Spectroscopy of the transition state: Elementary reactions of the hydroxyl
radical studied by photoelectron spectroscopy of O

2

(H

2

O) and H

3

O

2

2

Don W. Arnold,

a)

Cangshan Xu, and Daniel M. Neumark

b)

Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 and Chemical Sciences
Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720

~Received 7 November 1994; accepted 11 January 1995!

The transition state regions of the OH

1OH→O~

3

P

!1H

2

O and the OH

1H

2

O

→H

2

O

1OH reactions

are studied by photoelectron spectroscopy of the O

2

~H

2

O

! and H

3

O

2

2

anions and their deuterated

analogs. The spectra show resolved vibrational progressions attributed to H-atom vibrational motion
in the unstable neutral complexes formed by photodetachment. The positions and intensities of the
peaks change markedly upon isotopic substitution. One-dimensional Franck–Condon calculations
using ab initio potentials for the anion and neutral are used to interpret the peak spacings and
intensities, as well as the strong isotopic effects. The results are discussed in the context of
previously obtained transition state spectra for heavy

1light–heavy reactions. © 1995 American

Institute of Physics.

I. INTRODUCTION

In recent years, negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

has been demonstrated to provide a powerful and detailed
probe of the transition state region in bimolecular chemical
reactions.

1

In these experiments, the transition state region is

accessed by photodetachment of a stable negative ion with a
geometry similar to that of the neutral transition state; the
resulting photoelectron spectrum probes the spectroscopy
and dissociation dynamics of the transition region species.
Several reactions have been studied with this method, includ-
ing heavy–light–heavy hydrogen transfer reactions

~X

1HY→XH1Y; X,Y5I,Br,Cl,F!,

2,3

hydrogen abstraction re-

actions by fluorine

~OH1F→O1HF and ROH1F→RO

1HF; R5CH

3

O, C

2

H

5

O

!,

4

and the prototypical F

1H

2

reaction.

5

In this article, we present the results of recent ex-

periments in our laboratory where the photoelectron spectra
of the H

3

O

2

2

and O

2

~H

2

O

! anions are collected to study the

unstable neutral complexes involved in two fundamental re-
actions of the hydroxyl radical

OH

1H

2

O

→H

2

O

1OH,

~1!

OH

1OH→O~

3

P

!1H

2

O.

~2!

The role of the hydroxyl radical as a propagator of chain

reactions makes it extremely important in atmospheric chem-
istry, combustion chemistry, and a wide range of other
chemically active environments.

6

The hydroxyl radical is

known to play a vital role in the stratospheric ozone chem-
istry through the HO

x

cycle.

7

It also acts to remove many

chemical species which are important in tropospheric chem-
istry, including CO, H

2

S, SO

2

, and CH

3

CCl

3

.

8

The reaction

of O

~

1

D

!1H

2

O serves as a major source of tropospheric OH

radicals.

9

In combustion, reaction

~2! and its reverse reaction

serve as termination and propagation steps, respectively, in
the oxidation of hydrogen.

10

This set of experiments studying the transition state spe-

cies of hydroxyl radical reactions not only begins our study
of this extremely important class of bimolecular reactions
but also continues the extension of our transition state studies
to reactions with polyatomic reactants and

\or products. Both

of the reactions studied here represent quite fundamental
chemical reactions that are accessible to accurate study by ab
initio 
methods. To date, however, only a few detailed theo-
retical studies exist for either reaction

~1! or ~2!.

Figures 1 and 2 show schematic energy diagrams for

reactions

~1! and ~2!. Since the anion geometry and energet-

ics play a key role in our experiment, the energetics for the
analogous ion–molecule reactions are also shown. The fig-
ures represent the energy of the systems as a function of
generic reaction coordinates. In Fig. 1, both the anion and
neutral reactions are thermoneutral due to symmetry. The
H

3

O

2

2

anion is calculated to have a single minimum

~see Sec.

III B

!,

11

and its dissociation energy, D

0

~OH

2

•••H

2

O

!51.18

eV, has been measured by high pressure mass spectrometry.

12

The electron affinity of OH

@EA~OH!51.825 eV#

13

has been

accurately measured by threshold photodetachment of OH

2

.

The values shown for the neutral potential curve are from ab
initio 
calculations. Schaefer and co-workers

14

calculated van

der Waals minima of 0.15 eV

~3.5 kcal/mole! for the

OH

~H

2

O

! complex in the hydrogen-bonded configuration

which is applicable to the photodetachment experiments. The
global minimum was found to occur in a different intramo-
lecular configuration which is not conducive to hydrogen
exchange and lies 0.13 eV

~3.1 kcal/mole!

15

lower in energy

than the local minimum shown in Fig. 1. A barrier height of
0.56 eV

~13 kcal/mole! for the reaction was determined in an

ab initio investigation by Nanayakkara et al.

16

In Fig. 2, the shape of the anion potential is adapted

from Lifshiftz

17

and is based upon an anion reaction model

developed by Brauman and co-workers.

18

However, no ac-

tual characterization of this anion potential surface has been
made

~i.e., the height of the barrier between the two geom-

etries, if one exists, has not been determined

!. Limits for the

binding energies of the O

2

~H

2

O

! and OH

2

~OH! anions have

been determined by flow tube kinetics

19,20

and pulsed high

a

!

Current Address: Department of Chemistry, University of Southern Cali-
fornia, Los Angeles, CA 90089.

b

!

Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher–Scholar.

6088

J. Chem. Phys. 102 (15), 15 April 1995

0021-9606/95/102(15)/6088/12/$6.00

© 1995 American Institute of Physics

Downloaded¬03¬Mar¬2003¬to¬128.32.220.150.¬Redistribution¬subject¬to¬AIP¬license¬or¬copyright,¬see¬http://ojps.aip.org/jcpo/jcpcr.jsp

pressure mass spectrometry.

21

Note that these experimental

limits do not indicate whether there are two geometries cor-
responding to local minima in the potential energy surface
separated by a barrier or if the two structures are actually
indistinguishable. The electron affinity of oxygen has also
been measured by anion threshold photodetachment.

22

Simi-

larly to OH

1H

2

O, a van der Waals minimum is also pre-

dicted to exist on the OH

1OH triplet surface. Fueno

23

pre-

dicts the dipole–dipole complex to be bound by 6.9 kcal/
mole. However, Harding suggests that the binding energy is
more on the order of 4.2 kcal/mole.

24

Harding and Wagner

calculate a 2.3 kcal/mole barrier for the reaction.

25

Photodetachment of the H

3

O

2

2

anion was first studied by

Golub and Steiner over 25 years ago.

26

The total photode-

tachment cross section was measured as a function of photon
energy up to 4 eV. The monotonic increase observed in their
photoelectron signal with increasing photon energy beyond
2.8 eV was interpreted as photodetachment of the OH

2

~H

2

O

!

anion cluster to form a dissociative neutral complex. No un-
derlying structure was resolved in the data obtained from
their early study. Since then, however, the H

3

O

2

2

anion has

been characterized by x-ray structural analysis after its ob-
servation in the crystals of transition metal complexes.

27

This

anion has also been observed in the IR spectra of tetraalky-
lammonium ion hydroxide hydrate complexes.

28

The photo-

electron spectra of H

3

O

2

2

presented below show resolved fea-

tures which contain information about the dynamics near the
transition state region of reaction

~1!. The OH1H

2

O reaction

has been studied using oxygen atom isotopic exchange mea-
surements. The gas phase reaction rate constant was
determined

29

to be

,1310

215

cm

3

molecule

21

s

21

at 298

and 373 K. The rate of reaction

~1! in solution, initiated by

pulsed radiolysis, has also been investigated in conjunction
with a study of the O

2

1H

2

O

→OH

2

1OH reaction.

30

Reaction

~2! has been more thoroughly investigated ex-

perimentally. Numerous measurements of the rate of reaction
~2! over various temperature ranges

31– 40

show that hydroxyl

radical disproportionation has a non-Arhennius behavior.

41

Measurements for the rate of the reverse reaction have also
been made and found to be consistent with these findings.

42

The source of this non-Arhennius behavior has been debated
with respect to the presence or absence of a potential barrier
along the reaction path. Initially, Wagner and Zellner

32

sug-

gested a barrierless reaction in which the long-range attrac-
tive forces affected the temperature dependence of the reac-
tion. Harding and Wagner have since calculated a 2.3 kcal/
mole barrier and conclude that the long range forces do not
play a major role in the reaction’s temperature dependence.

25

Recent results by Michael

43

are consistent with the results of

Ref. 25. While the O

2

1H

2

O reaction has been studied by

several groups

44 – 49

and O

2

~H

2

O

! has been observed by mass

spectrometry in H

2

/O

2

/N

2

flames,

50

no experimental charac-

terization of the O

2

~H

2

O

! anion has been completed which

can confirm the results of the ab initio calculations to be
presented in Sec. III B.

The reverse of reaction

~2! may also play a role in ex-

periments studying O

~

1

D

!1H

2

O

→OH1OH where O atoms

are generated by ozone photolysis.

51,52

Sauder et al.

52

esti-

mate that as much as 10% of the observed OH products may
result from reactions of O

~

3

P

! ground state atoms with the

water molecules in these photoinitiated reaction experiments.

In the following sections, we will briefly describe the

experiments performed

~Sec. II! and present the results ob-

tained

~Sec. III A!. Ab initio calculations to be used in the

FIG. 1. Schematic energetics diagram for the H

3

O

2

2

/OH

1H

2

O system. Val-

ues in italics are theoretically determined values. References given in text.

FIG. 2. Schematic energetics diagram for the O

2

~H

2

O

!/OH1OH system.

Values in italics are theoretically determined values. References given in
text.

6089

Arnold, Xu, and Neumark: Reactions of the hydroxyl radical

J. Chem. Phys., Vol. 102, No. 15, 15 April 1995

Downloaded¬03¬Mar¬2003¬to¬128.32.220.150.¬Redistribution¬subject¬to¬AIP¬license¬or¬copyright,¬see¬http://ojps.aip.org/jcpo/jcpcr.jsp

analysis of the data are described in Sec. III B. The results of
these calculations are used in one-dimensional Franck–
Condon analyses to qualitatively understand the photoelec-
tron spectra in terms of the dynamics in the transition state
region of the reaction. Comparisons will be drawn with our
studies of related fluorine atom reactions

~OH1F and

CH

3

OH

1F! which we have investigated previously.

4

II. EXPERIMENT

The apparatus employed in these experiments, described

in detail previously,

3

is a dual time-of-flight anion photoelec-

tron spectrometer. Details relevant to the present results will
be summarized here. Anions of interest are generated in the
source region at the intersection of a pulsed molecular beam
and a 1 keV electron beam, using a configuration similar to
that developed by Johnson et al.

53

A gas mixture

~4% H

2

O or

D

2

O, 96% N

2

O

!, at a stagnation pressure of 1 bar, is ex-

panded through the molecular beam valve orifice

~0.020 in.!

at a repetition rate of 20 Hz. The 1 keV electron beam inter-
sects the molecular beam at the orifice of the molecular beam
valve. At this intersection, a variety of chemical processes
occur which lead to the formation of O

2

~H

2

O

! and H

3

O

2

2

anions. O

2

anions, generated by dissociative attachment of

low-energy electrons to N

2

O,

54,55

can form O

2

~H

2

O

! by ter-

molecular clustering reactions or OH

2

by O

2

1H

2

O

→OH

2

1OH. Hydroxide ions which are generated can also

cluster to H

2

O molecules to form the H

3

O

2

2

clusters. As

shown by Melton

56

and others, electron bombardment of

H

2

O generates H

2

, O

2

, and OH

2

anions, all of which can

contribute to ion formation. As the expansion continues, the
molecules relax rotationally and vibrationally by collisions
with the carrier gas.

The cooled ions are extracted into a Wiley–McLaren-

type time-of-flight mass spectrometer

57

where the ions sepa-

rate, according to mass, from other anions which are formed
in the source region. The mass resolution of the apparatus,
/

DM;250, allows easy separation of the H

3

O

2

2

and

O

2

~H

2

O

! ions. The ion of interest is then selectively photo-

detached by a properly timed 8 ns Nd:YAG laser pulse. Pho-
toelectrons, detected with 70 mm multichannel plates, are
energy analyzed after time-of-flight measurements through a
1 m field-free flight tube oriented perpendicular to the mass
spectrometer flight tube. The resolution of the apparatus is 8
meV for electrons with 0.65 eV of electron kinetic energy
~eKE! and degrades as ~eKE!

3/2

. For these experiments, the

fourth harmonic

~266 nm; 15 mJ/pulse! of the Nd:YAG laser

was employed for photodetachment. The plane-polarized la-
ser beam can be rotated with a half-wave plate in order to
study photoelectron angular distributions.

III. RESULTS

A. Experimental results

Figure 3 shows the photoelectron spectra collected for

H

3

O

2

2

and D

3

O

2

2

. Figure 4 displays the O

2

~H

2

O

! and

O

2

~D

2

O

! spectra. In these spectra, the relationship between

the eKE and the internal energy of the neutral complex is
given by

eKE

5h

n

2D

0

2EA2E

int

0

1E

int

2

.

~3!

In Eq.

~3!, D

0

is the lowest dissociation energy of the anion

complex

@i.e., D

0

~OH

2

•••H

2

O

! or D

0

~O

2

•••H

2

O

! given in

FIG. 3. Photoelectron spectra of H

3

O

2

2

and D

3

O

2

2

collected using a 4.657 eV

photodetachment energy. The arrow ‘‘a’’ indicates the asymptotic energy for
the OH

1H

2

O ground state products.

FIG. 4. Photoelectron spectra of O

2

~H

2

O

! and O

2

~D

2

O

! collected using a

4.657 eV photodetachment energy. The regions a/a

8

and b/b

8

indicate the

limits for the asymptotic energies for dissociation of the neutral complex
into O

1H

2

O and OH

1OH, respectively.

6090

Arnold, Xu, and Neumark: Reactions of the hydroxyl radical

J. Chem. Phys., Vol. 102, No. 15, 15 April 1995

Downloaded¬03¬Mar¬2003¬to¬128.32.220.150.¬Redistribution¬subject¬to¬AIP¬license¬or¬copyright,¬see¬http://ojps.aip.org/jcpo/jcpcr.jsp

Figs. 1 and 2

# and EA is the electron affinity of the fragment

anion

@i.e., EA~OH!51.825 eV ~Ref. 13! and EA~O!51.462

eV

~Ref. 22!#. E

int

2

and E

int

0

represent the internal energies of

the anion and neutral complexes, respectively. For the anion,
E

int

2

is the internal energy above the zero point. For the neu-

tral

@HOHOH# complex, E

int

0

is the energy above the sepa-

rated OH

1H

2

O ground state fragments. For the

@HOHO#

complex, E

int

0

is the energy above the ground state O

1H

2

O

products.

In each of the spectra, the energetic asymptotes for dis-

sociation of the neutral complex are indicated by arrows;
features at lower eKE than the arrows correspond to neutral
states with sufficient energy to dissociate. In Fig. 3, the ar-
row marked ‘‘a’’ indicates the OH

1H

2

O limit while in Fig. 4

the regions bounded by the a/a

8

and b/b

8

arrows indicate

the limits for the O

1H

2

O

~product! and OH1OH ~reactant!

ground state energetic asymptotes; the large uncertainties re-
flect the uncertainty in D

0

~O

2

–H

2

O

!. Clearly, almost all of

the signal in the spectra is from neutral states which can
dissociate into either reactants or products.

There are several similarities between the H

3

O

2

2

and the

O

2

~H

2

O

! spectra. The spectra consist primarily of very

broad, irregularly spaced features. Isotopic substitution sig-
nificantly changes not only the positions of the features but
also the intensities. The centers, widths, and spacings of the
broad features in the H

3

O

2

2

and D

3

O

2

2

spectra are given in

Table I. Those for the O

2

~H

2

O

! and O

2

~D

2

O

! spectra are

given in Table II. Based upon previous studies of the heavy–
light–heavy hydrogen exchange reactions,

2,3

we expect these

features to be related to the antisymmetric stretch motion of
the ‘‘transfer’’ hydrogen atom between the oxygen atoms
~i.e., O•••HI•••O!.

Another common feature to the data sets is the appear-

ance of a feature at very low eKE. The intensity of this
feature

~labeled as in the H

3

O

2

2

spectra and in the

O

2

~H

2

O

! spectra! is suppressed by the electron detector cut-

off function. The large energy separation from the other fea-
tures in the spectrum suggests that the low eKE feature rep-
resents photodetachment to electronically excited neutral
complexes. Another piece of evidence which supports this
assignment is the change in position of peak upon isotopic

substitution. As seen in Fig. 4, peak moves to lower eKE
upon deuteration. This effect is consistent with the assign-
ment of this feature to an excited state which undergoes a
smaller zero point energy decrease than the anion upon deu-
teration.

Also seen in the O

2

~H

2

O

! and O

2

~D

2

O

! photoelectron

spectra is a feature near 2.85 eV. This peak occurs at the
same energy as signal for OH

2

photodetachment. We believe

that this feature corresponds to a sequential two-photon pro-
cess. The O

2

~H

2

O

! anion is photodissociated into OH

2

1OH

followed by photodetachment of the OH

2

anion during the

same 8 ns laser pulse, as demonstrated previously by Buntine
et al.

49

A less intense signal was also observed at

;3.2 eV

which corresponds to O

2

photodetachment after photodisso-

ciation of O

2

~H

2

O

! into O

2

1H

2

O.

B.

Ab initio calculations

As an aid to the interpretation of the data presented

above, we have performed ab initio calculations using the
Gaussian92 package for the anion and neutral complexes in-
volved in these experiments. The calculations include geom-
etry optimizations and potential energy curve calculations
along selected coordinates. While not intended as state-of-
the-art calculations for these systems, the results are to be
used in simple model calculations to understand, qualita-
tively, the features observed in the photoelectron spectra. We
are specifically interested in the anion and neutral potentials
along the O

•••H•••O hydrogen transfer coordinate.

1. Anion calculations

Several studies of the hydrogen bonding characteristics

of the closed-shell H

3

O

2

2

ion have been carried out previ-

ously using ab initio methods.

11,58,59

However, in most of

these studies, only partial geometry optimizations were per-
formed with one or more fixed parameters. The full optimi-
zation by Rohlfing et al.

11

at the MP2/6-31G

**

level of

theory resulted in a complex with a linear, symmetric
O

•••H•••O arrangement within a nonplanar overall H

3

O

2

2

ge-

ometry as shown in Fig. 5. From these results, it appears that

TABLE I. Peak positions and widths for the H

3

O

2

2

and D

3

O

2

2

4.66 eV

photoelectron spectra.

a

Peak

eKE

~eV!

Energy

~cm

21

!

Width

~eV!

H

3

O

2

2

A

1.45

0.0

0.33

B

1.10

2823

0.19

C

0.91

4355

0.21

D

3

O

2

2

A

1.45

0.0

0.33

B

1.16

2339

0.20

C

0.94

4113

0.21

D

0.293

b

•••

•••

a

Position of peak center and full width at half-maximum

~FWHM! as deter-

mined by fit to a Gaussian-shaped peak. No consideration is made for
superimposed vibrational structure.

b

Intensity severely affected by electron detector cutoff function.

TABLE II. Peak positions and widths for the O

2

~H

2

O

! and O

2

~D

2

O

! 4.66

eV photoelectron spectra.

a

Peak

eKE

~eV!

Energy

~cm

21

!

Width

~eV!

O

2

~H

2

O

!

A

1.72

0.0

0.34

B

1.27

3629

0.22

C

1.00

5807

0.27

D

;0.7

;8200

0.3

E

0.40

b

10646

•••

O

2

~D

2

O

!

A

1.76

0.0

0.34

B

1.41

2823

0.25

C

1.15

4920

0.22

D

0.925

6734

0.21

E

0.297

b

11800

•••

a

Position of peak center and full width at half-maximum

~FWHM! as deter-

mined by fit to a Gaussian-shaped peak. No consideration is made for
superimposed vibrational structure.

b

Intensity severely affected by electron detector cutoff function.

6091

Arnold, Xu, and Neumark: Reactions of the hydroxyl radical

J. Chem. Phys., Vol. 102, No. 15, 15 April 1995

Downloaded¬03¬Mar¬2003¬to¬128.32.220.150.¬Redistribution¬subject¬to¬AIP¬license¬or¬copyright,¬see¬http://ojps.aip.org/jcpo/jcpcr.jsp

the strong hydrogen bond which exists in the H

3

O

2

2

anion

leads to a rather short O–O distance

~;2.4 Å! with the hy-

drogen atom centered between the two oxygen atoms. No
further optimizations of the H

3

O

2

2

geometry are pursued

here.

As seen in Fig. 5, the dihedral angle of H

3

O

2

2

is calcu-

lated to be 110°. Since the hindered rotation/torsional motion
is expected to be somewhat floppy, we have calculated the
MP2/6-31

11G

**

energy of the complex as a function of

the dihedral angle with all of the other geometrical param-
eters fixed. The shape of the potential curve and the height of
the ‘‘trans’’ barrier

~;120 cm

21

at

p

radians

!, shown in Fig.

6, agrees with Spirko et al.’s

59

calculations using different

fixed parameters, but the ‘‘cis’’ barrier

~;600 cm

21

at 0 ra-

dians

! is significantly larger than that obtained by Spirko

~;300 cm

21

!. In their analysis, they find a zero point energy

of 62 cm

21

for the hindered rotor motion. Thus, while the

potential minima occur at dihedral angles of 110° and 250°,
the anion torsional motion is very floppy with an average
dihedral angle of 180°.

With this in mind, potential energy curves for the anti-

symmetric O

•••H•••O motion of trans-H

3

O

2

2

are calculated at

the MP2/6-31

11G

**

level of theory using a dihedral angle

of 180°

~the ‘‘trans’’ configuration!. In addition to the dihe-

dral angle, several other parameters are frozen to calculate
the potential for this coordinate

~see caption for Fig. 7!. The

central hydrogen atom, H2, was allowed to move between
two oxygen atoms which were fixed at R

~O1–O2!52.4 Å.

The resultant potential energy curve

~Fig. 7, bottom! has a

very flat bottom with a minimum which occurs at the cen-
trosymmetric nuclear configuration.

Fewer theoretical studies of the O

2

~H

2

O

! anion have

been made as a result of the more complicated open-shell
interaction. Roehl et al.

60

find that the O

2

~H

2

O

! anion is

most stable in a planar, ‘‘quasilinear’’ configuration

~Fig. 5!

at the MP2/6-31

1G

*

level of theory. The geometry of this

quasilinear

species

is

reoptimized

here

at

the

MP2/6-31

11G

**

level of theory to include additional basis

functions on the hydrogen atoms. The optimized parameters
from both calculations are summarized in Fig. 5. In all of the
calculations, the OHO angle is nearly linear while the HOH
angle is slightly more acute than the angle found in H

2

O. The

extended R

~O2–H1! bond length as compared to R~O2–H2!

indicates that considerable hydrogen bonding occurs be-

FIG. 5. Ab initio calculated geometries for the H

3

O

2

2

and O

2

~H

2

O

! anions.

Values for H

3

O

2

2

are from Ref. 11. For O

2

~H

2

O

!, values ‘‘A’’ are MP2/

6-31

1G

*

parameters from Ref. 60 and values ‘‘B’’ are MP2/6-31

11G

**

parameters determined in the present study. See text for details.

FIG. 6. Ab initio potential energy curve for the H

3

O

2

2

hindered rotor motion

at the MP2/6-31

11G

**

level of theory. The dihedral angle is varied while

the other geometrical parameters are fixed as R

~O1–O2!52.4 Å; R~O1–H1!

5R~O2–H3!50.962 Å; R~O1–H2!5R~O2–H2!51.2 Å; OHO5180°; HOH

5104.5°.

FIG. 7. Ab initio calculated potential energy curves for H

3

O

2

2

and HOHOH

along the central hydrogen atom antisymmetric stretch coordinate. The
H-atom position is varied while the other parameters are fixed as R

~O1–O2!

52.4 Å; R~O1–H1!5R~O2–H3!50.962 Å; OHO5180°; HOH599.1°;
dihedral

5180°.

6092

Arnold, Xu, and Neumark: Reactions of the hydroxyl radical

J. Chem. Phys., Vol. 102, No. 15, 15 April 1995

Downloaded¬03¬Mar¬2003¬to¬128.32.220.150.¬Redistribution¬subject¬to¬AIP¬license¬or¬copyright,¬see¬http://ojps.aip.org/jcpo/jcpcr.jsp

tween the O

2

and the H

2

O but not as much as in the H

3

O

2

2

anion. The calculated anion ground state has

2

A

9

symmetry,

with the unpaired electron in an orbital perpendicular to the
plane of symmetry.

The antisymmetric O

•••H•••O motion of O

2

~H

2

O

! is also

investigated as in the case of H

3

O

2

2

. In this case, the poten-

tial energy curves are calculated at the QCISD/6-31

11G

**

level of theory. As for the H

3

O

2

2

calculations, several param-

eters are fixed. While the OHO bond angle is assumed to be
linear for simplicity, the remainder of the frozen parameters
are based upon the ab initio results and are given in caption
for Fig. 8. Along the constrained O

•••H•••O coordinate, the

potential energy curve for the ground electronic state

~Fig. 8,

bottom

! has a single minimum which occurs at the equilib-

rium geometry. However, there is a shelf in the potential,
corresponding to the OH

2

–OH geometry, which is

,0.1 eV

above the minimum in the curve. Note that this does not
mean there is no OH

2

•OH local minimum; such a minimum

could occur at a different O–O distance than the one consid-
ered here.

2. Neutral calculations

We have also calculated potential energy curves for the

neutral

@HOHOH#

and

@HOHO#

complexes along the

O

•••H•••O coordinate. These will be used in the Franck–

Condon simulations presented in the following section. In
these calculations, which are performed at the same levels of
theory used for the anions, the coordinates other than the
O

•••H•••O coordinate are fixed at the same values used in the

anion calculations. The calculated curves, shown in Figs. 7
and 8, respectively, represent one-dimensional ‘‘slices’’

through the O

1H

2

O and OH

1H

2

O reaction surfaces.

~See

Figure 6 in Ref. 2a to see how such a slice is taken through
a two-dimensional potential energy surface.

! Both curves

show double minima. Note that these do not correspond to
minima of the neutral surfaces but rather to points where the
1-D slice through the reaction surfaces intersects the bottom
of the reactant and product valleys. Also, the barriers in the
1-D curves do not directly relate to the barrier along the
minimum energy reaction path but are instead the barrier
separating the reactant and product valleys at a given O–O
separation.

The

minima

in

the

1-D

potential

functions

for

@HOHOH#

in Fig. 7 correspond to geometries of the com-

plex with C

s

symmetry, and the molecular orbitals for

both the anion and neutral will be labeled using this point
group.

Thus,

the

H

3

O

2

2

anion

has

a

~•••(6a

8

)

2

(7a

8

)

2

(1a

9

)

2

(8a

8

)

2

(2a

9

)

2

! orbital occupation at

the MP2/6-31

11G

**

level of theory; the 8a

8

and 2a

9

or-

bitals have

s

u

and

p

g

symmetry, respectively, with respect to

the O–H–O bond. Photodetachment of the anion can lead to
either a

2

A

8

or a

2

A

9

state, both of which correlate to the

ground state OH

1H

2

O dissociation products of the neutral

@HOHOH#

complex. The surface shown in Fig. 7 is the

2

A

8

surface which is calculated to be lowest in energy at the
MP2/6-31

11G

**

level of theory in the Franck–Condon re-

gion. At the minimum energy anion geometry used in the
potential curve calculations, the

2

A

8

state is predicted to lie

;0.58 eV below the

2

A

9

state at the MP2/6-31

11G

**

level

of theory.

61

The barrier to symmetric hydrogen exchange

along this restricted O

•••H•••O coordinate is 0.50 eV at the

MP2/6-31

11G

**

level of theory.

For OH

1OH, the interaction of two ground state hy-

droxyl radicals splits the OH

~

2

P! states into four singlet

states and four triplet states. The hydroxyl radical dispropor-
tionation, reaction

~2!, can occur adiabatically on three of the

four triplet states along a C

s

planar reaction path.

32

Based

upon the orbital occupation calculated for the O

2

~H

2

O

! an-

ion,

~•••(6a

8

)

2

(1a

9

)

2

(7a

8

)

2

(8a

8

)

2

(2a

9

)

1

!, one-electron

photodetachment from either of the two highest molecular
orbitals can form the

1

A

8

,

1

A

9

, or

3

A

9

species. Of these pos-

sibilities, the lowest energy species at the geometry of the
anion is the

3

A

9

state; the corresponding surface is the one on

which the OH

1OH reaction is most likely to produce

O

~

3

P

!1H

2

O.

23,24

A

3

A

8

state is calculated to lie

;2.4

kcal/mole

24

above the

3

A

9

state at the saddle point but since

this electronic state has unpaired electrons in two different a

8

orbitals

@•••(7a

8

)

1

(8a

8

)

1

(2a

9

)

2

# it is not accessible by one-

electron photodetachment of the O

2

~H

2

O

! anion. Therefore,

we have calculated the potential energy curve for the

3

A

9

state along the constrained O

•••H•••O coordinate; the result

is shown in Fig. 8. The two minima are separated by 0.690
eV, and the barrier height is 0.322 eV with respect to the
OH–OH minimum.

Two hydroxyl radicals can also react to form H

2

O

2

; the

singlet surface on which this reaction occurs correlates to
O

~

1

D

!1H

2

O.

62

The O

2

~H

2

O

! anion clearly has very poor

Franck–Condon overlap with H

2

O

2

, so our experiment does

not probe the region of the surface near the H

2

O

2

well. How-

FIG. 8. Ab initio calculated potential energy curves for O

2

~H

2

O

! and

HOHO along the central H-atom antisymmetric stretch vibrational coordi-
nate. The H-atom position is varied while the other geometrical parameters
are fixed as R

~O1–O2!52.5 Å; R~O2–H3!50.962 Å; OHO5180°; HOH

5102.8°.

6093

Arnold, Xu, and Neumark: Reactions of the hydroxyl radical

J. Chem. Phys., Vol. 102, No. 15, 15 April 1995

Downloaded¬03¬Mar¬2003¬to¬128.32.220.150.¬Redistribution¬subject¬to¬AIP¬license¬or¬copyright,¬see¬http://ojps.aip.org/jcpo/jcpcr.jsp

ever, peak in the O

2

~H

2

O

! photoelectron spectrum may be

due to a transition to this surface near the product
O

~

1

D

!1H

2

O asymptote.

It is also of interest to calculate the transition state ge-

ometries

~i.e., saddle point geometries! for the two neutral

reactions. The transition state structure of the OH

1H

2

O re-

action has been investigated in detail by Nanayakkara et al.

16

Their best calculated transition state geometry

~Fig. 9! lies

on a barrier estimated to be 0.46 eV above the separated
products. No further investigation is made of this species.
For the OH

1OH reaction, the

3

A

9

saddle point species has

been located previously at the self-consistent field

~SCF!

23

and multiconfiguration SCF

~MCSCF!

24

level of theory. We

have located the stationary point at the MP2/6-31

11G

**

and QCISD/6-31

11G

**

levels of theory. The geometries

for the

@HOHO#

structure calculated at these various levels

of theory are given in Fig. 9.

IV. ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION

A. Initial considerations

The appearance of each photoelectron spectrum is pri-

marily determined by the Franck–Condon

~FC! overlap be-

tween the bound anion ground state wave function and the
scattering wave functions on the OH

1HX→X1H

2

O

~X

5OH,O! reaction surfaces. Thus, the success of negative ion
photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of reaction dynamics
in the transition state region is contingent upon having sig-
nificant Franck–Condon overlap between the anion ground
state and the transition state region of the neutral reaction

surface. It is therefore useful to compare the calculated ge-
ometries for the anions and neutral transition state species.

Both of the anions used in this study have significant

hydrogen bonding character. The calculated equilibrium ge-
ometries for these anion species

~Fig. 5! indicate that the

central hydrogen atom interacts significantly with both oxy-
gen atoms. The very flat antisymmetric stretch potential for
both anions

~Fig. 7 and 8! results in an extended hydrogen

atom motion and a large FC region for the photodetachment
process. Based upon the classical turning points for the

v

8

50

level of the calculated one-dimensional potential curves,
R

~O1–H2! varies from 0.99 to 1.42 Å for H

3

O

2

2

, and R

~O1–

H1

! varies from 1.06 to 1.56 Å for O

2

~H

2

O

!.

A comparison of the anion equilibrium geometries

~Fig.

5

! to the calculated transition state structures ~Fig. 9! finds

reasonable overlap between the anion and neutral geom-
etries. The O–O separation in the transition state species is
shorter than that of the ion in both cases. The OHO bond
angles are also slightly different, with the anions being more
linear than the neutral transition state in both cases. Both
types of deviation between anion and neutral transition state
are similar to several of the XHX

2

systems studied previ-

ously in this laboratory.

2,3

Overall, the FC region will be

centered slightly away from the saddle point toward the en-
trance and exit channels, but it should still be in the transi-
tion state region for both reactions. This is supported by the
vibrational structure in the spectra, discussed below.

To assess the relationship of the features observed in the

photoelectron spectra to the dynamics which occur at the
transition state of reactions

~1! and ~2!, several factors must

be considered. A good starting point is the general appear-
ance of the data. All of the data consist of several very broad
features

@full width at half maximum ~FWHM!;0.2 eV or

greater

# which are irregularly spaced in energy and which lie

above the neutral dissociation asymptote. By forming the
anions in a molecular beam expansion, we produce anions
which are primarily in their ground vibrational state. Thus,
the spacings observed between features in the photoelectron
spectrum will be representative of the vibrational motions of
the unstable neutral complex. These vibrations must corre-
spond to motions which are approximately perpendicular to
the reaction coordinate and have vibrational periods which
are on a time scale shorter than that of the dissociation pro-
cess. Otherwise, only a structureless spectrum would be ob-
served. In the OH

1H

2

O and OH

1OH systems, the reaction

coordinate is described, to a good approximation, by the
O–O separation.

As mentioned in Sec. III A, the isotopic dependence

shows that the vibrations primarily involve hydrogen atom
motion. While the observed peak spacings are quite irregular,
it is useful to compare them to the observed vibrational fre-
quencies of the ‘‘component’’ OH

~

v

e

53735 cm

21

!

63

and

H

2

O

~

n

1

53657 cm

21

;

n

2

51595 cm

21

;

n

3

53756 cm

21

!

64

molecules. The observed A-spacing in the H

3

O

2

2

spectrum

~;2800 cm

21

! does not match well with any of the ‘‘com-

ponent’’ frequencies. The B-spacing is significantly
smaller

~;1500 cm

21

!. In the case of the O

2

~H

2

O

! data, the

A-spacing

~;3600 cm

21

! is near the OH stretching fre-

quencies of the OH radical and the H

2

O molecule. However,

FIG.

9.

Ab

initio

calculated

transition

state

geometries

for

the

OH

1H

2

O

→H

2

O

1OH and OH1OH→O1H

2

O reactions. Parameters for

@HOHOH#

are from Ref. 16. For

@HOHO#

, ‘‘A’’ parameters are UHF/4-

31G values from Ref. 23, ‘‘B’’ parameters are MCSCF/DZP values from
Ref. 25, and ‘‘C’’ parameters are MP2/6-31

11G

**

values are from the

present work. See text for details.

6094

Arnold, Xu, and Neumark: Reactions of the hydroxyl radical

J. Chem. Phys., Vol. 102, No. 15, 15 April 1995

Downloaded¬03¬Mar¬2003¬to¬128.32.220.150.¬Redistribution¬subject¬to¬AIP¬license¬or¬copyright,¬see¬http://ojps.aip.org/jcpo/jcpcr.jsp

as for the H

3

O

2

2

spectrum, the B-spacing is significantly

smaller

~;2300 cm

21

! and does not match any of the ‘‘com-

ponent’’ frequencies.

This substantial perturbation of vibrational frequencies

relative to OH and H

2

O indicates that the central hydrogen

atom interacts significantly with both of the oxygen atoms in
the neutral complexes. Thus these experiments are, in fact,
probing the transition state region for reactions

~1! and ~2!.

The observed irregular energy level spacings are also consis-
tent with the eigenvalue spectrum expected from the double
minimum potentials calculated for the

@HOHO# and @HO-

HOH

# complexes; the relation between these potentials and

the spectra will be considered more quantitatively in the next
section.

The observed peak widths are at least an order of mag-

nitude greater than the experimental resolution. This obser-
vation is similar to that observed in previous transition state
spectra of heavy–light–heavy anions. These result from ho-
mogeneous contributions due to the lifetime of the neutral
complex, and from inhomogeneous contributions due to un-
resolved progressions in low frequency vibrational modes of
the complex. In some cases, it has been possible to resolve
this finer vibrational structure. For example, progressions in
the low frequency bend and symmetric stretch modes were
seen in the IHI

2

zero electron kinetic energy

~ZEKE!

spectrum,

65

and bend/hindered rotor progressions were ob-

served in the FH

2

2

photoelectron spectrum

5

and inferred in

the recent analysis of the OHCl

2

photoelectron spectrum.

66

For the O

2

~H

2

O

! and H

3

O

2

2

spectra, it is not immediately

obvious whether lifetime effects or unresolved transitions are
primarily responsible for the peak widths. However, based
upon the calculated geometries for the anions and the neutral
transition state species, we expect a significant amount of
bend/hindered rotor excitation of the neutral upon anion pho-
todetachment.

B. Franck–Condon simulations

To put the discussion in the previous section on more

quantitative ground, it is useful to compare the data with a
Franck–Condon simulation of the spectra. An exact simula-
tion requires an accurate determination of the anion geom-
etry, a high quality potential energy surface for the neutral
reaction, and a complex scattering calculation. While these
requirements have recently resulted in a successful simula-
tion of the FH

2

2

spectrum,

5

the systems presented here are

insufficiently characterized to warrant such a treatment.

We have shown previously that analysis within a re-

duced dimensionality model can provide valuable and in-
sightful information about the photoelectron spectra.

2– 4

In

heavy–light–heavy triatomic systems studied previously,
simple treatments of the data employed one-dimensional
~1-D! and two-dimensional ~2-D! slices from semiempirical
potential energy surfaces along coordinates which could pos-
sibly be active in the photoelectron spectrum. These simple
analyses revealed quite clearly that the major features in the
photoelectron spectra of other heavy–light–heavy systems
could be assigned to the antisymmetric hydrogen atom mo-
tion in the neutral transition state complex. However, such
semiempirical potential energy surfaces have not been con-

structed for reactions

~1! and ~2! yet. As an alternative ap-

proach, we will use the one-dimensional ab initio potential
energy curves along the antisymmetric hydrogen stretch co-
ordinate for the anion and neutral

~Sec. III B!. These poten-

tial energy curves can then be used to calculate one-
dimensional stick spectra which may be compared to the
data.

The polynomial functions determined from least-squares

fit to the ab initio data points for both the anion and the
neutral complexes are used to determine 1-D Franck–
Condon factors

~FCFs! along the approximate hydrogen

atom antisymmetric stretch vibrational coordinate. In this
model, both the anion and neutral potential functions support
a set of bound quantum states such that, within the FC ap-
proximation, the intensity of a photodetachment transition is
given by

I

}v

e

•u

t

e

u

2

•u

^

c

v

8

~Q

as

!u

c

v

9

~Q

as

!

&

u

2

.

~4!

In Eq.

~4!,

c

v

9

and

c

v

8

are the vibrational wave functions of

the anion and neutral, respectively, along the hydrogen atom
antisymmetric stretch vibrational coordinate, Q

as

, and

v

e

is

the asymptotic velocity of the photodetached electron. In the
simulations, the electronic transition dipole,

t

e

, is assumed

to be constant as a function of eKE. For each potential func-
tion, eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are determined numeri-
cally by standard matrix methods.

67

The eigenfunctions are

used to determine the Franck–Condon factors by numerical
integration. An appropriate change in the reduced mass al-
lows calculation of FCF’s for the deuterated analogs using
the same potential energy curves. In the figures shown be-
low, the stick spectra will be compared directly with the data.
In addition, the stick spectra will be convoluted with the
experimental resolution function plus an additional Gaussian
with FWHM

5200 meV for comparison to the broad features

observed in the experimental data.

Shown in Fig. 10 are the results of the H

3

O

2

2

and D

3

O

2

2

simulations calculated by the above method using the anion
and potential energy curves calculated at MP2/6-31

11G

**

level of theory. The simulations are superimposed upon the
experimental data for comparison of peak spacings, intensi-
ties, and isotope dependence. Since the simulations assume
that all of the anions are in their ground vibrational state, the
peaks spacings in the simulations are indicative of the energy
levels which are supported by the neutral potential energy
surfaces. Fixing the terminal OH bond lengths at equal val-
ues imposes a symmetry about the center of the potential
energy curves. Due to this symmetry, only transitions to even
states of the neutral have nonzero intensity. Thus, the fea-
tures in the simulation represent photodetachment transitions
to the

v

8

50, v

8

52, and v

8

54 vibrational states supported by

the neutral potential energy curve. In both the H

3

O

2

2

and

D

3

O

2

2

spectra, the observed peak spacings are reasonably

well reproduced by the simulations. Although the intensity of
peak is underestimated in both simulations, the observed
change in peak intensities that result from isotopic substitu-
tion is very well modeled. The positions of these peaks, their
relative integrated intensities, and their assignments are
given in Table III.

6095

Arnold, Xu, and Neumark: Reactions of the hydroxyl radical

J. Chem. Phys., Vol. 102, No. 15, 15 April 1995

Downloaded¬03¬Mar¬2003¬to¬128.32.220.150.¬Redistribution¬subject¬to¬AIP¬license¬or¬copyright,¬see¬http://ojps.aip.org/jcpo/jcpcr.jsp

Shown in Fig. 11 are the results of the O

2

~H

2

O

! and

O

2

~D

2

O

! simulations. In general, there is reasonable agree-

ment between the convoluted 1-D simulations and the pho-
toelectron spectra, particularly for the O

2

~H

2

O

! spectrum.

Note that since there is no symmetry in these potentials,
transitions to all of the neutral vibrational levels are allowed,
as indicated. As might be expected, the peak positions
change upon isotopic substitution. The peak shifts are not
uniform, however. Inspection of the simulated peak positions
given in Table IV shows that the

v

8

51 and the v

8

53 transi-

tions shift by 963 and 1315 cm

21

, respectively, to higher

eKE while the

v

8

52 peak shifts 85 cm

21

to lower eKE.

Although the length of the O

2

~D

2

O

! progression is overesti-

mated, the simulations also reproduce the change of relative
intensities upon isotopic substitution. However, the intensity
pattern is very irregular. This is particularly true for the
O

2

~D

2

O

! simulation where the v

8

52 feature is the dominant

transitions while

v

8

53 has almost no intensity. A similar

situation occurs for the

v

8

54/v

8

55 pair.

In order to understand the significant changes in peak

spacings and intensities that occur upon isotopic substitution,

it is useful to study the wave functions that are supported by
the 1-D potential energy curves calculated for the restricted
O

•••H•••O motion of the neutral complexes. As shown in

Fig. 7, the maximum in the H

3

O

2

2

anion ground state wave

function occurs at the location of the barrier in the symmetric
neutral potential. In Fig. 12, the calculated neutral potentials
for the

@HOHOH#

and

@DODOD#

complexes are shown

again with their corresponding eigenvalues and eigenfunc-
tions. For both complexes, the

v

8

50 and 1 levels lie below

the barrier. Upon deuteration, the

v

8

50 level drops in energy

and its amplitude in the region of the barrier is reduced.
Hence, its overlap with the anion wave function is reduced,
and the corresponding peak

~peak A! in the photoelectron

spectrum should be smaller in agreement with experiment.
This effect has been observed previously in XHX

2

photo-

electron spectra.

1

The O

2

~H

2

O

! anion ground state wave function ~Fig. 8!,

while overlapping both the reactant and product wells, has its
greatest amplitude at a geometry which corresponds to the

FIG. 10. Experimental data

~dotted! and Franck–Condon simulations ~solid!

for H

3

O

2

2

and D

3

O

2

2

. Franck–Condon factors are calculated using the ab

initio surfaces shown in Fig. 7.

TABLE III. Simulated peak positions for the H

3

O

2

2

and D

3

O

2

2

spectra.

v

8

H

D

Energy

~cm

21

!

Intensity

Energy

~cm

21

!

Intensity

0

0.0

1.0

0.0

0.28

1

125

0.0

49

0.0

2

2548

0.88

2105

1.0

3

3819

0.0

2489

0.0

4

5922

0.03

3842

0.21

FIG. 11. Experimental data

~dotted! and Franck–Condon simulations ~solid!

for O

2

~H

2

O

! and O

2

~D

2

O

!. Franck–Condon factors are calculated using the

ab initio surfaces shown in Fig. 8.

TABLE IV. Simulated peak positions for the O

2

~H

2

O

! and O

2

~D

2

O

! spec-

tra.

v

8

H

D

Energy

~cm

21

!

Intensity

Energy

~cm

21

!

Intensity

0

0.0

0.44

0.0

0.18

1

3664

1.0

2701

0.48

2

5032

0.62

5117

1.0

3

6527

0.86

5212

0.02

4

7989

0.07

6814

0.87

5

9890

0.03

7480

0.01

6

•••

•••

8746

0.06

6096

Arnold, Xu, and Neumark: Reactions of the hydroxyl radical

J. Chem. Phys., Vol. 102, No. 15, 15 April 1995

Downloaded¬03¬Mar¬2003¬to¬128.32.220.150.¬Redistribution¬subject¬to¬AIP¬license¬or¬copyright,¬see¬http://ojps.aip.org/jcpo/jcpcr.jsp

product side

~O1H

2

O

! of the barrier. The terms ‘‘reactant’’

and ‘‘product’’ relate to the valleys in the multidimensional
potential energy surface which correspond to the minima in
the 1-D potential functions used in these calculations.

Shown in Fig. 13 are the neutral curves for HOHO and

DODO with the associated eigenvalues and eigenfunctions.
The effects of the barrier in this case are more interesting as
a result of the asymmetry of the potential functions. The
v

8

50 and v

8

51 levels are localized in the product well for

both the hydrated and deuterated species. However, the
v

8

52 and v

8

53 levels of HOHO are located near the barrier

between the reactant and product wells. Upon isotopic sub-
stitution, we see that the

v

8

52 and v

8

53 vibrational levels

and the

v

8

54 and v

8

55 levels of DODO form nearly degen-

erate pairs. Further inspection of the

v

8

52/v

8

53 eigen-

function pair for DODO shows that one of the levels

~v52!

is primarily localized in the product well while the other
~v53! has most of its intensity in the reactant well. Within
each pair of DODO levels, the combination of different
nodal structures and localization for the wave function re-
sults in markedly different FCFs for consecutive states
~Table IV and Fig. 11!. Thus the v

8

52 state has good FC

overlap with the anion function while that of the

v

8

53 level

is nearly zero. A similar effect occurs for the

v

8

54 and v

8

55

levels. For the HOHO complex, the intensity alternation be-
tween adjacent levels is less dramatic.

It is interesting to consider how the spectra relate to the

asymptotic dynamics as a function of the vibrational ‘‘level’’
of the unstable neutral complex. The neutral that results from
photodetachment of H

3

O

2

2

has only one dissociation channel,

OH

1H

2

O. However, the

@HOHO# complex has two acces-

sible dissociation channels at the photodetachment energy
used. As indicated by the arrows a/a

8

and b/b

8

in Figs. 4

and 11 the O

1H

2

O product channel is open to all of the

observed vibrational levels, but the OH

1OH reactant chan-

nel becomes accessible only at the higher vibrational levels.
For example, peak in both the O

2

~H

2

O

! and O

2

~D

2

O

!

spectra is energetically limited to product dissociation, while
peak in both spectra can dissociate to both reactant and
product. While peak is limited to product dissociation in
O

2

~D

2

O

!, the uncertainty in the asymptote prevents an as-

signment for feature in the O

2

~H

2

O

! spectrum.

The 1-D wave functions suggest reactant/product speci-

ficity beyond what is energetically allowed. For

@DODO#, the

v

8

52 and v

8

54 states are localized in the product well,

while the

v

8

53 and v

8

55 states, which have poor FC over-

lap with the anion, are localized in the reactant well. Thus,
within the limits of the wave functions of this 1-D model and
their FC overlap with the anion, these results suggest that a
DODO complex generated from O

2

~D

2

O

! photodetachment

will preferentially dissociate to products, rather than reac-
tants, even though both are energetically allowed. The vibra-
tional levels of the HOHO complex have a somewhat differ-
ent reactant/product character. Even though though the
uncertainty of the OH

1OH asymptote may energetically al-

low the

v

8

51 state of HOHO ~peak B! to dissociate to reac-

tants, the wave function in Fig. 13 shows that it most likely
will be a product state. In contrast, the HOHO

v

8

52 wave

function

~peak C! is primarily a reactant wave function.

It is instructive to compare the results presented here to

earlier

studies

4

of

the

OH

1F→O1HF and CH

3

OH

1F→CH

3

O

1HF reactions by photoelectron spectroscopy of

FIG. 13. The MP2/6-31

11G

**

and QCISD/6-31

11G

**

neutral potential

energy curves or the HOHO complex

~as in Fig. 8! with the associated

eigenfunctions and eigenvalues.

FIG. 12. The MP2/6-31

11G

**

neutral potential energy curves for the

HOHOH complex

~as in Fig. 7! with the associated eigenfunctions and

eigenvalues.

6097

Arnold, Xu, and Neumark: Reactions of the hydroxyl radical

J. Chem. Phys., Vol. 102, No. 15, 15 April 1995

Downloaded¬03¬Mar¬2003¬to¬128.32.220.150.¬Redistribution¬subject¬to¬AIP¬license¬or¬copyright,¬see¬http://ojps.aip.org/jcpo/jcpcr.jsp