Original article

Effect of pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation on knee cartilage,

subchondral and epyphiseal trabecular bone of aged

Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs

Milena Fini

a

,

*

Paola Torricelli

a

, Gianluca Giavaresi

a

Nicolo` Nicoli Aldini

a

,

Francesco Cavani

b

Stefania Setti

c

, Andrea Nicolini

d

, Angelo Carpi

e

, Roberto Giardino

a

,

f

a

Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Research Institute Codivilla-Putti, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna, Italy

b

Department of Anatomy and Histology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy

c

IGEA SRL, Carpi, Modena, Italy

d

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy

e

Department of Reproduction and Ageing, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy

f

Chair of Surgical Pathophisiology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy

Received 20 February 2007; accepted 8 March 2007

Available online 3 April 2007

Abstract

It has been demonstrated that pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) stimulation has a chondroprotective effect on osteoarthritis (OA) progres-

sion in the knee joints of the 12-month-old guinea pigs. The aim of the present study was to discover whether the therapeutic efficacy of PEMFs
was maintained in older animals also in more severe OA lesions.

PEMFs were administered daily (6 h/day for 6 months) to 15-month-old guinea pigs. The knee joints (medial and lateral tibial plateaus, me-

dial and lateral femoral condyles) were evaluated by means of a histological/histochemical Mankin modified by Carlsson grading score and
histomorphometric measurements of cartilage thickness (CT), fibrillation index (FI), subchondral bone thickness (SBT) and epiphyseal bone
microarchitecture (bone volume: BV/TV; trabecular thickness: Tb.Th; trabecular number: Tb.N; trabecular separation: Tb.SP). Periarticular
knee bone was also evaluated with dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).

PEMF stimulation significantly changed the progression of OA lesions in all examined knee areas. In the most affected area of the knee joint

(medial tibial plateau), significant lower histochemical score (

p < 0.0005), FI ( p < 0.005), SBT ( p < 0.05), BV/TV ( p < 0.0005), Tb.Th

(

p < 0.05) and Tb.N ( p < 0.05) were observed while CT ( p < 0.05) and Tb.Sp ( p < 0.0005) were significantly higher than in SHAM-treated

animals. DXA confirmed the significantly higher bone density in SHAM-treated animals. Even in the presence of severe OA lesions PEMFs
maintained a significant efficacy in reducing lesion progression.
Ó 2007 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

Keywords: Osteoarthritis; Pulsed electromagnetic fields; Guinea pig; Chondroprotection

1. Introduction

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease affecting mil-

lions of people. Aging decreases the ability of chondrocytes to
maintain articular cartilage mechanical competence and
restore its integrity after minor damage, resulting in tissue de-
generation and loss of function

[1]

. Currently, treatment is

aimed at relieving symptoms and in most instances it is unable
to prevent disease progression. Therefore, the increasing

Abbreviations: OA, osteoarthritis; PEMF, pulsed electromagnetic field; CT,

cartilage thickness; FI, fibrillation index; SBT, subchondral bone thickness;
BV/TV, bone volume; Tb.Th, trabecular thickness; Tb.N, trabecular number;
Tb.Sp, trabecular separation; DXA, dual X-ray absorptiometry; BMD, bone
mineral density; BMC, bone mineral content; DFBMD, distal femur bone min-
eral density; DFBMC, distal femur bone mineral content; PTBMD, proximal
tibia bone mineral density; PTBMC, proximal tibia bone mineral content.

* Corresponding author. Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Research In-

stitute Codivilla-Putti, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via di Barbiano, 1/10,
40136 Bologna, Italy. Tel.:

þ39 051 636 6557; fax: þ39 051 636 6580.

E-mail address:

milena.fini@ior.it

(M. Fini).

0753-3322/$ - see front matter

Ó 2007 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

doi:10.1016/j.biopha.2007.03.001

Available online at

www.sciencedirect.com

Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy 62 (2008) 709e715

severity of OA often leads to hip or knee replacement surgery,
as is well known in clinical practice. The ideal therapy of OA
should be aimed at preventing or stabilising the progression of
OA by acting on the underlying pathophysiological processes

[2,3]

.

Recent findings have opened new perspectives for the un-

derstanding of the fundamental mechanism of OA and its
treatment. Two recent studies by Stanton et al.

[4]

and Glasson

et al.

[5]

demonstrated that the deletion of active ADAMTS5

(aggrecanase-2) prevents cartilage degradation in a murine
model of OA. Cohen et al.

[6]

demonstrated that septic joint

destruction could be prevented by treating rabbits with an
adenosine receptor agonist. Finally, electromagnetic stimula-
tion of Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs was effective in preventing
OA progression in the knee joint

[7]

In all the above studies it

was hypothesized that a key role was played by the control of
inflammatory cytokines.

Although not considered a traditional inflammatory disease,

inflammation processes are closely involved in OA pathogen-
esis. Symptoms of inflammation and synovitis are present in
many patients affected by OA

[8,9]

. The presence of increased

levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IL-1,
TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-18, IL-17) has been demonstrated in the
synovial fluid and it has been shown that pro-inflammatory
cytokines stimulate the expression of inflammatory matrix de-
grading enzymes in an OA joint

[2,9e12]

.

The positive effect of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF)

stimulation on OA prevention has been attributed to an anti-
inflammatory effect mediated by the adenosine receptor ago-
nist effect observed

in vitro

[13]

Moreover, PEMF stimulation

was shown to increase chondrocyte proliferation

in vitro, aug-

ment proteoglycan synthesis in full-thickness cartilage ex-
plants, prevent the catabolic effect of IL-1 on extracellular
matrix, and up-regulate gene expression of the TGF-beta su-
perfamily members

in vivo

[14e20]

. These effects of PEMFs

are largely dependent on exposure length and the stimulation
parameter used.

PEMF stimulation has been used in clinical studies in pa-

tients suffering from OA and a significant improvement in
pain and disability in PEMF-treated patients in comparison
with SHAM-treated ones has been described according to dif-
ferent physical parameters and exposure times

[21e26]

.

In previous studies the chondroprotective effect of PEMFs

was demonstrated in 12-month-old Dunkin Hartley (DH)
guinea pigs

[7,27]

It is well known that OA lesion progression

and pathogenesis in the DH guinea pig are very similar to
those of the human form of this disease. The earliest histolog-
ical signs of OA in DH guinea pigs appear at 3e6 months of
age. They are more relevant in the medial tibial compartment
and progress to moderate and severe degenerative changes
with aging

[28e33]

Particularly in the medial tibial plateau

of 15-month-old animals, the present authors observed a quan-
tifiable progressive worsening of OA lesions in comparison
with 12-months aged animals with significant increase of car-
tilage surface irregularities, decrease of cartilage thickness and
increase in epiphyseal trabecular bone eburnization (unpub-
lished data). Therefore, in order to obtain additional

information in the efficacy of PEMF stimulation in the treat-
ment of OA lesions, the aim of the present study was to find
out whether the positive effect of PEMFs on articular cartilage
could be observed in more advanced stages of cartilage degen-
eration than previously studied

[7,27]

. The severity of OA

lesions, in fact, is of extreme relevance in evaluating the ther-
apeutic efficacy of any proposed treatment for OA

[34]

.

Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs aged 15 months at the begin-

ning of the study were used and were treated for 6 months (un-
til the age of 21 months) with PEMFs (6 h/day).

The effects of PEMF stimulation were analysed in all areas

of the knee joints: the medial and lateral tibial plateaus, and
the medial and lateral femoral condyles. The cartilage was
evaluated by means of a histomorphometric/histochemical
score and measuring articular surface regularity, and cartilage
thickness. We focussed also on subchondral and epiphyseal
trabecular bone as parameters of cartilage deterioration. Carti-
lage degeneration causes the direct transfer of mechanical
stress to the articular bone that increases its thickness and its
density. Subchondral bone thickness and microarchitecture
of epiphyseal femoral and tibial trabecular bone were evalu-
ated with histomorphometry and dual X-ray absorptiometry
(DXA).

2. Methods and materials

2.1. Animals and PEMF stimulator

A pre-hoc power analysis at 95% power,

p

¼ 0.01, was per-

formed and it was determined that 5 guinea pigs in each group
were necessary to detect a decrease in cartilage histochemical
score of about 65% when comparing PEMF-treated to SHAM-
treated animals

[7]

.

The animal study was approved by the Italian Ministry of

Health and was performed following Italian Law on animal
experimentation. Ten DH guinea pigs (Charles River, Calco,
Lecco, Italy) aged 15 months at the beginning of the study
were used. The animals were housed individually in Plexiglas
cages (40

 25  18 cm) and nourished with standard food

(Piccioni, Settimo Milanese, Italy) and given tap water

ad libi-

tum. Experimental conditions were set up at a temperature
20

 1



C with a relative humidity of 55% and 12 h of illumi-

nation alternated with 12 h of darkness. Ten animals aged
15 months were randomly divided into two groups of five:
the PEMF-treated group underwent PEMF stimulation for
6 h/day for 6 months while the SHAM-treated group under-
went treatment simulation. At the end of the study, the animals
(21 months old) were euthanized via intravenous injection of
Tanax (Hoechst Roussel Vet, Milan, Italy) under general an-
aesthesia (ketamine 87 mg/kg and xylazine 13 mg/kg). Right
and left knee joints were cut 1 cm above and below the joint
line, stripped of muscle, and post-fixed. A total of 10
PEMF-treated and 10 SHAM-treated knees were examined.

Electromagnetic stimulators generated a pulsed electro-

magnetic field with the following characteristics: frequen-
cy

¼ 75 Hz, intensity of electromagnetic field ¼ 1.6 mT and

duty cycle

¼ 1.3 ms. The coil was placed outside the cage

710

M. Fini et al. / Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy 62 (2008) 709e715

and then connected to the pulsed generator. The stimulators
were turned on for 6 h a day for 6 months. The same condi-
tions were applied to the five animals housed in separate
non-energized cages. This constituted the control of the exper-
iment (SHAM-treated, Control group). When the pulsed gen-
erator was switched off, the non-static electromagnetic field
background, measured by Emdex II (EnertechQ2), was of
5

 0.2 mT in both experimental and control cages. The instru-

ments used to evaluate the magnetic field and the induced volt-
age were a Gaussmeter DG50 (Teslameter, Electrophysical
Laboratory, Nerviano, Milano, Italy) and a Tektronix 720A
oscilloscope (Tektronix, Inc., Beaverton). Temperature was
measured in both active and SHAM conditions with a probe
having a sensitivity of 0.1



C (Hygrometer HD 8501H, Del-

taohm, Padova, Italy) and no differences were observed
between the 2 groups. In the exposure conditions, coils and ca-
ges were not in direct contact but separated by a 1 mm dis-
tance. The PEMF generator system was kindly provided by
IGEA (ONE, IGEA Srl, Carpi, Modena, Italy).

2.2. Histology and histomorphometry

Specimens were fixed in 4% buffered paraformaldehyde

and dehydrated in a graded series of alcohols for undecalcified
bone processing in polymethylmethacrylate. Blocks were sec-
tioned along a sagittal plane with a Leica 1600 diamond saw
microtome (Leica SpA, Milan, Italy). A series of 10 sections,
300 mm in thickness and spaced 300 mm apart, were obtained
and sliced to about 5 mm. After staining with toluidine blue
and fast green, the joints were processed for histological and
histomorphometric analysis with a transmission and polarized
light Axioskop microscope (Carl Zeiss GmbH, Jena, Ger-
many) and image analysis Kontron KS 300 software (Kontron
Electronic GmbH, Eiching bei Munchen, Germany). The mid-
dle third of 6 central sections, defined as the central portion of
the articular bone surfaces corresponding to an area of 3e
4 mm

2

, was analyzed for each knee and all measurements

were made in this central portion

[32]

.

The semi-quantitative histological grading criteria of Man-

kin modified by Carlsson

[35]

was used for chondropathy eval-

uation at a magnification of 100

. The histological score

represented the sum of articular cartilage structure (from
0 in normal cartilage to 8 in the presence of clefts, extending
to the zone of calcified cartilage), proteoglycan loss (from 0 in
uniform staining throughout articular cartilage to 6 in case of
loss of staining in all 3 zones for half the length or greater of
the condyle or plateau), cellularity (from 0 in normal to 3 in
hypocellularity) and tidemark integrity (0 in intact/single tide-
mark and 1 when tidemark was crossed by vessels and redupli-
cated). Cartilage thickness (CT) was measured in mm at
a magnification of 20

 and the cartilage surface fibrillation in-

dex (FI) was calculated according to the method developed by
Pastoureau et al.

[36]

by dividing the length of the cartilage

surface border by the length of a standardized measured area
100 (expressed in %) at a magnification of 80. The sub-
chondral bone plate thickness (SBT) was measured in mm
from the cartilage-bone interface to the top of the epiphyseal

marrow space. The mean of 10 measurements for each section
perpendicular to the articular surface was calculated.

Histomorphometric evaluation of epiphyseal trabecular

bone underlying subchondral bone plate was measured on
the same samples where the cartilage was evaluated. Measure-
ments were performed on the superior half of the epiphysis
(from the end of the subchondral bone plate to a distance of
450

 50 mm from it) as suggested by Pastoreau et al.

[36]

.

The following parameters were calculated: trabecular bone
volume (BV/TV, %), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th, mm), trabec-
ular number (Tb.N, mm), and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp,
mm) at a magnification of 50

.

All sections were read blindly by an experienced

investigator.

2.3. Dual X-ray absorptiometry

Immediately after animal euthanasia, the bone mineral den-

sity (BMD) and content (BMC) of the proximal tibiae and dis-
tal femurs were measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry
(Norland XR 26 Mark, Norland Scientific Instruments, Fort
Atkinson, WI), with a scan speed of 1 mm/s and a resolution
of 0.5

 0.5 mm. Before taking the measurements, the instru-

ment was calibrated by means of a Norland phantom. The
BMD (mg/cm

2

) and BMC (mg) were determined by the anal-

ysis of two regions of interest (ROI): the distal femur
(DFBMD, DFBMC) and the proximal tibia (PTBMD,
PTBMC) in an area of about 0.50 cm

2

.

2.4. Statistical analysis

Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS v.12 soft-

ware (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Data are reported as
mean

 SD at a significance level of p < 0.05. After testing

data for normal distribution, Student’s unpaired

t-test was

used to assess the significant difference between PEMF-
treated and SHAM-treated animals.

3. Results

The morphological findings in the cartilage were signifi-

cantly different between the PEMF- and SHAM-treated ani-
mals.

Fig. 1

shows histological images of the medial tibial

plateau of SHAM (a) and PEMF (b)-treated animals. Surface
irregularities and loss of proteoglycan in superficial and me-
dial cartilage zones are well visible in SHAM-treated com-
pared to PEMF-treated animals. It is also possible to observe
the increased subchondral bone thickness and epiphyseal tra-
becular bone eburnization in SHAM-treated animals versus
PEMF-treated ones.

Fig. 2

shows images of the knee medial compartment (tibial

medial plateau and medial femoral condyle) in SHAM (a) and
PEMF (b)-treated animals. In SHAM-treated joints (a) the
complete absence of proteoglycan in superficial, medial and
deep cartilage zones of both tibial and femoral surfaces are
well evident together with a high degree of hypocellularity.

711

M. Fini et al. / Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy 62 (2008) 709e715

Table 1

reports the results of histochemical score, FI, CT

and SBT in all knee examined areas.

In

Fig. 3

data on bone histomorphometric parameters of

epiphyseal trabecular bone in DH guinea pigs PEMF-treated
in comparison to SHAM-treated from the age of 15 to
21 months are reported.

Six months of PEMF stimulation produced a significant de-

lay in OA lesion severity compared to that of the SHAM-
treated animals. In all examined surfaces the quite totality of
bone and cartilage values measured were significantly better
in stimulated versus SHAM-treated animals, demonstrating
that OA was more advanced in the untreated animals.

The medial tibial plateau, as expected, was the most af-

fected area compared to the other surfaces of the knee joint,
as demonstrated by the cartilage histochemical score (cartilage
structure, proteoglycan loss, cellularity, tidemark integrity),
surface irregularities and clefts (FI), and epiphyseal trabecular
bone microarchitecture (BV/TV, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp).

As a result of increased subchondral bone thickness and

epiphyseal bone eburnization, BMD and BMC measured in
the knee periarticular bone of the proximal tibia (PTBMD,
PT BMC) and of the distal femur (DFBMD, DFBMC) con-
firmed histomorphometric results. PTBMD and DFBMD of
PEMF-treated animals (0.252

 0.019 and 0.266  0.03 mg/

cm

2

, respectively) were significantly lower (

p < 0.05) than

PTBMD and DFBMD of SHAM-treated animals (0.292



0.036 and 0.310

 0.039 mg/cm

2

, respectively). Finally, also

PTBMC of PEMF-treated animals (0.111

 0.030 mg) was

significantly lower (

p < 0.005) than PTBMC of SHAM-

treated animals (0.159

 0.032 mg).

4. Discussion

Interest in the effects of PEMFs on articular hyaline carti-

lage to prevent degeneration or possibly favour its repair is in-
creasing. Both

in vitro and in vivo data are quite convincing

Fig. 1. a. Medial tibial plateau of a SHAM-treated animal. Surface irregularities and loss of staining in the superficial and medial cartilage surfaces are visible
(Toluidine Blue staining, 50

). (SB: subchondral bone; EB: epiphyseal bone). b. Medial tibial plateau of a PEMF-treated animal. Articular cartilage maintains

a normal structure and staining (Toluidine Blue staining, 50

) (SB: subchondral bone; EB: epyphiseal bone; M: meniscus). (For interpretation of the references

to colour in figure legends, the reader is refered to web version of this article).

Fig. 2. a. Medial articular compartment of the knee in a SHAM-treated animal. The almost complete absence of staining and chondrocytes in articular cartilage are
shown (Toluidine Blue staining, 50

) (T: medial tibial plateau; F: medial femoral condyle; M: meniscus). b. Medial articular compartment of the knee in a PEMF-

treated animal. Presence of cells and proteoglycan in both femoral condyle and tibial plateau (Toluidine Blue staining, 50

) (T: medial tibial plateau; F: medial

femoral condyle; M: meniscus). (For interpretation of the references to colour in figure legends, the reader is refered to web version of this article).

712

M. Fini et al. / Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy 62 (2008) 709e715

and the being able to supply the treatment locally and
non-invasively without side effects is certainly appealing
also for human applications

[37]

.

To the authors’ knowledge, to date 2 experimental

in vivo

studies into the effect of PEMFs on OA have been performed
and in both studies 12-month-old DH guinea pigs were used.
The results of these studies demonstrated a chondroprotective
effect of PEMFs on OA lesion progression in the animals’
knees

[7,27]

.

In this study, we assessed whether PEMFs could protect the

joint against OA degeneration by diminishing cartilage dam-
age progression and subchondral bone sclerosis even in
more severe disease than that studied previously

[7,27]

. To

do this, previously the spontaneous age-related lesion progres-
sion was studied in DH guinea pigs.

In fact, focussing the attention on the medial tibial plateau

that is the most affected area by OA of the knee joint, the
increase in OA severity in DH guinea pigs from the age of
12 months to the age of 15 months was previously demon-
strated with a significant increase of cartilage surface irregu-
larities (FI,

þ23%, p < 0.005), a significant decrease of CT

(

13%, p < 0.01), and a significant higher density of epiphy-

seal trabecular bone as demonstrated by the increase of BV/
TV (

þ42%, p < 0.001) and Tb.Th (þ79%, p < 0.0005)

accompanied by the decrease of Tb.N (

19%, p < 0.005)

and Tb.Sp (

43%, p < 0.05) (unpublished data). Therefore,

the adopted experimental model include the pathophysiologi-
cal steps of human knee OA progression and data on knee joint
conditions in 15 month-aged animals substained the rationale
of the present study.

All cartilage parameters considered in both tibia and femo-

ral joint surfaces demonstrated that the progression of OA was
significantly delayed by the exposure to PEMFs over a 6-
month period. The average modified Mankin score was 2 to
3 times higher in control animals compared to PEMF-treated
ones. In fact, stimulation with PEMFs had striking effects on
the cartilage degeneration that is normally characterized by
a progressive loosening of structure with formation of clefts
and fibrillations, loss of glycosaminoglycans and cells, and
thinning.

Because of the persistence of the articular cartilage degen-

eration, bone metabolism parameters are more and more mark-
edly altered; this fact could be explained by the current
knowledge on OA, which suggests that chondrocytes play an
important role in OA process initiation, while subchondral
bone response may play a role in disease progression and is
secondary to cartilage degeneration

[38,39]

. The loss of func-

tion of the degenerated articular cartilage exposes over time

Fig. 3. Percentage variations of bone histomorphometric parameters of DH guinea pigs PEMF-Treated in comparison to SHAM-Treated from the age of 15 to
21 months in all examined knee areas (medial tibial plateau, medial femoral condyle, lateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle). Student’s

t-test: *,

p < 0.05; **, p < 0.005; ***, p < 0.0005.

Table 1
Histochemical score (Mankin modified by Carlsson), fibrillation index (FI), cartilage thickness (CT) and subchondral bone thickness (SBT) in the medial tibial
plateau, medial femoral condyle, lateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle of Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs SHAM and PEMF-treated from the age of 15 to
21 months

Anatomic site

Histochemical score

FI

CT

SBT

SHAM

PEMFs

SHAM

PEMFs

SHAM

PEMFs

SHAM

PEMFs

Medial tibial plateau

13.8

 1.1

4.6

 1.5***

173

 5

111

 6**

218

 11

243

 26*

329

 82

263

 18*

Medial femoral condyle

6.3

 1.1

2.3

 1.2***

107

 7

102

 1**

150

 41

163

 14*

377

 44

320

 39*

Lateral tibial plateau

5.0

 1.3

2.3

 1.5***

101

 1

102

 2**

146

 8

180

 41*

361

 43

271

 10*

Lateral femoral condyle

4.6

 2.0

2.0

 1.4***

102

 1

102

 2

133

 14

144

 32*

355

 83

291

 31*

Differences according to Student’s

t-test between PEMF-treated and SHAM-treated animals: *, p < 0.05; **, p < 0.005; ***; p < 0.0005. Mean

 SD, n ¼ 5.

713

M. Fini et al. / Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy 62 (2008) 709e715

the subchondral and cancellous bone to increased mechanical
loads, thus resulting in altered metabolism. On the other side,
a reduction of subchondral bone compliance may results in
greater stresses being sustained by the articular cartilage lead-
ing to overloading and, consequently, breakdown

[40]

.

The increased thickening of both subchondral bone and

epiphyseal trabecular bone density is reflected in the BMD
and BMC values, which are significantly higher in control
SHAM-Treated animals. Increased BMD is often associated
to juxta-articular bone sclerosis in the OA knee

[41]

The

role of DXA in the osteoarthritic distal femur of meniscectom-
ized animals was emphasized by other authors, who found sig-
nificantly increased BMD in operated animals in comparison
to control ones

[42]

.

Our results support the positive effect of PEMF against ar-

ticular degeneration both in cartilage and bone in late-stage le-
sions. The effect of stimulation on subchondral and epiphyseal
bone was not evident in previous studies involving 12 month
old animals probably because the OA was not so dated and ad-
vanced

[7]

.

In vitro studies indicate that PEMF can prevent cartilage

degeneration through an adenosine receptor agonist effect
that can control locally the inflammatory processes that are al-
ways associated with OA progression

[13]

. Drugs with adeno-

sine receptor agonist have been shown to prevent the cartilage
degeneration associated to OA

[6]

.

In vitro in full-thickness

cartilage explants PEMFs are able to favour proteoglycan syn-
thesis both directly and in the presence of IGF-1

[18,19]

Fur-

thermore,

in-vivo PEMF stimulation favours the expression of

TGF-b in DH guinea pig articular cartilage

[27]

. The capabil-

ity to favour anabolic activity at the level of articular cartilage
can be of great value in maintaining the extracellular matrix
homeostasis and therefore its mechanical competence, which
can ultimately protect the subchondral bone from direct me-
chanical stress.

These results are relevant for the human pathology and may

open therapeutic perspectives for the local treatment of indi-
vidual joints whenever the OA process may be accelerated af-
ter trauma, in local chronic inflammatory processes, torsion,
shear stress to joint cartilage, and in professional athletes.

Acknowledgement

The authors appreciate the technical assistance of Claudio

Dal Fiume, (Experimental Surgery Department, IOR).

References

[1] Buckwalter JA, Mankin HJ, Grodzinsky AJ. Articular cartilage and oste-

oarthritis. Instr Course Lecture 2005;54:465e80.

[2] Pellettier JP. The influence of tissue cross-talking on OA progression:

role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Osteoarthritis Cartilage
1999;7:374e6.

[3] Altman R, Brandt K, Hochberg M, Moskowitz R, Bellamy N, Bloch DA,

et al. Design and conduct of clinical trials in patients with osteoarthritis:
recommendations from a task force of the Osteoarthritis Research Soci-
ety. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 1996;4:217e43.

[4] Stanton H, Rogerson FM, East CJ, Golub SB, Lawlor KE, Meeker CT,

et al. ADAMTS5 is the major aggrecanase in mouse cartilage in vivo
and in vitro. Nature 2005;434:648e52.

[5] Glasson SS, Askew R, Sheppard B, Carito B, Blanchet T, Ma HL, et al.

Deletion of active ADAMTS5 prevents cartilage degradation in a murine
model of OA. Nature 2005;434:644e8.

[6] Cohen SB, Leo BM, Baer GS, Turner MA, Beck G, Diduch DR. An

adenosine A2A receptor agonist reduces interleukin-8 expression and
glycosaminoglycans loss following septic arthrosis. J Orthop Res
2005;23:1172e8.

[7] Fini M, Giavaresi G, Torricelli P, Cavani F, Setti S, Cane V, et al.

Pulsed electromagnetic fields reduce knee osteoarthritic lesion progres-
sion in the aged Dunkin Hartley guinea pig. J Orthop Res 2005;23:
899e908.

[8] Brooks P. Inflammation as an important feature of osteoarthritis. Bull

World Health Organ 2003;81:689e90.

[9] Ahmed S, Anuntiyo J, Malemud CJ, Haqqi TM. Biological basis for the

use of botanicals in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. A review.
Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2005;2:301e8.

[10] Goldring SR, Goldring MB. The role of cytokines in cartilage matrix de-

generation in osteoarthritis. Clin Orthop Rel Res 2004;427S:S27e36.

[11] Rowan AD, Young DA. Collagenase gene regulation by pro-inflamma-

tory cytokines in cartilage. Front Biosci 2007;12:536e50.

[12] Burrage PS, Mix KS, Brunckerhoff CE. Matrix metalloproteinases: roles

in arthritis. Front Biosci 2006;11:544e69.

[13] Varani K, Gessi S, Merighi S, Iannotta V, Cattabriga E, Spisani S, et al.

Effects of low frequency electromagnetic fields on A2A adenosine recep-
tors in human neutrophils. Br J Pharmacol 2002;136:57e66.

[14] Aaron RK, Ciombor DM. Acceleration of experimental endochondral os-

sification by biophysical stimulation of the progenitor cell pool. J Orthop
Res 1996;14:582e9.

[15] Liu H, Lees P, Abbott J, Bee JA. Pulsed electromagnetic fields preserve

proteoglycan composition of extracellular matrix in embrionic chick ster-
nal cartilage. Biochim Biophys Acta 1997;1336:303e14.

[16] Liu H, Abbott J, Bee JA. Pulsed electromagnetic fields influence hyaline

cartilage extracellular matrix composition without affecting molecular
structure. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 1996;4:63e76.

[17] De Mattei M, Caruso A, Pezzetti F, Pellati A, Stabellini G, Sollazzo V,

et al. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on human articular chon-
drocyte proliferation. Connect Tissue Res 2001;42:1e11.

[18] De Mattei M, Pasello M, Pellati A, Stabellini G, Massari L, Gemmati D,

et al. Effects of electromagnetic fields on proteoglycan metabolism of bo-
vine articular cartilage explants. Connect Tissue Res 2003;44:54e9.

[19] De Mattei M, Pellati A, Pasello M, Ongaro A, Setti S, Massari L, et al.

Effects of physical stimulation with electromagnetic field and insulin
growth factor-I treatment on proteoglycan synthesis of bovine articular
cartilage. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2004;12:793e800.

[20] Aaron RK, Boyan BD, Ciombor DM, Schwartz Z, Simon BJ. Stimulation

of growth factor synthesis by electric and electromagnetic fields. Clin
Orthop Relat Res 2004;419:30e7.

[21] Trock DH, Bollet AJ, Dyer Jr RH, Fielding LP, Miner WK, Markoll R. A

double-blind trial of the clinical effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields
in osteoarthritis. J Rheumatol 1993;20:456e60.

[22] Trock DH, Bollet AJ, Markoll R. The effects of pulsed electromagnetic

fields in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee and cervical spine. Re-
port of randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trials. J Rheumatol
1994;21:1903e11.

[23] Pipitone N, Scott DL. Magnetic pulse treatment for knee osteoarthritis:

a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Curr Med Res
Opin 2001;17:190e6.

[24] Jacobson JI, Gorman R, Yamanashi WS, Saxena BB, Clayton L. Low

amplitude, extremely low frequency magnetic fields for the treatment
of osteoarthritic knees: a double-blind clinical study. Alter Ther Health
Med 2001;7:54e64.

[25] Nicolakis P, Kollmitzer J, Crevenna R, Bittner C, Erdogmus CB,

Nicolakis J. Pulsed magnetic field therapy for osteoarthritis of the
knee-a double-blind sham-controlled trial. Wien Klin Wochenschr
2002;114:678e84.

714

M. Fini et al. / Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy 62 (2008) 709e715

[26] Thamsborg G, Florescu A, Oturai P, Fallentin E, Tritsaris K, Dissing S.

Treatment of knee osteoarthritis with pulsed electromagnetic fields: a ran-
domized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Osteoarthritis Cartilage
2005;13:575e81.

[27] Ciombor DM, Aaron RK, Wang S, Simon B. Modification of osteoarthri-

tis by pulsed electromagnetic field-a morphological study. Osteoarthritis
Cartilage 2003;11:455e62.

[28] Bendele AM, Hulman JF. Spontaneous articular degeneration in guinea

pigs. Arthritis Rheum 1988;31:561e5.

[29] Bendele AM, White SL, Hulman JF. Osteoarthritis in guinea pigs: histo-

pathologic and scanning electron microscopic features. Lab Anim Sci
1989;39:115e21.

[30] Wei L, Brismar BH, Hultenby K, Hjerpe A, Svensson O. Distribution of

chondroytin 4 sulphate epitopes (2/B/6) in various zones and compart-
ments of articular cartilage in guinea pig osteoarthrosis. Acta Orthop
Scand 2003;74:16e21.

[31] Tessier JJ, Bowyer J, Brownrigg NJ, Peers IS, Westwood FR,

Waterton JC, et al. Characterisation of the guinea pig model of osteoar-
thritis by in vivo three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging. Osteo-
arthritis Cartilage 2003;11:1e9.

[32] Brismar BH, Lei W, Hjerpe A, Svensson O. The effect of body mass and

physical activity on the development of guinea pig osteoarthrosis. Acta
Orthop Scand 2003;74:442e8.

[33] Flahiff CM, Kraus VB, Huebner JL, Setton LA. Cartilage mechanics in

the guinea pig model of osteoarthritis studied with an osmotic loading
method. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2004;12:383e8.

[34] Aaron RK, Skolnick AH, Reinert SE, Ciombor DM. Arthroscopic debrid-

ment of osteoarthritis of the knee. J Bone Joint Surg Am 2006;88:
936e43.

[35] Carlson CS, Loeser RF, Purser CB, Gardin JF, Jerome CP. Osteoarthritis

in cynomolgus macaques III: effects of age, gender, and subchondral
bone thickness on the severity of the disease. J Bone Miner Res
1996;11:1209e17.

[36] Pastoureau P, Leduc S, Chomel A, De Ceuninck F. Quantitative assess-

ment of articular cartilage and subchondral bone histology in the menis-
cectomized guinea pig model of osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis Cartilage
2003;11:412e23.

[37] Fini M, Giavaresi G, Carpi A, Nicoli Aldini N, Setti S, Giardino R. Ef-

fects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on articular hyaline cartilage: re-
view of experimental and clinical studies. Biomed Pharmacother
2005;59:388e94.

[38] Mosckovitz RW. Bone remodelling in osteoarthritis: subchondral and os-

teophytic responses. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 1999;7:323e4.

[39] Chappard C, Peyrin F, Bonnassie A, Lemineur G, Brunet-Imbault B,

Lespessailles E, et al. Subchondral bone micro-architectural alterations
in osteoarthritis: a synchrotron micro-computed tomography study. Oste-
oarthritis Cartilage 2006;14:215e23.

[40] Li B, Aspden RM. Mechanical and material properties of the subchondral

bone plate from the femoral head of patients with osteoarthritis or oste-
oporosis. Ann Rheum Dis 1997;56:247e54.

[41] Clarke S, Wakeley C, Duddy J, Sharif M, Watt I, Ellingham K, et al.

Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry applied to the assessment of tibial
subchondral bone mineral density in osteoarthritis of the knee. Skeletal
Radiol 2004;33:588e95.

[42] Pastoreau PC, Chomel AC, Bonnet J. Evidence of early subchondral

bone changes in the meniscectomized guinea pig. A densitometric study
using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry subregional analysis. Osteoar-
thritis Cartilage 1999;7:466e73.

715

M. Fini et al. / Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy 62 (2008) 709e715