&XUUHQW3HUVSHFWLYHVRQWKH)XQFWLRQRI6OHHS

$OODQ5HFKWVFKDIIHQ

Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, Volume 41, Number 3, Spring
1998, pp. 359-390 (Article)

3XEOLVKHGE\-RKQV+RSNLQV8QLYHUVLW\3UHVV

DOI: 10.1353/pbm.1998.0051

For additional information about this article

                                                    Access provided by University of Sussex (22 Sep 2015 01:33 GMT)

http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/pbm/summary/v041/41.3.rechtschaffen.html

CURRENT PERSPECTIVES ON THE FUNCTION

OF SLEEP

ALLAN RECHTSCHAFFEN*

Introduction

Sleep researchers are often confronted with such reasonable questions

as the following: How much sleep do we need? What is the most efficient
sleep schedule? Does anything substitute for sleep? What is the most impor-
tant sleep stage? Do we need less sleep when we get older?

Genuine answers to these questions require some understanding of the

function of sleep. How can one say which sleep is most efficient or how
much sleep we need unless we know what sleep is supposed to accomplish?
Sleep researchers and clinicians can retain some posture of expertise with

answers like, "Get enough sleep to keep from feeling sleepy during the

day." But this temporizing answer addresses the issue of relieving discom-
fort, not the issue of need fulfillment. Would we feel comfortable advising
patients to "Eat enough to keep from feeling hungry"?

More genuine answers are difficult to come by because our understand-

ing of sleep function is quite uncertain. This paper aims to review for biolo-
gists the ground that sleep researchers have covered in their quest for the

function of sleep and to convey our own contention that the issue is not

yet resolved. This overview will not permit a detailed examination of all the

theories of sleep function or the full merits of any of the theories, but we

will note certain features of theoretical or empirical weakness to show why

these theories have not enjoyed overwhelming acceptance. Greater atten-
tion will be given to the more recently advanced theories which have not
been subjected to critical review.

There are several indications that sleep is indeed functionally important,

i.e., that it ultimately enhances survival.

* Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, The University of Chicago

Correspondence: Sleep Research Laboratory, 5743 Drexel Ave. Chicago, IL 60637.

This research has been supported by Grants MH4151 and MH 18428 from the National

Institute of Mental Health.

© 1998 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

0031-5082/98/41034037$01.00

Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, 41, 3 ¦ Spring 1998 | 359

1.Sleep is ubiquitous among mammals, birds, and reptiles. The occa-

sional, rare reports of sleepless species or individuals probably result from
insensitive or insufficiently prolonged observation. Sleep may also be ubiq-
uitous among lower forms, e.g., amphibians, fish, and invertebrates, but
this is uncertain because they do not show the characteristic electroenceph-
alographic sleep patterns of the higher orders [I]. Their quiescent states
might be simple reductions of activity characteristic of rest rather than
sleep, which is much more organizationally complex.

2.Sleep has persisted in evolution even though it is apparently maladap-

tive with respect to other functions. While we sleep we do not procreate,
protect or nurture the young, gather food, earn money, write papers, etc.
It is against the logic of natural selection to sacrifice such important activi-
ties unless sleep serves equally or more important functions.

3.Accommodations are made to permit sleep in different environments

and life styles. For example, the maintenance of critical muscle tone per-
mits perching birds to sleep [2]. Some marine mammals sleep with one half
of the brain at a time, which enables the wake half to continue regulation of

periodic surfacing for air [3]. Many prey species select safe sleeping sites.

4.Sleep is homeostatically regulated. Sleep deprivation is usually fol-

lowed by sleep compensation. The rebound sleep almost never compen-
sates completely for lost sleep time, but it may be more "intense" than
normal sleep. The urge to sleep following sleep deprivation may be so over-
powering as to be life threatening, as is all too frequently seen in driving
accidents. Selective deprivation of specific sleep stages is often followed by
selective rebounds of the lost stage, suggesting that the different sleep
stages serve at least partially different functions.

5.Serious physiological changes result from prolonged sleep depriva-

tion of animals. Rats die after about two to three weeks of total sleep depri-

vation—not much longer than the average of 16 days of total food depriva-

tion [4]. Rats also die after about five weeks of selective deprivation of rapid
eye movement (REM) sleep [5], which usually comprises only about 7 to

10 percent of the adult rat's existence.

Given the apparent importance of sleep and its accessibility to scientific

study, one would think that its function would long since have been re-
solved, but this has not been the case. Many theories have been proposed

as explanations for limited features of sleep, but to date no theory has ex-

plained the diverse data of sleep so parsimoniously as to inspire confidence

that the essence of sleep function has been captured.

This review will be organized mostly in terms of the data revealed by the

classical scientific strategies of description, stimulation (experimentation),

correlation, and deprivation. As applied to the study of function, each strat-

egy has its own strengths and weaknesses. Descriptive features may identify

functional targets, but these features may also be epiphenomenal to less

360

Allan Rechtschaffen ¦ Function of Sleep

obvious but more critical outcomes. (A prone position is typical of human
sleep, but lying prone is not a major functional target of sleep. Lying prone

is easily achieved without sleep, and persons who are bedridden still need

to sleep.) Correlates of sleep may offer clues about function but they could

reflect causes of sleep, effects of sleep, or effects of third variables which
are not related to function. (A correlation between amount of sleep and
a personality trait could mean that people with that personality need much
sleep, or that sleep time predisposes to that personality, or that both are
independent responses to certain constitutional features.) Hopefully, the

stimuli which affect sleep would suggest the kind of internal changes to which

sleep processes respond; however, the stimuli may excite or inhibit sleep
mechanisms independent of need state. (Sleeping pills might stimulate
sleep mechanisms, but not the sleep need.) Ideally, sleep deprivation would
reveal what goes wrong without sleep, but it might also reflect independent
responses to the sleep-preventing stimuli. (If animals are kept awake by
continuous forced locomotion, ensuing pathology could result from motor

fatigue rather than sleep loss.) Almost 20 years ago, we suggested that, since

the sins of one method are not necessarily visited upon the data from other
methods, a confluence of findings from the different methods would con-
stitute strong support of an indicated function [6]. We can now update the
major findings of the different methods to see whether any such confluence

has developed over the past two decades. Although the presentation will

be largely organized according to the yields of the different research strate-
gies, these boundaries will be violated where data from more than one
strategy are relevant to a particular theoretical position.

For the most part, we will consider the functions of non-rapid eye move-

ment (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep separately, because
their functions may be different. It is now widely known that NREM sleep
is characterized by a distinctive electroencephalographic (EEG) pattern of

"sleep spindles" (12 to 14 Hz in humans) and/or high amplitude, slow

(circa 0.5 to 1.0 Hz in humans) "delta" waves; that REM sleep is character-

ized by the occurrence of rapid eye movements, a low voltage-mixed fre-
quency EEG pattern, and muscle atonia; that NREM sleep constitutes the
major portion of the sleep period (about 75 to 80 percent in humans); and
that sleep usually starts with NREM sleep which is interrupted periodically
by episodes of REM sleep (at about 90 min. intervals in humans). NREM
sleep may be further divided into four substages according to EEG criteria

[7], Reports of dreaming can be elicited on awakenings from all stages but

are the most vivid and most frequent on awakenings from REM sleep.

The Evidence from Descriptive Studies

Major descriptive features of NREM sleep are abbreviated in Table 1. The

systemic features of NREM sleep (including motor, metabolic, vascular, and

Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, 41, 3 ¦ Spring 1998

361

TABLE 1

Descriptive Features of NREM Sleep

Systemic Features

Reductions in motor activity, postural tonus, behavioral responsiveness,

metabolic rate, heart rate, respiration rate, ventilatory response to

CO2, vasomotor tone, arterial blood pressure, brain and body tempera-

tures, thermoregulatory setpoint, renal function, decreased intestinal

motility

General parasympathetic dominance

Endocrine Features

Reductions in release of Cortisol and thyrotropin

Increased secretion of growth hormone, aldosterone, testosterone, pro-

lactin, insulin

Increased glucose levels

Cerebral Features

Drifting, unfocused thought; occasional dreams; occassional reports of

no mental activity

Decreased activation of forebrain by reticular system

Hyperpolarization of thalamocortical neurons
Decreased neuronal firing in some areas; increases in others

Burst-pause firing pattern of neurons in several major brain areas

"Sleep-active" neurons in anterior hypothalamus, basal forebrain, amyg-

dala, and nucleus of the solitary tract

Reduced cerebral metabolism during slow wave sleep

Cerebral blood flow varies regionally

Cerebral temperature decreases

Note. —For detailed information on features described above, see references [86-89].

sympathetic aspects) all show the reductions of activity which have pro-
duced the widely held view that the purpose of sleep is to rest. However,
there are several reasons why these descriptive features are not convincing
evidence that sleep is for rest.

The reductions in energy expenditure during sleep are relatively modest.

The metabolic savings of sleep over quiet wakefulness has been estimated

at approximately 10 to 15 percent; from the standpoint of energy savings,
a night of sleep for a 200-pound person is worth a cup of milk [8]. With
those savings, why should overweight people sleep at all? Of course, reduc-
tions of activity might be functionally targeted to specific organ systems,
but specific organs that require sleep in order to rest have not been identi-
fied. As shown in Table 1, the endocrine system certainly does not shut
down during sleep, when, in fact, the release of several hormones is in-

creased.

Contrary to some popular beliefs, the brain does not shut down during

sleep. According to one recent, comprehensive study of human sleep, cere-
bral metabolism is substantially reduced from waking levels only during the
high-voltage, slow-wave portion of NREM sleep, which normally constitutes

362

Allan Rechtschaffen ¦ Function of Sleep

only about 20 percent of total sleep [9]. There is no pronounced, wide-

spread decrease in neuronal firing. Rather, there are complex changes in
neuronal firing which vary with state and brain site [10]. Neurons in tha-
lamic and cortical areas tend to show modest decreases in rate during
NREM sleep and then increases to the waking level or above during REM
sleep. In many of these neurons, the most striking change is the develop-
ment of a burst-pause firing pattern, which has been interpreted by some
as functionally important (see below) . Limbic and hypothalamic neurons
may show increases or decreases in firing rates in NREM or REM sleep,
depending on the specific nuclei recorded. Brain stem neurons generally
show decreased firing rates during NREM sleep, but in REM sleep they may
show their highest firing rates in some areas, such as the mesencephalic
or pontine reticular formation, or their lowest firing rates in other areas,
such as the dorsal raphe or locus coeruleus nuclei. In the passage from

waking to NREM sleep, there is increased firing in neurons of the anterior

hypothalamus, nucleus of the solitary tract, and amygdala, which are be-
lieved to be involved in sleep generation or behavioral inhibition. Complex
changes in patterns of neural activity can occur without changes in average
firing rates: in the visual cortex, association cortex, and brain stem of the
cat, neurons that fire rapidly during NREM sleep tend to fire even more
rapidly during waking, while neurons which fire more slowly during NREM
sleep tend to fire even more slowly during waking [H]. Clearly, there is

no simple descriptive characteristic of brain activity that points to sleep

function.

The quiescence of sleep and the refreshed feeling that often follows it

have inspired a popular corollary of the "sleep is for rest" theory, i.e., the
idea that something is restored or rejuvenated during sleep. But theories
of what may be restored during sleep are challenged by inconsistent evi-
dence from correlative and sleep deprivation studies. Although a tissue res-
toration function for sleep is suggested by the well-documented increase
of growth hormone release during the slow wave portion of NREM sleep,
other studies have shown no effect of sleep on total protein synthesis [12,

13]. Neither is there convincing evidence that energy stores (ATP) are re-

plenished by sleep [14]. A recent theory has proposed that sleep functions

to restore brain glycogen levels which are depleted during wakefulness [15].

An older study showed that brain glycogen levels in the rat are increased

during the early portions of sleep periods and decreased during the early

portions of wake periods, but there is little further change as sleep or wake
periods are extended, i.e., there is very limited proportionality between
brain glycogen and amounts of sleep and wakefulness [16]. Based on the
available data, rats should require only several minutes of sleep to restore
brain glycogen levels, leaving the functional utility of most of rat sleep unex-
plained. (Rats sleep about 14 hours a day.) Also, one must ask, if the func-

Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, 41, 3 ¦ Spring 1998 | 363

TABLE 2

Descriptive Features of REM Sleep

Motor and Vegetative Features

Rapid eye movements

Diminished baroreflexes

Pupil constriction and phasic dilation

Reduced behavioral responsiveness

Irregular heart rate

Irregular respiration

Irregular blood pressure

Penile erections

Actively induced motor inhibition, interrupted by phasic twitches

Decreased temperature regulation

Further reductions of ventilatory response to CO2 during phasic REM

Vasodilation in tonic REM (except in red muscle); constriction in

phasic REM

Whole body metabolic rate increased in man, but not in cat

Cerebral Features

Abundant dreaming

Suspension of reflective thought

Increased cerebral metabolism
Increased cerebral blood flow

Increased intracranial pressure
Increased brain temperature

Hypersynchronous hippocampal theta EEG

Increased neuronal activity in pyramidal tract; visual cortex; brainstem

reticular formation; laterodorsal tegmental nucleus; pedunculopontine

nucleus

Decreased neuronal activity in dorsal raphe and locus coeruleus
PGO spikes and associated phenomena

Note. —For detailed information on features described above, see references [86, 87].

tion of NREM sleep is to restore brain glycogen, why is NREM sleep regu-
larly interspersed with the relatively high cerebral metabolic rates of REM
sleep [9]?

Other theories consider the rest and energy-conserving features of sleep

as incidental correlates of its major behavioral attributes—the motor quies-
cence and decreased response to sensory stimulation, which are viewed as
its major functional features. One theory views sleep as a behavioral adapta-
tion which gets the animal out of harm's way once it enters the phase of
the diurnal cycle when it can no longer behave adaptively (e.g., the hours
of darkness for most animals) [17]. A related theory views sleep as protec-
tion from prédation [18]. Central to such theories is the idea that sleep
simply fills time that is not otherwise useful. These theories are hard pressed

to explain sleep rebounds following prior sleep deprivation. After staying

awake on a Monday night, what protective behavioral adaptation would be
served by sleeping longer on Tuesday night? Indeed, the added sleepiness
during the day on Tuesday would appear to be behaviorally maladaptive.

Descriptive features of REM sleep are shown in Table 2. (The distinction

364

Allan Rechtschaffen ¦ Function of Sleep

TABLE 3

REM Characteristics and REM Theories

CharacteristicTheoretical Function

Emotional contents of dreamsEmotional adaptation [90]

Follows NREM sleepCompensates for NREM restorative process [29]
Cerebral arousalCompensates for NREM quiescence

Provides periodic endogenous stimulation [92]

Prepares for awakening (sentinal function) [19]

Promotes cerebral maturation [53]

Motor inhibitionProtects infants when brain activity is high [53]

Increased brain temperatureWarms brain after NREM cooling [62]

Eye movementsExercises binocular coordination [24]

Locus coeruleus quiescenceUpregulates catecholamine receptors [27]

Behaviors of cats without REM sleep

Rehearses genetically programmed behaviors [93]

motor inhibition

Hypersynchronous theta EEG inFacilitates memory consolidation [76]

hippocampus

Increased brain protein synthesisProtects neural circuitry subserving memory [94]

Bizarre dreams that are mostlyWeakens useless memory traces [21]

forgotten

between descriptive and correlative features is partly arbitrary and not very
important for present purposes.) These descriptive features obviously fail

to converge on a common function; they are so diverse as to challenge
creative ingenuity. For example, the reader is invited to construct a func-
tional theory of REM sleep that includes dreaming; intense bursts of neu-
ronal activity in certain pontine nuclei; spike potentials in the pons, lateral
geniculate body, and visual cortex (PGO spikes); neuronal silence in the
raphe nuclei and locus coeruleus; increased brain temperature, but a pro-
found reduction in thermoregulatory responses to thermal challenges; ac-
tive inhibition of spinal motoneurons, but frequent twitches of the extremi-
ties and vigorous eye movements; penile erections. The obvious difficulty
in formulating a parsimonious theory of REM sleep has not deterred theo-

rizing about its function. The quest for parsimony has simply been largely

ignored, and partial theories have been proposed for each of several iso-

lated features of REM sleep, as shown in Table 3. The implications of such

a plethora of partial theories will be considered later.

Even in their explanation of isolated REM phenomena, most of the theo-

ries suffer theoretical or empirical weaknesses. For example, the theory that
REM sleep serves a sentinel function that prepares the sleeper for rapid
arousal when confronted by predatory threat suffered from subsequent evi-
dence that REM sleep was selectively reduced in rats which slept near cats

[19, 20]. Because we usually have several dreams a night that are forgotten,
Crick and Mitchison proposed that vigorous bursts of random neural activ-
ity during REM sleep function to erase or unlearn useless memories to

Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, 41, 3 ¦ Spring 1998

365

make room for new learning [21]. Acknowledging that a direct test of the
theory by examining structural and chemical correlates of the unlearning
is not now possible, the authors turned for support to comparative data.
They suggested that the echidna, a primitive egg-laying mammal, may need
its relatively large cerebrum to store new memories because it does not

have REM sleep to erase old memories. However, this formulation did not

fit with an earlier report of little relationship across mammalian species
between amount of REM sleep and brain weight (corrected for a measure

of metabolic rate based on body weight) [22]. Neither is it consistent with

the more recent report of little relationship between REM sleep and en-
cephalization, or with another recent report of REM sleep-like neuronal
activity in the brainstem of the echidna [8, 23]. Also, the theory defies the
common sense experience that, before we enjoy our nightly REM sleep,

we are quite capable, especially if we are old, of forgetting most of the

thousands of noncritical sense impressions that have bombarded us during

the day. Furthermore, we don't have the impression that major areas of

forgotten mental contents are typically represented in dreams. Most of us

in academia forget thousands of lectures and papers, yet when awakened
in the laboratory for freshly recalled dreams, students and faculty subjects
rarely report dreams with the contents of such lectures or papers.

Positive correlations between amounts of REM sleep and conjugate eye

mobility in phylogenesis inspired the theory that REM sleep facilitates the
development and maintenance of binocularly coordinated eye movements
during wakefulness [24]. This theory was then supported by evidence that
binocular depth perception was better on awakenings made at the ends of
REM periods than on awakenings made at the beginnings of REM periods

[25]. Subsequent reports of REM sleep (without eye movements) in the

owl, which has immobile eyes, and the mole, which is virtually blind, were
explained as possible vestiges from ancestors with functional eye move-

ments, or as indicative of multi-functional determination of REM sleep [26].
The hypothesis that REM sleep functions to upregulate central noradrener-
gic receptors certainly fits with the dramatic reduction of neuronal firing
in the locus coeruleus nucleus during REM sleep, but it is challenged by
the failure of chronic sleep deprivation to substantially affect these recep-

tors [27, 28].

Largely on the basis of the usual appearance of REM sleep episodes after

NREM sleep and the positive relationship between REM sleep occurrence
and prior NREM sleep accumulation in rats, Benington and Heller pro-
posed the purpose of REM sleep was to reverse some unspecified conse-
quence of the neural activity of NREM sleep [29]. To maintain the argu-
ment for the dependence of REM sleep on prior NREM sleep, the authors
proposed that the occurrences of REM sleep shortly following wakefulness
in narcoleptic and depressed patients were abnormal phenomena; that the
predominant REM sleep of infants was morphologically and functionally

366

Allan Rechtschaffen · Function of Sleep

different than the REM sleep of adults; and that correlations between the
durations of adjacent NREM and REM episodes were not found in the hu-
man because "it is not the optimal species" for establishing such correla-
tions. One previous study was specifically directed at the issue of whether
REM was generated during wakefulness and NREM sleep or only during
NREM sleep. During a day in bed, human experimental subjects were al-
lowed unlimited NREM sleep and almost no REM sleep while control sub-

jects were kept awake and had no REM sleep. The two groups had similar

REM sleep that night [30]. Benington, Woudenberg, and Heller explained
this finding on the basis that control subjects still accumulated 49 minutes
of NREM sleep (and associated drowsiness) during the day, during which
time REM need could have accumulated. Their argument obfuscates the
issue, since the experimental subjects accumulated almost five hours of
NREM sleep during the day, which should have produced a much greater
propensity for subsequent REM sleep according to their hypothesis. In a
similar vein, Endo, et al., more recently reported that REM sleep depriva-

tion of rats produced REM rebounds, regardless of whether NREM sleep
or wakefulness dominated the deprivation period [31]. Finally, the theory

would have difficulty explaining the huge, extended rebounds of REM

sleep following total sleep deprivation in the rat [32].

The Evidence from Stimulation (Experimental) Studies

If sleep is a functional response to the demands of waking life, then one

would expect that certain classes of waking stimulation should strongly in-

crease the need for sleep and promote its occurrence. Table 4 summarizes
several major findings on the effects of waking stimuli on subsequent sleep.
The list is certainly not complete, since some relevant studies have undoubt-
edly escaped our attention or memory. However, it is unlikely that we have
failed to capture major findings that would undo or reverse our major con-

clusions.

An overview of stimulation that successfully affects sleep reveals a pot-

pourri of miscellaneous effects with no obvious central, organizing themes.

Few of the effects are very powerful, some have been demonstrated only

in one species, some have been ruled out in other species, and very few
have been demonstrated to persist on a chronic basis if the stimulation is
repeated daily over many days or weeks. One fairly consistent stimulus ef-
fect has been the increase in REM sleep following exposure to enriched

environments or during "time windows" following learning trials [33].

These studies have been taken as evidence for a role of REM sleep in the
consolidation of memories. Such a role would also predict memory impair-
ments following REM deprivation, but the relevant studies have been meth-
odologically complicated and have produced mixed results [34-36]. In fact,
in certain learning situations, acquisition is followed by decreases in REM

Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, 41, 3 ¦ Spring 1998

367