a BM
5289 (BPL-India, Banglore, India) bedside monitor. Blood
pressure  was  measured  using  an  arm  mercury  sphygmo-
manometer. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) was derived
using the formula, diastolic pressure plus one third of pulse

pressure  from  individual systolic and diastolic BP  values.
The  respiratory  rate  (RR)  was  counted while  the  subjects
were lying in the supine position. Dynamic lung functions
such as forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory vol-
ume  in  1  second  (FEV

1

),  forced  expiratory  volume  per-

centage  (FEV%),  peak  expiratory  flow  rate  (PEFR),  and
maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV)  were  studied with
the help of a computer-automated portable vitalograph (Vi-
talograph  Compact,  Vitalograph  Ltd.,  Buckingham,  UK).
The orthostatic tolerance was evaluated to assess the effects
of change of posture on the BP and HR and to quantify the
vasomotor reactivity of the subjects. The BP and HR were
measured while subjects were lying down and after 3 min-
utes of change in posture to standing position. The degree
of variation of these parameters during the change in pos-
ture was analyzed using Crampton’s  index. In this scoring
system,  the  highest scores  are  awarded  to  increase  in  BP
with negligible rise in HR and subjects whose BP cannot be

HARINATH  ET AL.

264

T

ABLE

3. R

ESTING

H

EART

R

ATE

(HR),  S

YSTOLIC

B

LOOD

P

RESSURE

(SBP), D

IASTOLIC

B

LOOD

P

RESSURE

(DBP), 

M

EAN

A

RTERIAL

P

RESSURE

(MAP) 

IN

C

ONTROL AND

E

XPERIMENTAL

S

UBJECTS

Controls

Yoga and meditation

Before

After

Before

After

HR  (beats/min)

58.4 6 2.2

62.1 6 1.9

59.2 6  2.4

58.2 6 2.2

SBP  (mm Hg)

117.5 6 2.3

116.0 6 2.5

117.0 6  1.7

107.8 6 2.2

a

DBP  (mm Hg)

78.1 6 2.0

76.4 6 1.9

77.4 6  1.9

67.8 6 1.5

a

MAP  (mm Hg)

83.1 6 1.9

85.9 6 2.1

90.9 6  1.7

80.6 6 1.7

a

a

Versus before , 0.001.

Values are mean 6 standard error of the mean (SEM).

1

2

3

4

5

Usually

Often

Sometimes

Rarely

Never

34. When given a set of rules, I follow them exactly to the letter:
35. I get hurt more by the way people say things than by what they say:
36. I get overexcited in upsetting situations:
37. It is difficult for me to control my fears and worries:
38. I take things easy:
39. Noise in darkness frightens me:
40. While alone I  worry about my near and dear ones:
41. I am happy about my  physical endurance and stamina:
42. I have feelings of premature ageing:
43. My keenness and interest in work is high:
44. I feel emotionally upset:
45. I get along with others quite well:
46. I remain depressed and anxious:
47. I feel discontented with my surroundings:
48. Others are noncooperative:
49. Medical assistance is available in time:
50. I feel on top of the world:

T

ABLE

2. S

ELF

“W

ELL

-B

EING

” I

NVENTORY

(C

ONT

D

)

HATHA  YOGA AND  OMKAR  MEDITATION

265

T

ABLE

4. O

RTHOSTATIC

T

OLERANCE IN

C

ONTROL AND

Y

OGA

G

ROUP

Before

After

Yoga group

73.53 6  3.4

80.01 6 4.5

a

Control group

72.14 6  3.8

75.71 6 4.9

a

a

Versus before , 0.05.

Values are in mean 6 standard error of the mean (SEM).

T

ABLE

5. T

HE

R

ESTING

R

ESPIRATORY

R

ATE AND

L

UNG

F

UNCTIONS IN

C

ONTROL AND

E

XPERIMENTAL

S

UBJECTS

Controls

Yoga and meditation

Before

After

Before

After

RR  (cycles/min)

17.0 6 0.89

17.5 6 1.1

16.4 6 0.73

14.5 6 0.63

FVC  (L)

3.7 6 0.12

3.9 6 0.11

3.6 6 0.11

4.8 6 0.12

a

FEV

1

(L)

3.2 6 0.12

3.3 6 0.13

3.2 6 0.12

3.8 6 0.12

a

FEV %

86.1 6 1.2

86.8 6 1.1

88.3 6 1.02

93.9 6 1.15

a

PEFR  (L/min)

545 6 29.0

554 6 27.0

555.6 6 28.7

589 6 27.4

b

MVV (L/min)

121 6 3.4

122 6 4.6

119.5 6 4.3

132.0 6 8.7

b

a

Versus before , 0.05.

b

Versus before , 0.01.

RR,  respiratory rate; FVC,  forced vital capacity; FEV

1

,  forced expiratory volume in 1  second; FEV%,  forced expiratory volume 

percentage; PEFR, peak expiratory flow rate; MVV, maximum voluntary ventilation.

Values are mean 6 standard error of the mean (SEM).

maintained in spite of tachycardia get the lowest score. Anx-
iety  was  tested  using  IPAT  Anxiety  Scale  questionnaire
(Cattell  and  Scheier,  1963)  and  depression was  measured
using  Minneasota  Multiphasic  Personality  Inventory
(MMPI)  questionnaire  (Hathaway  and  Charnely,  1943).
Each test consisted of 40 questions, higher the score more
were the anxiety and depression. The well-being was eval-
uated using a questionnaire to answer questions about gen-
eral health, quality of sleep, mental condition and feelings
towards  peers  and  superiors  (Table  2).  A  five-point scale
was  used and the total score of subjective well-being was
calculated. These psychologic questionnaires were adminis-
tered to both the groups together during the morning hours
after the physiologic variables were recorded. Serial venous
blood samples were drawn simultaneously at 8:00 

AM

, 12:00

PM

, 1:00 

PM

, 2:00 

PM

, 12:00 

AM

, 2:00 

AM

, 3:00 

AM

, and 4:00

AM

to study melatonin rhythmicity. Blood samples  during

night were collected under dim light conditions (,200 lux)
to  avoid light-induced inhibition of  pineal melatonin syn-
thesis. Circulatory levels of melatonin were estimated in 1
mL  of  plasma  using  double-antibody  radioimmunoassay
based on the Kennaway G280 antimelatonin antibody kits
from  Buhlmann  Labs,  Postfach,  Switzerland.  Reversed-
phase column-extracted plasma samples, reconstituted stan-
dards, and controls were incubated with antimelatonin anti-
body  and 

125

I  melatonin.  After  20  hours  of  incubation,

solid-phase second antibody was added to the mixture in or-
der to precipitate the antibody bound hormone. The super-
natant was aspirated and the antibody-bound 

125

I melatonin

was counted in an automated gamma counter. Melatonin lev-

els of individual samples were calculated from the standard
curve. The interassay and intra-assay variability at three dif-
ferent points was less than 10%. All the samples of the study
were  processed  in  two  consecutive assays  using the  same
batch of reagents to avoid interassay variations.

The statistical analysis was done using independent Stu-

dent’s  test  for  comparing two different sets  of data. The
analysis  of  variance  (ANOVA)  Newman-Kaul’s  multiple
range test with Bonferroni-Holm method was used for mul-
tiple comparisons. A result was considered significant if ,
0.05. Pearson correlation was used to determine the corre-
lation coefficient between two different parameters.

RESULTS

Table 3  shows  HR,  systolic blood pressure  (SBP),  dia-

stolic blood pressure (DBP), and MAP in yoga and control
groups before and after 3 months of yogic practices. In con-
trol  group,  the  mean  HR,  SBP,  DBP,  and  MAP  after  3
months of  follow-up were  not significantly different (.
0.05) than the initial basal values. In the yoga group, after
3 months of yogic practices, the mean HR did not show any
significant (. 0.05)  change.  The  systolic,  diastolic, and
mean arterial BP showed a significant reduction (, 0.001)
after  the  yogic  practices.  The  orthostatic  tolerance  in  the
yoga  group  showed  a  slight  but  significant increase  (,
0.05) and did not show any significant alterations in the con-
trol group (Table 4).

Table 5 shows RR, FVC, FEV

1

, FEV%, PEFR, and MVV

in the control and yoga groups. The RR in yoga group tended
to  decline  but  the  change  was  not  statistically significant
(. 0.05). The FVC, FEV

1

, and FEV% in the control group

did not show any appreciable change but showed a signifi-
cant increase (, 0.05) in the yoga group. The PEFR and
MVV also showed a significant increase (, 0.01) after yo-
gic practices but did not show any significant change (.
0.05) in the control group.

The psychologic parameters, such as anxiety and depres-

sion, did not show any significant change (. 0.05) in both

the  groups  (Table  6).  However,  the  well-being  inventory
score increased significantly (, 0.001) in the yoga group
compared to control. Figure 1 shows melatonin levels at dif-
ferent  times  of  the  day  in  yoga  group  before  and  after  3
months of yogic practices. The plasma melatonin before yo-
gic  practices at  8:00 

AM

varied between 1.1 pg/mL  to  8.5

pg/mL with a mean value of 3.91 6 0.91 mg/mL. The mean
value of 1.92 6 0.61 pg/mL at 12:00 

PM

was not significantly

different (. 0.05) than the 8:00 

AM

values. The mean mela-

tonin levels at 12:00 

PM

, 1:00 

PM

, and 2:00 

PM

were not sig-

nificantly different (. 0.05) from  each other. The lowest
melatonin levels were observed in samples drawn at 1:00 

PM

,

whereas the highest levels were seen between 12:00 

AM

to

4:00 

AM

. The yogic practices did not alter melatonin rhyth-

micity and the lowest melatonin levels after yoga were seen
between 12:00 

PM

to 1:00 

PM

and the highest levels were ob-

served between 12:00 

AM

to 4:00 

AM

. The melatonin levels

at 8:00 

AM

, 12:00 

PM

, 1:00 

PM

, 2:00 

PM

, and 12:00 

AM

were

not significantly different (. 0.05) than the initial control
values. However, the mean melatonin levels at 2:00 

AM

, 3:00

AM

and 4:00 

AM

after yoga and meditation were significantly

higher  (, 0.05)  than  before  administration  of  yoga  and
meditation (Fig. 1). The systolic, diastolic, mean BP, and or-
thostatic  tolerance in  the  control  and  yoga  groups  did  not
show  any  correlation with  plasma melatonin. However,  in
the yoga group the rise in melatonin during night hours (2:00

AM

, 3:00 

AM

and 4:00 

AM

) showed a significant correlation

with well-being score (5 0.71, , 0.05).

DISCUSSION

The  present study demonstrates that regular  practice of

Hatha yoga and Omkar meditation causes alterations in au-
tonomic balance, respiratory  performance  and  well  being.
Significant reduction in systolic, diastolic, and mean arter-
ial pressure indicates a trend of gradual shift of autonomic
equilibrium  toward  relative  parasympathodominance  be-
cause of the reduction of sympathetic activity. This modu-
lation of autonomic nervous system activity probably might
have been brought about through the conditioning effects of
yoga on autonomic function, mediated through limbic sys-
tem and higher areas of the central nervous system. The in-

dividuals  practicing  yoga  have  been  demonstrated  to  de-
velop  some  degree  of  resistance  against  physical  stress
(Udupa et al., 1975). This may be useful for the personnel
who are  likely to be exposed to various kinds of stressful
environments as in the case of armed forces, where stable
autonomic equilibrium may be useful to face the stress more
effectively (Malhotra et al., 1976; Selvamurthy et al., 1983).

Cardiovascular response to orthostasis also showed a sig-

nificant improvement after yoga, because cardioacceleration
to standing was  significantly lower in  the  yoga group. On
the other hand, these subjects maintained their systolic BP
during orthostasis more effectively than their counterparts
as revealed by Crampton’s  score. These observations sug-
gest that yoga help to improve the cardiovascular efficiency
and homeostatic control of the body. Pranayama, which is
an  integral part  of  yogic practices, is  reported to  improve
breathing rate  and  ventilatory function of  the  lung  (Mak-
wana et al., 1988; Joshi et al., 1992). Significant improve-
ment in FVC, FEV

1

, FEV%, PEFR, and MVV in our study

indicates that it may be caused by strengthening of respira-
tory  musculature  incidental  to  regular  practice  of
pranayamic breathing. Similar  ventilatory training even in
elderly subjects  (ages  60–75)  has  been  shown  to  improve
lung volumes and capacities (Belman et al., 1988). Lung in-
flation  near  to  total  lung  capacity  is  a  major  physiologic
stimulus for the release of lung surfactant (Hildebran et al.,
1981) and prostaglandins into alveolar spaces (Smith et al.,

HARINATH  ET AL.

266

T

ABLE

6. E

FFECT OF

Y

OGA AND

M

EDITATION ON

P

SYCHOLOGIC

P

ROFILE IN

C

ONTROL AND

Y

OGA

G

ROUP

Controls

Yoga and meditation

Before

After

Before

After

Anxiety

18.90 6 5.84

19.50 6 6.18

15.00 6 3.77

15.21 6 4.02

Depression

18.00 6 5.75

15.70 6 6.73

14.94 6 4.48

14.05 6 5.34

Well being inventory

106.7 6 18.23

117.6 6 22.93

94.05 6 14.49

107.89 6 13.09

a

a

Versus before , 0.001.

Values are mean 6 standard error of the mean (SEM).

8:00

AM

12:00

PM

1:00

PM

2:00

PM

12:00

AM

2:00

AM

3:00

AM

4:00

AM

FIG. 1. Melatonin rhythmicity before and after 3 months of yoga
and meditation.

1976), which increases lung compliance and decreases bron-
chiolar smooth muscle tone respectively.

Meditation, which is essentially a part of yogic schedule

is characterized physiologically as a wakeful hypometabolic
state of parasympathetic dominance. During meditation the
practitioner  remains  awake  and  vigilant  but  the  physical
body goes into a state of deep muscle relaxation (Jevnig et
al.,  1992).  Meditation also  causes  an  increase  in  cerebral
perfusion  and  alpha  activity  of  EEG  and  skin  resistance
(Wallace and Benson, 1972) besides decreasing vascular re-
sistance, blood levels of catecholamines, cortisol and lactate
(Jevning et al., 1992; Young and Taylor, 1998). The most
characteristic feature of all meditational techniques appears
to be a decline in O

2

consumption and CO

2

elimination with

decrease in respiratory rate and minute ventilation with no
change in respiratory quotient (Wallace and Benson, 1972).
The important significant difference is that the body appears
to move into a state analogous to many, but not all aspects
of sleep while subjects remain responsive and alert.

The  exact significance and mechanisms responsible for

increase in melatonin levels after  yoga and meditation re-
mains speculative. The higher melatonin levels during night
after yoga and meditation showed a positive correlation with
well-being. However, no such correlation was forthcoming
between indices of cardiorespiratory function and melatonin
indicating that yoga and meditation induced psychological
elation might have been due to increased secretion of mela-
tonin. In fact, the neurotransmitter serotonin has been well
correlated with improvement in psychological profile (Bu-
jatti and Rirderer, 1976). The increase in melatonin secre-
tion after  the  yogic practices may  either be  caused by  in-
creased  secretion  of  hormone  by  the  pineal  gland  or
decreased  clearance  from  the  circulation.  Walton  et  al.
(1995), have reported that yogic practices increase serotonin,
which in turn might be acting as a precursor for increasing
melatonin  synthesis  during  yogic  practices.  Our  observa-
tions on increase in nighttime melatonin after yoga and med-
itation are in consonance with the findings of Tooley et al.
(2000) who have also reported an increase in melatonin fol-
lowing meditation.

Some  of  the  properties of  melatonin resemble  those of

hypnotic drugs especially in the induction of sleep (James
et al., 1987), increase in theta wave activity and improve-
ment of sleep quality (Waldhauser et al., 1990). In humans,
alterations in melatonin circadian rhythmicity has been as-
sociated with sleep disturbances, anxiety states and psycho-
somatic disorders (Brown et al., 1987). Electrophysiologic
recording has also demonstrated that the timing of the steep-
est increase in nocturnal sleepiness (the sleep gate) is related
with  rise  in  urinary  excretion  of  6-sulfatoxymelatonin
(Tzischinsky et al., 1993). The low nighttime serum mela-
tonin concentration has  been reported in  patients with  de-
pression (Brown et al., 1987). In view of the observations
that  melatonin  counteracts  sympathetic  activity  (Vish-
wanathan et al., 1986), improves quality of sleep (James et
al.,  1987),  counteracts  stress-induced disorders,  resets  the

body’s  aging  clock (Picrrefiche  and Labonit, 1995; Poeg-
gler  et  al.,  1994), and elevates mood (Dawsan  and Encel,
1993), it is possible that yoga- and meditation-induced im-
provement in autonomic balance and psychologic function
might be mediated through an increase in secretion of mela-
tonin from the pineal gland.

These observations suggest that regular practice of Hatha

yoga and Omkar meditation can bring significant improve-
ment in the autonomic balance, respiratory performance and
well-being. It also facilitates secretion of melatonin from the
pineal gland, which may be acting as a psychosensitive hor-
mone. It is possible that if yoga and meditation are admin-
istered along with routine army exercises, both physical and
mental performance can be improved.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The investigators are grateful to W. Selvamurthy, M.Sc.,

Ph.D.,  F.A.B.M., Chief Controller Research and Develop-
ment  (Life  Sciences &  Human  Resource) for  his  constant
support,  encouragement,  and  guidance  to  carry  out  this
study. The secretarial assistance of  Mr.  Parveen Kumar  is
also acknowledged.

REFERENCES

Akbulut KG, Gonul B, Akbulut H. The effects of melatonin on hu-

moral immune responses of young and aged rats. Immunol In-
vest 2001;30:17–20.

Belman  MJ,  Gaesser GA.  Ventilatory muscle training in  the  el-

derly. J Appl Physiol 1988;64:899–905.

Brown RP, Kocsis JH, Caroff S. Depressed mood and reality dis-

turbance  correlate  with  decreased nocturanl melatonin  in  de-
pressed patients. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1987;76:272–275.

Bujatti M, Rirderer P. Serotonin, noradrenaline, dopamine metabo-

lites  in  transcedental  meditation-technique.  J  Neural  Transm
1976;39:257–267.

Cattell RB, Scheier IH. Handbook for IPAT Anxiety Scale Ques-

tionnaire (Self analysis form). Champaign IL: Institute for Per-
sonality and Ability Testing, 1963.

Dawsan D, Encel N. Melatonin and sleep in Humans. Pineal Re-

search 1993;15:1–5.

Gitto E, Tan DX, Reiter RJ, Karbownik M, Manchester LC, Cuz-

zocrea S, Fulia F, Barberi I. Individual and synergistic antiox-
idative actions of melatonin: Studies with vitamin E, vitamin C,
glutathione and desferrioxamine (desferoxamine) in rat liver ho-
mogenates. J Pharm Pharmacol 2001;53:1393–1401.

Hathawey SR, Charnely J. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality In-

ventory. New York: Psychological Corporation, 1943.

Hildebran JN, Georke J, Clements JA. Surfactant release in exer-

cised  rat  lung  is  stimulated  by  air  inflation.  J  Appl  Physiol
1981;51:905–910.

Hoyos M, Guerrero JM, Perez-Cano R, Olivan J, Fabiani F, Gar-

cia-Perganeda A, Osuna C. Serum cholesterol and lipid peroxi-
dation are decreased by melatonin in diet-induced hypercholes-
terolemic rats. J Pineal Res 2000;28:150–155.

HATHA  YOGA AND  OMKAR  MEDITATION

267

James SP,  Medeleson WB, Sack DA, Rosanthod NE, When TA.

The effect of melatonin on normal sleep. Neuropsychopharma-
cology 1987;1:41–44.

Jevning R, Wallace RK, Beidebach M. The physiology of medita-

tion:  A  review. A  wakeful hypometabolic response. Neurosci
Biobehav 1992;16:415–424.

Joseph S, Sridharan K, Patil SKB, Kumaria ML, Selvamurthy W,

Joseph NT,  Nayar  HS.  Study  of  some  physiological and  bio-
chemical parameters in subjects undergoing yogic training. Ind
J Med Res 1981;74:120–124.

Joshi LN, Joshi VD, Sokhale LV. Effect of short term “Pranayam”

practice on breathing rate and ventilatory functions of lung. In-
dian J Physiol Pharmacol 1992;36:105–108.

Kitajima  T,  Kanbayashi  T,  Saitoh  Y,  Ogawa  Y,  Sugiyama  T,

Kaneko Y, Sasaki Y, Aizawa R, Shimisu T. The effects of oral
melatonin on the autonomic function in healthy subjects. Psy-
chiatry Clin Neurosci 2001;55:299–300.

Kornblihtt  LI,  Finocchiaro  L,  Molinas  FC.  Inhibitory  effect  of

melatonin on platelet activation induced by collagen and arachi-
donic acid. J Pineal Res 1993;4:184–191.

Makwana K, Khirwadkar N, Gupta HC. Effect of short term yoga

practice on ventilatory function tests. Indian J Physiol Pharma-
col 1988;32:202–208.

Malhotra MS,  Selvamurthy W,  Purkayastha SS,  Mukherjee AK,

Dua  GL.  Responses to  autonomic nervous system  during ac-
climatization to high altitude in man. Aviat Space Environ Med
1976;47:1076–1079.

Manchanda SC,  Narang R, Reddy KS,  Sachdeva U, Prabhakaran

D, Dharmanand S, Rajani M, Bijlani R. Retardation of coronary
atherosclerosis with yoga lifestyle intervention. J Assoc Physi-
cians India 2000;48:687–694.

Murugesan R,  Govindarajulu N,  Bera TK. Effect of selected yo-

gic practices on the management of hypertension. Indian J Phys-
iol Pharmacol 2000;44:207–210.

Nayar HS, Mathur RM, Kumar RS. Effects of yogic exercises on

human physical efficiency. Ind J Med Res 1975;63:69–73.

Ornish D, Scherwitz LW, Billings JH, Brown SE, Gould KL, Mer-

ritt  TA,  Sparler  S,  Armstrong  WT,  Ports  TA,  Kirkeeide  RL,
Hogeboom C, Brand RJ. Intensive lifestyle changes for reversal
of coronary heart disease. JAMA 1998;280:2001–2012.

Picrrefiche G, Labonit H. Oxygen free radicals. Melatonin and ag-

ing. Exp Gerontol 1995;30:213–227.

Poeggler B, Sarrela S, Reiter RJ, Tan DX, Chen LD, Manchester

LC, Barlow L, Walden LR. Melatonin, a highly potent endoge-
nous free radical scavenger and electron donor. Ann NY  Acad
Sci 1994;738:419–420.

Ray  US,  Mukhopadhyaya S,  Purkayastha SS,  Asnani V,  Tomer

OS, Prashad R, Thakur L, Selvamurthy W. Effect of yogic ex-
ercises on physical and mental health of young fellowship course
trainees. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol 2001;45:37–53.

Sathyaprabha TN, Murthy H, Murthy BT. Efficacy of naturopathy

and yoga in bronchial asthma—A  self controlled matched sci-
entific study. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol 2001;45:80–86.

Selvamurthy W,  Sridharan  K,  Ray  US,  Tiwary  RS,  Hegde  KS,

Radhakrishan U,  Sinha  KC.  A  new  physiological approach to
control  essential  hypertension.  Indian  J  Physiol  Pharmacol
1998;42:205–213.

Selvamurthy W,  Nayar  HS,  Joseph NT,  Joseph S.  Physiological

responses to cold (10°) in man after six months of yoga exer-
cise. Int J Biomet 1983a;32:188–193.

Selvamurthy W,  Nayar  HS,  Joseph NT,  Joseph S.  Physiological

effects of yogic practices. NIMHANS 1983b;1:71–75.

Smith AP. Prostaglandins and respiratory system. In Karim SMM,

ed.  Prostaglandins: Physiological, Pharmacological and  Patho-
logical Aspects. Baltimore: University Park Press, 1976:102–110.

Telles S,  Naveen KV.  Yoga for rehabilitation: An  overview. In-

dian J Med Sci 1997;51:123–127.

Tooley GA, Armstrong SM, Norman TR, Sali A. Acute increases

in night-time plasma melatonin levels following a period of med-
itation. Biol Psychol 2000;53:69–78.

Tzischinsky O, Shlitner A, Liavie P. The association between the

nocturnal  sleep  gate  and  nocturnal  onset  of  urinary  6-sulfa-
toxymelatonin. J Biol Rhythms 1993;8:199–209.

Udupa KN, Singh RH, Settiwar RM. Physiological and biochem-

ical studies on the effect of yoga and certain other exercises. Ind
J Med Res 1975;63:620–624.

Viswanathan M, Hissa R, Geroge JC. Suppression of sympathetic

nervous system by short photoperiod and melatonin in the Syr-
ian hamster. Life Sci 1986;38:73–75.

Wallace KW,  Benson H.  The  physiology of meditation. Sci  Am

1972;226:84–86.

Waldhauser F, Saletu B, Trinchard LI. Sleep laboratory investiga-

tions  on  hypnotic  properties  of  melatonin.  Psychopharmacol
1990;100:222–225.

Walton KG, Pugh ND, Gelderloos P, Macrae P. Stress reduction

and  preventing  hypertension: preliminary  support  for  a  psy-
choneuroendocrine  mechanism.  J  Altern  Complement  Med
1995;1:263–283.

Young JD, Taylor E. Meditation as a voluntary hypometabolic state

of biological estivation. News Physiol Sci 1998;13:149–153.

Address reprint requests to:

Ramesh Chand Sawhney, Ph.D.

Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism

Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences

Lucknow Road

Timarpur

Delhi-110054

India

E-mail: em_dipas@yahoo.com

HARINATH  ET AL.

268