Tribulin and Endogenous MAO-Inhibitory

Regulation In Vivo

Alexei E. Medvedev

1

Vivette Glover

2,*

1

Institute of Biomedical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russia

2

IRDB, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Campus, Du Cane Road, London W12 ONN, UK

Abstract

Tribulin is the name given to a family of endogenous nonpeptide substances which inhibit monoamine oxidase (MAO)

and benzodiazepine binding. It is widely distributed in mammalian tissues and body fluids, and exhibit some species and
tissue variations. Several components selectively inhibiting MAO A, MAO B, central and peripheral benzodiazepine
binding (tribulins A, B, BZc and BZp, respectively) have been recognised. Tribulin A represents some tissue-specific
metabolites of trace amines, whereas isatin is the major component of tribulin B. Tribulin content increases in brain
under conditions of stress and anxiety and is reduced under sedation. Changes in tribulin content in the brain are
accompanied by corresponding changes in the content of monoamines and their acidic metabolites, and also by altered
susceptibility of MAO to specific mechanism-based inhibitors. This suggests that tribulin is involved in MAO inhibitory
regulation in vivo.
# 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Keywords: MAO; Endogenous regulation; Tribulin; Isatin

INTRODUCTION

Endogenous monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibitory

activity, which was named tribulin by Merton Sandler
(

Sandler, 1982

), was originally discovered in human

urine (

Glover, 1993; Glover et al., 1980

). Attempts to

develop a simple method for the evaluation of urinary
tyramine excretion based on the competitive inhibition
of MAO activity with tyramine as a substrate led to the
discovery of the intriguing fact that human urine
exhibited potent inhibition of MAO in test systems
even without loading of volunteers with tyramine
(

Glover, 1993

). Major and minor components of urine

(including monoamine metabolites) did not inhibit
MAO (

Glover et al., 1980

). Tribulin was readily

extractable into ethyl acetate and had molecular mass
about 180 Da (

Glover et al., 1980

).

Subsequent studies in man and animals revealed the

presence of tribulin in various tissues and body fluids

(see for review

Glover, 1993, 1998; Glover and Sand-

ler, 1993; Glover et al., 1988; Medvedev, 1996

).

Increased tribulin output was associated with condi-
tions of stress and anxiety and tribulin was considered
as an endocoid marker of stress (

Bhattacharya et al.,

1991, 1993, 1995, 1996a,b, 2000

;

Glover, 1993

).

Originally, tribulin content was evaluated by inhibi-

tion of MAO in test systems containing tyramine
(

Armando et al., 1989; Bhattacharya et al., 1991; Clow

et al., 1983, 1988, 1989; Glover et al., 1980; Lemoine
et al., 1990

), which is as a common substrate for MAO

A and MAO B. The employment of test systems for
separate analysis of MAO A and MAO B-inhibitory
activity of tribulin revealed different time-course of
accumulation of MAO A and MAO B-inhibitory
components of brain tribulin in rats with different
intensity of audiogenic seizures (

Medvedev et al.,

1992

). Subsequent studies by several groups revealed

different responses of the MAO A and MAO B-inhi-
bitory components of tribulin under various stress
conditions, with the MAO A component being selec-
tively elevated (

Clow et al., 1997; Doyle et al., 1996;

Oxenkrug et al., 2000

).

NeuroToxicology

25 (2004) 185–192

*

Corresponding author. Tel.:

þ44-207-594-2136;

fax:

þ44-207-594-2138.

E-mail address: v.glover@ic.ac.uk (V. Glover).

0161-813X/$ – see front matter # 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
doi:10.1016/S0161-813X(03)00098-6

STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS OF TRIBULIN

Functionally, a crude tribulin fraction inhibits not

only MAO A and MAO B but also central and per-
ipheral benzodiazepine receptor binding (

Armando

et al., 1986; Clow et al., 1983; Hucklebridge et al.,
1998

). The latter suggests that tribulin is a family of

nonpeptide molecules, possessing a range of biologi-
cal activities (

Glover, 1998

). However, only some of

the MAO A and MAO B components have been
isolated, purified and identified (

Glover et al., 1988

;

Medvedev et al., 1995a,b

). Isatin is a selective inhi-

bitor of MAO B (K

i

 3–20 mM); it inhibits MAO A

with a K

i

of about 60–70 mM (

Glover et al., 1988;

Medvedev et al., 1995c

). Several selective MAO A

inhibitors have been isolated from crude urinary and
brain tribulin. The selective MAO A inhibitors isolated
from human urinary tribulin were all esters of trypta-
mine and tyramine metabolites. They selectively
inhibited MAO A (with IC

50

values ranged from 40

to 120 mM), whereas IC

50

for MAO B inhibition was

>1 mM. Although good evidence exists that these
esters were not formed artificially during purification
procedure (

Medvedev et al., 1995a

they were not

detected in pig brain tribulin fraction, where 4-hydro-
xyphenylethanol seems to be a selective MAO A
inhibitor (

Medvedev et al., 1995b

). The K

i

value for

4-hydroxyphenylethanol is rather high (1.4 mM). Per-
haps there is some tissue specificity in the distribution
of chemical components underlying MAO A-inhibi-
tory activity of tribulin. The latter may be attributed to
various preferential pathways of the trace amine
metabolism in particular tissue. For example, 4-hydro-
xyphenyl acetic aldehyde formed during MAO-depen-
dent oxidative deamination of tyramine may be further
converted into 4-hydroxyphenylethanol or 4-hydro-
xyhenylacetic acid or involved into ester formation. It
is also possible that several small molecules fit to the
substrate/inhibitor binding site of MAO (A) and thus
exhibit MAO A inhibition. In the latter case, the steric
requirements might represent the only precondition
for such type of inhibition (see also the paper by
Veselovsky et al., this issue).

ISATIN

Isatin is the major MAO B-inhibitory component of

tribulin. Besides effective competitive inhibition of
MAO B in vitro isatin administration to rats protects
brain MAO B (but not MAO A) against irreversible
inhibition by the mechanism-based inhibitor, phenelzine

(

Panova et al., 1997; Sandler et al., 2000

). In some

tissues and body fluids, isatin does account for the MAO
B-inhibitory component, e.g. in cerebrospinal fluid
(

Sandler et al., 2000

see also

Table 1

).

Hamaue et al.

(1998)

found a positive correlation between isatin con-

centration and tribulin-like activity in both rat urine
(r

¼ 0:924, P < 0:001) and kidney extracts (r ¼ 0:862,

P

< 0:01).
In contrast to MAO A-inhibitory components which

may be considered as products of MAO-dependent
metabolism trace amines tyramine and tryptamine
(

Medvedev et al., 1995a,b

), the origin of isatin remains

unclear. One possibility is that isatin may be derived
from the amino acid tryptophan; however, the chain of
events, leading to isatin formation is unknown (

Sandler

et al., 2000

). In vitro isatin catabolism may occur via

oxidase and reductase pathways. The latter involves,
isatin reductase, a member of a family of NADPH-
dependent carbonyl reductases, which has recently
been purified from human kidneys and liver (

Usami

et al., 2001

). The enzyme catalyzes NADPH-depen-

dent reduction of isatin into 3-hydroxy-2-oxindole. The
apparent K

m

value for isatin (10 mM) is within the

upper limits of physiological range of concentrations
(

Usami et al., 2001

). Although nothing was known

before about the occurrence of this metabolite in vivo it
was detected in the human urine (

Usami et al., 2001

).

The oxidase pathway in vitro involves superoxide-

generating systems like xanthine oxidase

þ xanthine or

glucose oxidase

þ glucose (

Medvedev et al., 1994;

Sandler et al., 2000

). Urate oxidase, generating hydro-

gen peroxide (in the presence of uric acid), without the
intermediate formation of superoxide is ineffective
(

Medvedev et al., 1994

). The reduction of isatin level

in these systems was accompanied by the appearance
of anthranilic acid (

Sandler et al., 2000; Panova, 2001

)

(

Fig. 1

). Although this co-oxygenation reaction of

isatin degradation is less specific than isatin reduction,

Table 1
Isatin content of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and MAO B-inhibitory
activity of CSF tribulin (

Sandler et al., 2000

)

Isatin content as assessed by GC–MS

42.0

 4.6 ng/ml

Calculated concentration of isatin, as diluted

in the in the assay medium of tribulin

1.2

 0.2 mM

Inhibition of MAO B by CSF tribulin

23.9

 2.9%

MAO B inhibition by

1 mM isatin

23.0

 3.8%

10 mM isatin

57.0

 2.0%

Tribulin fraction was isolated from human samples of cerebrospinal fluid
with known isatin content. The latter was used for calculation of rough
isatin concentration in the assay medium containing tribulin. It was
assumed that CSF isatin was completely extracted into the tribulin fraction.

186

A.E. Medvedev, V. Glover / NeuroToxicology 25 (2004) 185–192

(any superoxide generating system may be potentially
involved in isatin degradation), the resultant anthranilic
acid may link isatin catabolism with the general path-
way of tryptophan metabolism.

Administration of isatin over a dose range of

10–300 mg/kg increases the concentration of mono-
amines such as dopamine, 5-HT and noradrenaline in
the rat brain (see

Table 2

). The nature of the effect

depends on both the dose and the time of analysis after
isatin injection. It is also possible that sensitivity to
isatin varies between different rat strains. At higher
concentrations, both MAO A and B are inhibited and
this has to be considered as a partial explanation for the
observed increased levels of noradrenaline and 5-HT,
both of which are mainly metabolised by MAO A in rat
brain. However, the effects are quite complex and
variable at higher dosage and depend on the brain
region and monoamine being measured (

Table 2

). In

most studies, an increase in 5-HT concentration was
not accompanied by a corresponding decrease in 5-
hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), which would
have been expected if MAO were inhibited function-
ally (

McIntyre and Norman, 1990; Bhattacharya and

Acharya, 1993; Hamaue et al., 1994

): in fact, 5-HIAA

concentration was essentially unchanged. As MAO A
is more important than MAO B for metabolising the
major neurotransmitter monoamines in the brain, most
of the pharmacological effects described seem likely to
stem from some other mechanism, independent of
MAO inhibition (

Glover et al., 1988

). This remains

to be identified.

Isatin readily crosses the blood–brain barrier and

accumulates in the brain (

Bhattacharya et al., 1991

).

Isatin transport into some type of cells involves the
serotonin transporter as it is sensitive to serotonin
reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (

Medvedev et al., 2002

).

Fig. 1. Anthranilic acid formation during oxidative degradation of isatin by xanthine

þ xanthine oxidase system (adapted from

Panova,

2001)

: (a) incubation of isatin in the presence of xanthine

þ xanthine oxidase; (b) incubation of isatin in the presence of

xanthine

þ xanthine þ HCl; (c) identification of anthranilic acid.

A.E. Medvedev, V. Glover / NeuroToxicology 25 (2004) 185–192

187

Isatin-binding sites have been recognised in the brain

and peripheral tissues of rat (

Figs. 2 and 3

) (

Ivanov

et al., 2002

). Isatin binding predominated in the mem-

brane fraction of brain, liver and heart preparations,
whereas in the kidneys the highest binding was
observed in the soluble fractions. The distribution of
isatin binding sites in the particulate fraction reduced in
the following order: brainstem > brain hemispheres

¼

cerebellum > heart > kidneys > liver. In the soluble
fraction there was a different rank of isatin binding:
kidneys > heart > brainstem

¼ brainhemispheres >

liver > cerebellum (

Ivanov et al., 2002

).

Purification of the rat liver mitochondria by digi-

tonin treatment and isolation of the purified outer
mitochondrial membranes (the total content of mar-
ker enzyme of the inner mitochondrial membrane was
less than 10% of mitochondrial activity) increased
specific binding of these preparations to immobilised
isatin (

Ivanov et al., 2002

). Changes in such binding

by clorgyline and deprenyl points to an interaction of
immobilised isatin with mitochondrial MAO (

Ivanov

et al., 2002

). However, it is clear that besides MAO

other targets for isatin also exist. These include atrial
natriuretic peptide (ANP) stimulated particulate gua-
nylate cyclase (GC) (

Glover et al., 1995; Medvedev

et al., 1998; Sandler, 1982

and soluble nitric oxide-

stimulated guanylate cyclase (

Medvedev et al., 2002

).

These enzymes are even more sensitive to isatin than
MAO B.

Certain evidence exists that isatin antagonises atrial

natriuretic peptides in vivo. Isatin administration
blocks cyclic GMP excretion under conditions of fluid
overload, which recruits endogenous natriuretic pep-
tides (

Medvedev et al., 2001

). It also inhibited brain

natriuretic and C-type natriuretic peptide-induced
facilitation of memory consolidation in passive-avoid-
ance learning in rats (

Telegdy et al., 2000

and some

other natriuretuic peptide-dependent effects (

Bhatta-

charya et al., 1996a,b

;

Pataki et al., 2002

).

It should be noted that ANP antagonises certain

monoamine functions (

Sandler et al., 2000

). It inhibits

catecholamine release from adrenal medulla and, in
the brain, it is a functional antagonist of angiotensin II
which potentiates catecholamine release (

Galli and

Phillips, 1996; Peng et al., 1996; Matsukawa and
Mano, 1996; Wuttke et al., 1992

). It is possible that

isatin, as the major MAO B-inhibitory component
may rise monoamine levels (by MAO-dependent
and independent mechanisms) and inhibit natriuretic
peptide receptor binding and intracellular signal
transduction mechanism. The simultaneous inhibition
of a key enzyme of monoamine metabolism (MAO)
and of natriuresis may represent a new regulatory
mechanism.

Table 2
Effect of isatin administration on monoamine levels in rat brain (adapted from

Medvedev et al., 1996

)

Amine

Isatin dose (mg/kg)

Time of exposure (min)

Rat strain

Brain area

Effect (%)

Serotonin

80

60

Sprague–Dawley

Hypothalamus

þ60

Frontal cortex

þ37

Serotonin

80

120

Fisher 344N

Whole brain

þ15

Serotonin

10

30

Charles Foster albino

Whole brain

þ33

10

60

Whole brain

þ77

20

15

Whole brain

þ96

20

60

Whole brain

þ97

Dopamine

20

15

Wistar Kyoto

Whole brain

þ55

20

30

Whole brain

þ81

20

60

Whole brain

þ60

Serotonin

50

120

Wistar Kyoto

Cortex

þ47

50

120

Hypothalamus

þ18

200

120

Cortex

þ329

200

120

Hypothalamus

þ82

Noradrenaline

50

120

Wistar Kyoto

Cortex

þ27

50

120

Hypothalamus

–34

200

120

Cortex

þ428

200

120

Hypothalamus

–46

Serotonin

300

120

Albino rats

Whole brain

þ27

300

360

Whole brain

þ15

188

A.E. Medvedev, V. Glover / NeuroToxicology 25 (2004) 185–192

TRIBULIN A USEFUL CONCEPT?

There have been two interrelated but rather distinct

views of tribulin. Some authors have considered tribulin
(and its components) as a putative endocoid marker of
stress and anxiety (

Bhattacharya et al., 2000; Satyan

et al., 1995

), whereas others believe that the regulation

of tribulin level in the brain is itself of biological
importance (

Clow et al., 1997; Glover, 1993, 1998

).

If any compound or a family of related compounds

are to be biologically important regulators of some
processes (or enzymes) in the cell they obviously
should meet several criteria.

(1) There should be certain conditions favouring not

only increased but also decreased formation of
such compound(s).

(2) Opposite changes in the level of the compound(s)

should be observed under opposite behavioural
reactions (e.g. anxiety versus sedation).

(3) Opposite changes in the content of the com-

pound(s) should cause opposite changes in the
activity of corresponding enzyme.

Tribulin as the endogenous monoamine oxidase

regulator has to be subjected to dual regulation:
increase under conditions of stress and anxiety and
decrease under sedation. There are several experimen-
tal observations that tribulin meets the two first criteria.
For example, oral administration of extracts Rhazya
stricta leaves, which have both antidepressant and
sedative properties caused opposite effects on the

Fig. 2. Isatin binding activity of liver (a), kidney (b), and heart (c)
preparations (

Ivanov et al., 2002

).

Fig. 3. Isatin binding activity of rat cerebellum (a), hemispheres
(b) and brainstem (c).

A.E. Medvedev, V. Glover / NeuroToxicology 25 (2004) 185–192

189

MAO A-inhibitory components of rat brain tribulin
(

Ali et al., 1998

). In an acute study, intermediate doses

caused a significant reduction of MAO A-inhibitory
activity. Subchronic administration (21 days) caused a
significant decrease in MAO A-inhibitory activity,
most prominent at low dosage, and an increase in
MAO B-inhibitory activity (

Ali et al., 1998

). Admin-

istration of bioactive glycowithanolides from the roots
of Withania somnifera or lorazepam also caused reduc-
tion of brain tribulin level (

Bhattacharya et al., 2000

).

Chronic alcohol feeding of rats resulted in some
decrease of MAO A- and MAO B-inhibitory compo-
nents of brain tribulin (

Panova et al., 2000

) whereas the

development of drug (or ethanol) withdrawal anxiety in
rats was accompanied by a clear increase of brain
tribulin components (

Bhattacharya et al., 1995

). These

data provide convincing evidence for the existence of
flexible regulation of tribulin level in the brain.

Demonstration of monoamine oxidase regulation by

tribulin in vivo (the third criterion, see above) repre-
sents a rather more complex problem, because of the
readily reversible tribulin interaction with MAO. This
makes hard to detect significant MAO inhibition after
tissue preparations in situ. So functional inhibition of
MAO in vivo is usually analysed by comparison of the
content of monoamines and their metabolites and also
by the sensitivity of MAO to specific irreversible
mechanism-based inhibitors such as phenelzine, pargy-
line, clorgyline etc.

Detection of increased monoamine levels accom-

panied by corresponding decrease of monoamine
acidic metabolite(s) under conditions of elevated
tribulin output gives a reasonable support for a phy-
siological role for tribulin in MAO regulation in vivo
(

Clow et al., 1988; McIntyre et al., 1989; Oxenkrug

and McIntyre, 1985

). However, there is evidence that

the acidic metabolites may also be formed in the brain
in an MAO-independent manner (

Dyck et al., 1993

).

Nevertheless, the results of several studies have pro-
vided convincing evidence for the regulatory role of
tribulin as an endogenous MAO inhibitor in vivo. For
example, cold-restrained stress increased tribulin
content in the rat brain, and the ratio of 5-hydroxy-
tryptamine/5-hydroxyindole acetic acid in the pineal
gland (

Oxenkrug and McIntyre, 1985; Oxenkrug et al.,

2000

). This was accompanied by an increase of

N-acetylserotonin and melatonin content (

Oxenkrug

and McIntyre, 1985; Oxenkrug et al., 2000

). The same

changes in pineal N-acetylserotonin and melatonin
content were also observed after administration of
MAO (A) inhibitors (

McIntyre et al., 1985; Oxenkrug

et al., 1994

).

In man, the functional inhibition of MAO under

conditions of increased tribulin output is less docu-
mented. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that
lactate-induced panic attacks caused increased output
of urinary tribulin, which was accompanied by reduc-
tion of urinary excretion of catecholamine metabolites
(

Clow et al., 1988

).

Clow et al. (1989)

found that under conditions of

increased tribulin output the administration of the
antidepressant phenelzine to rats produced smaller
MAO inhibition compared to the control. Similar
results have been obtained by

Lemoine et al. (1990)

,

who found that stress conditions, characterised by
increased tribulin output also reduced sensitivity of
MAO A to the mechanism-based inhibitor, clorgyline.
These data suggest endogenous MAO inhibition by
tribulin in vivo which decreases the effect of exogen-
ously administered irreversible inhibitors. However,
the latter experimental approach does not take into
consideration the possibility of stress-induced oxida-
tive modification of MAO molecules, which is quite
possible and which can also account for reduced
sensitivity to specific inhibitors (

Gorkin, 1983; Med-

vedev and Tipton, 1997

). This problem may be over-

come by comparison of in vitro sensitivity of MAOs
from control and experimental animals to the inhibitor
used. If the sensitivity of MAO to such inhibitor(s)
remains unaltered this is the decisive argument, which
rules out the possibility of stress-induced modification
of MAO. Using this argument

Panova et al. (2000)

found that chronic alcohol treatment reduced brain
tribulin content and increased in the vivo sensitivity
of MAO A to the mechanism-based inhibitor, pargy-
line. Since the in vitro sensitivity of MAO to this
inhibitor remained unchanged the increased sensitivity
of brain MAO A of alcoholised rats to pargyline may be
reasonably attributed to the deficit of brain tribulin.

CONCLUSION

Twenty years ago Merton Sandler named the endo-

genous monoamine oxidase/benzodiazpine receptor
inhibitory activity as tribulin (

Sandler, 1982

). Now it

is clear that tribulin is a complex family of endogenous
inhibitors which may be further classified into tribulin
A (selectively inhibiting MAO A), tribulin B (selec-
tively inhibiting MAO B), and tribulin BZc and BZp
(c and p for central and peripheral benzodazepine
inhibitors). These tribulins obviously represent various
chemical molecules, which may be different in different
tissues. Good evidence now exists that tribulin A and

190

A.E. Medvedev, V. Glover / NeuroToxicology 25 (2004) 185–192

tribulin B regulate the activity of MAO A and MAO B,
respectively. The role of tribulins BZc and BZp as
regulatory substances remains to be clarified. Some
chemical components as isatin have started their own
MAO-independent life and this indicates the existence
of various links in the regulatory pathways between
MAO, monoamines and other signalling systems.

Thus, we should take the tribulin story into the third

millennium and continue to investigate this intriguing
family and to characterise its biological and medical
role.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This work was supported by the Russian Foundation

for Basic Research (00-04-48446 and 03-04-48244),
INTAS (grant 97-1818), The Royal Society and Char-
ity Foundation for Support of Russian Medicine.

REFERENCES

Ali BH, Bashir AK, Tanira MO, Medvedev AE, Jarrett N, Sandler

M, Glover V. Effect of extract of Rhazya stricta, a traditional
medicinal plant, on rat brain tribulin. Pharmacol Biochem
Behav 1998;59:671–5.

Armando I, Glover V, Sandler M. Distribution of endogenous

benzodiazepine receptor ligand-monoamine oxidase inhibitory
activity (tribulin) in tissues. Life Sci 1986;38:2063–7.

Armando I, Lemoine AP, Ferrini M, Segura ET, Barontini M.

Repeated (isolation) stress increases tribuli-like activity in the
rat. Cell Mol Neurobiol 1989;9:115–22.

Bhattacharya SK, Acharya SB. Further investigation on the

anxiogenic effects of isatin. Biogenic Amines 1993;9:453–63.

Bhattacharya SK, Tripathi M, Acharya SB. Rat brain endogenous

MAO inhibitor (tribulin) activity during carrageenan-induced
acute paw inflammation. J Neural Transm Gen Sect 1991;84:
135–40.

Bhattacharya SK, Chakrabarti A, Sandler M, Glover V. Rat brain

monoamine oxidase A and B inhibitory (tribulin) activity
during drug withdrawal anxiety. Neurosci Lett 1995;199:103–6.

Bhattacharya SK, Chakrabarti A, Sandler M, Glover V. Anxiolytic

activity of intraventricularly administered atrial natriuretic
peptide in the rat. Neuropsychopharmacology 1996a;15:
199–206.

Bhattacharya SK, Chakrabarti A, Sandler M, Glover V. Isatin

inhibits the memory-facilitating effect of centrally administered
atrial natriuretic peptide in rats. Med Sci Res 1996;24:299–301.

Bhattacharya SK, Bhattacharya A, Sairam K, Ghosal S.

Anxiolytic-antidepressant

activity

of

Withania

somnifera

glycowithanolides: an experimental study. Phytomedicine 2000;
6:463–9.

Clow A, Glover V, Armando I, Sandler M. New endogenous

benzodiazepine receptor ligand in human urine: identity with
endogenous monoamine oxidase inhibitor? Life Sci 1983;33:
735–41.

Clow A, Glover V, Weg MW, Walker PL, Sheehan DV, Carr DB,

Sandler M. Urinary catecholamine metabolite and tribulin
output during lactate infusion. Br J Psychiatr 1988;152:
122–6.

Clow A, Glover V, Oxenkrug G, Sandler M. Stress reduces in vivo

inhibition of monoamine oxidase by phenelzine. Neurosci Lett
1989;107:331–4.

Clow A, Patel S, Najafi M, Evans PD, Hucklebridge F. The

cortisol response to physiological challenge is preceded by a
transient rise in endogenous inhibitor of monoamine oxidase.
Life Sci 1997;61:567–75.

Doyle A, Hucklebridge F, Evans P, Clow A. Urinary output of

endogenous monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity is related to
everyday stress. Life Sci 1996;58:1723–30.

Dyck LE, Durden DA, Boulton A. Effects of monoamine oxidase

inhibitors on the acid metabolites of some trace amines and of
dopamine in the rat striatum. Biochem Pharmacol 1993;45:
1317–22.

Galli SM, Phillips MI. Interactions of angiotensin II and atrial

natriuretic peptide in the brain: fish to rodent. Proc Soc Exp
Biol Med 1996;213:128–37.

Glover V. Trials and tribulations with tribulin. Biogenic Amines

1993;9:443–51.

Glover V. Function of endogenous monoamine oxidase inhibitors

(tribulin). J Neural Transm 1998;52(Suppl):313–9.

Glover V, Sandler M. Tribulin and isatin: an update. In: Yasuhara

H, Parvez SH, Oguchi K, Sandler M, Nagatsu T, editors.
Monoamine oxidase: basic and clinical aspects. Utrecht: VSP;
1993. p. 61–72.

Glover V, Reveley MA, Sandler M. A monoamine oxidase

inhibitor in human urine. Biochem Pharmacol 1980;29:467–70.

Glover V, Halket JM, Watkins PJ, Clow A, Goodwin BL, Sandler

M. Isatin: identity with the purified endogenous monoamine
oxidase inhibitor tribulin. J Neurochem 1988;51:656–9.

Glover V, Medvedev A, Sandler M. Isatin is a potent endogenous

antagonist of guanylate cyclase-coupled atrial natriuretic
peptide receptors. Life Sci 1995;57:2073–9.

Gorkin VZ. Amine oxidases in clinical research. Oxford:

Pergamon Press; 1983.

Hamaue N, Minami M, Kanamaru Y, Ishikura M, Yamazaki N,

Saito H, Parvez SH. Identification of isatin, an endogenous
MAO inhibitor in the brain of stroke-prone SHR. Biogenic
Amines 1994;10:99–110.

Hamaue N, Yamazaki N, Minami M, Endo T, Hirahuji M, Monma

Y, Togashi H. Determination of isatin, an endogenous
monoamine oxidase inhibitor, in urine and tissues of rats by
HPLC. Gen Pharmacol 1998;30:387–91.

Hucklebridge F, Doyle A, Pang FY, Adlard M, Evans P, Clow A.

Regional and molecular separation of the four bioactivities of
‘tribulin’. Neurosci Lett 1998;240:29–32.

Ivanov YD, Panova NG, Gnedenko OV, Buneeva OA, Medvedev

AE, Archakov AI. Study of the tissue and subcellular
distribution of isatin-binding proteins with optical biosensor.
Vopr Med Khim (Moscow) 2002;48:73–83.

Lemoine AP, Armando I, Brun JC, Segura ET, Barontini M.

Footshock affects heart and brain MAO and MAO inhibitory
activity and open field behavior in rats. Pharmacol Biochem
Behav 1990;36:85–8.

Matsukawa T, Mano T. Atrial natriuretic hormone inhibits

angiotensin II-stimulated sympathetic nerve activity in humans.
Am J Physiol Regulat Integr Comp Physiol 1996;40:R464–71.

A.E. Medvedev, V. Glover / NeuroToxicology 25 (2004) 185–192

191

McIntyre IM, Norman TR. Serotonergic effects of isatin: an

endogenous MAO inhibitor related to tribulin. J Neural Transm
(Gen Sect) 1990;79:35–40.

McIntyre IM, McCauley R, Murphy SH, Goldman H, Oxenkrug

GF. Effect of superior cervical ganglionectomy on melatonin
stimulation by specific MAO-A inhibition. Biochem Pharmacol
1985;34:393–4.

McIntyre IM, Norman T, Burrows G, Oxenkrug G. The effect of

stress on melatonin and serotonin in rat brain. Stress Med
1989;5:5–8.

Medvedev

AE.

Tribulin—endogenous

monoamine

oxidase

inhibitory activity: dedication to Merton Sandler. Vopr Med
Khim (Moscow) 1996;42:95–103.

Medvedev AE, Tipton KF. Oxidative modification of monoamine

oxidase. Vopr Med Khim (Moscow) 1997;43:471–81.

Medvedev AE, Gorkin VZ, Fedotova IB, Semiokhina AF, Glover

V, Sandler M. Increase of brain endogenous monoamine
oxidase inhibitory activity (tribulin) in experimental audiogenic
seizures in rat. Evidence for a monoamine oxidase inhibiting
component of tribulin. Biochem Pharmacol 1992;44:1209–10.

Medvedev AE, Halket J, Glover V. Effect of hydrogen peroxide

and

hydrogen-peroxide

producing

enzymes

on

isatin

metabolism in vitro. Med Sci Res 1994;22:713–4.

Medvedev AE, Halket J, Goodwin BL, Sandler M, Glover V.

Monoamine oxidase A-inhibiting components of urinary
tribulin: purification and identification. J Neural Transm Park
Dis Dement Sect 1995a;9:225–37.

Medvedev AE, Kamyshanskaia NS, Halket J, Glover V, Sandler

A. An endogenous inhibitor of monoamine oxidase A (tribulin
A) from brain: purification and structure identification.
Biochemistry Moscow 1995b;60:659–67.

Medvedev AE, Ivanov AS, Kamyshanskaya NS, Kirkel AZ,

Moskvitina TA, Gorkin VZ, Li NY, Marshakov VYu.
Interaction of indole derivatives with monoamine oxidase A and
B. Studies on the structure–inhibitory activity relationship.
Biochem Mol Biol Int 1995c;36:113–22.

Medvedev AE, Clow A, Sandler M, Glover V. Isatin—a link

between natriuretic peptides and monoamines? Biochem
Pharmacol 1996;52:385–91.

Medvedev AE, Sandler M, Glover V. Interaction of isatin with

type A-natriuretic peptide receptor: possible mechanism. Life
Sci 1998;62:2391–8.

Medvedev AE, Adamik A, Glover V, Telegdy G. Cyclic GMP

excretion blocked by isatin administration under conditions of
fluid overload. Biochem Pharmacol 2001;62:225–7.

Medvedev AE, Byssygina O, Pyatakova N, Glover V, Severina IS.

Effect of isatin on nitric oxide-stimulated soluble guanylate cy-
clase from human platelets. Biochem Pharmacol 2002;63:763–6.

Oxenkrug G, McIntyre IM. Stress-induced synthesis of melatonin:

possible involvement of the endogenous monoamine oxidase
inhibitor (tribulin). Life Sci 1985;37:1743–6.

Oxenkrug G, Requitina PJ, Correa RM, Juwiller A. The effect of

6-months l-deprenyl administration on pineal MAO-A and
MAO-B activity and on the content of melatonin and related
indoles in aged female Fisher 344N rats. Neural Transm
1994;41(Suppl):249–52.

Oxenkrug GF, Medvedev AE, Requitina PJ, Glover V. The effect

of cold immobilization stress on brain MAO-A-inhibitory
activity and pineal N-acetylserotonin and melatonin in
spontaneously hypertensive and normotensive rats. Stress Med
2000;16:239–41.

Panova NG, Zemskova MA, Axenova LN, Medvedev AE. Does

isatin interact with rat brain monoamine oxidases in vivo?
Neurosci Lett 1997;233:58–60.

Panova NG, Axenova LN, Medvedev AE. The stimulating effects

of ethanol consumption on synthesis of rat brain monoamine
oxidases and their sensitivity to the irreversible inhibitor,
pargyline. Neurosci Lett 2000;292:66–8.

Panova NG. Study of components of monoamine oxidase

inhibitor, tribulin, and their interaction with the enzymes in vivo
and in vitro. Ph.D. thesis, Moscow; 2001.

Pataki I, Adamik A, Telegdy G. Isatin (Indole-2,3-dione) inhibits

natriuretic peptide-induced hyperthermia in rats. Peptides
2002;1(3):373–7.

Peng N, Oparil S, Meng QC, Wyss JM. Atrial natriuretic peptide

regulation of noradrenaline release in the anterior hypothalamic
area of spontaneously hypertensive rats. J Clin Invest 1996;
98:2060–5.

Sandler M. The emergence of tribulin. Trends Pharmacol Sci

1982;3:471–2.

Sandler M, Medvedev AE, Panova NG, Matta S, Glover V. Isatin:

from monoamine oxidase to natriuretic peptides. In: Magyar K,
Visi ES, editors. Milestones in monoamine oxidase research:
discovery of (–)deprenyl. Budapest: Meditcina Publishing
House Co.; 2000. p. 237–51.

Satyan KS, Rai A, Jaiswal AK, Acharya SB, Bhattacharya SK.

Isatin, a putative anxiogenic endocoid, induces memory
dysfunction in rats. Indian J Exp Biol 1995;33:576–9.

Telegdy G, Adamik A, Glover V. The action of isatin (2,3-

dioxoindole) an endogenous indole on brain natriuretic and C-
type

natriuretic

peptide-induced

facilitation

of

memory

consolidation in passive-avoidance learning in rats. Brain Res
Bull 2000;53:367–70.

Usami N, Kitahara K, Ishikura S, Nagano M, Sakai S, Hara A.

Characterization of a major form of human isatin redu-
ctase and the reduced metabolite. Eur J Biochem 2001;268:
5755–63.

Wuttke W, Dietrich M, Jarry H. Antagonistic effects of

angiotensin II and ANF on catecholamine release in the adrenal
medulla. In: Kvetnansky R, MacCarty R, Axelrod J, editors.
Stress: neuroendocrine and molecular approaches. New York:
Gordon and Breach; 1992. p.171–9.

192

A.E. Medvedev, V. Glover / NeuroToxicology 25 (2004) 185–192