Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia

Israeli Practices towards the Palestinian 
People and the Question of Apartheid 

Palestine and the Israeli Occupation, Issue No. 1

 

E/ESCWA/ECRI/2017/1 

Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA) 

Israeli Practices towards  
the Palestinian People  
and the Question of Apartheid 

Palestine and the Israeli Occupation, Issue No. 1 

 

United Nations 
Beirut, 2017 

 

© 2017 United Nations 

All rights reserved worldwide 

Photocopies and reproductions of excerpts are allowed with proper credits. 

All queries on rights and licenses, including subsidiary rights, should be addressed 

to the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia 

(ESCWA), e-mail: publications-escwa@un.org.  

The findings, interpretations and conclusions expressed in this publication are 

those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations 

or its officials or Member States. 

The designations employed and the presentation of material in this publication do 

not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the United 

Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its 

authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. 

Links contained in this publication are provided for the convenience of the reader 

and are correct at the time of issue. The United Nations takes no responsibility for 

the continued accuracy of that information or for the content of any external 

website. 

References have, wherever possible, been verified. 

Symbols of United Nations documents are composed of capital letters combined 

with figures. Mention of such a symbol indicates a reference to a United Nations 

document. 

United Nations publication issued by ESCWA, United Nations House, Riad El Solh 

Square, P.O. Box: 11-8575, Beirut, Lebanon. 

Website: www.unescwa.org. 

 

 

Acknowledgements 

This report was commissioned by the Economic and Social Commission for 

Western Asia (ESCWA) from authors Mr. Richard Falk and Ms. Virginia Tilley.  

Richard Falk (LLB, Yale University; SJD, Harvard University) is currently Research 

Fellow, Orfalea Center of Global and International Studies, University of California at 

Santa Barbara, and Albert G. Milbank Professor of International Law and Practice 

Emeritus at Princeton University. From 2008 through 2014, he served as United 

Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian 

territories occupied since 1967. He is author or editor of some 60 books and hundreds 

of articles on international human rights law, Middle East politics, environmental 

justice, and other fields concerning human rights and international relations.  

Virginia Tilley (MA and PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and MA in 

Contemporary Arab Studies, Georgetown University) is Professor of Political 

Science at Southern Illinois University. From 2006 to 2011, she served as Chief 

Research Specialist in the Human Sciences Research Council of South Africa  

and from 2007 to 2010 led the Council’s Middle East Project, which undertook  

a two-year study of apartheid in the occupied Palestinian territories. In addition to 

many articles on the politics and ideologies of the conflict in Israel-Palestine, she is 

author of The One-State Solution (University of Michigan Press and Manchester 

University Press, 2005) and editor of Beyond Occupation: Apartheid, Colonialism 

and International Law in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (Pluto Press, 2012). 

This report benefited from the general guidance of Mr. Tarik Alami, Director of the 

Emerging and Conflict-Related Issues (ECRI) Division at ESCWA. Mr. Rabi’ Bashour 

(ECRI) coordinated the report, contributed to defining its scope and provided 

editorial comments, planning and data. Ms. Leila Choueiri provided substantive 

and editorial inputs. Ms. Rita Jarous (ECRI), Mr. Sami Salloum and Mr. Rafat 

Soboh (ECRI), provided editorial comments and information, as well as technical 

assistance. Mr. Damien Simonis (ESCWA, Conference Services Section) edited  

the report. 

iv  

|

  Israeli Practices towards the Palestinian People and the Question of Apartheid 

Appreciation is extended to the blind reviewers for their valuable input. 

We also acknowledge the authors of and contributors to Occupation, Colonialism, 

Apartheid? A Reassessment of Israel’s Practices in the Occupied Palestinian 

Territories under International Law, whose work informed this report (see annex I) 

and was published in 2012 as Beyond Occupation: Apartheid, Colonialism and 

International Law in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

|

  v 

Preface 

The authors of this report, examining whether Israel has established an apartheid 

regime that oppresses and dominates the Palestinian people as a whole, fully 

appreciate the sensitivity of the question.

1

 Even broaching the issue has been 

denounced by spokespersons of the Israeli Government and many of its supporters 

as anti-Semitism in a new guise. In 2016, Israel successfully lobbied for the 

inclusion of criticism of Israel in laws against anti-Semitism in Europe and the 

United States of America, and background documents to those legal instruments 

list the apartheid charge as one example of attempts aimed at “destroying Israel’s 

image and isolating it as a pariah State”.

2

  

The authors reject the accusation of anti-Semitism in the strongest terms. First, the 

question of whether the State of Israel is constituted as an apartheid regime 

springs from the same body of international human rights law and principles that 

rejects anti-Semitism: that is, the prohibition of racial discrimination. No State is 

immune from the norms and rules enshrined in the International Convention on 

the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, which must be applied 

impartially. The prohibition of apartheid, which, as a crime against humanity, can 

admit no exceptions, flows from the Convention. Strengthening that body of 

international law can only benefit all groups that have historically endured 

discrimination, domination and persecution, including Jews. 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

1

 

This report was prepared in response to a request made by member States of the United Nations Economic and Social 

Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA) at the first meeting of its Executive Committee, held in Amman on 8 and 9 June 2015. 
Preliminary findings of the report were presented to the twenty-ninth session of ESCWA, held in Doha from 13 to 15 December 
2016. As a result, member States passed resolution 326 (XXIX) of 15 December 2016, in which they requested that the 
secretariat “publish widely the results of the study”. 

2

 

Coordinating Forum for Countering Antisemitism (CFCA): FAQ: the campaign to defame Israel. Available from 

http://antisemitism.org.il/eng/FAQ:%20The%20campaign%20to%20defame%20Israel. The CFCA is an Israeli Government 
“national forum”. “The new anti-Semitism” has become the term used to equate criticism of Israeli racial policies with anti-
Semitism, especially where such criticism extends to proposing that the ethnic premise of Jewish statehood is illegitimate, 
because it violates international human rights law. The European Union Parliament Working Group on Antisemitism has 
accordingly included in its working definition of anti-Semitism the following example: “Denying the Jewish people their right to 
self-determination, e.g., by claiming that the existence of the State of Israel is a racist endeavour” (see 
www.antisem.eu/projects/eumc-working-definition-of-antisemitism). In 2016, the United States passed the Anti-Semitism 
Awareness Act, in which the definition of anti-Semitism is that set forth by the Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-
Semitism of the Department of State in a fact sheet of 8 June 2010. Examples of anti-Semitism listed therein include: “Denying 
the Jewish people their right to self-determination, and denying Israel the right to exist.” (Available from https://2009-
2017.state.gov/documents/organization/156684.pdf). 

vi  

|

  Israeli Practices towards the Palestinian People and the Question of Apartheid 

Secondly, the situation in Israel-Palestine constitutes an unmet obligation of the 

organized international community to resolve a conflict partially generated by its 

own actions. That obligation dates formally to 1922, when the League of Nations 

established the British Mandate for Palestine as a territory eminently ready for 

independence as an inclusive secular State, yet incorporated into the Mandate the 

core pledge of the Balfour Declaration to support the “Jewish people” in their 

efforts to establish in Palestine a “Jewish national home”.

3

 Later United Nations 

Security Council and General Assembly resolutions attempted to resolve the 

conflict generated by that arrangement, yet could not prevent related proposals, 

such as partition, from being overtaken by events on the ground. If this attention to 

the case of Israel by the United Nations appears exceptional, therefore, it is only 

because no comparable linkage exists between United Nations actions and any 

other prolonged denial to a people of their right of self-determination.  

Thirdly, the policies, practices and measures applied by Israel to enforce a system 

of racial discrimination threaten regional peace and security. United Nations 

resolutions have long recognized that danger and called for resolution of the 

conflict so as to restore and maintain peace and stability in the region.  

To assert that the policies and practices of a sovereign State amount to apartheid 

constitutes a grave charge. A study aimed at making such a determination should 

be undertaken and submitted for consideration only when supporting evidence 

clearly exceeds reasonable doubt. The authors of this report believe that evidence 

for suspecting that a system of apartheid has been imposed on the Palestinian 

people meets such a demanding criterion. Given the protracted suffering of the 

Palestinian people, it would be irresponsible not to present the evidence and legal 

arguments regarding whether Israel has established an apartheid regime that 

oppresses the Palestinian people as a whole, and not to make recommendations 

for appropriate further action by international and civil society actors.  

In sum, this study was motivated by the desire to promote compliance with 

international human rights law, uphold and strengthen international criminal law, 

and ensure that the collective responsibilities of the United Nations and its Member 

States with regard to crimes against humanity are fulfilled. More concretely, it aims 

to see the core commitments of the international community to upholding 

international law applied to the case of the Palestinian people, in defence of its rights 

under international law, including the right of self-determination.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

3

 

The Council of the League of Nations, League of Nations Mandate for Palestine, December 1922, article 2. Available from 

www.mandateforpalestine.org/the-mandate.html. 

|

  vii 

Contents 

Page 

Acknowledgements 

iii

 

Preface 

v

 

Executive Summary 

1

 

Introduction 

9

 

1.

 

The Legal Context: Short History of the Prohibition of Apartheid 

11

 

Alternative definitions of apartheid 

12

 

2.

 

Testing for an Apartheid Regime in Israel-Palestine 

27

 

 

The political geography of apartheid 

27

 

A.

 

Israel as a racial State 

30

 

B.

 

Apartheid through fragmentation 

37

 

C.

 

Counter-arguments 

49

 

D.

3.

 

Conclusions and Recommendations 

52

 

 

Conclusions 

52

 

A.

 

Recommendations 

53

 

B.

Annexes

 

  I.  Findings of the 2009 HSRC Report 

58

 

 II.  Which Country? 

64

 

 

 

 

Executive Summary 

This report concludes that Israel has established an apartheid regime that 

dominates the Palestinian people as a whole. Aware of the seriousness  

of this allegation, the authors of the report conclude that available evidence 

establishes beyond a reasonable doubt that Israel is guilty of policies and  

practices that constitute the crime of apartheid as legally defined in  

instruments of international law. 

The analysis in this report rests on the same body of international human rights 

law and principles that reject anti-Semitism and other racially discriminatory 

ideologies, including: the Charter of the United Nations (1945), the Universal 

Declaration of Human Rights (1948), and the International Convention on the 

Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (1965). The report relies for its 

definition of apartheid primarily on article II of the International Convention on the 

Suppression and Punishment of the Crime of Apartheid (1973, hereinafter the 

Apartheid Convention): 

The term "the crime of apartheid", which shall include similar policies and practices of 
racial segregation and discrimination as practiced in southern Africa, shall apply to… 
inhuman acts committed for the purpose of establishing and maintaining domination by  
one racial group of persons over any other racial group of persons and systematically 
oppressing them.  

Although the term “apartheid” was originally associated with the specific instance 

of South Africa, it now represents a species of crime against humanity under 

customary international law and the Rome Statute of the International Criminal 

Court, according to which: 

“The crime of apartheid” means inhumane acts… committed in the context of an 
institutionalized regime of systematic oppression and domination by one racial group  
over any other racial group or groups and committed with the intention of maintaining  
that regime. 

Against that background, this report reflects the expert consensus that the 

prohibition of apartheid is universally applicable and was not rendered moot by 

the collapse of apartheid in South Africa and South West Africa (Namibia).