Melatonin enhances chondrogenic differentiation of human
mesenchymal stem cells

Abstract: Intramembranous ossification and endochondral ossification are two
ways through which bone formation and fracture healing occur. Accumulating
amounts of evidence suggests that melatonin affects osteoblast differentiation,
but little is known about the effects of melatonin on the process of
chondrogenic differentiation. In this study, the effects of melatonin on human
mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) undergoing chondrogenic differentiation were
investigated. Cells were induced along chondrogenic differentiation via high-
density micromass culture in chondrogenic medium containing vehicle or
50 n

M

melatonin. Histological study and quantitative analysis of

glycosaminoglycan (GAG) showed induced cartilage tissues to be larger and
richer in GAG, collagen type II and collagen type X in the melatonin group
than in the untreated controls. Real-time RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that
melatonin treatment significantly up-regulated the expression of the genes
involved in chondrogenic differentiation, including aggrecan (ACAN), collagen
type II (COL2A1), collagen type X (COL10A1), SRY (sex-determining region
Y)-box 9 (SOX9), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and the potent
inducer of chondrogenic differentiation, bone morphogenetic protein 2
(BMP2). And the expression of melatonin membrane receptors (MT) MT1
and MT2 were detected in the chondrogenic-induced-MSCs by
immunofluorescence staining. Luzindole, a melatonin receptor antagonist, was
found to partially block the ability of melatonin to increase the size and GAG
synthesis of the induced cartilage tissues, as well as to completely reverse the
effect of melatonin on the gene expression of ACAN, COL2A1, COL10A1,
SOX9

and BMP2 after 7 days of differentiation. These findings demonstrate

that melatonin enhances chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs at least
partially through melatonin receptors.

Wenjie Gao

1

*, Mianlong Lin

1

*,

Anjing Liang

1

*, Liangming Zhang

2

,

Changhua Chen

3

, Guoyan Liang

1

,

Caixia Xu

4

, Yan Peng

1

, Chong

Chen

5

, Dongsheng Huang

1

and

Peiqiang Su

5

1

Department of Spine Surgery, Sun

Yat-sen Memorial Hospital of Sun Yat-sen
University, Guangzhou, China;

2

Department of

Spine Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of
Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China;

3

School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen

University, Guangzhou, China;

4

Research

Center of Translational Medicine, The First
Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University,
Guangzhou, China;

5

Department of Orthopedic

Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun
Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China

Key words: bone morphogenetic protein 2,
chondrogenic differentiation, human
mesenchymal stem cells, melatonin, melatonin
receptors

Address reprint requests to Peiqiang Su,
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The First
Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University,
Guangzhou 510080, China.
E-mail: supq@mail.sysu.edu.cn
Dongsheng Huang, Department of Orthopedic
Surgery, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital of Sun
Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510120, China.
E-mail: huangdongshen18@hotmail.com

*These authors contributed equally to this
study.

Received August 11, 2013;
Accepted September 20, 2013.

Introduction

The methoxyindole melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytrypta-
mine), which was first discovered in the 1950s, is an
uncommonly widely distributed molecule [1, 2]. It has been
shown to be involved in a number of physiological pro-
cesses, such as circadian rhythm, sleep, inhibition of tumor
growth, immune response, and reproduction [3

–7].

Intramembranous ossification and endochondral ossifi-

cation are two ways through which bone formation and
fracture healing occur, and both processes begin with
MSCs proliferation and condensation [8]. Recent studies
have shown that melatonin affects bone formation through
enhancing osteogenic differentiation. Melatonin treatment
can prevent osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats and
increase the volume of newly formed cortical bone of fem-
ora in mice [9

–13]. Topical application of melatonin was

found to accelerate osteointegration of dental implants
and bone implants in Beagle dog and rabbit models

[14

–16]. In vitro, melatonin has been reported to promote

osteogenic differentiation in several kinds of cells, includ-
ing MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts, rat osteoblast-like osteosar-
coma 17/2.8 cells, human bone cells, human osteoblasts,
and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) [9, 17

21]. Regarding chondrogenic differentiation, only one
relevant study, conducted by Pei et al. [22], reported that
melatonin can enhance cartilage matrix synthesis of por-
cine articular chondrocytes, which are terminally differen-
tiated chondrocytes. The data regarding the effects of
melatonin on chondrogenic differentiation of precommit-
ted progenitor cells are limited.

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stro-

mal cells that can differentiate into a variety of unique
mesenchymal cell types, such as osteoblasts, chondro-
cytes, and adipocytes [23]. Previous studies have shown
that melatonin plays an important role in regulating the
osteogenic differentiation and adipogenic differentiation
of MSCs [17, 24]. However, the effects of melatonin on

62

J. Pineal Res. 2014; 56:62–70

Doi:10.1111/jpi.12098

© 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Journal of Pineal Research

Molecula

r,

Biological

,P

h

ysiological

 and

 Clinical

 Aspe

ct

of

 Mel

atoni

n

chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs have not
yet been studied.

In the present study, melatonin was evaluated for its

ability to affect chondrogenic differentiation of human
MSCs, as well as the potential underlying mechanism.
The goals of this study are to further determine the
important role of melatonin in the regulation of the dif-
ferentiation of MSCs and in bone formation and to pro-
vide further evidence for the use of melatonin as a drug
in orthopedics, especially in the enhancement of fracture
healing.

Materials and methods

Isolation and culture of human bone marrow

–derived

mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)

The study was approved by the Ethical Committee of Sun
Yat-sen University, and written informed consent was
obtained from all subjects included in the study. Human
MSCs were isolated from bone marrow obtained from
healthy volunteer donors as described previously [17, 24,
25]. Briefly, the bone marrow samples were diluted with
PBS. Cells were then fractionated on a lymphoprep den-
sity gradient by centrifugation at 500 g for 20 min. Inter-
facial mononuclear cells were collected, resuspended in
low-glucose Dulbecco’s modified Eagle medium (DMEM)
supplemented with 10% FBS, seeded and incubated at
37

°C/5% CO

2

. After 48 hr, nonadherent cells were

removed by changing the medium. Thereafter, the medium
was changed every 3 days. When the cells reached 80

90% confluence, they were trypsinized, counted and plated
again. Cells from passages 3

–6 were used for the experi-

ments.

Chondrogenic differentiation

High-density micromass culture system was applied for
the chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs as
described previously [25]. Briefly, culture-expanded MSCs
were trypsinized, washed and then resuspended at 2

9 10

7

cells/mL in a chemically defined chondrogenic medium
consisting of high-glucose DMEM supplemented with
10 ng/mL recombinant human transforming growth fac-
tor-

b3 (TGF-b3; Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ, USA),

100 n

M

dexamethasone (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO,

USA), 50

lg/mL ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (Sigma–

Aldrich), 1 m

M

sodium pyruvate (Sigma

–Aldrich), 40 lg/

mL proline (Sigma

–Aldrich) and ITS+ Universal Culture

Supplement Premix (BD Biosciences, Bedford, MA, USA;
final concentrations: 6.25

lg/mL bovine insulin, 6.25 lg/

mL transferrin, 6.25

lg/mL selenous acid, 5.33 lg/mL li-

noleic acid and 1.25 mg/mL bovine serum albumin).
Droplets (12.5

lL) were carefully placed in each interior

well of a 24-well plate. Cells were allowed to adhere at
37

°C for 2 hr, followed by addition of 500 lL chondro-

genic medium containing vehicle or 50 n

M

melatonin

(Sigma

–Aldrich). The medium was changed every 3 days,

and induced-cartilage tissues were harvested on days 7, 14,
and 21. To assess the involvement of melatonin receptors,
cells were also exposed to chondrogenic medium in the

presence of 5

l

M

luzindole (Sigma

–Aldrich), which is a

melatonin receptor antagonist.

Quantitative analysis of glycosaminoglycan (GAG)

Micromasses were washed and digested in PBS containing
0.03% papain (Merck, Darmstadt, Germany), 5 m

M

cyste-

ine hydrochloride (Sigma

–Aldrich) and 10 m

M

EDTA

(Sigma

–Aldrich) for 16 hr at 65°C. The GAG concentra-

tion was measured using the 1, 9-dimethylmethylene blue
(DMMB; Sigma

–Aldrich) dye binding assay. Briefly, an

aliquot of the lysate was reacted with DMMB solution for
10 min, and the absorbance at 525 nm was measured
using Varioskan Flash (Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA,
USA). DNA concentration was calculated by fluorescent
dye Hoechst 33258 (Sigma

–Aldrich) binding assay using

SpectraMax M5 Microplate Reader (Molecular Devices,
Sunnyvale, CA, USA). For comparison, GAG content
was normalized by DNA content.

Histology and immunohistochemistry

Micromasses were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde for 3 hr,
then dehydrated with ethanol, washed with xylene, and
embedded in paraffin. Sections with a thickness of 5

lm

were cut and coated on the glass slides. Safranin O stain-
ing was used to assess the proteoglycan level, and immu-
nohistochemistry was used to assess the levels of collagen
type II and collagen type X. Hematoxylin (Sigma

–Aldrich)

served as a counterstain. Briefly, for Safranin O staining,
sections were deparaffinized and exposed to 0.1% Safranin
O solution for 5 min. For immunohistochemistry, the
Histostain-Plus kit (ZSGB-BIO, Beijing, China) was used.
After deparaffinization, tissue sections were treated with
pepsin at 37

°C for 10 min, incubated with peroxidase-

blocking solution for 10 min, and then allowed to react
with the appropriate primary antibodies overnight at 4

°C

[rabbit anti-human collagen type II polyclonal antibody
(Abzoom Biolabs, Dallas, TX, USA) diluted at 1:100 and
rabbit anti-human collagen type X polyclonal antibody
(Millipore, Billerica, MA, USA) diluted at 1:50]. Detection
was conducted with a DAB Horseradish Peroxidase Color
Development Kits (ZSGB-BIO) according to the manufac-
turer’s protocols. Finally, the sections were photographed
with an Olympus BX51 microscope (Olympus, Tokyo,
Japan).

Immunofluorescence staining

After deparaffinization, tissue sections were microwaved in
10 m

M

citrate buffer, incubated with blocking solution

containing 1% BSA in PBS for 1 hr, and reacted with the
appropriate primary antibodies overnight at 4

°C [goat

anti-human melatonin receptor 1A (MT1) polyclonal anti-
body (Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Santa Cruz, CA, USA)
diluted at 1:50 and goat anti-human melatonin receptor
1B (MT2) polyclonal antibody (Santa Cruz Biotechnol-
ogy) diluted at 1:50]. Then, samples were immunostained
with FITC-conjugated secondary antibody (Santa Cruz
Biotechnology) for 1 hr at room temperature. Finally, sec-
tions were stained with DAPI, covered with glycerol, and

63

Melatonin enhances chondrogenic differentiation

examined with confocal microscope Zeiss LSM 710 (Carl
Zeiss, Heidelberg, Germany).

Reverse transcription and real-time PCR analysis

Total RNA was extracted from micromasses using RNA-
iso Plus reagent (TaKaRa, Dalian, China) and then con-
verted to cDNA using PrimeScript

â

RT Master Mix

(TaKaRa) according to the manufacturer’s protocols.
Real-time PCR was performed on iQ5 Real-Time PCR
Detection System (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Hercules, CA,
USA) using SYBR Green I Master Mix (TOYOBO,
Osaka, Japan). Expression of the following genes was
examined: aggrecan (ACAN), collagen type II (COL2A1),
collagen type X (COL10A1), SRY (sex determining region
Y)-box 9 (SOX9), runt-related transcription factor 2
(RUNX2) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2).
The level of expression of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate
dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene served as reference. The
primer sequences used are listed in Table 1. Each PCR
was processed in triplicate. The C

t

value of the GAPDH

was subtracted from the C

t

value of the target gene (

△C

t

)

,

and the average

△C

t

value of the triplicates was recorded.

The relative expression levels of each gene were deter-
mined using the 2

DD

Ct

method.

Statistical analysis

All quantitative data were presented as mean

 standard

error (S.E.). Statistical analysis was performed using one-
way ANOVA followed by a Newman

–Keuls post hoc

t

-test with the SPSS 16.0 statistical software (SPSS, Chi-

cago, IL, USA). The level of statistical significance was set
at P

< 0.05.

Results

To determine the effects of melatonin on chondrogenic dif-
ferentiation of human MSCs, 50 n

M

melatonin was added

to chondrogenic medium. As shown in Fig. 1A, the
induced cartilage tissues treated with melatonin were lar-

ger than those of the controls, especially on the early stage
of differentiation. The quantitative analysis of glycosami-
noglycan

(GAG)

showed

that

the

GAG

synthesis

increased gradually as incubation continued and was sig-
nificantly elevated by melatonin treatment on days 7 and
21 (P

< 0.05), as well as slightly elevated on day 14, com-

pared with the untreated controls (P

> 0.05) (Fig. 1B).

After 21 days of chondrogenic differentiation, in the
induced cartilage tissues treated with melatonin, Safranin
O staining showed a higher and more homogenous GAG
distribution, and immunohistochemical staining showed
more accumulations of collagen type II and collagen type
X than in the controls (Fig. 1C).

Real-time RT-PCR was used to evaluate the effects of

melatonin on the expression of genes involved in chondro-
genic differentiation of human MSCs. As shown in Fig. 2,
consistent with the results of quantitative GAG analysis
and histological findings (Fig. 1B

–C), melatonin signifi-

cantly

up-regulated

the

gene expression

of

ACAN

,

COL2A1

and COL10A1 during chondrogenic differentia-

tion, as well as the gene expression of transcription factors
SOX9

and RUNX2, which are critical to chondrogenic dif-

ferentiation. Of note, the expression of BMP2, which is a
potent inducer of bone and cartilage development, was
detected and found to be significantly elevated by melato-
nin during chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs.

The involvement of melatonin receptors in chondrogenic

differentiation of human MSCs was here evaluated. The
expression of melatonin receptors (MT) MT1 and MT2
were detected in the induced chondrogenic MSCs by
immunofluorescence staining (Fig. 3). Then, the ability of
luzindole, a melatonin receptor antagonist, to inhibit the
effects of melatonin on chondrogenic differentiation was
evaluated. 5

l

M

luzindole was added to chondrogenic

medium containing vehicle or 50 n

M

melatonin. Luzindole

alone (CHO/LUZ group) was not found to affect the
chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs (Fig. 4).
However, the enhancement of melatonin on the size and
GAG synthesis of the induced cartilage tissues (CHO/
MEL group) was partially reversed by luzindole (CHO/
MEL/LUZ

group)

(Fig. 4A

–B).

Real-time

Table 1. Primers used for real-time PCR

Gene (Accession no.)

Primer sequence

Product size (bp)

GAPDH (NM_002046)

5

′-AGAAAAACCTGCCAAATATGATGAC-3′

126

5

′-TGGGTGTCGCTGTTGAAGTC-3′

ACAN (NM_001135)

5

′-TGCATTCCACGAAGCTAACCTT-3′

84

5

′-GACGCCTCGCCTTCTTGAA-3′

COL2A1 (NM_001844)

5

′-GGCAATAGCAGGTTCACGTACA-3′

79

5

′-CGATAACAGTCTTGCCCCACTT-3′

COL10A1 (NM_000493)

5

′-CAAGGCACCATCTCCAGGAA-3′

70

5

′-AAAGGGTATTTGTGGCAGCATATT-3′

SOX9 (NM_000346)

5

′-AGCGAACGCACATCAAGAC-3′

110

5

′-GCTGTAGTGTGGGAGGTTGAA-3′

RUNX2 (NM_001024630)

5

′-AGAAGGCACAGACAGAAGCTTGA-3′

78

5

′-AGGAATGCGCCCTAAATCACT-3′

BMP2 (NM_001200)

5

′-ACTACCAGAAACGAGTGGGAA-3′

113

5

′-GCATCTGTTCTCGGAAAACCT-3′

GAPDH, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; ACAN, aggrecan; COL2A1, collagen type II; COL10A1, collagen type X; SOX9,
SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9; RUNX2, runt-related transcription factor 2; BMP2, bone morphogenetic protein 2.

64

Gao et al.

RT-PCR was also conducted to investigate the effects of
luzindole on melatoin-induced mRNA expression of the
genes involved in chondrogenic differentiation. As shown
in Fig. 4C, after 7 days of differentiation, the effects of
melatonin to enhance the expression of ACAN, COL2A1,
COL10A1

, SOX9 and BMP2 (CHO/MEL group) was

blocked by luzindole (CHO/MEL/LUZ group).

Discussion

In the present study, the effects of melatonin on chondro-
genic differentiation of human MSCs were investigated.
MSCs were induced along chondrogenic differentiation via
high-density micromass culture in chondrogenic medium
supplemented with vehicle or 50 n

M

melatonin. Results

showed

that

melatonin

treatment

led

to

increased

expression of chondrocyte differentiation markers as evi-
denced by quantitative GAG analysis, histological finding
and real-time RT-PCR analysis, all of which indicated that
melatonin

promoted

chondrogenic

differentiation

of

human MSCs. In the previous studies, we found that mel-
atonin can enhance osteogenesis and inhibit adipogenesis
of MSCs [17, 24]. And thus we suggested that melatonin is
an important regulator of MSCs differentiation and may
have potential applications in the promotion of bone for-
mation and fracture healing.

Pei et al. [22] reported that melatonin can enhance carti-

lage matrix synthesis of procine articular chondrocytes
including aggrecan and collagen type II but had no effect
on the expression of collagen type X, which is a hypertro-
phic marker. In the present study, we found during chon-
drogenic differentiation of human MSCs, melatonin

(A)

(B)

(C)

Fig. 1

. Effects of melatonin on chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs. Cells were seeded in 24-well plates via high-density micro-

mass culture and induced along chondrogenic differentiation in chondrogenic medium containing vehicle or 50 n

M

melatonin. (A) Macro-

images of induced cartilage tissues were taken at days 7, 14, and 21. Scale bar

= 1 mm. (B) Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content was

quantitatively analyzed and normalized by DNA content at days 7, 14, and 21. The results are representative of three independent experi-
ments.

*P < 0.05 versus the control. (C) Safranin O staining for proteoglycan and immunohistochemistry for collagen type II and colla-

gen type X were performed after 21 days of differentiation. Magnification:

9200.

65

Melatonin enhances chondrogenic differentiation

Fig. 2

. Effects of melatonin on the expression of genes involved in chondrogenic differentiation. Cells were seeded in 24-well plates via

high-density micromass culture and induced along chondrogenic differentiation in chondrogenic medium containing vehicle or 50 n

M

mel-

atonin. The mRNA expression of aggrecan (ACAN), collagen type II (COL2A1), collagen type X (COL10A1), SRY (sex determining
region Y)-box 9 (SOX9), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) was measured using
quantitative real-time PCR and normalized to GAPDH expression. The relative expression level of each gene was calculated using the
2

DDC

t

method. The results are representative of three independent experiments.

*P < 0.05, **P < 0.01 versus the control.

Fig. 3

. Expression of melatonin receptors in chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs as indicated by immunofluorescence staining.

Cells were seeded in 24-well plates via high-density micromass culture and induced along chondrogenic differentiation in chondrogenic
medium. Samples of induced cartilage tissues were harvested on day 7. The expressions of melatonin receptors (MT) MT1 and MT2 were
visualized by immunofluorescence staining using anti-MT1, MT2 antibodies and FITC-conjugated secondary antibodies (green). Nuclei
were counterstained using DAPI (blue). The far right panels show merged green and blue images. Magnification:

9630.

66

Gao et al.

(A)

(B)

(C)

Fig. 4

. Effects of melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole on human MSCs undergoing chondrogenic differentiation in chondrogenic

medium supplemented with melatonin. Cells were seeded in 24-well plates via high-density micromass culture and induced along chondro-
genic differentiation in chondrogenic medium supplemented with vehicle (CHO), with 5

l

M

luzindole (CHO/LUZ), with 50 n

M

melatonin

(CHO/MEL) or with both melatonin and luzindole (CHO/MEL/LUZ). (A) Macroimages of induced cartilage tissues were taken after
7 days of differentiation. Scale bar

= 1 mm. (B) Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content was quantitatively analyzed and normalized by DNA

content after 21 days of differentiation. The results are representative of three independent experiments. (C) The mRNA expression of
ACAN

, COL2A1, COL10A1, SOX9, RUNX2 and BMP2 was measured using quantitative real-time PCR and normalized to GAPDH

expression after 7 days of differentiation. The relative expression level of these genes was calculated using the 2

DDC

t

method. The results

are representative of three independent experiments.

a

P

< 0.05 versus CHO group,

b

P

< 0.05 versus CHO/MEL group.

67

Melatonin enhances chondrogenic differentiation

treatment yielded chondrocyte-micromasses with larger
size and more accumulations of GAG, collagen type II
and collagen type X. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed
that melatonin significantly up-regulated not only the gene
expression of the chondrogenic markers including ACAN,
COL2A1

, COL10A1, and SOX9, but also RUNX2, a tran-

scription factor critical to chondrocyte maturation and
osteogenesis [26]. The different effects of melatonin
observed in the present and previous studies may be attrib-
uted to the heterogeneity of the cells studied that articular
chondrocytes are terminally differentiated chondrocytes,
while MSCs are multipotent precursor cells. Current stud-
ies also indicated that different signal pathways were
involved in melatonin-induced differentiation of articular
chondrocytes and MSCs. In the melatonin-treated articu-
lar chondrocytes, up-regulation of internal transforming
growth factor beta1 (TGF-

b1) expression was observed

[22], while in our study, melatonin was found to enhance
the gene expression of BMP2 during chondrogenic differ-
entiation of MSCs. And further study is needed to identify
the specific molecular mechanisms. Similarly, the diverse
effects of melatonin have also been observed in the regula-
tion of adipogenic differentiation. Gonzalez et al. [27]
reported that melatonin can promote adipocyte differentia-
tion of 3T3L1 murine preadipocytes through melatonin
receptors. However, in our previous study, melatonin was
found to inhibit adipogenesis of MSCs and luzindole
cannot block the inhibitory effects [17].

In mammals, there are two subtypes of melatonin mem-

brane receptors (MT), MT1 and MT2, both of which are
members of the seven transmembrane G protein-coupled
receptor family [28]. In the present study, MT1 and MT2
membrane receptors were detected in the chondrogenic-
induced-MSCs

using

immunofluorescence

staining.

Luzindole, a melatonin receptor antagonist, was used to
determine whether melatonin receptors were involved in
chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. Findings showed
that luzindole can partially block the effects of melatonin
on the size and GAG synthesis of the induced cartilage
tissues, and completely reverse melatonin-induced gene
expression of ACAN, COL2A1, COL10A1, SOX9, and
BMP2

, all of which indicated that the ability of melatonin

to enhance chondrogenic differentiation was at least par-
tially dependent upon melatonin membrane receptors.
Recent studies have reported that melatonin is a ligand for
the ROR/RZR family of orphan nuclear receptors and that
it can interact with intracellular proteins, such as calmodu-
lin- and tubulin-associated proteins [29, 30]. Melatonin can
also exert direct antioxidant effects [31]. Further study is
needed to identify other mechanisms by which melatonin
affects chondrogenic differentiation. The MT2 melatonin
receptor has been reported to be involved in melatonin-
induced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs [20,21], and our
data showed that melatonin can inhibit adipogenic differen-
tiation of MSCs likely via orphan nuclear receptor ROR

a

(L. Zhang, W. Gao, P. Su, D. Huang, unpublished data).
Therefore, it is here speculated that melatonin’s effects on
adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation of
human MSCs may act through different pathways.

Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which belong to

the transforming growth factor

b (TGFb) superfamily,

play crucial roles in the development of bone and cartilage
[32, 33]. Recent studies have shown that in vitro BMPs
can induce chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs
[34

–38]. Sethi et al. [21] reported that during osteogenic

differentiation of human MSCs, melatonin can enhance
the expression of BMP2 through the MT2 melatonin
receptor. Similarly, Park et al. [39] reported that melato-
nin can up-regulate the expression of BMP2 and BMP4
during the differentiation of mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-
E1 cells and that the BMP-dependent signaling pathway is
involved

in

the

melatonin-induced

differentiation

of

MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, melatonin was
found to significantly elevate the expression of BMP2 dur-
ing chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs, and the
melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole can reverse the
enhancing effect, indicating that melatonin-induced expres-
sion of BMP2 is mediated by melatonin receptors. The
mechanism through which activation of melatonin recep-
tors stimulated the expression of BMP2 in chondrogenic
differentiation remains unknown. It has been reported that
activation of ERK1/2 can contribute to BMP2 transcrip-
tion during osteoblast differentiation [40], and melatonin
has been shown to stimulate phosphorylation of ERK1/2
via melatonin receptors [20, 21, 39]. Further study is
needed to identify the exact mechanism by which melato-
nin-induced chondrogenic differentiation takes place. In
addition, smads 1, 5, and 8, which are the immediate
downstream molecules of BMP receptors, play a central
role in BMP signal transduction downstream. There is
some evidence that phosphorylation of smad1/5/8 is posi-
tively involved in cartilage development [41]. Combined
deletions of smads 1, 5, and 8 has been shown to cause
severe chondrodysplasia in mice [42], and in vitro blockage
of smad1/5/8 phosphorylation can significantly inhibit
chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs [43]. Our
data showed that melatonin treatment can stimulate phos-
phorylation of smad1/5/8 during chondrogenic differentia-
tion of human MSCs (data not shown). In this way, we
speculated that the BMP/smad signal pathway is involved
in

melatonin-induced

chondrogenic

differentiation

of

human MSCs, and further study is needed to confirm this
hypothesis.

In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that mela-

tonin can enhance chondrogenic differentiation of human
MSCs at least partially through melatonin receptors. It
also provides further evidence for the use of melatonin as
a drug in orthopedics, especially in the enhancement of
fracture healing. However, the underlying signal transduc-
tion mechanism requires further elucidation. New studies
are planned to assess the role of the BMP/smad signal
pathway in the effects of melatonin on chondrogenic dif-
ferentiation of human MSCs.

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank all participants for their support
in this study. We also thank Dr. Yadi Liao for his help in
editing the manuscript. This work was supported by the
National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.
81171674,

No.

81371907,

No.

81371908

and

No.

81301524), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program

68

Gao et al.

of Higher Education of China (No. 20110171110067), Pro-
gram for New Century Excellent Talents in University
(NCET-12-0564), Research Fund of Social Development
of Guangdong Province (No. 2010B031900023), Research
Fund of Popular Science of Guangzhou City (No.
2011KP012) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the
Central Universities (No. 11ykzd10).

References

1. H

ARDELAND

R, C

ARDINALI

DP, S

RINIVASAN

V et al. Melato-

nin

–a pleiotropic, orchestrating regulator molecule. Prog

Neurobiol 2011;

93:350–384.

2. R

EITER

RJ, T

AN

DX, R

OSALES

-C

ORRAL

S et al. The universal

nature, unequal distribution and antioxidant functions of
melatonin and its derivatives. Mini Rev Med Chem 2013;
13:373–384.

3. H

ARDELAND

R, M

ADRID

JA, T

AN

DX et al. Melatonin, the

circadian multioscillator system and health: the need for
detailed analyses of peripheral melatonin signaling. J Pineal
Res 2012;

52:139–166.

4. C

ARDINALI

DP, S

RINIVASAN

V, B

RZEZINSKI

A et al. Melatonin

and its analogs in insomnia and depression. J Pineal Res
2012;

52:365–375.

5. W

ITT

-E

NDERBY

PA, R

ADIO

NM, D

OCTOR

JS et al. Therapeutic

treatments potentially mediated by melatonin receptors:
potential clinical uses in the prevention of osteoporosis, cancer
and as an adjuvant therapy. J Pineal Res 2006;

41:297–305.

6. M

AURIZ

JL, C

OLLADO

PS, V

ENEROSO

C et al. A review of the

molecular aspects of melatonin’s anti-inflammatory actions:
recent insights and new perspectives. J Pineal Res 2013;
54:1–14.

7. B

ARRETT

P, B

OLBOREA

M. Molecular pathways involved in

seasonal body weight and reproductive responses governed by
melatonin. J Pineal Res 2012;

52:376–388.

8. K

ELLY

DJ, J

ACOBS

CR. The role of mechanical signals in reg-

ulating chondrogenesis and osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem
cells. Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today 2010;

90:75–85.

9. S

ATOMURA

K, T

OBIUME

S, T

OKUYAMA

R et al. Melatonin at

pharmacological doses enhances human osteoblastic differen-
tiation in vitro and promotes mouse cortical bone formation
in vivo. J Pineal Res 2007;

42:231–239.

10. L

ADIZESKY

MG, C

UTRERA

RA, B

OGGIO

V et al. Effect of mel-

atonin on bone metabolism in ovariectomized rats. Life Sci
2001;

70:557–565.

11. O

STROWSKA

Z, K

OS

-K

UDLA

B, M

AREK

B et al. The influence

of pinealectomy and melatonin administration on the
dynamic pattern of biochemical markers of bone metabolism
in experimental osteoporosis in the rat. Neuro Endocrinol
Lett 2002;

23(Suppl 1):104–109.

12. O

STROWSKA

Z, K

OS

-K

UDLA

B, M

AREK

B et al. The relation-

ship between the daily profile of chosen biochemical markers
of bone metabolism and melatonin and other hormone secre-
tion in rats under physiological conditions. Neuro Endocrinol
Lett 2002;

23:417–425.

13. L

ADIZESKY

MG, B

OGGIO

V, A

LBORNOZ

LE et al. Melatonin

increases oestradiol-induced bone formation in ovariecto-
mized rats. J Pineal Res 2003;

34:143–151.

14. C

ALVO

-G

UIRADO

JL, G

OMEZ

-M

ORENO

G, L

OPEZ

-M

ARI

L et al.

Actions of melatonin mixed with collagenized porcine bone
versus porcine bone only on osteointegration of dental
implants. J Pineal Res 2010;

48:194–203.

15. C

ALVO

-G

UIRADO

JL, G

OMEZ

-M

ORENO

G, B

ARONE

A et al.

Melatonin plus porcine bone on discrete calcium deposit
implant

surface

stimulates

osteointegration

in

dental

implants. J Pineal Res 2009;

47:164–172.

16. C

ALVO

-G

UIRADO

JL,

R

AMIREZ

-F

ERNANDEZ

MP,

G

OMEZ

-

M

ORENO

G et al. Melatonin stimulates the growth of new

bone around implants in the tibia of rabbits. J Pineal Res
2010;

49:356–363.

17. Z

HANG

L, S

U

P, X

U

C et al. Melatonin inhibits adipogenesis

and enhances osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells
by suppressing PPARgamma expression and enhancing
Runx2 expression. J Pineal Res 2010;

49:364–372.

18. R

OTH

JA, K

IM

BG, L

IN

WL et al. Melatonin promotes osteo-

blast differentiation and bone formation. J Biol Chem 1999;
274:22041–22047.

19. N

AKADE

O, K

OYAMA

H, A

RIJI

H et al. Melatonin stimulates

proliferation and type I collagen synthesis in human bone
cells in vitro. J Pineal Res 1999;

27:106–110.

20. R

ADIO

NM, D

OCTOR

JS, W

ITT

-E

NDERBY

PA. Melatonin

enhances alkaline phosphatase activity in differentiating
human adult mesenchymal stem cells grown in osteogenic
medium via MT2 melatonin receptors and the MEK/ERK
(1/2) signaling cascade. J Pineal Res 2006;

40:332–342.

21. S

ETHI

S, R

ADIO

NM, K

OTLARCZYK

MP et al. Determination

of the minimal melatonin exposure required to induce osteo-
blast differentiation from human mesenchymal stem cells and
these effects on downstream signaling pathways. J Pineal Res
2010;

49:222–238.

22. P

EI

M, H

E

F, W

EI

L et al. Melatonin enhances cartilage

matrix synthesis by porcine articular chondrocytes. J Pineal
Res 2009;

46:181–187.

23. B

RUDER

SP, F

INK

DJ, C

APLAN

AI. Mesenchymal stem cells in

bone development, bone repair, and skeletal regeneration
therapy. J Cell Biochem 1994;

56:283–294.

24. Z

HANG

L, Z

HANG

J, L

ING

Y et al. Sustained release of melato-

nin from poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres
to induce osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells in
vitro. J Pineal Res 2013;

54:24–32.

25. Z

HANG

L, S

U

P, X

U

C et al. Chondrogenic differentiation of

human mesenchymal stem cells: a comparison between micro-
mass and pellet culture systems. Biotechnol Lett 2010;
32:1339–1346.

26. K

ARSENTY

G. Minireview: transcriptional control of osteo-

blast differentiation. Endocrinology 2001;

142:2731–2733.

27. G

ONZALEZ

A, A

LVAREZ

-G

ARCIA

V, M

ARTINEZ

-C

AMPA

C et al.

Melatonin promotes differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts.
J Pineal Res 2012;

52:12–20.

28. von G

ALL

C, S

TEHLE

JH, W

EAVER

DR. Mammalian melatonin

receptors: molecular biology and signal transduction. Cell
Tissue Res 2002;

309:151–162.

29. W

INCZYK

K, P

AWLIKOWSKI

M, K

ARASEK

M. Melatonin and

RZR/ROR receptor ligand CGP 52608 induce apoptosis in
the murine colonic cancer. J Pineal Res 2001;

31:179–182.

30. H

ARDELAND

R. Melatonin: signaling mechanisms of a pleio-

tropic agent. BioFactors 2009;

35:183–192.

31. L

OPEZ

A, G

ARCIA

JA, E

SCAMES

G et al. Melatonin protects

the mitochondria from oxidative damage reducing oxygen
consumption, membrane potential, and superoxide anion pro-
duction. J Pineal Res 2009;

46:188–198.

32. R

EDDI

AH. Role of morphogenetic proteins in skeletal tissue

engineering and regeneration. Nat Biotechnol 1998;

16:

247

–252.

69

Melatonin enhances chondrogenic differentiation

33. W

OZNEY

JM. Overview of bone morphogenetic proteins.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2002;

27:S2–S8.

34. M

AJUMDAR

MK, W

ANG

E, M

ORRIS

EA. BMP-2 and BMP-9

promotes chondrogenic differentiation of human multipoten-
tial mesenchymal cells and overcomes the inhibitory effect of
IL-1. J Cell Physiol 2001;

189:275–284.

35. S

EKIYA

I, L

ARSON

BL, V

UORISTO

JT et al. Comparison of

effect of BMP-2, -4, and -6 on in vitro cartilage formation of
human adult stem cells from bone marrow stroma. Cell Tis-
sue Res 2005;

320:269–276.

36. S

HEN

B, W

EI

A, T

AO

H et al. BMP-2 enhances TGF-beta3-

mediated chondrogenic differentiation of human bone mar-
row multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in alginate bead
culture. Tissue Eng Part A 2009;

15:1311–1320.

37. S

TEINERT

AF, P

ROFFEN

B, K

UNZ

M et al. Hypertrophy is

induced during the in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of
human mesenchymal stem cells by bone morphogenetic pro-
tein-2 and bone morphogenetic protein-4 gene transfer.
Arthritis Res Ther 2009;

11:R148.

38. C

ARON

MM, E

MANS

PJ, C

REMERS

A et al. Hypertrophic dif-

ferentiation during chondrogenic differentiation of progenitor

cells is stimulated by BMP-2 but suppressed by BMP-7.
Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2013;

21:604–613.

39. P

ARK

KH, K

ANG

JW, L

EE

EM et al. Melatonin promotes

osteoblastic

differentiation

through

the

BMP/ERK/Wnt

signaling pathways. J Pineal Res 2011;

51:187–194.

40. G

HOSH

-C

HOUDHURY

N, M

ANDAL

CC, C

HOUDHURY

GG.

Statin-induced Ras activation integrates the phosphatidylino-
sitol 3-kinase signal to Akt and MAPK for bone morphoge-
netic protein-2 expression in osteoblast differentiation. J Biol
Chem 2007;

282:4983–4993.

41. C

AO

X, C

HEN

D. The BMP signaling and in vivo bone forma-

tion. Gene 2005;

357:1–8.

42. R

ETTING

KN, S

ONG

B, Y

OON

BS et al. BMP canonical

Smad signaling through Smad1 and Smad5 is required for
endochondral bone formation. Development 2009;

136:1093–

1104.

43. H

ELLINGMAN

CA, D

AVIDSON

EN, K

OEVOET

W et al. Smad

signaling determines chondrogenic differentiation of bone-
marrow-derived

mesenchymal

stem

cells:

inhibition

of

Smad1/5/8P prevents terminal differentiation and calcifica-
tion. Tissue Eng Part A 2011;

17:1157–1167.

70

Gao et al.