THE

SUBTLE BODY

PRACTICE MANUAL

A Comprehensive Guide to Energy Healing

                   

CYNDI DALE

This book is dedicated to the healers, sages, and seers

who have carried the torch of hope through the centuries.

W

INTRODUCTION

We face the extraordinary possibility of fashioning a health

care system that emphasizes life instead of death, and unity

and oneness instead of fragmentation, darkness, and

isolation.

LARRY DOSSEY, MD

hether licensed or layperson, we are all healers. Our roles shift and change depending
on a myriad of factors, such as our state of health, the health of those around us, the
season  of  our  lives,  and  whether  we  have  chosen  healing  as  a  vocation.  But  at  one

time or another, each of us takes our turn as healer and self-healer, as practitioner and patient.

Looking  deeper,  we  can  observe  that  we  are  all  self-healers  all  the  time.  Even  when  we  are

helping others under the aegis of being a trained practitioner, every training program and each client
session is another opportunity to work on ourselves, to detoxify and rebuild in body, mind, and spirit
so that we might be clearer conduits for subtle energies.

It  was  this  understanding  that  led  to  the  writing  and  publication  of  The  Subtle  Body:  An

Encyclopedia  of  Your  Energetic  Anatomy,  my  compendium  outlining  the  subtle  energy  anatomy.  A
detailed accounting of the invisible energies that underpin physical reality and our physical bodies,
The Subtle Body is a comprehensive resource from which healers of all persuasions and experience
levels can build a strong knowledge base. It lays a solid foundation for comprehending the intricacies
of subtle energy medicine and understanding the modalities and tools that are used around the world
to evoke our innate healing abilities.

This book, The Subtle Body Practice Manual, is the natural extension of that original resource

guide—a hands-on companion about putting subtle energy medicine to work with ease, elegance, and
effectiveness. You can use it alone or in conjunction with The Subtle Body. The Subtle Body provides
you with the what, and The Subtle Body Practice Manual provides you with the how. And because
The Subtle Body is so rich with scientific and spiritual research, I have limited such discourse here in
The Subtle Body Practice Manual. Unless otherwise noted, references to research and scientific data
can be found in The Subtle Body.

Every day, our human family contends with minor ailments, major illnesses, emotional distress,

mental upsets, and sometimes the need for a simple energy boost. There are many ways to address our
issues  when  we  get  off  balance.  This  book’s  carefully  chosen  tools  and  techniques  can  be
immediately useful to both the self-healer and the experienced healing professional. As healing is the
purpose and goal of this information, it is useful to examine what healing really is, especially when
it’s viewed through the lens of subtle energy practices.

WHAT DOES HEALING MEAN?

“What  is  the  true  nature  of  healing?”  is  one  of  the  most  important  questions  we  can  contemplate  as
practitioners  or  self-healers  working  with  subtle  energy.  In  effect,  all  practitioners,  whether  their
approach is conventional or holistic, are energy healers, and so we must all ask this question at some
point. The answer will prove to be our North Star, guiding the way through all kinds of terrain along
the healing journey (whether that journey is a one-hour session or a years-long partnership between
healer and client).

As  we  venture  into  the  subtler  realms,  one  of  the  most  important  distinctions  we  can  make  is

between healing and curing. To cure is to focus on the eradication of symptoms, whereas to heal is to
emphasize  and  support  a  person’s  inherent  state  of  wholeness.  The  subtle  energy  practitioner  starts
from the premise that a person is always whole at the deepest level, no matter what—even if they are
missing a limb, wrestling with depression or cancer, or trying to shake off a nasty cold. A practitioner
of  any  type  who  is  focused  on  curing  is  likely  to  place  an  emphasis  on  diagnostics  and  relieving
symptoms. A subtle energy practitioner, on the other hand, will work with a person to gain relief—
and possibly release—from the cause of their symptoms.

Subtle  energy  healers  work  to  help  themselves  or  others  recognize  and  embrace  their  innate

wholeness,  regardless  of  appearances  or  even  the  outcome  of  treatment.  Instead  of  achieving
wholeness, healing is a matter of remembering and recovering the wholeness that already is. Whether
we are working with others or on ourselves, it is incumbent upon us that we not attempt to make all
supposed  frailties  disappear.  Subtle  energy  tools  and  techniques  are  far  more  effective  when  we
understand that wholeness doesn’t equal perfection. I have been fortunate to see with my own eyes the
remarkable shifts that can take place—the movement toward wellness—when people feel supported
in an environment of compassion and acceptance.

Understanding and believing in wholeness is a deeply optimistic state, one that we may encounter

with our podiatrist or our reflexologist, and one we seek to acknowledge within ourselves. The trust
in our natural ability to return to balance just may be the invisible bridge (the subtle energy bridge)
that connects the best of allopathic medicine with the brilliant field of healing that used to be called,
not so very long ago, “alternative.”

THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS: COLLABORATIVE AND
COMPLEMENTARY METHODS OF HEALING

An  acupuncturist  steps  back  and  nods  his  head.  “Your  problem  is  caused  by  an  energy  block  in  the
liver,” he says, pointing out the “stagnant liver chi” in your toe.

A physician peers at the x-ray and nods her head. “See what’s going on here?” She points to the

picture of the organ just under your ribs. “That’s your liver. That’s where your issue lies.”

Who is right? Is it the acupuncturist, whose perspective of the liver is linked to an intricate flow

of  energy  throughout  your  body,  one  that  somehow  mysteriously  involves  your  toes?  Or  is  it  the
conventional doctor, who views your liver as a single organ unto itself, one that sits quietly beneath
your ribs, minding its own business?

Well,  both  of  them  are  right.  Our  organs—in  fact,  many  parts  of  us—anchor  somewhere

physically. But they are also energetic, which means that they connect to other parts of ourselves in

ways that are hard to measure, see, or prove. The subtle aspects of our organs are part of the energy
anatomy that we will explore in 

part 1

, a complex set of the fast-moving energy channels, organs, and

fields  that  compose  what  I  think  of  as  the  “you  underneath  or  around  yourself,”  the  energies  that
establish  the  rules  and  foundation  for  physical  health  and  wellbeing.  This  energy  anatomy  and  its
systems  are  the  basis  of  subtle  energy  medicine.  And  while  subtle  energy  practitioners  often  work
with  energy  systems  that  transform  sensory  or  physical  energy  into  subtle  energy  (and  vice  versa),
one of the subjects of 

chapter 1

, they can also work with concrete systems, like those in the physical

body.

Because of our Western cultural conditioning, most people don’t typically think of their general

practitioner, gynecologist, or dermatologist as subtle energy practitioners. (The doctors may not think
of themselves this way either.) Contrary to popular opinion, allopathic medicine—or what we often
call Western medicine or conventional medicine—is actually an energy-based practice. Surgery and
prescription  medicines  work  on  our  physical  energy  systems,  while  x-rays  and  ECGs
(electrocardiograms) measure the energetic patterns present in our bodies. Since our bodies are made
up of energy, any practice or method that involves the body is a subtle energy practice. Subtle energy
medicine  can’t  be  claimed  by  holistic  practitioners,  naturopathic  doctors,  and  “alternative”  healers
alone. Therefore, we in the helping and healing professions can officially let go of the “us and them,”
dualistic perspective and join forces. Knowing that all medicine is really subtle energy medicine can
result  in  greater  benefits  and  brighter  outcomes  for  everyone  concerned—practitioners,  physicians,
healers, patients, clients, and those who love them.

When  it  comes  to  healing  modalities  and  types  of  practitioners,  there  is  an  overflowing

cornucopia of options available. The following is a list of broad categories and how they’re typically
used:

Allopathic medicine, also known as Western or conventional medicine, is absolutely necessary
for critical or chronic care, diagnostic needs, surgery, physical intervention, trauma, physical
therapy, prescription medicine, or if you are ever in any doubt about a situation.

Mental health therapy is often essential for treating depression, anxiety, stress, emotional
trauma, or abuse.

Meridian-based therapies, such as acupuncture, acupressure, and Eastern massage styles, are
ideal for stress or pain, addictions, emotional issues, and broad physical categories like ear,
nose, and throat conditions; heart-related issues; muscle problems; common ailments like
infections; skin conditions; and more. (See 

chapter 3

.)

Chakra-based therapies aid in physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual issues of all sorts.
(See 

chapter 4

.) They are typically recommended as a complement to allopathic care or other

subtle energy practices.

Field-based therapies assist in resolving physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual issues of all
varieties. They are also recommended for issues involving boundaries, for protection, and for
environmental sensitivities. (See 

chapter 2

.) They are typically recommended as an adjunct to

allopathic care or other subtle energy practices. Examples include aura clearing and balancing,
aromatherapy, and sound healing.

Natural healing supports allopathic care, in addition to balancing body, mind, and soul through
low-impact treatments. The use of herbal medicine, supplements, hands-on healing, spiritual
healing, homeopathy, aromatherapy, flower essences, Ayurveda, guided imagery, holistic
dentistry, diet/nutritional medicine, exercise, and other forms of natural care all bring about
healing. (See all chapters in 

part 3

.)

Bodywork reduces stress and alleviates bodily pain from chronic conditions, as well as
supporting allopathic care. Massage, chiropractic treatments, osteopathy, colon therapy, and
reflexology are all forms of bodywork. (See 

chapter 12

 for specific hands-on healing

techniques.)

Certain forms of subtle energy medicine, such as Healing Touch, Reiki, color healing, and sound

healing,  fall  into  several  categories.  For  instance,  Healing  Touch  and  Reiki  use  the  hands  to  clear,
balance, and energize the energy system, but they also achieve the same results as bodywork. Color
and sound healing can effectively calm the nerves and therefore be adjuncts for mental health therapy,
but  they  also  shift  the  energetic  field.  You’ll  discover  that  many  types  of  subtle  energy  medicine
achieve several goals.

There are so many ways that modalities from the different categories can—and do—complement

each  other.  For  example,  a  person  going  through  an  extended  period  of  anxiety  and  depression  may
work with a massage therapist and a psychiatrist. At one point in their process, they might also add
the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT, see 

chapter 1

) to their healing plan. A pregnant woman, in

addition  to  seeing  her  obstetrician-gynecologist  (ob-gyn)  and  midwife,  might  discover  that  working
with a healer who specializes in aromatherapy (see 

chapter 20

) and sound healing (see 

chapter  21

)

exponentially increases her energy level and sense of emotional equilibrium.

Undoubtedly, you are someone who mixes and matches some of the best of both worlds yourself.

I  know  that  I  do.  I  eat  organic,  whole  foods;  walk  daily;  and  utilize  my  own  energy  balancing  and
healing  techniques  in  one  way  or  another  just  about  every  day.  And  I  also  employ  the  services  of
allopathic practitioners and medicines when I deem necessary. I believe it’s important to not rely on a
single modality. We are complex beings, and our health needs are complex as well. I suggest that you
select modalities and therapies as part of an overall wellness plan that supports your highest goals.
Because our needs change over time, it’s also important to “never say never” or dismiss a modality
out  of  hand—especially  allopathic  modalities.  A  broken  bone  will  require  allopathic  care;
homeopathy won’t hold that bone in place. Serious depression can be treated in many ways; you don’t
want to rule out prescription medicine. All medicine is energy medicine and, if properly dispensed,
can boost and bolster your health.

TOPICS IN THIS BOOK

This  book  gives  you  a  wealth  of  information  about  subtle  energy  healing.  In 

part  1

,  you  will  learn

about  energy  medicine  and  the  energetic  anatomy,  which  is  made  of  energy  fields,  channels,  and
centers. 

Part 2

 prepares you for serving as a subtle energy healer, whether you are a layperson or a

well-decorated professional.

Subtle  energy  practitioners  have  special  considerations  that  self-healers  do  not,  and  we  cover

these unique concerns in 

part 2

. For instance, in order to build and maintain a thriving practice as a