This article was downloaded by: [University of Guelph]
On: 29 May 2012, At: 05:18
Publisher: Routledge
Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer
House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

Journal of Psychoactive Drugs

Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information:

http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/ujpd20

Phytochemical Analyses of Banisteriopsis Caapi and
Psychotria Viridis

J. C. Callaway 

a

 , Glacus S. Brito 

b

 & Edison S. Neves 

b

a

 Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Kuopio, Finland

b

 Centro de Estudos Medico da Uni

āo do Vegetal, Sāo Paulo, Brasil

Available online: 07 Sep 2011

To cite this article: J. C. Callaway, Glacus S. Brito & Edison S. Neves (2005): Phytochemical Analyses of Banisteriopsis
Caapi and Psychotria Viridis , Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 37:2, 145-150

To link to this article:  

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02791072.2005.10399795

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE

Full terms and conditions of use: 

http://www.tandfonline.com/page/terms-and-conditions

This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes. Any substantial or systematic
reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any form to
anyone is expressly forbidden.

The publisher does not give any warranty express or implied or make any representation that the contents
will be complete or accurate or up to date. The accuracy of any instructions, formulae, and drug doses
should be independently verified with primary sources. The publisher shall not be liable for any loss, actions,
claims, proceedings, demand, or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever caused arising directly or
indirectly in connection with or arising out of the use of this material.

Phytocherrrl.cal Analyses of Banisteriopsis 

Caapi 

and Psychotria Vzridist 

J.C. Callaway, Ph.D. * ;  Glacus S. Brito, M.D.** 

Edison S .  Neves, M.D.** 

Abstract-A 

total o f  3 2  

Banisteriopsis  caapi 

samples  and  3 6  samples o f  

Psychotria  viridis 

were 

carefully  collected  from  different  plants  on  the  same  day  from  22  sites  throughout  Brazil  for 
phytochemical analyses. A broad range in alkaloid distribution was observed in both sample sets. All 

B. caapi 

samples had detectable amounts of harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine (THH), while 

some samples  of 

P. 

viridis 

had  little  or no detectable  levels  of N,N-dimethyltryptamine  (DMT). 

Leaves of 

P. 

viridis 

were also collected from one plant and analyzed for DMT throughout a 24-hour cycle. 

Keywords-ayahuasca, 

circadian, 

hoasca, yaje, mariri,  caupuri,  tucunacti 

Decoctions of a traditional South American sacrament 

are  made  from  the  pounded  woody  portions  of the  Iiana 

Banisteriopsis caapi, 

and typically brewed with the care­

fully washed leaves of the shrub 

Psychotria viridis. 

Use of 

these plants and the resulting decoctions form the core spiri­

tual 

doctrines of many  religious  groups  in this  region  of 

the 

world. Althoughit has been known by many other names, 

and many variations of this "tea" have been described (Ott 

1994 ),  the most common  identifying  feature  is the pres­

ence  of harmala alkaloids from 

B.  caapi 

(Schultes  1 982). 

Although these harmala alkaloids are not particularly psy­
choactive on their own, they can facilitate the activity of 
N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) from 

P.  viridis 

by the in­

hibition 

of the enzyme monoamine oxidase (MAO) in the 

liver 

and central nervous system (Ott 1 994; McKenna, Tow­

ers 

Abbot  1 984; Holmstedt 

Lindgren  1 967). 

The purpose of this article is to provide a phytochemi­

cal  overview  of the  alkaloid  content in 

B.  caapi 

and 

P. 

tThe authors extend their gracious thanks to Jeffrey Bronfman and 

the Aurora Foundation for financial support for this work, to the Unill.o 
do Vegetal for organizing these samples and their deepest gratitude to 
Dr.  Seppo Auriola for initial confirmation of these alkaloids by LC-MS. 

*Docent  of Ethnopharmacology,  Department  of Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry,  University  of Kuopio,  Finland. 

**Centro de Estudos Medico da Unill.o do Vegetal, Sao Paulo, Brasil. 
Please address correspondence and reprint requests to J.C. Callaway, 

Ph.D.,  Docent  of Ethnopharmacology,  Department  of  Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry, University of Kuopio, 

PL 1627, FIN-7021 1  Kuopio, Finland; 

email: callaway @uku.fi 

Journal of  Psychoactive Drugs 

145 

viridis, 

in order to have a better understanding of these use­

ful plants. There  are much deeper issues  concerning the 

relationship between these plants, their chemical composi­

tion  and  subsequent  religious  revelations  that  are  well 

beyond the scope of this article. 

MATERIALS AND METHODS 

Plant Material 

Samples of 

B.  caapi 

(known locally as 

mariri) 

and 

P. 

viridis 

(known as 

chacrona) 

were collected from 22 sites 

throughout Brazil between 6:00 and 9:00 AM on October 

7, 1 995 by experienced members of the Uniao do Vegetal 
(UDV), a religious  group that uses these plants.  The col­
lection area was within 23- 8° S  and 67-38° 

W. 

All plant 

samples were carefully dried at ambient temperatures (25 
to 35°C) over subsequent days before storage in paper en­
velopes. All samples were carefully stored in a dark, dry 
place at room temperature until analysis. In addition, leaf 
samples of 

P.  viridis 

were collected from opposing stems 

on the same bush over a 24-hour period, in order to exam­
ine possible circadian variations in DMT content. Most plant 
samples were obtained from  garden specimens that have 
been maintained near UDV temples for up to 20 years. A 
conscientious attempt was made to select samples from a 
wide variety of specimens, to insure a representative sample 
of "typical" ingredients 

for 

the 

production  of hoasca. 

Volume 37 (2),  June 2005 

Downloaded by [University of Guelph] at 05:18 29 May 2012 

Callaway, Brito 

Neves 

Phytochemical Analyses 

TABLE  1 

Overall Alkaloid Composition for 

B.  Caapi 

(i.e., Harmine,  Harmaline and THH)  and 

P. 

Viridis 

(DMT)  Samples, Presented 

as 

Milligram of Alkaloid per Gram of Dried Plant Material 

Harmine 

Harmaline 

Min. 

0.3 1 

mg!g 

0.03 

mg!g 

Max. 

8.43 

0.83 

Mean 

4.83 

0.46 

±S.D. 

2.06 

0. 1 9  

Analytical Methodology 

High  pressure  liquid chromatography  (HPLC)  with 

fluorescence detection was used to analyze all samples in 
a method previously  described  (Callaway  et al.  1 996). 
Briefly, the chromtographic column was packed with C-8 
material and the mobile phase was 20% methanol, 20% 
acetonitrile  and 60%  0. 1  M  ammonium  acetate  buffer, 

adjusted to pH 6.9 with acetic acid. Individual signals in 
the  chromatogram  were  verified  according  to retention 
time  and  molecular  weight  by  liquid chromatographic 
mass  spectrometry  (LC-MS), using a VG thermospray­
plasma probe coupled to  a VG Trio-2 quadropole mass 
spectrometer. 

Sample Preparation 

Banisteriopsis caapi. 

Approximately 30 g from each 

sample of 

B.  caapi 

was milled and then dried in the dark 

at  room  temperature  for  about  one  week.  For  analysis, 

1 00 mg of each milled sample was sonicated in 2 ml of 

methanol for  1 0  minutes  at room temperature  and then 

soaked for 24 hours  in the same solution, in the dark at 

room temperature. The extract was centrifuged at 300 g 

for five minutes. An aliquot of the supernatant from each 

sample was diluted by 1 00 fold in the HPLC mobile phase 
and injected directly for the analysis of harmine, harma­
line and tetrahydroharmine (THH). 

Psychotria  viridis. 

Whole leaves from each sample 

of 

P. viridis 

were weighted (0.60-2.60 g) and homogenized 

in 67% methanol,  1 1 %  acetonitrile  and 22% 0. 1 M  am­
monium acetate at pH  8.0. The  mixture  was  otherwise 
prepared  and  analyzed  for  N, N-dimethyl tryptamine 
(DMT) by HPLC. 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

Banisteriopsis Caapi 

According to experienced individuals in the UDV, two 

different  varieties  of 

B.  caapi 

are  recognized; 

mariri 

caupuri 

and 

mariri tucunaca. 

The 

caupuri 

grows near the 

equator while the 

tucunaca 

thrives in the cooler climes of 

southern  Brazil.  Botanically  speaking,  they are consid­

ered  to  be  the  same  species.  These  two  varieties  are 

morphologically distinct and impart different sensations 
to the body and mind from  the resulting teas. From the 

Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 

1 46 

THH 

DMT 

0.05 mg!g 

0.00 

mg!g 

2.94 

1 7.75 

1 .00 

7

.

50 

0

.

79 

5

.

01 

analytical  results,  a  slight  trend  was observed  towards 
higher  levels  of  all  harmala  alkaloids  in  the 

caupuri 

samples, but this trend was not statistically significant. The 
subjective difference  in  teas  from  these  two  varieties  is 
still a mystery. 

In the 

B.  caapi 

sample set (N 

33), a broad range of 

alkaloid profiles and concentrations were observed for the 
three most prominent components: harmine, harmaline and 
THH (see Table  1  and Figures  1 -3). A few  minor signals 
were observed in most samples, but the major components 
and distributions were always harmine, which was greater 
than THH and, to a much lesser extent, harmaline. Propor­
tional  levels  of harmine  and  harmaline  displayed  a 
surprisingly uniformity in all samples, as illustrated in Fig­

ures 

and 2, where harmine was consistently present at a 

level of approximately one magnitude over harmaline (ca. 

1 0: 1 ). Levels ofTHH showed a more variable distribution 

in these samples  and  had  no clear relationship  with  the 

other two harmala alkaloids (Figure 3). Two samples were 
consistently low in all harmala alkloids (Figures  1-3); these 

specimens were from older plants,  which were known to 
be seven and nine years old. 

Psychotria Viridis 

In the 

P.  viridis 

(known locally as 

chacrona) 

sample 

set (N 

37), a broad range of alkaloid concentrations was 

observed for DMT (Table  1  and Figure 

4). 

It was surpris­

ing to see absolutely no DMT in one sample and less than 

0.60  mg/g  in  eight  samples.  Although  some  species  of 

Psychotria 

do  not  contain  detectable  levels  of DMT 

(Verotta et al.  1 999), it is quite certain that the species ana­
lyzed in the present  study  was,  indeed, 

P.  viridis. 

P. viridis 

leaf samples were also collected from a single 

plant, at three hour intervals, for the better part of a 24-
hour period (from midnight until 9 p.m. of the same day). 
These samples were carefully selected from the same nodal 
order from the same the plant, and considered to be identi­
cal for the purpose of phytochemical  circadian analysis. 
In Figure 5  it can  be  seen  that 

P. viridis 

DMT levels  in­

creased until about 6 a.m. ,  with a decline in DMT from 6 
to 9 a.m., then gradually increasing again from 9 a.m. to a 
zenith at 6 p.m., and sharply decline after 6 p.m. to basal 
levels again at 9 p.m. It is not known why this fluctuation 

occurs,  although  circadian  variations  have already been 

Volume 37 (2),  June 2005 

Downloaded by [University of Guelph] at 05:18 29 May 2012 

Callaway, 

Brito & 

Neves 

Q) 

Q) 

.s:::. 

-

·= 

Q) 

·= 

... 

:I: 

-

� 

Q) 

Q) 

.s:::. 

-


Q) 

... 

:I: 

-

C') 

a, 

0.8 

0.6 

0.4 

0.2 

Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 

Phytochemical Analyses 

FIGURE  1 

Variations in 

Banisteriopsis  Caapi 

Harmine Levels in mglg 

···:;rl··i· TTTTl··l····i 

R a n k   order  of 

33 

different 

B. 

caapi  v i n e   samples 

FIGURE 2 

Variations in 

Banisteriopsis Caapi 

Harmaline Levels in mg/g 

Rank order of 

33 

different 

B. 

caapi vine sam ples 

1 47 

Volume 

37 (2},  June 2005 

Downloaded by [University of Guelph] at 05:18 29 May 2012 

Callaway, Brito 

Neves 

Phytochemical Analyses 

FIGURE 3 

Variations in 

Banisteriopsis  Caapi 

THH Levels in mg/g 

2.5 

Gl 

1 .5 

Gl 

� 

-

::z::: 

::z::: 

1-

-

.g: 

0.5 

Rank order of 

33 

different 

B. 

caapi vine samples 

FIGURE 4 

Variations of DMT Levels in Leaves of 

Psychotria  Viridis 

in mg/g 

20 

1 5  

-

I'll 

1 0  

.!! 

� 

"C 

.5 

1-

� 

-

Cl 

c, 

Rank order of 37 different  P. viridis leaf samples 

Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 

1 48 

Volume 37 

(2).  June 2005 

Downloaded by [University of Guelph] at 05:18 29 May 2012 

Callaway, Brito & Neves 

Phytochemical Analyses 

FIGURE S 

Circadian Fluctuations of DMT Levels within the Leaves of a 

Single Living Specimen of 

Psychotria Viridis 

in mg/g over 21 Hours 

1 0  

� DMT mg/g 

noted for alkaloids in other plants (see Itenov, M!lllgaard 

Nyman  1 999  and references  therein).  From  Figure  5,  it 

appears that a depression  in DMT production  begins  and 
ends during the hottest times of day, and perhaps 

P.  viridis 

produces  DMT to  protect  itself from solar radiation. An­

other possibility is that 

P. viridis 

produces DMT to actually 

absorb solar radiation for purposes other than self-preser­

vation. In either event, this is probably no accident, as the 

narrow range of UV-B radiation in the ultraviolet spectrum 

is between 3 1 5  and 280 nm, which also happens to be the 

range of greatest 

UV 

absorbance by DMT. 

CONCLUSIONS 

The English botanist Richard Spruce 

1 873) encoun­

tered  the  use  of 

B.  caapi 

decoctions  while  exploring 

tributaries of the Amazon River in 1 85 1 ,  which may or may 
not have contained the leaves of 

P.  viridis. 

It is quite cer­

tain that he was aware of the most important component of 
the brew, which he correctly attributed to the vine, 

B. caapi. 

In 1 853, Richard Spruce ( 1 873: 1 86) wrote of hope for fu­
ture investigations into the substance he referred to as 

caapi 

or 

aya-huas-ca, 

which must have been the  vine B .  

caapi 

and the resulting brew, respectively: "Some traveller[s] who 
may follow my steps, with greater resources at his com­
mand,  will,  it  is  to  be  hoped,  be  able  to 

bring  away 

Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 

1 0  

1 5  

20 

Hour  of  Day 

149 

materials adequate for the complete analysis of this curi­
ous plant." 

In fact, samples from Spruce's expedition were brought 

back and preserved at Kew Garderns in England, and sub­
sequently analyzed by Bo Holmstedt and Jan-Erik Lindgren 
at  the  Karolinska Institute  in  Stockholm,  Sweden  with 
modern chromatographic methods in 1 968 (Schultes et al. 

1 969). Soon afterwards, subsequent investigations focused 

on contemporary plant specimens and resulting decoctions 
(Riba, Saa 

Caseido 1 972; Rivier 

Lindgren 1 972; Riif 

1 972; Ghosal, Mazumber 

Bhattahcharaya 1 97 1 ), further 

demonstrating the extant use  of 

B.  caapi 

and  other plant 

additives in this native religious practice. 

The present article presents the results of the largest 

phytochemical survey to date of these two plant species, 

B. 

caapi 

and 

P.  viridi. 

The  ability to coordinate  and execute 

such a broad, regional collection on the same day stands as 
an example of dedication and group unity that is typical of 
UDV members. It is unlikely that these analyses are com­
plete, or that everything can actually be known about these 
plants  and their derivatives,  but it is hoped that these re­
sults  would  have  satisfied  the  academic  curiosity  of 
nineteenth century explorer Richard Spruce. These results 
may allow for additional insights into this ancient technol­
ogy,  and  perhaps  a  better  understanding  of its  use  and 

application 

in modern cultures. 

Volume 

37 (2), 

June 

2005 

Downloaded by [University of Guelph] at 05:18 29 May 2012 

Callaway, Brito 

Neves 

Phytochemical Analyses 

REFERENCES 

Callaway, J.C.; Raymon, L.P.; Hearn, W.L.; McKenna, D.J.; Grob, C.S.; 

Brito,  G.S. 

1 996. 

Quantitation  of N,N-dimethyltryptamine  and 

harmala alkaloids in human plasma after oral dosing with Ayahuasca. 

Journal of Analytical Toxicology 

20:  492-97. 

Ghosal, S.; Mazumber, U.K. 

Bhattahcharaya, S.K. 

1 97 1 .  

Chemical and 

pharmacological evaluation of Banistereopsis[sic] argentea Spring 
ex Juss. 

Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 

60:  1 209-1 2 .  

Holmstedt,  B.R. 

Lindgren,  J-E. 

1 967. 

Chemical  constituents  and 

pharmacology  of South  American  snuffs.  In:  D.H.  Efron;  B .  
Holmstedt 

N.S.  Kline  (Eds.) 

Ethnopharmacologic  Search for 

Psychoactive  Drugs 

(No. 

1 645). 

Washington,  D.C.:  U.S.  Public 

Health Service. 

ltenov,  K.;  Mi

Nyman,  U. 

1 999. 

Diurnal fluctuations of the 

alkaloid concentration in latex of poppy 

Papaver somniferum 

is due 

to day-night fluctuations of latex water content. 

Phytochemistry 

52: 

1 229-34. 

McKenna, D.J. ; Towers, G.H.N. 

Abbot, 

F.  1 984. 

Monoamine oxidase 

inhibitors in South American  hallucinogenic plants: Tryptamine 

and  �-carboline  constituents  of  ayahuasca. 

Jo urnal  of 

Ethnopharmacology 

1 1 :  1 89-206. 

Ott, J. 

1 994. 

Ayahuasca Analogues: Pangaean Entheogens. 

Kennewick, 

Washington: Natural Products. 

Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 

1 50 

Rivier,  L. 

Lindgren  J.-L. 

1 972. 

"Ayahuasca",  the  South American 

hallucinogenic  drink:  An  ethnobotanical  and  chemical 
investigation. 

Economic Botany 

26:  1 0 1 -09. 

Ribas, 

1.; 

Saa, J. 

Caseido,  L. 

1 972. 

Investigation del contiendo en 

alcaloides de Ia Banisteriopsis inebrians  (Malphigaceae). 

Anales 

di  Quimica 

68:  299-302. 

Riif, 

1.  1 972. Le 

'dutsee tui chez les Indiens Culina de Ptrou. 

Bulletin 

Societe Suisse des Americanistes 

36:  73-80. 

Schultes, R.E. 

1 982. 

The 

beta-carboline hallucinogens of South America. 

Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 

1 4  (3): 205-20. 

Schultes,  R.E.; Holmstedt,  B . ;  Lindgren, J.-L. 

Rivier, L. 

1 969. 

De 

plantis  toxicariis  e  Mundo  Novo tropicale commentationes  III. 

Phytochemical  examination  of  Spruce's  original  collection  of 

Banisteriopsis  caapi.  Botanical  Museum  Leaflets,  Harvard 
University 

22:  1 2 1 -32. 

Spruce, R. 

1 873. 

On some remarkable narcotics of the Amazon Valley 

and Orinoco. 

August Geographic Review 

1  (55):  1 84-93. 

Verotta,  L.;  Peterlonogo, 

F.; 

Elisabetsky,  E.; Amador,  T.A. 

Nunes, 

D.S. 

1 999. 

High-performance liquid chromatography-diode array 

detection-tandem  mass  spectrometry  analyses  of the  alkaloid 
extracts of Amazon 

Psychotria 

species. 

Journal of Chromatography 

841 :  1 65-76. 

Volume 

37 (2), 

June 

2005 

Downloaded by [University of Guelph] at 05:18 29 May 2012