nature neuroscience

  volume 12 | number 11 | november 2009 

1469

a r t i c l e s

1

Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA. 

2

Imaging Research Center, University of California at Davis, 

Sacramento, California, USA. 

3

Department of Psychology, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, USA. Correspondence should be 

addressed to V.v.V. (vanveen@berkeley.edu) or C.S.C. (cameron.carter@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu).

Received 29 July; accepted 8 September; published online 16 September 2009; doi:10.1038/nn.2413

One candidate region for the detection and processing of  cognitive 

dissonance is the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC). We and  others 
have proposed that one of the dACC’s functions in  cognition is to detect 
conflicts  between  active,  but  incompatible,  streams  of   information 
 processing

13–15

, such as between the color and the meaning of a word 

in the Stroop task

16,17

. dACC activation is consistently related to the 

amount of conflict occurring in such tasks. Computational  simulations 
of conflict in simple speeded response tasks have  measured conflict as 
Hopfield’s energy and have shown that dACC activation in such tasks can 
be well modeled by this measure

13,18

. Likewise,  conflict is an important 

component of the classic dissonance theory

1

, and  computational models 

of cognitive dissonance have measured it as increased energy

19,20

.

We hypothesized that the dACC’s conflict monitoring functions might 

generalize  from  detecting  conflict  in  simple  speeded-response  tasks 
to detecting conflict between prior attitudes and counter- attitudinal 
 behavior  in  cognitive  dissonance

11,14

.  To  test  this,  we  adapted  the 

induced  compliance  procedure

2

  into  an  event-related  fMRI  design. 

Participants first performed a rather long (45 min) and boring task in 
the  uncomfortable environment of the magnetic resonance scanner. 
Participants then participated in a second task, during which they had 
to respond to sentences presented on a screen with their left or right ring, 
middle, or index finger, as on a 6-point Likert scale (1 = left ring finger, 
completely agree; 6 = right ring finger, completely disagree). We used 
two types of sentences: target sentences consisting of attitudes toward 
the scanner and task, and neutral sentences (Fig. 1).

While participants were performing the initial task, they were  randomly 

assigned to one of two groups, dissonance or control. Participants in the 
control group were told to respond to the target  sentences as though 
they were enjoying the scanner and the task,  regardless of whether they 

According  to  cognitive  dissonance  theory,  people  tend  to  strive  to 
keep  their  knowledge,  actions  and  attitudes  consistent   (consonant). 
Inconsistent (dissonant) behavior and attitudes result in a  psychologically 
uncomfortable state that motivates people to reduce the dissonance, often 
by changing their attitudes to be more consonant with the displayed 
behavior. Since this theory was first proposed in the 1950s

1,2

, it has led to 

a large amount of fruitful research in social  psychology

3

 and is considered 

to be one of the most influential theories in psychology

4

. However, little 

is known about how cognitive  dissonance is represented in the brain or 
what the cognitive mechanisms might be that mediate this process.

We  used  functional  magnetic  resonance  imaging  (fMRI)  to  study 

how the brain responds to cognitive dissonance in a modified  version 
of  the  classic  ‘induced  compliance’  procedure

2

.  In  this  procedure, 

 participants argue in favor of a position that is counter to their actual 
attitudes  (counter-attitudinal argument). It has consistently been found 
that  participants change their attitudes to be more consistent with the 
counter-attitudinal behavior. Dissonance has been shown to be a  negative 
 emotional  state

5–7

  accompanied  by  autonomic  arousal

5,8

;  it  has  been 

shown  that  people  change  their  attitudes  and  restore   consonance  to 
specifically reduce the negative affect

5–7

. When participants in  control 

groups are able to attribute their counter-attitudinal behavior to payment

2

 

or coercion

3,9–11

, or when the counter-attitudinal behavior has no real-

world consequences

10,12

, conflict between behavior and prior attitudes 

is reduced, and participants experience less cognitive dissonance and do 
not change their attitudes (see Supplementary Discussion). Notably, as 
 dissonance theory has largely focused on what motivates attitude change 
rather than how that change comes about, we focused on the neural 
 correlates of the actual dissonance, rather than the attitude change that 
follows it, which awaits future study.

Neural activity predicts attitude change in cognitive 

dissonance

Vincent van Veen

1,2

, Marie K Krug

2

, Jonathan W Schooler

3

 & Cameron S Carter

2

When our actions conflict with our prior attitudes, we often change our attitudes to be more consistent with our actions. 
This phenomenon, known as cognitive dissonance, is considered to be one of the most influential theories in psychology. 
However, the neural basis of this phenomenon is unknown. Using a Solomon four-group design, we scanned participants with 
functional MRI while they argued that the uncomfortable scanner environment was nevertheless a pleasant experience. We 
found that cognitive dissonance engaged the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula; furthermore, we found that 
the activation of these regions tightly predicted participants’ subsequent attitude change. These effects were not observed in 
a control group. Our findings elucidate the neural representation of cognitive dissonance, and support the role of the anterior 
cingulate cortex in detecting cognitive conflict and the neural prediction of attitude change.

 

 

©

2009 

Nature 

America,

 Inc.

  All rights reser

ved.

1470 

volume 12 | number 11 | november 2009  

nature neuroscience

a r t i c l e s

 implicitly or explicitly (pretest sensitization). The way that this issue 
has been circumvented is by using a Solomon four-group design

21,22

in which one group of participants is given a pretest and one group is 
not, resulting in a two (dissonance, control) by two (with and without 
pretest) group design. The use of such a design allows us to use mea-
sures of attitude change within participant, while also allowing us to 
test for the presence of pretest sensitization

21

.

We  implemented  such  a  design  in  a  way  that  we  thought  might 

minimize pretest sensitization. Following performance of the initial 
boring task, participants in pretest groups received instructions to rate 
sentences honestly and we started the experiment. After five sentences, 
the experiment was interrupted and the participants were instructed to 
respond counter-attitudinally in the same way as the without-pretest 
groups were; that is, in the dissonance group, participants were given 
the patient cover story and, in the control group, participants were 
told they were paid $1 extra for each sentence that they responded to 
as though they were enjoying the scanner. Notably, the five sentences 
presented before the experimental manipulation included four ran-
domly chosen neutral sentences and the sentence “Overall, I like my 
experience in the scanner”. Each participant’s response to this item was 
taken as a pretest measure of scanner enjoyment.

We found that participants in the dissonance group changed their 

attitudes  more  than  participants  in  the  control  group  following 
counter-attitudinal behavior. Furthermore, dACC and anterior insula 
 activation during counter-attitudinal behavior predicted the final atti-
tude of  participants in the dissonance group, but not in the control 
group. These results support both dissonance theory

1,11

 and the conflict 

theory of dACC functioning

14,15

.

RESULTS
Across all participants, inter-correlation between post-test items was 
high (Cronbach’s 

α = 0.897), with little difference between experimen-

tal  groups  (dissonance  group  Cronbach’s 

α = 0.892, control group 

Cronbach’s 

α = 0.904). Thus, we can assume that the post-test items 

reflect a single, unidimensional latent psychological construct (attitude 
toward experience in the scanner) and that treating the composite post-
test score as reflecting this construct is valid.

Analysis of composite final attitude scores by means of an experi-

mental group (dissonance, control) by pretest presence (present, not 
present) ANOVA verified a main effect of experimental group (F

1,39

 = 

12.36, P = 0.001). This showed that scanner enjoyment was greater for 
the without-pretest dissonance group (M = 6.3, s.d. = 0.8) and with-
pretest dissonance group (M = 6.0, s.d. = 1.1) than for the without-
pretest control group (M = 5.1, s.d. = 1.3) and the with-pretest control 
group (M = 4.5, s.d. = 1.3). Individual t tests verified this effect for both 
the without-pretests groups (t

22

 = 2.51, P = 0.020) and the with-pretest 

groups (t

17

 = 2.43, P = 0.026). These results verified the basic cognitive 

dissonance finding.

We  did  not  observe  a  significant  main  effect  of  pretest  presence 

(F

1,39

 = 0.59, P = 0.45) or a significant interaction (F

1,39

 = 0.10, P = 

0.75), which suggested that the presence of a pretest measure had no 

were actually enjoying the experience. Furthermore, they were informed 
that they would receive an additional dollar for each sentence that they 
responded to in this way. They were instructed to respond honestly to 
the other (neutral) sentences.

Participants in the dissonance group were also instructed on how 

to respond to the stimuli. They were then told that a patient had been 
scheduled to be scanned after them and was to perform a similar task 
in the scanner. This patient, the participants were told, was now in 
the scanner control room, watching the screen of the experimental 
control computer, and was very nervous and uncomfortable about the 
 upcoming scanning session. The participants were then told that several 
of the sentences were about their attitudes toward the scanner and the 
task and were asked if they would be willing to respond as though they 
were enjoying being in the scanner and performing the task, regardless 
of how they actually felt about the experience. This, they were told, 
might put the patient’s mind at ease, as the patient in the control room 
could see the responses on screen. We reasoned that this would be 
analogous to making a counter-attitudinal argument.

After scanning, participants were led into a private waiting room 

where they filled out a set of forms, again with the target sentences; 
this time they were asked to respond with how they actually felt about 
their experience in the scanner. A composite score was then  calculated 
for the participants’ overall enjoyment of the scanner and task. After 
 completing  the  forms,  the  participants  were  carefully  debriefed; 
 participants who admitted having doubts about the validity of the cover 
story were not included in the analyses (see Supplementary Methods 
and Supplementary Results).

In previous studies of the induced compliance procedure,  attitude 

change  has  been  measured  as  a  difference  in  final  attitude  score 
between a dissonance and a control group (that is, a post-test–only 
control group design). The astute reader will realize that attitude change 
takes place within participants, not between participants. Arguably, a 
within- subject measure of attitude change, before and after the counter-
 attitudinal  argument,  would  constitute  a  more   critical   measure  of 
 attitude change (that is, use a pre- and post-test control group design). 
However, within-participant measures of attitude change are rarely 
assessed, as attitude measurements have often been shown to  influence 
subsequent  measurements

21,22

. When participants give their attitude 

during a  pretest, this often influences the subsequent  experimental 
manipulation  and  the  participant’s  subsequent  post-test,  either 

Time

Response

I feel calm, peaceful

in the scanner

I feel calm, peaceful

in the scanner

1.5 s

7 s

8 s

Figure 1  Trial sequence during the task. Throughout the task, the outline of 
six squares was visible below the fixation point, along with a + and a – sign, 
which represented agreement and disagreement, respectively. The participant 
responded by pressing with the left or right ring, middle, or index finger 
(completely agree, mostly agree, somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, mostly 
disagree, completely disagree). When a button was pressed, the corresponding 
square lit up, until 15 s into the trial, followed by a 1.5-s fixation point. Note 
that the actual stimulus was white on a black background, rather than black 
on a white background.

 

 

©

2009 

Nature 

America,

 Inc.

  All rights reser

ved.

nature neuroscience

  volume 12 | number 11 | november 2009 

1471

a r t i c l e s

of these regions (t

41

 range = 0.09 – 1.60, all P > 0.1). The activation to 

target sentences was greater in the dissonance group than in the control 
group, in all of the regions that also showed a significant sentence type 
by experimental group interaction (t

41

 = 2.35 – 4.20, all P < 0.05); these 

effects did not reach significance in the right angular gyrus (t

41

 = 1.72, 

P = 0.093) and the left vPMC (t

41

 = 1.02, P = 0.31).

influence on the difference in the final attitude scores between the two 
experimental groups in this study

21

. When taking pretest scores as a 

covariate, the two by two ANCOVA continued to show a main effect 
of experimental group (F

1,39

 = 14.25, P = 0.001). This was also true for 

the comparison between the with-pretest groups (t

17

 = 2.93, P = 0.010). 

Not surprisingly, pretest scores (rated 1–6) did not differ between the 
with-pretest dissonance group (M = 3.9, s.d. = 1.7) and the with-pretest 
control group (M = 3.8, s.d. = 1.3) (t

17

 = 0.18, P = 0.86).

This  latter  analysis  also  revealed  a  positive  relationship  between 

pretest  scores  and  final  attitude  scores  in  the  with-pretest  groups   
(r  =  0.64,  P  =  0.004;  controlling  for  experimental  group);  further 
analysis confirmed this positive correlation between pretest and final 
attitude scores in both the dissonance group (Spearman’s 

ρ = 0.74,  

P = 0.014) and the control group (Spearman’s 

ρ = 0.68, P = 0.043), 

with no significant between-group difference in the size of the cor-
relation (F

1, 15

 = 1.21, P = 0.29). The significant positive correlation 

between pretest and final attitudes scores suggests that these different 
measurements indeed reflected similar psychological constructs.

We analyzed fMRI data using a whole-brain sentence type (target, 

neutral) by experimental group (dissonance, control) ANOVA, using 
participant as random factor at 

α = 0.001 (uncorrected). A cluster size 

threshold of 11 voxels corrected for multiple comparisons at 

α = 0.01. 

The regions of activation included bilateral dACC, left pre–supplemen-
tary motor area (pre-SMA), bilateral anterior insula, bilateral middle 
frontal gyrus (MFG), bilateral dorsal premotor regions (PMd), right 
angular  gyrus,  left  ventral  premotor  area  (PMv)  and  the  midbrain 
(Fig. 2 and Table 1). For each region identified in this analysis, we 
extracted average time courses of activation as the percentage change 
from baseline (Fig. 3). We then repeated the analyses, taking the per-
participant, per-condition activation of the time course of activation 
following stimulus onset. The sentence type by experimental group 
interaction was not significant in the right angular gyrus (F

1,41

 = 1.26, 

P = 0.27) and the left vPMC (F

1,41

 = 0.04, P = 0.85); however, in the 

rest of these regions, this interaction remained significant (F

1,41

 range = 

4.62 – 14.46, all P < 0.05). Between-group t tests showed that activation 
to control sentences did not differ significantly between groups in any 

Figure 2  fMRI results. The results of a whole-brain experimental group 
(dissonance, control) by sentence type (target, neutral) interaction are 
shown, using participant as random factor (

α = 0.01, corrected, 297-mm

3

 

voxel contiguity), displayed on an inflated cortical surface.

Table 1  Regions that showed a significant sentence by group 

interaction (

α = 0.01, corrected)

Talairach coordinates

Region

Side

x

y

z

BA

Volume (mm

3

)

dACC

L

–8

19

30

24/32

1,593

dACC

R

10

14

37

24/32

2,565

pre-SMA

L

–7

11

52

6

1,134

PMd

L

–26

5

44

6

648

PMd

R

27

–6

47

6

783

PMv

L

–55

12

24

44/45

432

MFG/PMv

L

–27

42

24

46/44/45

999

MFG

R

38

21

32

9

1,647

AI

L

–32

13

19

1,134

AI

R

30

15

15

351

Angular gyrus

R

37

–75

28

39/19

1,431

Midbrain

M

0

–18

–1

1,944

AI, anterior insula; BA, Brodmann area; L, left; M, middle; R, right.

Dissonance

Control

Left

ACC

Right

ACC

Left

AI

Right

AI

Target sentences

Neutral sentences

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

0.30

0.20

0.10

0

–0.05

0.30

0.20

0.10

0

–0.05

0.30

0.20

0.10

0

–0.05

0.30

0.20

0.10

0

–0.05

0.35
0.30

0.20

0.10

0

–0.05

0.35
0.30

0.20

0.10

0

–0.05

0.35
0.30

0.20

0.10

0

–0.05

0.35
0.30

0.20

0.10

0

–0.05

Scan within trial

fMR signal (% baseline change)

Figure 3  Time courses of activation of the left and right dACC and 
anterior insula (AI). Left, target sentences. Right, neutral sentences. 
Black indicates the dissonance group and gray indicates the control 
group. Error bars represent ± s.e.m.

 

 

©

2009 

Nature 

America,

 Inc.

  All rights reser

ved.

1472 

volume 12 | number 11 | november 2009  

nature neuroscience

a r t i c l e s

participant. These attitude change scores were greater for the dissonance 
group than the control group (t

17

 = 2.40, P = 0.028). Correcting for 

reaction time, activation to the target sentences significantly  predicted 
attitude change, as indexed by this difference measure, in the  dissonance 
group  in  bilateral  dACC  and  left  anterior  insula  (partial  r  range  = 
0.72–0.75, all P < 0.05), but not in the control group (partial r range = 
–0.40–0.48, all P > 0.2). ANCOVA analyses verified that this correlation 
was significantly greater in the dissonance than in the control group 
in the right dACC (F

1,14

 = 7.82, P = 0.014) and left anterior insula  

(F

1,14

 = 5.74, P = 0.031) and was marginally significant in left dACC 

(F

1,14

 = 3.69, P = 0.075). These effects were not significant in right 

anterior insula or in any of the other identified regions (all P > 0.1).

We next tested correlations between activation and pretest scores, 

leaving aside final attitude scores. Activation correlated negatively with 
pretest scores in the dissonance group in the left dACC (r = –0.79,  
P  =  0.007),  the  left  PMd  (r  =  –0.70,  P  =  0.025)  and  the  left  MFG  
(r = –0.71, P = 0.022); a trend toward significance was found in the 
pre-SMA (r = –0.55, P = 0.099). These correlations were not  significant 
in  the  control  group  in  these  regions  (r  range  =  –0.11–0.17,  all  
P > 0.7); however, the ANCOVA was only significant for the left dACC  
(F

1, 15

 = 6.36, P = 0.024) and left MFG (F

1, 15

 = 5.88, P = 0.028). With 

the  exception  of  the  right  MFG,  which  showed  a  nonsignificant 
 positive correlation (r = 0.07, P = 0.84), all of the other regions showed  
nonsignificant negative correlations in the dissonance group between 
activation and pretest score (r range = –0.47 to –0.11, all P > 0.1). 
None  of  the  identified  regions  showed  a  significant  correlation  in 
the control group (r range = –0.30–0.26, all P > 0.4). Thus, the more 
that  participants in the dissonance group ‘lied’, the greater was their 
 activation of their left dACC, left PMd and left MFG.

DISCUSSION
These findings are consistent with a number of prior observations. Both 
cognitive dissonance and dACC and anterior insula activation have 
been associated with negative affect and autonomic arousal

23–28

. These 

regions might therefore be responsible for representing or triggering the 
negative affect and related autonomic arousal associated with the dis-
sonance. Another set of related observations is dACC activation during 
lying in guilty knowledge tasks

29,30

. Our data expand on those findings, 

indicating that dACC activity during the counter-attitudinal argument, 
which is similar to lying, predicts subsequent attitude change, but only 
when counter-attitudinal behavior conflicts with other cognitions. In 
addition, one earlier study that could be interpreted as cognitive dis-
sonance concerned US partisans reasoning about statements that either 
matched or conflicted with their pre-existing beliefs

31

. Although that 

study did not measure attitude change or correlations between brain 
activation and attitude change, it identified a dACC region similar to 
the ones engaged here. In short, our results are consistent with theo-
ries of cognitive dissonance that emphasize conflict between differ-
ent cognitions, such as the original theory

1,2

. In particular, our results 

are consistent with the action-based model of cognitive dissonance, 
which posits that conflict between cognitions evokes an aversive state 
because it potentially interferes with unconflicted, effective, goal-driven 
action

6,32

. This theory has explicitly predicted involvement of the dACC 

in cognitive dissonance

6,32

. Consistently, although we did not measure 

distress in a systematic way, the majority of participants in the disso-
nance groups indicated during debriefing that they felt uncomfortable 
or distressed about lying to the ‘patient’; none of the participants in the 
control group indicated feeling negatively toward responding as though 
their experience in the scanner was a pleasant one.

Our  results  do  not  appear  to  support  other  theories  of  attitude 

change in the induced compliance procedure that are not based on the 

To  test  whether  pretest  presence  affected  neural  activity,  we  per-

formed post hoc tests that included pretest presence as an additional 
between-group factor on the signals of each of these regions (averaged 
across voxels). These tests revealed no significant main or interaction 
effect  of  pretest  presence  for  any  of  these  regions  in  the  three-way 
(experimental group by sentence type by pretest presence) interaction 
(F

1,39

 range = 0.01–2.05, all P > 0.1) or when the two-way sentence type 

by pretest presence interaction was tested separately for the dissonance 
group (F

1,39

 range = 0.02–1.56, all P > 0.1) and control group (F

1,39

 

range = 0.0004–2.96, all P > 0.1). The lack of any significant effects of 
pretest presence on any of these findings again suggested that the pretest 
did not influence the pattern of neural activation

21

.

We next investigated the relationship of brain activation to attitude 

change by correlating the activation to the target sentences with final 
attitude score for each region, and correcting for pretest score,  pretest 
presence and mean reaction time to the target sentences. In the disso-
nance group, these partial correlations were significant for the bilateral 
dACC and bilateral anterior insula regions (partial r range = 0.60–0.68, 
all  P  <  0.01;  Fig.  4);  for  those  regions,  these  correlations  were  not 
 significant in the control group (partial r range = –0.33–0.11, all P > 0.1). 
ANCOVA analyses verified that for the bilateral dACC and left anterior 
insula, these correlations were greater in the dissonance group than 
in  the  control  group  (F

1,35

  range  =  4.10–9.43,  all  P  <  0.05).  For 

the  right  anterior  insula,  the  ANCOVA  was  marginally  significant  
(F

1,35

 = 3.186, P = 0.083). We did not find any strong correlations for 

any of the remaining regions (Supplementary Results).

Instead of using pretest scores as a covariant of non-interest, it could 

be argued that taking the difference between pretest and final attitude 
scores might constitute a more direct, within-participant index of atti-
tude change. For this reason, we calculated z scores of pretest and final 
attitude scores and took the difference between these two scores for each 

Left

dACC

Right

dACC

Left

AI

Right

AI

Dissonance group

Activation (residual, standardized)

Final attitude (residual, standardiz

ed)

Control group

2.0

1.0

0

–1.0

–2.5

2.0

1.0

0

–1.0

–2.5

2.0

1.0

0

–1.0

–2.5

2.0

1.0

0

–1.0

–2.5

–1.5

–3.0

–1.5

–1.5

0

1.0

2.0

0.5

2.5

–2.0

0

2.0

–1.0

0

1.0

2.5
1.5
0.5

–0.5
–1.5
–2.5

2.5
1.5
0.5

–0.5
–1.5
–2.5

2.5
1.5
0.5

–0.5
–1.5
–2.5

2.5
1.5
0.5

–0.5
–1.5
–2.5

–2.0

–1.0

0

1.0

2.0 –2.0

–1.0

0

1.0

2.0

–2.0

–2.0

–1.0

0

1.0

–1.0

0

1.0

2.0

r = 0.11
P = 0.64

r = –0.33

P = 0.17

r = –0.26

P = 0.28

r = –0.08

P = 0.73

r = 0.65

P = 0.004

r = 0.68

P = 0.002

r = 0.62

P = 0.007

r = 0.60

P = 0.008

Figure 4  Partial correlation plots between activation and final attitude 
score, controlling for mean reaction time, pretest presence and pretest 
score. Left, dissonance group. Right, control group. Bilateral dACC 
and anterior insula activation predicted the final attitude score in the 
dissonance group, but not in the control group. Note that residual scores 
have been standardized within group.

 

 

©

2009 

Nature 

America,

 Inc.

  All rights reser

ved.

nature neuroscience

  volume 12 | number 11 | november 2009 

1473

a r t i c l e s

empathy, rather than conflict or dissonance. However, this does not 
appear to be consistent with our finding that scanner comfort, as mea-
sured by the pretest, was negatively correlated with dACC activation in 
the dissonance group. Comfort and empathy or prosocial behavior tend 
to be positively correlated with each other

46,47

; thus, if the dACC activa-

tion reflected empathy, it would most likely have correlated positively 
rather than negatively with scanner comfort. Furthermore, empathy in 
and of itself cannot explain the correlation between dACC and anterior 
insula activation and attitude change.

A recent fMRI study

48

 used a different cognitive dissonance proce-

dure. This study examined the neural activity during the final attitude 
score measurement, rather than during the dissonance-arousing behav-
ior. Participants in that study performed a version of the ‘free choice’ 
or ‘spreading of alternatives’ procedure of cognitive dissonance; in this 
procedure, participants chose between two alternatives that they had 
previously rated either similarly or differently. It is commonly found 
in this procedure that participants align their attitudes to be more con-
sistent with the chosen item and less with the rejected item following 
a difficult choice between two similarly rated items than following an 
easy choice between two differently rated items. Thus, attitude change 
is greater following a difficult choice than following an easy choice. 
Changes  in  the  desirability  of  the  chosen  and  rejected  items  were 
reflected in changes in activation of the dorsal striatum, commonly 
associated with reward assessment

49

; thus, the conflict during the dif-

ficult choice resulted in changes in the hedonic value of the chosen 
and rejected items. These results are complementary to our own, as 
we expect that, had we somehow managed to measure neural activity 
during the final attitude score measurement, we would have observed 
changes in the dorsal striatum in the dissonance group reflecting their 
attitude change about the scanner environment. An important topic 
for future research and theory might focus on the actual mechanism of 
dissonance-induced attitude change, in addition to the causes of atti-
tude change (conflict represented in the dACC) and its consequences 
(altered hedonic value of the object of attitude, reflected by modulated 
activation of the dorsal striatum).

Traditionally,  researchers  have  assumed  that  the  processes 

 underlying dissonance and subsequent attitude change are the same 
across the different procedures used to study these processes, such 
as the induced compliance procedure that we used and the above-
 mentioned free choice procedure. We would predict that dissonance in 
other  dissonance procedures would also be accompanied by dACC and 
anterior insula activation, and that the magnitude of these activations 
predicts attitude change in those procedures, as well. These hypotheses 
can be readily tested in future fMRI studies using different cognitive 
dissonance procedures.

Cognitive dissonance is an important concept in psychology and is 

used to explain and predict attitude change in a wide range of human 
behavior. Our results shed light on the cognitive and neurobiological 
basis of dissonance, and indicate that the magnitude of conflict-related 
dACC and anterior insula activation predicts the subsequent attitude 
change. This result supports the core assumption of dissonance theory, 
that attitude change in cognitive dissonance is driven by conflict

1

. It is 

the basis for a neural prediction of attitude change. Our findings have 
considerable implications for understanding attitude change in a wide 
range of contexts in which cognitive dissonance theory has found broad 
practical application, including politics, marketing, management and 
the evaluation of psychotherapeutic interventions.

METHODS
Methods and any associated references are available in the online  version 
of the paper at http://www.nature.com/natureneuroscience/.

notion of conflict between cognitions. First, an important alternative 
to cognitive dissonance theory is self-perception theory

33

. This theory 

poses that, instead of attitude change driven by conflict between cogni-
tions, participants reflect on their own behavior when giving their final 
attitude measure and, except when they can attribute their behavior 
to a reward, simply infer their attitudes from their behavior. In other 
words, this theory assumes that the pattern of findings of the induced 
compliance procedure is only related to processes that occur during 
the phase in which participants give their final attitude measure and 
not  to  processes  taking  place  during  the  actual  counter-attitudinal 
argument. Our data, which relate neural activity during the counter-
attitudinal argument to attitude change, is therefore not consistent with 
self-perception theory. A fervent supporter of this theory might argue 
that the relationship between neural activity and attitude change that 
we observed is related to encoding; those who encoded their behavior 
‘better’ might have simply been better at retrieving their behavior when 
they were giving their final attitude. We do not believe that this line of 
reasoning is valid. If this were the case, we would expect to see activity in 
brain regions typically related to encoding into episodic memory, such 
as the medial temporal lobe

34–36

, rather than in the dACC and anterior 

insula. Our data are therefore consistent with the reported finding that 
individuals with anterograde amnesia show similar amounts of attitude 
change as healthy participants

37

.

A second competing theory is the new look theory

12

. This theory 

holds that individuals change their attitude to reduce the negative con-
sequences of their behavior that they feel personally responsible for, 
rather than being driven by the motivation to reduce conflict between 
two inconsistent cognitions. In our study, the negative consequence 
might be that the hypothetical patient will undergo an uncomfortable 
scanning session. Attitude change takes place to reduce these negative 
 consequences; if the participant starts to believe that the scanner isn’t 
such  an  uncomfortable  environment  after  all,  it’s  probably  not  that 
uncomfortable for the patient either, and the consequences of the partic-
ipant’s counter-attitudinal behavior were not that negative after all. The 
region most often associated with the anticipation of negative outcomes 
is the orbitofrontal cortex rather than the dACC

38–40

. For instance, regret 

and its anticipation and avoidance have been tightly linked to orbito-
frontal activation, rather than dACC

41

. We did not observe differential 

activity in orbitofrontal regions. However, it is not completely clear what 
the neural correlates are of the anticipation of negative consequences of 
actions that one feels personally responsible for. We therefore tentatively 
suggest that our data are not consistent with this theory either; however, 
more research is needed before we can be definitive about this issue. In 
sum, the involvement of the dACC and anterior insula, and their asso-
ciation with both conflict monitoring, including conflict with the self

42

and negative affect and physiological arousal, provides insights into the 
importance of conflict or dissonance per se in attitude change in this 
procedure, and thus argues against the view that dissonance-induced 
attitude change is a result of inferences drawn from self-observation

33

 

or the anticipation of negative consequences

12

 (see also Supplementary 

Discussion and Supplementary Fig. 1).

A possible source of confound in our study is the fact that the dis-

sonant condition was more social than the control condition. This is an 
intrinsic confound in our design and of many other studies using the 
induced compliance procedure; this is because, as explained, the phe-
nomenon tends to be greater when there are real-life consequences to 
the counter-attitudinal behavior

12

. For example, the participant might 

have felt empathy toward the patient, and perhaps the dACC and ante-
rior insula activation reflected this empathy. Indeed, both dACC and 
anterior insula have been associated with empathetic concern

43–45

 and 

it could therefore be argued that engagement of these regions reflects 

 

 

©

2009 

Nature 

America,

 Inc.

  All rights reser

ved.

1474 

volume 12 | number 11 | november 2009  

nature neuroscience

a r t i c l e s

21. Braver,  M.C.W.  &  Braver,  S.L.  Statistical  treatment  of  the  Solomon  four-group 

approach: a meta-analytic approach. Psychol. Bull. 

104, 150–154 (1988).

22. Solomon, R.L. An extension of control group designs. Psychol. Bull. 

46, 137–150 

(1949).

23. Critchley, H.D. Neural mechanisms of autonomic, affective and cognitive integration. 

J. Comp. Neurol. 

493, 154–166 (2005).

24. Critchley, H.D. et al. Human cingulate cortex and autonomic control: converging 

neuroimaging and clinical evidence. Brain 

126, 2139–2152 (2003).

25. Hajcak, G., McDonald, N. & Simons, R.F. Error-related psychophysiology and negative 

affect. Brain Cogn. 

56, 189–197 (2004).

26. Eisenberger, N.I., Lieberman, M.D. & Williams, K.D. Does rejection hurt? An fMRI 

study of social exclusion. Science 

302, 290–292 (2003).

27. Luu, P., Collins, P. & Tucker, D.M. Mood, personality and self-monitoring: negative 

affect and emotionality in relation to frontal lobe mechanisms of error processing. J. 
Exp. Psychol. Gen.
 

129, 43–60 (2000).

28. Craig, A.D., Reiman, E.M., Evans, A.C. & Bushnell, M.C. Functional imaging of an 

illusion of pain. Nature 

384, 258–260 (1996).

29. Nuñez, J.M., Casey, B.J., Egner, T., Hare, T. & Hirsch, J. Intentional false responding 

shares neural substrates with response conflict and cognitive control. Neuroimage 

25

267–277 (2005).

30. Langleben, D.D. et al. Brain activity during simulated deception: an event-related 

functional magnetic resonance study. Neuroimage 

15, 727–732 (2002).

31. Westen, D., Blagov, P.S., Harenski, K., Kilts, C. & Hamann, S. Neural bases of moti-

vated reasoning: an fMRI study of emotional constraints on partisan political judgment 
in the 2004 U.S. presidential election. J. Cogn. Neurosci. 

18, 1947–1958 (2006).

32. Harmon-Jones, E. & Harmon-Jones, C. Action-based model of dissonance: a review of 

behavioral, anterior cingulate, and prefrontal cortical mechanisms. Soc. Pers. Psychol. 
Compass
 

2, 1518–1538 (2008).

33. Bem, D.J. Self-perception: an alternative interpretation of cognitive dissonance phe-

nomena. Psychol. Rev. 

74, 183–200 (1967).

34. Kirchhoff, B.A., Wagner, A.D., Maril, A. & Stern, C.E. Prefrontal circuitry for episodic 

encoding and subsequent memory. J. Neurosci. 

20, 6173–6180 (2000).

35. Wagner, A.D. et al. Building memories: remembering and forgetting of verbal experi-

ences as predicted by brain activity. Science 

281, 1188–1191 (1998).

36. Brewer, J.B., Zhao, Z., Desmond, J.E., Glover, G.H. & Gabrieli, J.D. Making memories: 

brain activity that predicts how well visual experience will be remembered. Science 
281, 1185–1187 (1998).

37. Lieberman, M.D., Ochsner, K.N., Gilbert, D.T. & Schacter, D.L. Do amnesics exhibit 

cognitive dissonance reduction? The role of explicit memory and attention in attitude 
change. Psychol. Sci. 

12, 135–140 (2001).

38. Ursu, S. & Carter, C.S. Outcome representations, counterfactual comparisons and the 

human orbitofrontal cortex: implications for neuroimaging studies of decision-making. 
Brain Res. Cogn. Brain Res. 

23, 51–60 (2005).

39. Amodio, D.M. & Frith, C.D. Meeting of minds: the medial frontal cortex and social 

cognition. Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 

7, 268–277 (2006).

40. Ursu, S., Clark, K.A., Stenger, V.A. & Carter, C.S. Distinguishing expected negative 

outcomes from preparatory control in the human orbitofrontal cortex. Brain Res. 

1227

110–119 (2008).

41. Coricelli, G. et al. Regret and its avoidance: a neuroimaging study of choice behavior. 

Nat. Neurosci. 

8, 1255–1262 (2005).

42. Takahashi, H. et al. When your gain is my pain and your pain is my gain: neural cor-

relates of envy and schadenfreude. Science 

323, 937–939 (2009).

43. Singer, T. et al. Empathy for pain involves the affective, but not sensory components 

of pain. Science 

303, 1157–1162 (2004).

44. Immordino-Yang, M.H., McColl, A., Damasio, H. & Damasio, A. Neural correlates of 

admiration and compassion. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 

106, 8021–8026 (2009).

45. Hein, G. & Singer, T. I feel how you feel but not always: the empathic brain and its 

modulation. Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 

18, 153–158 (2008).

46. Lamm, C., Batson, C.D. & Decety, J. The neural substrate of human empathy: effects of 

perspective-taking and cognitive appraisal. J. Cogn. Neurosci. 

19, 42–58 (2007).

47. Batson, C.D. et al. “... As you would have them do unto you”: does imagining yourself 

in the other’s place stimulate moral action? Pers. Soc. Psychol. Bull. 

29, 1190–1201 

(2003).

48. Sharot, T., De Martino, B. & Dolan, R.J. How choice reveals and shapes expected 

hedonic outcome. J. Neurosci. 

29, 3760–3765 (2009).

49. Delgado, M.R., Locke, H.M., Stenger, V.A. & Fiez, J.A. Dorsal striatum responses 

to reward and punishment: effects of valence and magnitude manipulations. Cogn. 
Affect. Behav. Neurosci.
 

3, 27–38 (2003).

Note: Supplementary information is available on the Nature Neuroscience website.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We are grateful to M. Greenberg, G. Hein and K. Ochsner for discussions, and to 
S. Ravizza, D. Tamir, S. Ursu and A. Watrous for help with data collection. This 
research was supported by grants from the US National Institute of Mental Health 
and the Burroughs-Wellcome Foundation to C.S.C.

AUTHOR CONTRIBUTIONS
V.v.V., J.W.S. and C.S.C. designed the study. M.K.K. gathered fMRI data and 
administered questionnaires. V.v.V. developed stimuli, gathered pilot data and 
conducted analyses. V.v.V. wrote the paper with contributions from M.K.K., J.W.S. 
and C.S.C.

Published online at http://www.nature.com/natureneuroscience/.
Reprints and permissions information is available online at http://www.nature.com/
reprintsandpermissions/
.

1.  Festinger, L. A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance (Stanford University Press, Stanford, 

California, 1957).

2.  Festinger,  L.  &  Carlsmith,  J.M.  Cognitive  consequences  of  forced  compliance.  

J. Abnorm. Soc. Psychol. 

58, 203–210 (1959).

3.  Harmon-Jones, E. & Mills, J. Cognitive Dissonance: Progress on a Pivotal Theory in 

Social Psychology (American Psychological Association, Washington, DC, 1999).

4.  Jones, E.E. Major developments in social psychology during the past five decades. 

in Handbook of Social Psychology: Vol. 1. Theory and Methods (eds Lindzey, G. & 
Aronson, E.) 47–107 (Random House, New York, 1985).

5.  Losch, D.E. & Cacioppo, J.T. Cognitive dissonance may enhance sympathetic tonus, 

but attitudes are changed to reduce negative affect rather than arousal. J. Exp. Soc. 
Psychol.
 

26, 289–304 (1990).

6.  Harmon-Jones, E. Contributions from research on anger and cognitive dissonance to 

understanding the motivational functions of asymmetrical frontal brain activity. Biol. 
Psychol.
 

67, 51–76 (2004).

7.  Elliot, A.J. & Devine, P.G. On the motivational nature of cognitive dissonance: dis-

sonance as psychological discomfort. J. Pers. Soc. Psychol. 

67, 382–394 (1994).

8.  Croyle, R. & Cooper, J. Dissonance arousal: physiological evidence. J. Pers. Soc. 

Psychol. 

45, 782–791 (1983).

9.  Linder, D.E., Cooper, J. & Jones, E.E. Decision freedom as a determinant of the role of 

incentive magnitude in attitude change. J. Pers. Soc. Psychol. 

6, 245–254 (1967).

10. Hoyt, M.F., Henley, M.D. & Collins, B.E. Studies in forced compliance: confluence 

of choice and consequence on attitude change. J. Pers. Soc. Psychol. 

23, 205–210 

(1972).

11. Harmon-Jones, E., Gerdjikov, T. & Harmon-Jones, C. The effect of induced compliance 

on relative left frontal cortical activity: a test of the action-based model of dissonance. 
Eur. J. Soc. Psychol. 

38, 35–45 (2008).

12. Cooper, J. & Fazio, R.H. A new look at dissonance theory. in Advances in Experimental 

Social Psychology (ed. Berkowitz, L.) 229–264 (Academic Press, Orlando, Florida, 
1984).

13. Botvinick, M.M., Braver, T.S., Barch, D.M., Carter, C.S. & Cohen, J.D. Conflict monitor-

ing and cognitive control. Psychol. Rev. 

108, 624–652 (2001).

14. van Veen, V. & Carter, C.S. Conflict and cognitive control in the brain. Curr. Dir. 

Psychol. Sci. 

15, 237–240 (2006).

15. Botvinick, M.M., Cohen, J.D. & Carter, C.S. Conflict monitoring and anterior cingulate 

cortex: an update. Trends Cogn. Sci. 

8, 539–546 (2004).

16. Kerns, J.G. et al. Anterior cingulate conflict monitoring and adjustments in control. 

Science 

303, 1023–1026 (2004).

17. van Veen, V. & Carter, C.S. Separating semantic conflict and response conflict in the 

Stroop task: a functional MRI study. Neuroimage 

27, 497–504 (2005).

18. Jones, A.D., Cho, R.Y., Nystrom, L.E., Cohen, J.D. & Braver, T.S. A computational 

model of anterior cingulate function in speeded response tasks: effects of frequency, 
sequence and conflict. Cogn. Affect. Behav. Neurosci. 

2, 300–317 (2003).

19. Van Overwalle, F. & Jordens, K. An adaptive connectionist model of cognitive dis-

sonance. Pers. Soc. Psychol. Rev. 

6, 204–231 (2002).

20. Shultz, T.R. & Lepper, M.R. Cognitive dissonance reduction as constraint satisfaction. 

Psychol. Rev. 

103, 219–240 (1996).

 

 

©

2009 

Nature 

America,

 Inc.

  All rights reser

ved.

a r t i c l e s

nature neuroscience

 

doi:10.1038/nn.2413

mental manipulation included four randomly chosen neutral sentences and the 
sentence “Overall, I like my experience in the scanner”. We took each participant’s 
response to this item as a pretest measure of scanner enjoyment.

Following the scanning session, participants were led to a private waiting 

room  (when  participants  in  the  dissonance  groups  exited  the  scanner  and 
were led through the scanner control room to the waiting room, it was made 
 apparent that several people were present in the scanner control room,  including 
a ‘patient’, so as to not arouse suspicion). A questionnaire was then  administered 
that contained the same target sentences; participants were now asked to respond 
to them honestly. There was an 8.9-cm horizontal line next to each sentence on 
the questionnaire; participants indicated by tick mark how much they agreed 
with  the  sentence.  Instructions  for  filling  in  the  questionnaire  were  given 
verbally and in writing in the top header of each sheet of the questionnaire  
(left = completely disagree, right = completely agree). After participants filled in 
the questionnaires, we carefully debriefed them. We excluded participants who 
admitted to having doubts about or did not believe the validity of the patient 
cover story from the analyses (n = 8 in the without-pretest dissonance group 
and n = 0 in the with-pretest dissonance group).

Attitude scoring. Final attitude questionnaire items were scored by measuring, 
for negatively phrased items, the distance (in cm) to the tick mark from the 
right, and for positively phrased items, the distance from the left. Thus, higher 
scores reflected greater enjoyment for all items. We then computed composite 
final attitude scores for each participant by averaging across all items of the 
questionnaire.

fMRI  data  acquisition  and  analysis.  Functional  images  were  acquired  with 
a Siemens 3 T whole-body MRI system, using T2*-weighted gradient-recalled 
echo (field of view = 220 mm; matrix = 64 × 64; 28 oblique axial slices; slice  
thickness = 4.0 mm; repetition time = 1,500 ms; error time = 25 ms; flip angle = 90°). 
Data were preprocessed and analyzed using BrainVoyager QX software (Brain 
Innovation). The first eight images, corresponding to the initial 12,000-ms fixation 
screen, were discarded from the analysis. The remaining 825 images were prepro-
cessed using interscan slice time correction, three-dimensional motion correction, 
three-dimensional Gaussian spatial filtering (full-width half maximum = 8 mm) 
and temporal high-pass filtering using a low cutoff frequency of three cycles per 
run. For all participants, high-density three-dimensional images (MPRAGEs) of 
the brain were acquired in between the ‘boring’ task and the attitude task; for each 
participant, the functional data were aligned to these images, transformed into 
Talairach space and interpolated into a 3 × 3 × 3-mm

3

 voxel size.

We constructed four regressors (target and neutral sentences, stimulus and 

response-locked)  for  each  participant  and  convolved  with  a  hemodynamic 
response function. These were entered into a first-level multiple regression. We 
then conducted a second-level, whole-brain experimental group (dissonance, 
control) by sentence type (target, neutral) ANOVA, once on the obtained betas 
associated with the stimulus-locked regressors and once on the obtained betas 
associated with the response-locked regressors, using participant as random fac-
tor (thresholded at 

α = 0.001, uncorrected). For all analyses reported, temporal 

autocorrelation in the fMRI time series was corrected using an autoregressive 
function. As no significant results were obtained for the stimulus-locked regres-
sors, only the results using the response-locked regressors are discussed. Monte 
Carlo simulations of the random process of image generation, followed by the 
injection of spatial correlations between neighboring voxels and voxel inten-
sity thresholding, as implemented in BrainVoyager QX

50

, were used to select 

a cluster size threshold that corrected the obtained statistical map for multiple 
comparisons at 

α = 0.01.

For the activated regions, we obtained time courses of activation to the two sen-

tence types for each group, as percentage change from baseline. We then performed 
partial correlations between activation and final composite attitude score by taking 
the average scan for each participant that represented the greatest between-group 
difference in response to the target sentences, controlling for the per-participant 
mean reaction time to the target sentences, pretest presence and pretest score. 

50. Goebel, R., Esposito, F. & Formisano, E. Analysis of functional image analysis contest 

(FIAC) data with BrainVoyager QX: from single-subject to cortically aligned group gen-
eral linear model analysis and self-organizing group independent component analysis. 
Hum. Brain Mapp. 

27, 392–401 (2006).

ONLINE METHODS

Participants. In total, 53 people participated in the experiment after having 
provided written informed consent in accordance with the Institutional Review 
Board of the University of California at Davis. Participants who indicated that 
they had been in an fMRI scanner before were declined participation in the 
study. We included 13 participants in the without-pretest control group (five 
females, eight males; mean age = 25 years old, s.d. = 2.7) and nine participants 
in the with-pretest control group (six females, three males; mean age = 23 years 
old, s.d. = 3.4). Initially, we included 20 participants in the without-pretest 
dissonance group. During debriefing, eight of these participants admitted to 
 having doubts about or not believing the cover story and were excluded from the 
analyses. We also excluded one additional participant who opted not to comply 
with the instructions from the analyses, leaving a total of 11 participants in the 
without-pretest dissonance group (six females, five males; mean age = 24 years 
old, s.d. = 4.7). Initially, we included 11 participants in the with-pretest dis-
sonance group (seven females, three males; mean age = 24 years old, s.d. = 4.3). 
None of these participants admitted to having doubts about the cover story. We 
excluded one participant for not complying with the instructions, leaving ten 
participants in the with-pretest dissonance group.

Materials.  Stimuli  were  presented  using  E-Prime  software  (Psychological 
Software Tools). Throughout the task, the outline of six squares was visible at 
the bottom of the screen, with a + sign to the left, indicating agreement, and a  
– sign to the right, indicating disagreement. The session started with a 12,000-ms  
fixation screen.

Each trial started with a sentence being presented in the center of the screen 

for 8,000 ms, after which the sentence was replaced by a 7,000-ms fixation. 
Following a button press, the square corresponding at the bottom of the screen 
lit up; the square would dimmed again 1,500 ms before the onset of the next 
trial.

During  the  experiment,  neutral  and  target  sentences  were  presented  in 

random order. Target sentences consisted of 25 sentences describing the par-
ticipant’s subjective experience in the scanner. Of these, 12 were phrased in 
negative terms, which we expected the participants to disagree with, and 13 
were phrased in positive terms, which we expected the participants to agree 
with (Supplementary Table 1). In addition, we used 50 sentences as neutral 
stimuli, 25 of which concerned general attitudes and 25 of which were factual 
statements about the participant, the task and the scanner (Supplementary 
Table 2
). Neutral and target sentences were matched for length.

Procedure. After providing consent, participants were shown the magnetic reso-
nance facility and control room. They were informed that what they would see 
on screen while in the scanner was also visible on a screen in the control room. 
Participants in all groups first performed a forced-choice response task in a 
standard cognitive neuroimaging experiment, which lasted about 45 min (see 
Supplementary Methods). Following this experiment, a high-density structural 
magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) image was 
acquired, which lasted about 9 min.

While participants were performing the first task, we randomly assigned 

them to either the control or dissonance group. Following this part of the scan-
ning session, participants were taken partway out of the scanner and received 
instructions. Participants responded using a left- and a right-hand button glove. 
Participants were instructed to respond to each sentence with a button press, 
rating each sentence from completely agree to completely disagree (left ring 
finger = completely agree, left middle finger = mostly agree, left index finger = 
somewhat agree, right index finger = somewhat disagree, right middle finger = 
mostly disagree, right middle finger = completely disagree). Further instructions 
depended on experimental group.

Participants in with-pretest groups were first instructed to rate sentences 

honestly, without group-specific instruction, and the experiment was started. 
After five sentences, we interrupted the scanner, and we now instructed par-
ticipants to respond counter-attitudinally in the same way as participants in 
without-pretest groups (that is, in the dissonance group, we gave participants 
the patient cover story, and in the control group, we told participants that they 
would be paid $1 extra for each sentence they responded to as though they were 
enjoying the scanner). Critically, the five sentences presented before the experi-

 

 

©

2009 

Nature 

America,

 Inc.

  All rights reser

ved.