2

Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology

Volume 2002, Number 2

G. Olivieri

, U. Otten

,

F. Meier

, G. Baysang

,

B. Dimitriades-Schmutz

,

F. Mu

¨ ller-Spahn

, and

E. Savaskan

From

Neurobiology Laboratory,

Psychiatric University Hospital, Basel,
Switzerland, and

Department of

Physiology, University ofBasel,
Switzerland.

Oxidative Stress Modulates Tyrosine
Kinase Receptor A and p75 Receptor
(Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor
Receptor) Expression in SHSY5Y
Neuroblastoma Cells

The interaction of neurotrophins and

their tyrosine kinase receptors (trks) is
essential for differentiation and survival
of brain cells. In Alzheimer’s disease
(AD), the number of neurotrophins and
receptors is markedly decreased. The
cause of this reduction is unclear, but
the role of b-amyloid (Ab) seems central
in understandingthe mechanisms con-
trollingneurotrophin and trk expression.
In the study reported here, we exposed
SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells to Ab or
hydrogen peroxide (H

2

O

2

) and measured

the expression of trk-A and p75 at the
protein and molecular levels. Both Ab
and H

2

O

2

induced oxidative stress (mea-

sured by a decrease in cellular glutathi-
one), which decreased trk-A levels and
increased p75 levels, decreased mes-
senger RNA (mRNA) levels of both re-
ceptors, and increased nerve growth
factor (NGF) secretion. Pretreatment of
cells with the antioxidant melatonin re-
turned levels of protein expression,
mRNA, and NGF secretion to normal.
These results are significant, as they
can help in the planningand implemen-
tation of AD treatment strategies involv-
ingneurotrophins.

Keywords: tyrosine kinase receptor A
(trk-A), p75, b-amyloid (Ab), melatonin,
Alzheimer’s disease (AD), oxidative
stress, SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells

Address correspondence and reprint requests
to G. Olivieri, Neurobiology Laboratory,
Psychiatric University Hospital, CH-4025
Basel, Switzerland(e-mail: gianfranco
.olivieri@pukbasel.ch).

䉷 2002 American Academy of Clinical
Neurophysiology

Several authors have suggestedthat Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology
involves deficits in neurotrophin expression and/or tyrosine kinase re-
ceptor (trk) expression (Appel, 1981; Lucidi-Phillipi and Gage, 1993;
Rylett andWilliams, 1994; Connor et al, 1996; Savaskan et al, 2000).
Recently, Mufson et al (1995) proposedthat neurodegeneration associ-
ated with AD may be due to impaired retrograde transport of nerve
growth factor (NGF), which is caused by deficits in the production
and/or use of the neurotrophin receptor trk-A. Hock et al (1998) found
that trk-A expression in the cholinergic regions of brains with AD is sig-
nificantly reducedcomparedwith that of age-matchedcontrol brains.
Interestingly, p75 is up-regulatedin cholinergic neurons of the nucleus
basalis of Meynert in patients with AD (Ernfors et al, 1990; Mufson and
Kordower, 1992). Coupled to the loss of trophic support in neurodegen-
eration is the involvement of neurotrophin–trk interactions in oxidative
stress. NGF treatment reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesis
in neuronal cell cultures by activating the mitogen-activatedprotein ki-
nase pathway (Dugan et al, 1997) andincreases the activity of oxygen
free-radical scavengers (eg, glutathione peroxidase, catalase) in rats
(Goss et al, 1997). NGF pretreatment further protects PC12 cells from
oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H

2

O

2

) by increasing lev-

els of cellular glutathione (GSH) andby increasing the activity of c-glu-
tamylcysteine synthetase, a rate-limiting enzyme for GSH synthesis (Pan
andPerez-Polo, 1993; Satoh et al, 1999).

b-Amyloid(Ab), characteristically foundin the plaques of brains with

AD, is derivedfrom the cleavage of amyloidprecursor protein (Selkoe
1994). Ab destabilizes neurons and leads to cell death through induction
of oxidative stress (Pacifici and Davies, 1991; del Rio et al, 1992; Benzi
andMoretti, 1995; Martin et al, 1996). Oxidative stress, in turn, seems
to mediate Ab toxicity by producing free radicals and elevating cellular
H

2

O

2

(Behl et al, 1994; Butterfieldet al, 1994; Hensley et al, 1994; Behl,

1997). Ab interacts with trks. Yaar et al (1997) foundthat Ab specifi-
cally binds to p75 receptors in rat cortical neurons and in NIH3T3 cells
engineeredto stably express p75 receptors; similarly, Kuner et al (1998)
foundthat human neuroblastoma cell lines exposedto Ab enter apop-
totic cell death through a mechanism involving both direct binding of
Ab to p75 receptor andactivation of nuclear factor–jB (NF-jB). In both
studies, NGF administration prevented the induction of apoptosis, pre-
sumably by NGF–Ab competition for the trk (Rabizadeh et al, 1994;
Yaar et al, 1997; Kuner et al, 1998). Molecules that function as antioxi-
dants (Reiter, 1995) or that promote cellular antioxidant enzyme activ-
ity (Liu andNg, 2000)—melatonin, for example—are neuroprotective

Olivieri et al.

3

Volume 2002, Number 2

against Ab toxicity (Pappolla et al, 2000). Interest-
ingly, melatonin levels are reduced in the brain of pa-
tients with AD (Reiter, 1995).

AD progression is accompaniedby increases in Ab

synthesis andrelease, accumulation of Ab into
plaques, induction of oxidative stress, and decreased
neurotrophic support causedby a decrease in the
number of neurotrophins andreceptors (Kaplan and
Miller, 2000; Pappolla et al, 2000). This course of
events raises the question of the possible influence or
role of oxidative stress in the modulation of trk-A
andp75 expression. The significance of this question
lies in the central role of neurotrophins andtheir re-
ceptors in the maintenance andsurvival of neuronal
cells in the brain. In the study reported here, we in-
vestigated the effects of oxidative stress, induced by
Ab or H

2

O

2

, on the expression of trk-A andp75. We

also investigatedthe neuroprotective influences of
the pineal hormone melatonin.

Materials and Methods

Cell Culture

SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells were grown in complete
minimum essential medium (MEM) in a humidified
air/5% carbon dioxide chamber at 37

⬚C. Sixteen

hours before treatment, cells were washedfree of
medium containing fetal calf serum (FCS) and fur-
ther incubatedin FCS-free MEM containing neuro-
blastoma growth supplement N2. All cell culture re-
agents were from Gibco (Life Technologies, Paisley,
UK), andplastic ware was from Nunc (Roskilde, Den-
mark).

GSH Assay

Cellular GSH was measuredaccording to manufac-
turer instructions (ApoAlert GSH Detection Kit; Clon-
tech, Palo Alto, Calif), except that FCS-free medium,
containing either 1 lM of Ab1–42 or 50 lM of H

2

O

2

in the presence or absence of 12-hour preincubation
with 1 lM of melatonin, was added to the cells for 24
hours. All GSH assays were performedin quadrupli-
cate.

MTT Reduction Assay

SHSY5Y cells were seeded into 96 well culture-plates
andwere allowedto attach. FCS-free medium, con-
taining either 1 lM of Ab1–42 or 50 lM of H

2

O

2

in

the presence or absence of 12-hour preincubation
with 1 lM of melatonin, was added to the cells for 24
hours. MTT, 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-
diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (Sigma, St. Louis, Mo),
was added to all wells and was allowed to incubate in
the dark at 37

⬚C for 5 hours; cells were lysed, and

590-nm spectrophotometric measurement was per-

formedon a Labsystems Multiskan RC plate reader
using Genesis software (Labsystems, Helsinki, Fin-
land). All MTT assays were performed in triplicate.

NGF ELISA

Cell-culture supernatant levels of NGF were mea-
suredwith enzyme-linkedimmunosorbent assay
(ELISA) using monoclonal anti-b (2.5S, 7s) NGF anti-
bodies (clone 27/21; Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim,
Germany) according to Weskamp and Otten (1987).
The detection limit was 0.5 pg/mL; cross-reactivity
with other neurotrophins at 10 ng/mL was less than
2%, andthe ELISA was linear over a range of 0.5 to
500 pg/mL. All NGF ELISA assays were performedin
triplicate.

Western Analysis of Cell Membranes

SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cell membranes were isolated
according to Walter et al (1987) with some modifica-
tions. Briefly, cells were washedfree of culture me-
dium, scraped off culture flasks in homogenizing buf-
fer (10 mM of tris-HCI, pH 7.4, containing 1.5 mM of
CaCl

2

, 1 mM of spermidine, and protease inhibitors),

transferredto Eppendorf tubes, andsonicatedfor 20
seconds. Homogenates were centrifuged at 1000for
5 minutes to pellet, large-particulate matter. The re-
sultant supernatant was carefully placedin a bilayer
of 5% sucrose on top, 50% sucrose in homogeniza-
tion buffer. After centrifugation in a Sorvall RC 28S
(Newtown, Conn) at 40,000for 30 minutes, the tur-
bidlayer containing the membranes, at the boundary
between the 5%- and50%-sucrose layers, was re-
tained. All procedures were performed at 4

⬚C. Protein

concentration was normalized with Bradford’s pro-
tein assay and12 lg of total protein loaded onto
7.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide
gels (Laemmli, 1970; Baek et al, 1996). After separa-
tion, the proteins were transferredto nitrocellulose
membranes, blockedovernight, andprobedwith N-
terminal–recognizing anti–trk-A receptor antibodies
(Upstate Biotech, Lake Placid, NY) and anti-p75 (NGF
receptor [clone NGFR5]; NeoMarkers, Fremont, Ca-
lif). Secondary peroxidase POD labeled antibodies
(antirabbit POD, antimouse POD; Roche Diagnostics,
Mannheim, Germany) directed against the primary
antibodies andthen exposedto SuperSignal chemilu-
minescent substrate (Pierce, Rockford, Ill) allowed vi-
sualization of the bands. Images of the bands were
digitally captured using the Eagle Eye II still video
system (Stratagene, La Jolla, Calif) andwere ana-
lyzedusing ImageMaster software (Pharmacia Bio-
tech, Uppsala, Sweden). The results represent the
mean

Ⳳ SEM of 3 independent experiments and are

presentedas percent of the zero value.

4

Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology

Volume 2002, Number 2

Table 1 Cell Cytotoxicity (MTT Assay) and Oxidative Stress
(GSH Assay) in SHSY5Y Cells*

MTT (Absorbance at

590 nm)

Cellular GSH

(% of Control)

Control

0.39

Ⳳ0.02

100

Melatonin

0.38

Ⳳ0.08

93

Ⳳ5

Ab1–42

0.17

Ⳳ0.04

70

Ⳳ12

0.40

Ⳳ0.06

94

Ⳳ7

H

2

O

2

0.21

Ⳳ0.06

40

Ⳳ12

0.37

Ⳳ0.09

89

Ⳳ9

*MTT indicates 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium
bromide (Sigma, St. Louis, Mo); GSH, glutathione; Ab1–42, b-amyloid;
andH

2

O

2

, hydrogen peroxide. The table shows the effects of 1 lM of

Ab1–42 or 50 lM of H

2

O

2

after 24-hour exposure in the presence (

Ⳮ)

or absence (–) of 12-hour preincubation with 1 lM of melatonin.
Results are the mean

ⳲSEM of 9 observations (triplicate independent

assays) for the MTT assay andof 13 observations (quadruplicate
independent assays) for the GSH assay.

Significant difference (P

.005) from the control andmelatonin groups (Kruskal-Wallis test,
Dunn multiple-comparisons test).

RNA Extraction and RT-PCR

Total RNA was extractedfrom equivalent numbers of
cells andwas treatedas was done in the MTT and
GSH assays but using the RNeasy protocol (Qiagen,
Valencia, Calif). One microgram of total RNA
(

⬃3⳯10

5

cells) was usedfor reverse transcription

(RT) with oligodeoxythymidine primers and Ready-
to-Go You-Prime First-StrandBeads (Amersham
Pharmacia Biotech Inc, Piscataway, NJ). Primers spe-
cific for trk-A (sense, 5

⬘-CCATCGTGAAGAGTGGTCTC-

3

⬘; antisense, 5⬘-GGTGACATTGGCCAGGGTCA-3⬘)

andp75 (sense, 5

⬘-AGCCAACCAGACCGTGTGTG-3⬘;

antisense, 5

⬘-TTGCAGCTGTTCCACCTCTT-3⬘) were

usedfor polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifica-
tion. The internal control gene glyceraldehyde-6-
phosphate dehydrogenase (sense, 5

⬘-G-

GTGAAGGTCGGAGTCAACGG-3

⬘; antisense,

5

⬘-GGTCATGAGTCCTTCCACGAT-3⬘) was usedto

normalize for the amount of RNA in the initial re-
verse transcriptase reaction. Controls using RNA
without RT or controls without RNA were usedto
demonstrate absence of contaminating DNA. Condi-
tions used(initial denaturation, 95

⬚C, 4 minutes; de-

naturation, 95

⬚C, 30 seconds; annealing, 55⬚C, 30

seconds; extension, 72

⬚C, 60 seconds; final extension,

72

⬚C, 7 minutes; 40 cycles) were chosen to allow the

PCR to proceedin a linear range according to the
FastStart protocol (Roche Biochemicals, Mannheim,
Germany).

PCR products were separated on 1.4% agarose gels

containing ethidium bromide, were recorded using
the Eagle Eye II still video system (Stratagene, La
Jolla, Calif), andwere quantitatedusing ImageMaster
software (Pharmacia Biotech, Uppsala, Sweden). The
amount of trk-A messenger RNA (mRNA) or p75
mRNA over the assay periodis expressedas a percent
of the mRNA from the zero time point.

NGF Blocking Assay

To exclude and neutralize the influence of endoge-
nously secretedNGF within the cell culture, 1 lg/mL
of anti-NGF b-antibodies (clone 25623.1; Sigma, St.
Louis, Mo) was added. The specificity of the antibody
for this purpose was demonstrated by Kitamura et al
(1989). trk-A andp75 were then assayedfor as was
done using the Western analysis protocol.

Statistical Analysis

Statistical analysis was performedusing the Kruskal-
Wallis test andthe Dunn multiple-comparisons test.
Statistical significance was assumedat P

⬍ .05.

Results

Over 24 hours, 1 lM of Ab and50 lM of H

2

O

2

both

induced significant cell cytotoxicity and oxidative
stress, as measuredby decreasedMTT metabolism

anddecreasedcellular GSH levels, respectively (Table
1). Twelve-hour preincubation of cells with 1 lM of
melatonin preventedthe deleterious effects of both
Ab andH

2

O

2

(Table 1).

Western analysis of cell membranes following ex-

posure to Ab showeda significant loss of trk-A
(Fig. 1A) andan increase of p75 (Fig. 1C) at the cell
surface over time. Pretreatment of cells with melato-
nin restoredp75 (Fig. 1D) to control levels andpar-
tially restoredtrk-A (Fig. 1B) to control levels. H

2

O

2

treatment of cells produced similar results to those
observedwith Ab namely, significantly reduced trk-A
levels (Fig. 1A) andsignificantly increasedp75 levels,
over time (Fig. 1C), which was reversedby melato-
nin pretreatment (Figs. 1B, 1D).

To exclude the effects of endogenous NGF, cells

were exposedfirst to antibodies that specifically bind
andinactivate NGF andthen to the stress agent Ab
or H

2

O

2

. Western analysis showedthat, compared

with the results in untreatedcontrol cells, anti-NGF
antibodies alone affected trk-A only slightly (Fig. 2A)
anddidnot alter p75 (Fig. 2C) in cell membranes.
The presence of blocking antibody and melatonin did
not affect receptor levels (Fig. 2). With NGF blocking
in effect, both Ab andH

2

O

2

decreased trk-A in the

cell membrane (Fig. 2A); this result is similar to that
foundin experiments without NGF blocking in effect
(Fig. 1A). In both Ab- andH

2

O

2

-stressedcells, mela-

tonin pretreatment restoredtrk-A to control levels
(Fig. 2B); this change was significant. Comparedwith
control cells, H

2

O

2

-stressedcells treatedwith NGF

blocking showeda significant increase in p75

Olivieri et al.

5

Volume 2002, Number 2

Figure 1 Time course of the effect of 50 lM of hydrogen peroxide (H

2

O

2

) or 1 lM of b-amyloid (Ab) on tyrosine kinase receptor A (trk-A) and

p75 expression at the cell surface in SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells in the presence or absence of 12-hour preincubation with 1 lM of melatonin.
(A) Compared with untreated control cells, cells exposed to H

2

O

2

or Ab showed a significant (P

⬍ .001) decrease in trk-A over the entire

experimental period. Melatonin alone did not alter trk-A expression. (B) Melatonin pretreatment significantly reduced Ab- and H

2

O

2

-induced

decreases in trk-A in study cells compared with control cells, with the exception of 8 to 12 hours (P

⬍ .005) for Ab-stressed cells. (C) Compared

with untreated control cells, cells exposed to H

2

O

2

or Ab showed a significant (P

⬍ .005) increase in p75 over the entire experimental period.

Melatonin alone did not alter p75 expression. (D) Melatonin pretreatment restored Ab- and H

2

O

2

-induced increases in p75 to control levels; this

change was significant. Results represent the mean

Ⳳ SEM of 9 observations (triplicate independent experiments).

(Fig. 2C); this increase was eliminatedwith melato-
nin pretreatment, which restoredp75 to control lev-
els (Fig. 2D).

NGF levels in the culture medium of SHSY5Y cells

exposedto Ab or H

2

O

2

were assayedby ELISA. Over

time, Ab markedly increased the release of NGF from
the neuroblastoma cells comparedwith the untreated
control cells (Fig. 3A). Melatonin treatment andH

2

O

2

exposure produced a slight decrease in the release of
NGF, but this change was not significantly different
from what occurredin control cells (Fig. 3A). Melato-
nin pretreatment strongly attenuatedthe Ab-induced
increase in NGF to levels similar to those obtained
with melatonin alone (Fig. 3B). Similarly, NGF levels
in cells pretreatedwith melatonin andthen exposed
to H

2

O

2

were also below control levels at 24 and48

hours (Fig. 3B). ELISAs for cells treatedwith the
NGF-blocking antibody could not be performed, as
the antibody interferes with ELISAs. Immunoprecipi-
tation studies of culture medium with the blocking
antibody verified NGF secretion into the culture me-
dium and its capture by this antibody (data not
shown).

trk-A mRNA andp75 mRNA were also affectedby

the stress agents usedin this study. Ab andH

2

O

2

pro-

gressively decreased trk-A mRNA over the entire ex-
perimental period(Fig. 4A) andsignificantly de-
creasedp75 mRNA after 24 hours of exposure, with
p75 mRNA returning almost to control levels after 48
hours (Fig. 4C). Melatonin pretreatment significantly
protectedcells against Ab- andH

2

O

2

-induced de-

creases in both trk-A mRNA andp75 mRNA, with
levels approaching those of control cells (Figs. 4B,
4D). Melatonin alone did not affect mRNA levels.

Discussion

In this study, both Ab andH

2

O

2

induced significant

cell cytotoxicity andoxidative stress in SHSY5Y cells.
Ab seems to induce toxicity through several mecha-
nisms, including induction of ROS and resultant oxi-
dative stress (Pacifici and Davies, 1991; del Rio et al,
1992; Benzi andMoretti, 1995; Martin et al, 1996),
induction of lipid peroxidation (Behl et al, 1994), ac-
tivation of NF-jB (Behl et al, 1994; Yang et al, 1995),
andAb–p75 interaction leading to apoptosis (Kuner

6

Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology

Volume 2002, Number 2

Figure 2 To exclude the effects of endogenous nerve growth factor (NGF), SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells were exposed to anti-NGF antibodies.
Then, the effect of either 50 lM of hydrogen peroxide (H

2

O

2

) or 1 lM of b-amyloid (Ab) on tyrosine kinase receptor A (trk-A) and p75

expression at the cell surface in the presence or absence of 12-hour preincubation with 1 lM of melatonin was investigated. (A) Treatment with
anti-NGF antibodies did not alter trk-A expression. Compared with untreated control cells, cells exposed to H

2

O

2

or Ab showed a significant (P

⬍ .001) decrease in trk-A from 4 hours of exposure until the end of the assay. Melatonin alone did not alter trk-A expression. (B) Melatonin
pretreatment restored trk-A to control levels. (C) Treatment with anti-NGF antibodies did not alter p75 expression. Compared with all other
groups of cells, cells exposed to H

2

O

2

showed a significant (P

⬍ .001) increase in p75 expression over the entire experimental period.

Melatonin alone did not alter p75 expression. (D) Melatonin pretreatment restored p75 to control levels. Results represent the mean

Ⳳ SEM of

9 observations (triplicate independent experiments).

et al, 1998). Incubation of cells with melatonin was
usedto block the deleterious actions of Ab andH

2

O

2

.

Apparently exerting its neuroprotective effects
through activation of the GSH system, melatonin in-
creases synthesis of GSH-synthesizing enzymes such
as c-glutamylcysteine synthetase (Todoroki et al,
1998; Urata et al, 1999); increases the activity of an-
tioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase,
andGSH reductase (Liu andNg, 2000); inhibits Ab-
inducedlipidperoxidation (Daniels et al, 1998); and
acts as a general antioxidant (Reiter, 1995; Sewery-
nek et al, 1995; Pappolla et al, 2000).

Exposure of cells to Ab andH

2

O

2

produced a

markeddecrease in trk-A andan increase in p75.
Many authors have speculatedthat trk-A is involved
in cell differentiation andsurvival (Kuner andHertel,
1998; Kaplan andMiller, 2000) andthat p75 is in-
volvedin cell apoptosis (Kuner andHertel, 1998;
Kaplan andMiller, 2000). Further, the ratio of recep-

tors relative to each other also seems important in
regulating their cellular effects (Twiss et al, 1998). In
the brain of patients with AD, Hock et al (1998)
founddown-regulation of trk-A, andErnfors et al
(1990) foundup-regulation of p75. A combination of
trk-A decrease and p75 increase could push the cells
into an apoptotic pathway, which seems to be the
case during exposure of cells to toxic Ab andH

2

O

2

. In

addition, Kuner et al (1998) found that Ab can di-
rectly bindp75 andinduce apoptosis through a
mechanism involving NF-jB. As a result, Ab-induced
trk-A decrease and p75 increase, combined with Ab–
p75 binding, could prove fatal to neuronal cells—a
situation not unlike that foundin the brain of pa-
tients with AD.

To ascertain the neuroprotective effects of the pi-

neal indolamine melatonin within the cell culture
system, a specific anti-NGF antibody was added to in-
activate the NGF secretedby the neuroblastoma cells.

Olivieri et al.

7

Volume 2002, Number 2

Figure 3 Time course of the effect of 50 lM of hydrogen peroxide
(H

2

O

2

) or 1 lM of b-amyloid (Ab) on nerve growth factor (NGF) release

from SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells in the presence or absence of 12-
hour preincubation with 1 lM of melatonin. (A) Compared with
untreated control cells, cells exposed to Ab showed a significant (P

.001) increase in NGF release after 12 hours of exposure. Melatonin
pretreatment and H

2

O

2

exposure did not alter NGF release.

(B) Melatonin pretreatment restored the Ab-induced increase in NGF
to control levels; this change was significant. Results represent the
mean

Ⳳ SEM of 9 observations (triplicate independent experiments).

In numerous systems, NGF protects cells from oxida-
tive stress (Dugan et al, 1997), promotes cell differen-
tiation andsurvival (Kaplan andMiller, 2000), and
affects cellular antioxidant enzymes (Goss et al,
1997). Results of the blocking experiments were
similar to those not using the anti-NGF antibodies,
except that, in the blocking experiments, Ab lost its
ability to increase p75 levels. This exception is signifi-
cant, as it suggests NGF involvement in Ab-induced
p75 receptor modulation—a possibility strengthened
by results showing an Ab-induced increase in NGF
release from SHSY5Y cells. trk-A mRNA andp75
mRNA were also decreased in the presence of the
stress agents. The decrease in p75 mRNA is surpris-
ing, as an increase in p75 mRNA was expectedto
take into account the increasedexpression of recep-
tor protein. The result suggests that p75 mobilizes on

the membrane surface from some sort of storage area
or that p75 exposes epitopes that under normal con-
ditions are not available, thus allowing detection of
p75 on the membrane surface. This idea, however, is
purely speculative.

Melatonin pretreatment reversedthe deleterious

effects of both Ab andH

2

O

2

—including returning trk-

A andp75 to control levels, returning mRNA to con-
trol levels, andreturning NGF to normal levels. Mela-
tonin’s mechanism of action remains unclear
however, melatonin has been shown to be a strong
scavanger of free radicals (Reiter, 1995; Sewerynek et
al, 1995; Pappolla et al, 2000), inducer of cellular anti-
oxidant enzymes (Liu and Ng, 2000), and neuropro-
tective against Ab(reducing Ab fibrillogenesis, b-sheet
formation, andAb-induced oxidative stress/ROS)
(Pappolla et al, 1998). In light of these effects, we hy-
pothesize that the primary action of melatonin is that
of blocking trk-A andp75 modulation causedby oxi-
dative stress induced by Ab.

In conclusion, we have foundthat oxidative stress

induced by Ab andH

2

O

2

can modulate trk-A and p75

receptor expression. Further, we have foundthat the
antioxidant melatonin can protect neuroblastoma
cells from these deleterious effects. These results are
particularly important in that they can be usedin de-
signing AD treatment strategies involving NGF. For
example, using only NGF in a cellular environment
similar to one affectedby AD can be deleterious, but
coadministering NGF and melatonin to counteract
the cellular redox imbalance can allow NGF to func-
tion purely as a neuroprotective agent.

Acknowledgments

We thank Drs. Dieter Kunz andPia Mertz, Depart-
ment of Physiology, Basel, Switzerland, for participat-
ing in helpful discussions with us and Remy Longato,
Norvartis Pharma, for help in sequencing andverify-
ing PCR products.

References

Appel SH. A unifying hypothesis for the cause of amyotro-

phic lateral sclerosis, Parkinsonism andAlzheimer’s dis-
ease. Ann Neurol. 1981;10:499–505.

Baek JK, Heaton MB, Walker DW. Up-regulation of high-

affinity neurotrophin receptor, trk B–like protein on
Western blots of rat cortex after chronic ethanol treat-
ment. Brain Res Mol Brain Res. 1996;40:161–164.

Behl C. Amyloid beta-peptide toxicity and oxidative stress

in Alzheimer’s disease. Cell Tissue Res. 1997;290:471–
480.

Behl C, Davis J, Lesley R, Schubert D. Hydrogen peroxide

mediates amyloid b-protein toxicity. Cell. 1994;77:817–
827.

Benzi G, Moretti A. Are reactive oxygen species involvedin

Alzheimer’s disease? Neurobiol Aging. 1995;16:661–674.

8

Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology

Volume 2002, Number 2

Figure 4 Time course of the effect of 50 lM of hydrogen peroxide (H

2

O

2

) or 1 lM of b-amyloid (Ab) on tyrosine kinase receptor A (trk-A)

messenger RNA (mRNA) and p75 mRNA from SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells in the presence or absence of 12-hour preincubation with 1 lM of
melatonin. (A) Compared with untreated control cells, cells exposed to H

2

O

2

or Ab showed a significant (P

⬍ .004) decrease in trk-A mRNA over

the entire experimental period, with the exception of the 12-hour time point for H

2

O

2

. Melatonin alone did not alter trk-A mRNA levels.

(B) Melatonin pretreatment restored Ab- and H

2

O

2

-induced decreases in trk-A mRNA to control levels; this change was significant. (C) Compared

with untreated control cells, cells exposed to H

2

O

2

or Ab showed a significant (P

⬍ .001) decrease in p75 mRNA over the entire experimental

period, with the exception of the 12-hour time point for both. Melatonin alone did not alter p75 mRNA levels. (D) Melatonin pretreatment
restored Ab- and H

2

O

2

-induced decreases in p75 mRNA to control levels; this change was significant. Results represent the mean

Ⳳ SEM of 9

observations (triplicate independent experiments).

ButterfieldDA, Hensley K, Harris M, et al. Beta-amyloid

peptide free radical fragments initiate synaptosomal li-
poperoxidation in a sequence-specific fashion: implica-
tions for Alzheimer’s disease. Biochem Biophys Res Com-
mun
. 1994;200:710–715.

Connor B, Young D, Lawlor P, et al. Trk receptor alterations

in Alzheimer’s disease. Brain Res Mol Brain Res.
1996;42:1–17.

Daniels WM, van Rensburg SJ, van Zyl JM, TaljaardJJ.

Melatonin prevents beta-amyloidinducedlipidperoxi-
dation. J Pineal Res. 1998;24:78–82.

del Rio LA, Sandalio, LM, Palma JM, et al. Metabolism of

oxygen radicals in peroxisomes and cellular implica-
tions. Free Radical Biol Med. 1992;13:557–580.

Dugan LL, Creedon DJ, Johnson EM Jr, Holtzman DM.

Rapidsuppression of free radical formation by nerve
growth factor involves the mitogen-activatedprotein ki-
nase pathway. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1997;94:4086–
4091.

Ernfors P, Lindefors N, Chan-Palay V, Persson H. Choliner-

gic neurons of the nucleus basalis express elevatedlevels
of nerve growth factor receptor mRNA in senile demen-
tia of the Alzheimer type. Dementia. 1990;1:138–145.

Goss JR, Taffe KM, Kochanek PM, DeKosky ST. The antiox-

idant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and catalase in-
crease following traumatic brain injury in the rat. Exp
Neurol
. 1997;146:291–294.

Hensley K, Carney JM, Mattson MP, et al. A model for

beta-amyloidaggregation andneurotoxicity basedon
free radical generation by the peptide: relevance to Alz-
heimer’s disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1994;91:3270–
3274.

Hock C, Heese K, Mu¨ller-Spahn F, et al. DecreasedTrk A

neurotrophin receptor expression in the parietal cortex
of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Neurosci Lett.
1998;241:151–154.

Kaplan DR, Miller FD. Neurotrophin signal transduction in

the nervous system. Curr Opin Neurobiol. 2000;10:381–
391.

Olivieri et al.

9

Volume 2002, Number 2

Kitamura T, Tange T, Terasawa T, et al. Establishment and

characterization of a unique human cell line that prolif-
erates dependently on GM-CSF, IL-3 or erythropoietin. J
Cell Physiol
. 1989;140:323–334.

Kuner P, Hertel C. NGF induces apoptosis in a human neu-

roblastoma cell line expressing the neurotrophin recep-
tor p75

NTR

J Neurosci Res. 1998;54:465–474.

Kuner P, Schubenel R, Hertel C. Beta-amyloidbinds to

p75NTR andactivates NfkappaB in human neuroblas-
toma cells. J Neurosci Res. 1998;54:798–804.

Laemmli UK. Cleavage of structural proteins during the as-

sembly of the headof bacteriophage T4. Nature.
1970;227:680–685.

Liu F, Ng TB. Effect of pineal indoles on activities of the an-

tioxidant defense enzymes superoxide dismutase, cata-
lase, andglutathione reductase, andlevels of reduced
andoxidizedglutathione in rat tissues. Biochem Cell Biol.
2000;78:447–453.

Lucidi-Phillipi CA, Gage FH. The neurotrophin hypothesis

andthe cholinergic basal forebrain projection. Prog Brain
Res
. 1993;98:241–249.

Martin GM, AustadSN, Johnson TE. Genetic analysis of ag-

ing: role of oxidative and environmental stresses. Nat
Genetics
. 1996;13:25–34.

Mufson EJ, Conner JM, Kordower JH. Nerve growth factor

in Alzheimer’s disease: defective retrograde transport to
nucleas basalis. NeuroReport. 1995;6:1063–1066.

Mufson EJ, Kordower JH. Cortical neurons express nerve

growth factors in advanced age and Alzheimer’s disease.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1992;89:569–573.

Pacifici RE, Davies KJA. Protein, lipidandDNA repair sys-

tems in oxidative stress: the free-radical theory of aging
revisited. Gerontology. 1991;37:166–180.

Pan Z, Perez-Polo R. Role on nerve growth factor in oxi-

dant homeostasis: glutathione metabolism. J Neurochem.
1993;61:1713–1721.

Pappolla MA, Bozner P, Soto C, et al. Inhibition of Alzhei-

mer beta-fibrillogenesis by melatonin. J Biol Chem.
1998;273:7185–7188.

Pappolla MA, Chyan YJ, Poeggeler B, et al. An assessment

of the antioxidant and antiamyloidogenic properties of
melatonin: implications for Alzheimer’s disease. J Neural
Transm
. 2000;107:203–231.

Rabizadeh S, Bitler CM, Butcher LL, Bredesen DE. Expres-

sion of the low affinity nerve growth factor receptor en-
hances beta-amyloidpeptide toxicity. Proc Natl Acad Sci
U S A
. 1994;91:10703–10706.

Reiter R. Oxidative processes and anti-oxidative defense

mechanisms in the aging brain. FASEB J. 1995;9:526–
533.

Rylett RJ, Williams LR. Role of neurotrophins in

cholinergic-neurone function in the adult and aged
CNS. Trends Neurosci. 1994;17:486–490.

Satoh T, Yamagat T, Ishikawa Y, et al. Regulation of the re-

active oxygen species by nerve growth factor but not
Bcl-2 as a novel mechanism of protection of PC12 cells
from superoxide anion–induced death. J Biochem.
1999;125:952–959.

Savaskan E, Mu¨ller-Spahn F, Olivieri G, et al. Alterations in

Trk A, Trk B andTrk C receptor immunoreactivities in
parietal cortex andcerebellum in Alzheimer’s disease.
Eur J Neurol. 2000;44:172–180.

Selkoe DJ. Cell biology of the amyloidbeta-protein precur-

sor andthe mechanism of Alzheimer’s disease. Annu Rev
Cell Biol
. 1994;10:373–403.

Sewerynek E, Melchiorri D, Ortiz GG, et al. Melatonin re-

duces H

2

O

2

induced lipid peroxidation in homogenates

of different rat brain regions. J Pineal Res. 195;19:51–56.

Todoroki S, Yamaguchi M, Cho S, Sumikawa K. Molecular

mechanisms involvedin the antioxidant effect of mela-
tonin. Anesthesiology. 1998;89:204.

Twiss JL, Wada HG, Fok KS, et al. Duration and magnitude

of NGF signaling depend on ratio of p75 LNTR to Trk A.
J Neurosci Res. 1998;51:442–453.

Urata Y, Honma S, Goto S, et al. Melatonin induces

gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase mediated by activa-
tor protein-1 in human vascular endothelial cells. Free
Radical Biol Med
. 1999;27:838–847.

Walter J, Kern-Veits B, Huf J, et al. Recognition of position-

specific properties of tectal cell membranes by retinal
axons in vitroDevelopment. 1987;101:685–696.

Weskamp G, Otten U. An enzyme-linkedimmunoassay for

nerve growth factor: a tool for studying regulatory
mechanisms involvedin NGF production in the brain
andperipheral tissues. J Neurochem. 1987;48:1779–1786.

Yaar M, Zhai S, Pilch PF, et al. Binding of beta-amyloid to

p75 neurotrophin receptor induces apoptosis: a possible
mechanism for Alzheimer’s disease. J Clin Invest.
1997;100:2333–2340.

Yang K, Mu XS, Hayes RL. Increasedcortical nuclear

factor–kappa B (NF–kappa B) DNA binding activity after
traumatic brain injury in rats. Neurosci Lett.
1995;197:101–104.

10

Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology

Volume 2002, Number 2

Editor
Keith H. Chiappa, MD

Associate Editor
Didier Cros, MD

Electronic Mail
chiappa@helix.mgh.harvard.edu

Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology is a peer-reviewedandelectronically
publishedscholarly journal that covers a broadscope of topics encompassing
clinical andbasic topics of human neurology, neurosciences andrelatedfields.

Editorial Board

Robert Ackerman
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

Barry Arnason
University of Chicago

Flint Beal
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

James Bernat
Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center,
New Hampshire

Julien Bogousslavsky
CHU Vaudois, Lausanne

Robert Brown
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

DavidBurke
Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute,
Sydney

DavidCaplan
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

Gegory Cascino
Mayo Clinic, Rochester

Phillip Chance
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
Philadelphia

Thomas Chase
NINDS, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda

DavidCornblath
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore

F. Michael Cutrer
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

DavidDawson
Brockton VA Medical Center, Massachusetts

Paul Delwaide
Hoˆpital de la Citadelle, Liege

John Donoghue
Brown University, Providence

RichardFrith
Auckland Hospital, New Zealand

Myron Ginsberg
University of Miami School of Medicine

Douglas Goodin
University of California, San Francisco

James Grotta
University of Texas Medical School, Houston

James Gusella
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

John Halperin
North Shore University Hospital / Cornell
University Medical College

Stephen Hauser
University of California, San Francisco

E. Tessa Hedley-White
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

Kenneth Heilman
University of Florida, Gainesville

Daniel Hoch
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

FredHochberg
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

John Hoffman
Emory University, Atlanta

Gregory Holmes
Childrn’s Hospital, Boston

Bruce Jenkins
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

Ryuji Kaji
Kyoto University Hospital

Carlos Kase
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston

J. Philip Kistler
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

Jean-Marc Le´ger
La Salpe´trie`re, Paris

Simmons Lessell
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston

RonaldLesser
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore

DavidLevine
New York University Medical Center

Ira Lott
University of California, Irvine

Phillip Low
May Clinic, Rochester

RichardMacdonell
Austin Hospital, Victoria, Australia

Joseph Masdeu
St. Vincent’s Hospital, New York

Kerry R. Mills
Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford

Jose´ Ochoa
Good Samaritan Hospital, Portland

Barry Oken
Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland

John Penney
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

Karlheinz Reiners
Bayerische Julius-Maximilians-Universita¨t,
Wurzburg

Allen Roses
Duke University Medical Center, Durham

Thomas Sabin
Boston City Hospital, Boston

Raman Sankar
University of California at Los Angeles

Joan Santamaria
Hospital Clinic Provincial de Barcelona

Kenneth Tyler
University of Colorado Health Science Center,
Denver

Francois Viallet
CH Aix-en-Provence

Joseph Volpe
Children’s Hospital, Boston

Michael Wall
University of Iowa, Iowa City

Stephen Waxman
Yale University, New Haven

Wigbert Wiederholt
University of California, San Diego

Eelco Wijdicks
Mayo Clinic, Rochester

Clayton Wiley
University of California, San Diego

Anthony Windebank
Mayo Clinic, Rochester

Shirley Wray
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

Anne Young
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

Robert Young
University of California, Irvine