Talking

 Esports 

A guide to becoming a world-class esports broadcaster 

Paul “ReDeYe” Chaloner 

 

  

INTRODUCTION 

4 

HOW ON EARTH DID WE GET HERE? 

6 

BROADCAST ROLES 

10 

STREAMING 

12 

R

ESOURCES

 ............................................................. 14 

EARLY BROADCASTING 

15 

T

HE FIRST BROADCAST

 ............................................... 15 

G

OING PUBLIC

 ......................................................... 16 

T

EETHING ISSUES

 ...................................................... 17 

H

ANDLING 

C

RITICISM

 ................................................ 19 

L

EARNING FROM THE PROFESSIONALS

 ............................ 20 

THE KEYS TO SUCCESS ON ANY FORMAT 

22 

P

REPARATION

 ......................................................... 22 

G

AME

-

SPECIFIC PREPARATION

 ............................. 26 

P

LAY THE GAME

! ............................................... 26 

P

RACTICE

 ............................................................... 28 

P

ASSION

 ................................................................ 28 

P

ROFESSIONALISM

 .................................................... 29 

OFFLINE EVENTS 

31 

L

ANGUAGE

 ............................................................. 32 

T

HE CROWD

 ............................................................ 32 

P

RODUCTION DIFFERENCES

 ......................................... 33 

D

RESS CODE

 ............................................................ 35 

 

C

AMERAS

! .............................................................. 35 

R

EHEARSALS

 ............................................................ 37 

THE VOICE 

38 

W

HAT CAN 

I

 DO TO IMPROVE MY VOICE

? ........................ 38 

I

NFLECTION

 ............................................................. 39 

P

ROJECTION

 ............................................................ 39 

E

NUNCIATION

 .......................................................... 39 

P

ACING

 .................................................................. 40 

S

AVING YOUR VOICE 

(AKA

 AVOIDING A SORE THROAT

) ...... 40 

NATURAL TALENT VERSUS HARD WORK 

43 

STYLE AND TECHNIQUE 

43 

THE ART OF DEAD AIR 

44 

STORYLINES 

48 

CHEMISTRY 

49 

HOSTING AND PRESENTING 

52 

M

AIN STAGE HOST

 .................................................... 52 

D

ESK HOST

 .............................................................. 55 

G

RAPHICS AND STORYLINES

 ................................ 56 

C

AMERA USAGE

 ................................................ 57 

F

LOW

 ............................................................. 59 

Q

UESTIONNING 

S

KILLS

 ....................................... 60 

I

NTRODUCTIONS AND FUNNELING

 ................................. 62 

THROWS 

66 

R

EGULAR THROWS

 .................................................... 66 

 

E

NHANCED THROWS

 ................................................. 68 

T

HROW TO VIDEO

 ..................................................... 69 

T

HROW TO COMMERCIAL BREAK

 .................................. 71 

COPING WITH NEGATIVE FEEDBACK AND ABUSE 

72 

FINDING A COMPANY (AKA BREAKING INTO THE SCENE)  74 

HOW TO GET HIRED 

76 

MONEY AND NEGOTIATING FEES 

79 

ADVERTISING & SOCIAL MEDIA 

84 

COMMON MISTAKES (AKA THE GIBBS BROADCASTING 
RULES) 

86 

THANKS 

89 

CREDITS 

90 

INDEX 

91 

 

 

INTRODUCTION 

It doesn’t matter if you’re a casual or professional gamer - you’re 
likely to have heard or watched an online broadcast of an esports 
match or tournament at some point in the last ten years. Those who 
commentate these are often referred to as ‘casters’, or originally 
‘shoutcasters’. At the top end of the scale today, these same people 
are now full-time professional video game broadcasters, but it 
wasn’t always that way. 

The term ‘shoutcaster’ comes from the software written by the 
good chaps at Winamp.com, and 
introduced what we now know 
as internet radio. Then, a shout-
caster was simply a synonym for an internet radio DJ or commenta-
tor. As time moved on, it became inextricably linked to those who 
specifically covered gaming matches and tournaments.  

While the software is no longer updated (but still widely used for 
online radio), shoutcasters have expanded beyond the limits of the 
software (and their bedrooms) to bigger and better things such as 
live TV productions, huge events set in sports stadiums and dedicat-
ed gaming TV shows the world over and, more often than not, 
they’re now called broadcasters or commentators. However, the 
term ‘casters’ is still widely used as an abbreviated version of the 
original ’shoutcasters’. 

In 2007, I wrote a mini book to help those who wanted to get start-
ed in shoutcasting, and I’ve had many, many requests since to up-
date and rewrite it. 

The book you are now reading started life more than 8 years ago, 
but really came to life only in 2014 with a series of parts published 

 

on eslgaming.com over a 5 month period. Now, for the first time, 
those original parts plus many revisions, updates and new infor-
mation are put together in one place and in one document, Talking 
Esports. 

All of this hopefully means that you now have a complete guide to 
video game broadcasting, at least from the point of view of a bud-
ding host or commentator. That’s not to say that other forms of 
esports broadcasting wouldn’t benefit from reading it, but it’s pre-
dominantly focused on going from bedroom broadcasting to the big 
stage in front of tens of thousands of people. 

I hope that you enjoy the book, take something from it and that in 
some small way it helps you improve your commentating of video-
games. 

 

 

 

HOW ON EARTH DID WE GET HERE? 

We’ve come an awful long way since those early days of bedroom 
radio broadcasting, but many of the skills and talents required to 
succeed remain the same. That said, with the advent of modern 
streaming services and cameras everywhere, you’re going to need 
more than just a touch of natural talent to succeed. 

I first started shoutcasting in 2002, and purely by accident, but I was 
extremely lucky as I could make a ton of mistakes and get away with 
it. Back when I started, we were thrilled to get a couple of hundred 
people tuning in, and don’t forget - it was on internet radio, with no 
cameras pointed at me. 

Over the next couple of years, I poured all of my spare time (when 
not competing in esports) in to delivering coverage of various online 
cups, mostly for ClanBase and ESL. 

In early 2005, I joined Inside the Game (iTG) thanks to Marcus 
“djWHEAT” Graham recruiting me as part of their drive to increase 
their European casting talent.  

I continued with audio casting when I 
joined iTG, but quickly got into video 
casting at the ESWC Finals and 
QuakeCon, which was a totally dif-
ferent experience from providing 
audio commentary for online matches. 

Firstly, there were cameras, and I had no idea how to react on cam-
era or even where to look. I realised I needed help and enrolled in a 
local college course for a couple of evenings a week in order to help 
me understand the importance of voice projection, where to look 

 

on camera and how to use all of the tools available to me in order 
to present better on video streams. I was lucky enough to work on 
many top tournaments around the world, but while most of our 
expenses were covered, we rarely returned home with more money 
than we started with. 

Things started to change in 2006 when both Stuart “TosspoT” Saw 
and I started to get other work in the form of voice-overs for com-

mercials and movies, and 
had a chance to work on 
several segments for TV. 
We were also given a six 
part series to film for UK 
TV, which, while the 
production was pretty 
poor, did give us an in-

sight into the workings of TV and allowed us to learn and make 
mistakes in a very low risk environment. 

In 2007, I formed a new company called QuadV with the help of Joe 
Miller, Stuart Saw, Leigh Smith and Oliver Aldridge. Our aim was to 
have a dominant European commentary station for esports and, for 
the most part, we achieved our goal, certainly having the best Euro-
pean commentators on our books at the time. Almost all of them 
now work full time in esports in one way or another. 

Over the next few years, I did hundreds of live TV shows on DirecTV, 
Eurosport, Sky Sports and Sky One, pieces for Ubisoft including two 
rock concerts and even a live TV show from the Playboy Mansion. In 
addition to this, I hosted the stage at Multiplay events in the UK and 
commentated at the biggest esports events of the day including the 
WCG Finals, ESWC, CPL Finals and QuakeCon. I even commentated 

 

on a dedicated gaming channel (Xleague) on Sky TV in the UK on a 
regular basis – esports had surely arrived. 

Sadly, most of the TV contracts dried up in 2008 as the recession 
took hold, and once again we returned to scraping by on internet TV 
streams, but the experience we had gained was invaluable. Addi-
tionally, internet streaming 
costs at this time were huge 
and prohibitive to making a 
real salary, but Twitch wasn’t 
far away from launching. 

In late 2011, having kept in 
touch with esports throughout 
this period, I attended the 
WCG Finals in Korea for the 
final time, and just as esports 
was really starting to lift off, again. 

2012 was one of the busiest years for me personally as I was hired 
more and more for hosting duties, but I continued to commentate, 
too, and with a wide array of games in my repertoire I was consid-
ered one of the most flexible commentators in esports. Over the 
years, I have commentated on more than 40 different titles from as 
wide a field of genres as RTSs and FPSs right across to pool games, 
racing games and many from the fighting game scene. 

I joined ESL TV in early 2013, as head of the commentary team, 
training and guiding them as well as hiring talent for all of the major 
events such as Intel Extreme Masters, ESL One and WCS. Alongside 
all of this, I continued to host major events and commentate on a 
wide range of games across the world. Towards the end of my time 

 

with ESL, I hosted in major venues such as the Commerzbank Arena, 
previously used for the World Cup, Madison Square Garden and the 
San Jose Sharks Arena in California, not to forget the epic Spodek 
Arena in Katowice. 

Today I am Head of Broadcasting for Gfinity in the UK and continue 
to hire and work with esports broadcasting talent right across the 
board and across multiple titles. I was also chosen as the host for 
the $17million tournament The International in 2015. 

Hopefully this gives you a brief idea of who I am and why I decided 
to write this book. I’d love nothing more to see even more, well 
prepared and passionate commentators enjoy doing what I have in 
esports, so if this guide helps just one person, I’ll be thrilled!