Melatonin Impairs Fracture Healing by Suppressing RANKL-Mediated Bone

Remodeling

Tina Histing, M.D.,

*

,

,

1

Christina Anton,

*

,

Claudia Scheuer, M.D.,

,

Patric Garcia, M.D.,

*

,

Joerg H. Holstein, M.D.,

*

,

Moritz Klein, M.D.,

*

,

Romano Matthys,

§

Tim Pohlemann, M.D.,

*

,

and Michael D. Menger, M.D.

,

*Department of Trauma, Hand, and Reconstructive Surgery; †Institute for Clinical and Experimental Surgery, University of Saarland,

Homburg/Saar, Germany; ‡CRC Homburg (Collaborative Research Center, AO Foundation, Switzerland); and §AO Development

Institute, Davos, Switzerland

Originally submitted July 11, 2010; accepted for publication August 19, 2010

Background. Melatonin, the major pineal hormone,

is known to regulate distinct physiologic processes.
Previous studies have suggested that it supports skele-
tal growth and bone formation, most probably by in-
hibiting bone resorption. There is no information,
however, whether melatonin affects fracture healing.
We therefore studied in a mouse femur fracture model
the influence of melatonin on callus formation and bio-
mechanics during fracture healing.

Methods and Materials. Thirty CD-1 mice received

50 mg/kg body weight melatonin i.p. daily during the
entire 2-wk or 5-wk observation period. Controls (n

[

30) received equivalent amounts of vehicle. Bone heal-
ing was studied by radiological, biomechanical, histo-
morphometrical, and protein biochemical analyses at
2 and 5 wk after fracture.

Results. Biomechanical analysis at 2 wk after frac-

ture healing showed a significantly lower bending
stiffness in melatonin-treated animals compared with
controls. A slightly higher amount of cartilage tissue
and a significantly larger callus size indicated a de-
layed remodeling process after melatonin treatment.
Western blot analysis showed a significantly reduced
expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-

kB

ligand (RANKL) and collagen I after melatonin treat-
ment. The reduced expression of RANKL was associ-
ated with a diminished number of tartrate-resistant
acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts within
the callus of the newly formed bone.

Conclusions. Because bone resorption is an essen-

tial requirement for adequate remodeling during frac-
ture healing, we conclude that melatonin impairs
fracture healing by suppressing bone resorption
through down-regulation of RANKL-mediated osteo-
clast activation.

Ó 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Key Words: melatonin; mice; fracture healing; bone

formation; osteoclasts; RANKL; biomechanics.

INTRODUCTION

The secretion of melatonin, the major pineal hor-

mone, plays a critical role in the control of the circadian
rhythm

[1]

the reproductive function

[2]

, the body tem-

perature

[3]

, sexual activity

[4]

, immunomodulation

[5]

,

and aging

[6]

. Some of these actions are closely related to

sleep initiation and maintenance

[7]

. Besides, it has

been indicated that melatonin also influences bone me-
tabolism through regulation of osteoblast and osteclast
activity

[8]

The ability of melatonin to promote osteo-

blast maturation was first demonstrated in mouse pre-
osteoblasts and rat osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells,
where low concentrations of melatonin increased the
mRNA levels of several genes expressed in osteoblasts,
including alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteo-
calcin

[9]

. Another line of evidence that melatonin af-

fects bone metabolism is derived from osteoporosis
studies. Menopause is associated with a substantial de-
cline of melatonin secretion

[10]

and this fall of melato-

nin plasma levels is thought to be an important factor in
the development of osteoporosis. In line with this, mela-
tonin treatment has been shown to increase bone min-
eral density in ovariectomized rats

[11]

.

1

To whom correspondence and reprint requests should be ad-

dressed at Department of Trauma, Hand, and Reconstructive Sur-
gery, University of Saarland, D-66421 Homburg/Saar, Germany.
E-mail:

tina.histing@uks.eu

.

0022-4804/$36.00

Ó 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

83

Journal of Surgical Research 173, 83–90 (2012)

doi:

10.1016/j.jss.2010.08.036

The effects of melatonin on bone metabolism are pre-

sumably a result of inhibition of osteoclast activity
through changing the balance between receptor activator
of nuclear factor-

kB ligand (RANKL)/receptor activator of

nuclear factor-

kB (RANK) and osteoprotegerin (OPG).

RANKL is a potent stimulator of bone resorption by bind-
ing RANK in the cell membrane of osteoclasts. On the
other hand, OPG is a soluble decoy receptor for RANKL
that interferes with RANKL/RANK binding

[12]

.

Although there may be substantial interest how these

actions of melatonin influence bone regeneration, there
is complete lack of information, whether and how it acts
during the process of fracture healing. Under normal con-
ditions, bone remodeling during fracture healing proceeds
in cycles in which osteoclasts remove the old bone before
osteoblasts can invade the fracture zone and form new
bone by secreting osteoid. Because of the ability of melato-
nin to inhibit bone resorption through down-regulation of
RANKL, melatonin may indeed affect the process of re-
modeling during fracture healing. To test this hypothesis,
we herein studied the effect of melatonin on callus forma-
tion, bone remodeling, and RANKL and OPG expression
in a stably fixed femur fracture model in mice.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Animals and Specimens

CD-1 mice were bred at the Institute for Clinical and Experimental

Surgery, University of Saarland. They were kept at a 12-h light and
dark cycle and were fed a standard diet with water ad libitum. All animal
procedures were performed according to the National Institute of Health
guidelines for the use of experimental animals and were approved by the
German legislation on the protection of animals. For the present study,
a total of sixty 12- to 14-wk-old animals were used. Evaluation was
done after 2 and 5 wk observation period to assess the influence of mela-
tonin during the early and late phase of fracture healing.

Thirty mice were treated daily with 50 mg/kg body weight (BW) mel-

atonin (Sigma-Aldrich Chemie GmbH, Taufkirchen, Germany) i.p. for
the entire 2-wk and 5-wk observation period. This high dose of melato-
nin was chosen because others have shown that such high doses of mel-
atonin are capable of increasing bone mass and promoting cortical bone
formation in vivo

[8, 13]

. After 2 wk, 10 of these mice were killed for

radiological, biomechanical, and histomorphometrical analysis, and
another five mice were killed for protein biochemical analysis. In the
remaining 15 animals, daily melatonin treatment was continued for
a total of 5 wk. Ten of these mice were then killed for radiological,
biomechanical, and histomorphometrical analysis, and the remaining
five mice were killed for protein biochemical analysis.

Thirty vehicle-treated mice served as controls. After 2 wk 10 of

these mice were killed for radiological, biomechanical, and histomor-
phometrical analysis, and another five mice were killed for protein
biochemical analysis. The remaining 15 animals were kept for a total
of 5 wk. Ten of these mice were then killed for radiological, biome-
chanical, and histomorphometrical analysis, and the remaining five
mice were killed for protein biochemical analysis.

Surgical Procedure

Mice were anesthetized by an intraperitoneal injection of xylazine

(25 mg/kg BW) and ketamine (75 mg/kg BW). Under sterile conditions
a 4 mm medial parapatellar incision was performed at the right knee

to dislocate the patella laterally. After drilling a hole (0.5 mm in diam-
eter) into the intracondylar notch, an injection needle with a diameter
of 0.4 mm was drilled into the intramedullary canal. Subsequently,
a tungsten guide wire (0.2 mm in diameter) was inserted through
the needle into the intramedullary canal. After removal of the needle,
the femur was fractured by a 3-point bending device and an intrame-
dullary titanium screw (18 mm length, 0.5 mm in diameter) was im-
planted over the guide wire to stabilize the fracture

[14]

. The screw

consisted of a distal cone-shaped head (diameter 0.8 mm) and a prox-
imal thread (M 0.5 mm, length 4 mm) (AO Foundation, Research Im-
plants Systems (RIS), Davos, Switzerland). After fracture fixation,
the wound was closed using 6-0 synthetic sutures. Fracture and
implant position were confirmed by radiography (MX-20; Faxitron
X-ray Corporation, Wheeling, IL).

Radiological Analysis

At the end of the 2 and 5 wk observation period, the animals were

re-anesthetized and ventro-dorsal X-rays (MX-20 Faxitron X-ray Cor-
poration) of the healing femora were performed. Fracture healing was
analyzed according to the classification of Goldberg with stage 0 indi-
cating radiological non-union, stage 1 indicating possible union, and
stage 2 indicating radiological union

[15]

.

Biomechanical Analysis

For biomechanical analysis, the right and the left femora were re-

sected at 2 and 5 wk and freed from soft tissue. After removing the im-
plants, callus stiffness was measured with a nondestructive bending
test using a 3-point bending device with a 20 N load cell (Mini-Zwick
Z 2.5; Zwick GmbH, Ulm, Germany). Due to the different states of
healing, the loads that had to be applied varied markedly between
the individual animals. Loading was stopped individually in every
case when the actual load-displacement curve deviated more than
1% from linearity

[16]

. Control that the load was not destructive

was performed macroscopically and microscopically (histology). To ac-
count for differences in bone stiffness of the individual animals, the
unfractured left femora were also analyzed, serving as an internal
control. All values of the fractured femora are given in percent of
the corresponding unfractured femora. To guarantee standardized
measuring conditions, femora were mounted always with the ventral
aspect upwards. A working gauge length of 6 mm was used. Applying
a gradually increasing bending force with 1 mm/min, the bending
stiffness (N/mm) was calculated from the linear elastic part of the
load-displacement diagram

[17]

.

Histomorphometric and Immunohistochemical Analysis

For histology, bones were fixed in IHC zinc fixative (BM Pharmingen,

San Jose, CA, USA) for 24 h, decalcified in 10% EDTA solution for 2 wk
and then embedded in paraffin. Longitudinal sections of 5

mm thickness

were stained according to the trichrome method. At a magnification of
1.25

3 (Olympus BX60 Microscope; Olympus, Tokyo, Japan; Zeiss

Axio Cam and Axio Vision 3.1; Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany;
ImageJ Analysis System; NIH, Bethesda, MD) structural indices
were calculated according to the suggestions provided by Gerstenfeld
et al.

[18]

These included total callus area (bone, cartilaginous and

fibrous callus area)/femoral bone diameter (cortical width plus marrow
diameter) at the fracture gap [CAr/BDm (mm)], callus diameter/femoral
bone diameter [CDm/BDm], bone (total osseous tissue) callus area/total
callus area [TOTAr/CAr (%)], cartilaginous callus area/total callus
area [CgAr/CAr (%)], and fibrous tissue callus area/total callus area
[FTAr/CAr (%)].

Additionally, we used a score system to evaluate the quality of frac-

ture bridging

[19]

Both cortices were analyzed for bone bridging (two

points), cartilage bridging (one point), or bridging with fibrous tissue
(0 point). This score system results in a maximum of four points for
each specimen, indicating complete bone bridging.

JOURNAL OF SURGICAL RESEARCH: VOL. 173, NO. 1, MARCH 2012

84

For determination of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)

activity, bones were fixed in IHC zinc fixative (BM Pharmingen) for
24 h, decalcified in 10% EDTA solution for 2 wk and then embedded
in paraffin. Longitudinal sections of 5

mm thickness were stained ac-

cording to the trichrome method. After deparaffinizing again, the sec-
tions were incubated in a mixture of 5 mg naphotol AS-MX phosphate
and 11 mg fast red TR salt in 10 mL0.2 M sodium acetate puffer (pH
5.0) for 1 h at 37



C. Sections were counterstained with methyl green

and covered with glycerin gelatine.

For immunohistochemical detection of the melatonin receptor in the

callus tissue, zinc-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, which were de-
calcified for 2 wk in 10% EDTA solution, were cut in sections of 5

mm

thickness and deparaffinized with x-Tra (Medite Medizintechnik,
Burgdorf, Germany). After rehydration by a descending ethanol line
and antigen demasking with 0.05% saponin (Sigma-Aldrich, Deisenho-
fen, Germany) for 30 min at room temperature, endogenous peroxi-
dases and unspecific binding sites were blocked with 1% H

2

O

2

or 4%

donkey normal serum (Dianova, Hamburg, Germany). The primary
polyclonal rabbit anti-melatonin receptor antibody Mel-1A-R (1:50;
R-18, Santa Cruz, Heidelberg, Germany) was incubated at 4



C over-

night. As secondary antibody a peroxidase-conjugated donkey anti-
rabbit-IgG antibody (1:100; GE Healthcare, Freiburg, Germany) was
incubated for 30 min at room temperature. 3,3

0

Diaminobenzidine

(DAB, Sigma-Aldrich) was used as chromogen for the enzyme reac-
tion. Cell nuclei were counterstained with Mayer’s hemalaun. After
dehydration with ethanol and x-Tra, the slices were covered with
x-Tra-Kit (Medite Medizintechnik).

Western Blot Analysis

The callus tissue was frozen and stored at –80



C until further pro-

cessing. For whole protein extracts and Western blot analysis of OPG,
collagen I, PCNA, cleaved caspase-3, and RANKL, the callus tissue

A

B

*

2 weeks

control

melatonin

]

%[

s

s

e

nff

it

s

g

ni

d

n

e

b

0

30

60

90

5 weeks

control

melatonin

]

%[

s

s

e

nff

it

s

g

ni

d

n

e

b

0

30

60

90

FIG. 1.

Biomechanical analysis of the bending stiffness at 2 wk (A) and 5 wk (B) of fracture healing in controls (white bars) and melatonin-

treated animals (black bars). Means

6 SEM; *P < 0.05 versus control.

A

B

C

D

*

2 weeks

control

melatonin

]

m

m[ 

m

D

B/

r

A

C

0

2

4

6

8

5 weeks

control

melatonin

]

m

m[ 

m

D

B/

r

A

C

0

2

4

6

8

2 weeks

control

melatonin

er

o

c

s-

ot

si

H

0

1

2

3

4

5 weeks

control

melatonin

er

o

c

s-

ot

si

H

0

1

2

3

4

FIG. 2.

Histomorphometric analysis of the total callus area (CAr) in relation to the diameter of the femur (BDm) (A) and (B), and the healing

score (C) and (D) after 2 wk (A) and (C), and 5 wk (B and D) of fracture healing in controls (white bars) and melatonin-treated animals (black
bars). For histologic scoring, both cortices were analyzed for bone bridging (2 points), cartilage bridging (1 point) or bridging with fibrous tissue
(0 point). Means

6 SEM; *P < 0.05 versus control.

HISTING ET AL.: MELATONIN IMPAIRS FRACTURE HEALING

85

was homogenized in lysis buffer [10 mM Tris pH 7.5, 10 mM NaCl,
0.1 mM EDTA, 0.5% Triton-X 100, 0.02% NaN3, 0.2 mM PMSF, and
protease inhibitor cocktail (1:100 vol/vol; Sigma-Aldrich, Taufkirchen,
Germany)], incubated for 30 min on ice and centrifuged for 30 min at
16,000

3 g. Protein concentrations were determined using the Lowry

assay. The whole protein extracts (10

mg protein per lane) were sepa-

rated discontinuously on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels
and transferred to polyvinylendifluoride membranes. After blockade
of nonspecific binding sites, membranes were incubated for 4 h with
the following antibodies: mouse anti-mouse PCNA (1:500; DAKO Cyto-
mation, Hamburg, Germany), rabbit anti-mouse OPG (1:100; Santa
Cruz Biotechnology, Heidelberg, Germany), rabbit anti-mouse cleaved
caspase-3 (1:400; Cell Signaling, Frankfurt, Germany), mouse anti-
mouse RANKL (1:300; Abcam, Cambridge, UK), and rabbit anti-
mouse collagen I (1:75; Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Heidelberg,
Germany). This was followed by corresponding horseradish peroxidase
conjugated secondary antibodies (1.5 h, 1:5000; GE Healthcare Amer-
sham, Freiburg, Germany). Protein expression was visualized using
luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL, GE Healthcare Amer-
sham). Signals were densitometrically assessed (Quantity One,
Geldoc; BioRad, Mu

¨ nchen, Germany) and normalized to

b-actin signals

(1:20,000, anti-

b-actin, Sigma-Aldrich) to correct for unequal loading.

Statistical Analysis

All data are given as means

6 SEM. After proving the assumption

for normal distribution (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test) and equal vari-
ance (F-test), comparison between the experimental groups was per-
formed by Student’s t-test or one way ANOVA and Student
Newman-Keuls post-hoc test. For nonparametrical data Mann-
Whitney test was used. Statistics were performed using the Graph-
Pad Prism 4.0 software package (Graphpad, San Diego, CA). A
P value

< 0.05 was considered to indicate significant differences.

RESULTS

Radiological Analysis

Radiological analyses 2 and 5 wk after fracture could

not

demonstrate

significant

differences

between

melatonin-treated animals and controls (P

> 0.05).

Biomechanical Analysis

Biomechanical analysis at 2 wk after fracture healing

showed a significantly lower bending stiffness in
melatonin-treated animals compared with controls
(

Fig. 1

A). After 5 wk, the melatonin-treated animals

still showed a lower bending stiffness compared with
controls, however, the difference did not prove statisti-
cally significant (

Fig. 1

B).

Histologic Analysis

All samples demonstrated a typical pattern of second-

ary fracture healing with callus formation, including in-
tramembranous and endochondral ossification. At 2 wk
after fracture healing, the size of the total callus of the
melatonin-treated animals was almost the same as that
of controls (

Fig. 2

A). After 5 wk, however, the callus

size was significantly larger in melatonin-treated ani-
mals compared with controls (

Fig. 2

B). This indicates

a delay in bone remodeling after melatonin treatment.

A

C

B

D

2 weeks

control

melatonin

]

%[ 

r

A

C/

r

A

T

O

T

0

25

50

75

100

5 weeks

control

melatonin

]

%[ 

r

A

C/

r

A

T

O

T

0

25

50

75

100

2 weeks

control

melatonin

]

%[ 

r

A

C/

r

A

g

C

0

25

50

75

100

5 weeks

control

melatonin

]

%[ 

r

A

C/

r

A

g

C

0

1

2

3

4

5

FIG. 3.

Histomorphometric analysis of the tissue distribution within the callus area. Total osseous tissue callus area/total callus area (TO-

TAr/CAr %) (A) and (B), and cartilaginous callus area/total callus area (CgAr/CAr %) (C) and (D), after 2 wk (A) and (C), and 5 wk (B) and (D), of
fracture healing in controls (white bars) and melatonin-treated animals (black bars). Means

6 SEM.

JOURNAL OF SURGICAL RESEARCH: VOL. 173, NO. 1, MARCH 2012

86

At 2 wk after fracture, melatonin-treated animals

showed a slightly but not significantly lower healing
score compared with controls (

Fig. 2

C). After 5 wk,

the histologic scores did not differ between the two
groups (

Fig. 2

D).

Analysis of callus composition revealed that at 2 wk

bone formation was slightly reduced and cartilage for-
mation was increased in melatonin-treated animals

compared with controls (

Fig. 3

and C). After 5 wk,

all animals showed a comparable amount of bone tis-
sue, i.e.,

w90% and cartilaginous tissue could not any-

more be detected (

Fig. 3

B and D).

Analysis of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase

(TRAP) activity demonstrated a significantly reduced
number of TRAP-positive cells after melatonin treat-
ment compared with controls (

Fig. 4

A). TRAP activity

was detected predominately in multinuclear osteoclasts
within the central region of the callus (

Fig. 4

B). Of in-

terest, TRAP-positive cells could neither be found in
the periosteum nor in the endosteal region of the callus.
Immunostaining with a monoclonal antibody against
Mel 1aR demonstrated that osteoblasts within the cal-
lus are capable of expressing melatonin receptors
(

Fig. 4

C). The negative control showed no positively

stained cells.

Protein Expression Analysis

At 2 wk, Western blot analysis demonstrated that ex-

pression of OPG, which is an inhibitor of osteoclasto-
genesis, was not affected by melatonin treatment
(

Fig. 5

and B). However, the expression of RANKL,

which is an essential factor for osteoclast formation, ac-
tivation and survival, promoting bone resorption and
bone loss, was significantly reduced compared with con-
trols (

Fig. 5

and C). The expression of collagen I,

a marker of osteoblastogenesis, was also significantly
reduced after melatonin treatment (

Fig. 5

A and D).

The expression of PCNA, which serves as an indicator
of cell proliferation, was slightly but not significantly
lower in the fracture callus of melatonin-treated ani-
mals compared with controls (

Fig. 5

A and E). Cleaved

caspase-3, a marker for apoptotic cell death, was not de-
tectable in the callus tissue of either of the groups (data
not shown).

DISCUSSION

In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that

melatonin affects the remodeling process during frac-
ture healing. The data of our experiments confirmed
our hypothesis. We herein demonstrate for the first
time that melatonin induces a marked delay of fracture
repair, as indicated by a significantly lower bending
stiffness compared with non-treated controls during
the early time period of healing. The action of melatonin
involves most probably an inhibition of bone resorption
through down-regulation of RANKL, an essential factor
for osteoclast activity. This view is supported by the sig-
nificantly reduced expression of RANKL and the dimin-
ished number of TRAP-positive cells within the fracture
callus.

FIG. 4.

TRAP-positive cells at 2 wk of bone healing (A) in controls

(white bars) and melatonin-treated animals (black bars). Means

6

SEM; *P

< 0.05 versus control. Immunohistochemical staining of

TRAP-positive cells (B), arrows, and Mel 1aR expression (C), arrows,
within the callus of a control animal after 2 wk of fracture healing.
(Color version of figure is available online.)

HISTING ET AL.: MELATONIN IMPAIRS FRACTURE HEALING

87

In general, there is substantial evidence that melato-

nin may act beneficial in bone

[20]

. For example, Mun˜oz

et al.

[21]

demonstrated that topical application of mela-

tonin and growth hormone accelerates bone healing
around dental implants in dogs. Calvo-Guirado et al.

[22]

and Cutando et al.

[23]

showed also a significantly in-

creased bone formation and bone density after topical ap-
plication of melatonin of dental implants in Beagle dogs
and postulated that melatonin enhances osteointegra-
tion. Satomura et al.

[13]

further showed that melatonin

stimulates mineralized matrix formation as well as pro-

liferation and alkaline phosphatase activity of human os-
teoblasts in vitro through increased gene expression of
type I collagen, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteo-
calcin. Of interest, in vitro human osteoblasts from youn-
ger subjects displayed higher expression of Mel 1aR than
those from the elderly, both in males and females. More-
over, intraperitoneal injection of melatonin in mice in-
creased the volume of newly formed cortical bone of
femora. Based on these results, the authors suggested
that melatonin may be applied to promote bone regener-
ation during fracture healing

[13]

.

RANKL 

control

melatonin 


0,0 

0,5 

1,0 

1,5 

PCNA 

control

melatonin 


10 

15 

20 

OPG 

control

melatonin 


10 

15 

20 

25 

RANKL 

-actin 

Collagen I 

-actin 

PCNA 

-actin 

OPG 

β  

β  

β  

β  

-actin 

control

melatonin 

collagen I 

control

melatonin 


10 

15 

20 

25 

FIG. 5.

Western Blot analysis of OPG (A) and (B), RANKL (A) and (C), collagen I (A) and (D), and PCNA (A) and (E) expression in callus of

melatonin-treated mice (black bars) and controls (white bars) after 2 wk of fracture healing. Means

6 SEM; *P < 0.05 versus control.

JOURNAL OF SURGICAL RESEARCH: VOL. 173, NO. 1, MARCH 2012

88

In the present study, we could demonstrate for the

first time that osteoblasts within fracture callus are ca-
pable of expressing melatonin receptors also in vivo.
This confirms a possible role of melatonin in bone for-
mation, although melatonin was not effective to accel-
erate the process of fracture healing.

In contrast to the aforementioned results, Koyama

et al.

[8]

found that daily administration of melatonin

for 4 wk in mice did not increase bone formation, as in-
dicated by histomorphometric analysis and a lack of
a significant increase of serum alkaline phosphatase
(ALP). However, this study showed that melatonin in-
creases bone mass through suppression of bone resorp-
tion. These results are supported by other studies,
demonstrating that melatonin treatment in ovariecto-
mized rats

[24]

as well as in obese women

[25]

leads to

an acute and marked decrease of bone resorption. In
line with the results of these studies, we demonstrate
herein that melatonin significantly reduces RANKL ex-
pression and, additionally, diminishes the number of
TRAP-positive cells. Because remodeling during frac-
ture healing requires osteoclast-mediated bone resorp-
tion, melatonin may have negatively affected fracture
healing by delaying the process of remodeling, as indi-
cated by a significantly decreased callus stiffness.

Previous studies have indeed demonstrated that in-

hibition of RANKL affects bone metabolism. Li et al.

[26]

reported

that

RANKL

inhibition

prevents

orchiectomy-related deficits in trabecular bone mineral
density, trabecular architecture, and periosteal bone
formation. Of interest, Gerstenfeld et al.

[27]

also

showed that RANKL inhibition delays the process of re-
modeling within the fracture callus, although these au-
thors found an enhanced stiffness of the healing bone.
This difference compared with our study may be due
to the fact that we herein studied the biomechanics dur-
ing the early healing period (d 14), while Gerstenfeld
et al.

[27]

performed the biomechanical analysis at

a very late time point (d 42), when fracture healing in
mice is already completed.

In the present study, melatonin did not affect the ex-

pression of OPG in vivo. Although it has been reported
that in vitro melatonin is capable of inducing the expres-
sion of OPG and suppressing the expression of RANKL

[8]

results from cross-sectional in vivo studies in hu-

mans vary from no association between bone mineral
density and OPG to a decrease in BMD with increasing
OPG levels in both genders

[28]

Furthermore, Kon et al.

[29]

showed peaks of OPG expression during bone heal-

ing at 24 h and 7 d after fracture. On the other hand,
RANKL expression peaked at 3 and 14 d. In line with
this, the present study demonstrates expression of
OPG and RANKL until 14 d after fracture.

Melatonin may not only affect bone metabolism

through control of the RANKL/RANK/OPG system,

but also through regulation of biochemical processes.
Melatonin is a potent free radical scavenger and,
thus, neutralizes free radicals and reactive oxygen spe-
cies

[30]

Because osteoblasts generate high levels of su-

peroxide anions during bone resorption that contribute
to the degradative process, the effect of melatonin in
preventing osteoclast activity in bone may, in part, be
also due to the free radical scavenging properties of
the hormone.

The expression of collagen I, a marker of osteoblasto-

genesis, was significantly reduced after melatonin treat-
ment compared with controls. This result contrasts those
of in vitro studies. Nakade et al.

[31]

demonstrated that

melatonin stimulates the proliferation and type I colla-
gen synthesis in human bone cells in vitro. Despite the
fact that melatonin increases the proliferation, differen-
tiation, and bone formation in vitro

[9, 31]

the hormone

may not be osteogenic in vivo. Suzuki et al.

[32]

found

that melatonin suppresses the osteoblastic activities by
suppressing the ALP activity. This is in line with our
result that melatonin significantly reduced collagen I
expression.

In conclusion, melatonin may increase bone mass by

inhibiting bone resorption rather than increasing bone
formation. Thus melatonin may serve as an important
regulator of bone mass relating to osteoporosis. How-
ever, melatonin is not capable of accelerating fracture
healing. In contrast, it delays the time course of bone re-
pair by affecting the process of remodeling.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors thank Janine Becker for excellent technical assistance.

This study was supported by a grant of the University of Saarland,
HOMFOR.

REFERENCES

1.

Redman JR. Circadian entrainment and phase shifting in mam-
mals with melatonin. J Biol Rhythms 1997;12:581.

2.

Reiter RJ, Tan DX, Manchester LC, et al. Melatonin and repro-
duction revisited. Biol Reprod 2009;81:445.

3.

Cagnacci A, Elliott JA, Yen SS. Melatonin: A major regulator of
the circadian rhythmus of core temperature in humans. J Clin
Endocrinol Metab 1992;75:447.

4.

Drago F, Busa L. Acute low doses of melatonin restore full sexual
activity in impotent male rats. Brain Res 2000;878:98.

5.

Liebmann PM, Wo¨lfler A, Felsner P, et al. Melatonin and the im-
mune system. Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 1997;112:203.

6.

Sandyk R. Possible role of pineal melatonin in the mechanisms of
aging. Int J Neurosci 1990;52:85.

7.

Dijk DJ, Duffy JF, Riel E, et al. Ageing and the circadian and ho-
meostatic regulation of human sleep during forced desynchrony
of rest, melatonin, and temperature rhythmus. J Physiol (Lond)
1999;516:611.

8.

Koyama H, Nakade O, Takada Y, et al. Melatonin at pharmaco-
logic doses increases bone mass by suppressing resorption
through down-regulation of the RANKL-mediated osteoclast for-
mation and activation. J Bone Miner Res 2002;17:1219.

HISTING ET AL.: MELATONIN IMPAIRS FRACTURE HEALING

89

9.

Roth JA, Kim BG, Lin WL, et al. Melatonin promotes osteoblast
differentiation and bone formation. J Biol Chem 1999;
274:22041.

10.

Sack RL, Lewy AJ, Erb DL, et al. Human melatonin production
decreases with age. J Pineal Res 1986;3:379.

11.

Uslu S, Uysal A, Oktem G, et al. Constructive effect of exogenous
melatonin against osteoporosis after ovariectomy in rats. Anal
Quant Cytol Histol 2007;29:317.

12.

Lacey DL, Timms E, Tan HL, et al. Osteoprotegerin ligand is
a cytokine that regulates osteoclast differentiation and activa-
tion. Cell 1998;93:165.

13.

Satomura K, Tobiume S, Tokuyama R, et al. Melatonin at phar-
macological doses enhances human osteoblastic differentiation
in vitro and promotes mouse cortical bone formation in vivo.
J Pineal Res 2007;42:231.

14.

Holstein JH, Matthys R, Histing T, et al. Development of
a stable closed femoral fracture model in mice. J Surg Res
2008;153:71.

15.

Goldberg VM, Powell A, Shaffer JW, et al. Bone grafting: Role of
histocompatibility in transplantation. J Orthop Res 1985;3:389.

16.

Schoen M, Rotter R, Schattner S, et al. Introduction of a new in-
terlocked intramedullary nailing device for stabilization of criti-
cally sized femoral defects in the rat: A combined biomechanical
and animal experimental study. J Orthop Res 2008;26:184.

17.

Histing T, Garcia P, Matthys R, et al. An internal locking plate to
study intramembranous bone healing in a mouse femur fracture
model. J Orthop Res 2010;28:397.

18.

Gerstenfeld LC, Wronski TJ, Hollinger JO, et al. Application of
histomorphometric methods to the study of bone repair. J Bone
Miner Res 2005;20:1715.

19.

Garcia P, Holstein JH, Histing T, et al. A new technique for in-
ternal fixation of femoral fractures in mice: Impact of stability
on fracture healing. J Biomech 2008;41:1689.

20.

Sandyk R, Anastasiadis PG, Anninos PA, et al. Is postmeno-
pausal osteoporosis related to pineal gland functions? Int J Neu-
rosci 1992;62:215.

21.

Mun

˜ oz F, Lo´pez-Pen

˜ a M, Min˜o N, et al. Topical application of

melatonin and growth hormone accelerates bone healing around
dental implants in dogs. Clin Implant Dent Relat Res 2009;29.
Epub ahead of print.

22.

Calvo-Guirado JL, Go´mez-Moreno G, Barone A, et al. Melatonin
plus porcine bone on discrete calcium deposit implant surface
stimulates osteointegration in dental implants. J Pineal Res
2009;47:164. Epub 2009 Jun 29.

23.

Cutando A, Go´mez-Moreno G, Arana C, et al. Melatonin stimulates
osteointegration of dental implants. J Pineal Res 2008;45:174.

24.

Ostrowska Z, Kos-Kudla B, Swietochowska E, et al. Assessment
of the relationship between dynamic pattern of nighttime levels
of melatonin and chosen biochemical markers of bone metabo-
lism in a rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Neuro Endo-
crinol Lett 2001;22:129.

25.

Ostrowska Z, Kos-Kudla B, Marek B, et al. Assessment of the re-
lationship between circadian variations of salivary melatonin
levels and type I collagen metabolism in postmenopausal obese
women. Neuro Endocrinol Lett 2001;22:121.

26.

Li X, Ominsky MS, Stolina M, et al. Increased RANK ligand in
bone marrow of orchiectomized rats and prevention of their
bone loss by the RANK ligand inhibitor osteoprotegerin. Bone
2009;45:669.

27.

Gerstenfeld LC, Sacks DJ, Pelis M, et al. Comparison of effects of
the bisphosphonate alendronate versus the RANKL inhibitor de-
nosumab on murine fracture healing. J Bone Miner Res 2009;
24:196.

28.

Abrahamsen B, Hjelmborg JV, Kostenuik P, et al. Circulating
amounts of osteoprotegerin and RANK ligand: Genetic influence
and relationship with BMD assessed in female twins. Bone 2005;
36:727.

29.

Kon T, Cho TJ, Aizawa T, et al. Expression of osteoprotegerin,
receptor activator of NF-

kB ligand (osteoprotegerin ligand)

and related proinflammatory cytokines during fracture healing.
J Bone Miner Res 2001;16:1004.

30.

Reiter RJ, Tan DX, Manchester LC, et al. Biochemical reactivity
of melatonin with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species: A review
of the evidence. Cell Biochem Biophys 2001;34:237.

31.

Nakade O, Koyama H, Ariji H, et al. Melatonin stimulates prolif-
eration and type I collagen synthesis in human bone cells in vitro.
J Pineal Res 1999;27:106.

32.

Suzuki N, Hattori A. Melatonin suppresses osteoclastic and oste-
oblastic activities in the scales of goldfish. J Pineal Res 2002;
33:253.

JOURNAL OF SURGICAL RESEARCH: VOL. 173, NO. 1, MARCH 2012

90