Enhanced Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic
Factor mRNA Expression Upon (

2)-Deprenyl

and Melatonin Treatments

Yu Ping Tang,

1

Yun Li Ma,

1

Chih Chang Chao,

2

Kai Yi Chen,

1

and Eminy H.Y. Lee

1

*

1

Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China

2

Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China

Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)
has been shown to be a preferentially selective neuro-
trophic factor for dopamine (DA) neurons. In the
present study, we have examined the distribution of
GDNF mRNA expression in several major DA-
containing cell body and terminal areas and the
regulation of GDNF mRNA expression upon various
pharmacological treatments. Results indicated that
there is a relatively higher GDNF mRNA level in
neurons of the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamin-
ergic pathways. Upon chronic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-
1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment (30 mg/
kg, i.p., for 7 days), DA level was decreased, whereas
GDNF mRNA expression was increased in the stria-
tum, suggesting that more GDNF is synthesized and
expressed to cope with the neurotoxin insult. Further-
more, among several DA neuron protective and/or
therapeutic agents examined, both intrastriatal injec-
tions of (

2)-deprenyl (1.25 mg and 2.5 mg) and

melatonin (30

mg, 60 mg, and 120 mg) significantly

enhanced GDNF mRNA expression in the striatum,
whereas the same concentrations of (

2)-deprenyl did

not affect monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) activity,
although it increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx)
and/or superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Simi-
larly, the same concentrations of melatonin did not
alter SOD or GPx activities, except that the highest
dose of melatonin (120

mg) increased lipid peroxida-

tion in the striatum. Conversely, GM1 ganglioside
injection (45

mg) lacked of an effect on GDNF mRNA

expression. Together, these results suggest that both
(

2)-deprenyl and melatonin up-regulate GDNF gene

expression at threshold doses lower than that needed
for altering MAOB activity and/or the antioxidant
enzyme systems, respectively. These results provide
new information on the neuroprotective and therapeu-
tic mechanisms of (

2)-deprenyl and melatonin on DA

neurons. J. Neurosci. Res. 53:593–604, 1998.

r

1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Key words: glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor;
1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine; (

2)-

deprenyl; GM1 ganglioside; melatonin; gene expres-
sion; striatum

INTRODUCTION

Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)

is a growth factor that belongs to the transforming growth
factor- superfamily, which shows preferential selectivity
to dopamine (DA) neurons in the brain (Lin et al., 1993,
1994). Both in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that
GDNF supports the survival of DA neurons and protects
DA neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahy-
dropyridine (MPTP) and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)
toxicity (Kearns and Gash, 1995; Hou et al., 1996; Shults
et al., 1996). When genetically engineered cells that
contain GDNF are transplanted into 6-OHDA-lesioned
rat brain, they survive and interact with tyrosine hydroxy-
lase-positive neuronal fibers (Lindner et al., 1995). Fur-
thermore, when GDNF is administered after MPTP
administration, it restores DA levels and fiber densities in
mice (Tomac et al., 1995a) and recovers dopaminergic
function in monkeys (Gash et al., 1996). Although
regional distribution studies have revealed the presence
of GDNF mRNA throughout the central nervous system
(Springer et al., 1994; Choi-Lundberg and Bohn, 1995),
the relative distribution of GDNF mRNA in different
DA-containing neurons in the brain is not known. The
first part of the present study examined this distribution.

R(

2)-deprenyl is known as a monoamine oxidase B

(MAOB) inhibitor that binds to MAOB and irreversibly
inhibits the enzyme (Youdim, 1978; Heinonen and Lam-
mintausta, 1991), which consequently accumulates DA in

Contract grant sponsor: National Science Council of Taiwan, Republic
of China; Contract grant number: NSC 86–2314-B-001–006-M35;
Contract grant number: NSC 87–2314-B-001–017-M35.

*Correspondence to: Dr. Eminy H.Y. Lee, Ph.D., Institute of Biomedi-
cal Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, Republic of China.
E-mail: eminy@mail.ibms.sinica.edu.tw

Received 16 January 1998; Revised 27 April 1998; Accepted 1 May
1998

Journal of Neuroscience Research 53:593–604 (1998)

r

1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

neuronal tissues. Clinical trials have demonstrated that
(

2)-deprenyl delays the need for levodopa treatment in

Parkinson’s disease (Parkinson Study Group, 1993a,b).
Animal studies with (

2)-deprenyl have also shown that

pretreatment with (

2)-deprenyl protects DA neurons

against the toxicity of MPTP. When it is administered
after MPTP treatment, it also has a satisfactory therapeu-
tic effect (Lee et al., 1994). More recently, in addition to
its action as an MAOB inhibitor, deprenyl was found to
suppress the hydroxyl radical formation and to exert
antioxidant action in rescuing DA neurons (Wu et al.,
1996; Thomas et al., 1997). Similarly, melatonin was
suggested to be a free-radical scavenger and an antioxi-
dant (for reviews, see Reiter 1995, 1996). Recent research
indicates that prior administration of melatonin sup-
presses the increase in lipid peroxidation (LP) caused by
MPTP and prevents MPTP-induced decrease in tyrosine
hydroxylase immunoreactivity (Acuna-Castroviejo et al.,
1997). On the other hand, glycosphingolipids are impor-
tant constituents of vertebrate cell membrane and have
been proposed to play a critical role in central nervous
system growth and function (Ledeen, 1985). The monosia-
loganglioside GM1 is one of glycosphingolipids and has
been shown to induce functional recovery upon nerve
injury both behaviorally and neurochemically, particu-
larly within the damaged dopaminergic system (Toffano
et al., 1983; Sabel et al., 1985; Li et al., 1986; Skaper et
al., 1989). With regard to the present study, GM1
ganglioside was found to promote the recovery of surviv-
ing DA neurons and enhanced dopaminergic innervation
in MPTP-treated monkeys (Schneider et al., 1992; Her-
rero et al., 1993). Furthermore, when GM1 ganglioside
was combined with basic fibroblast growth factor or
epidermal growth factor (EGF), it produced a greater
restoration of DA concentration in MPTP-treated mice
(Schneider and DiStefano, 1995).

With the above-described neuron-rescuing and/or

protective actions that have been observed with (

2)-

deprenyl, melatonin, and GM1 ganglioside, whether they
also act through the GDNF signaling pathway is not
known. The aim of the present study was to examine the
effects of these compounds on GDNF mRNA expression
in rat striatum. Meanwhile, their effects on the antioxi-
dant enzyme systems, lipid peroxidation, and/or MAOB
activity were also assayed.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Animals

Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–350 g) that

were bred in the Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Aca-
demia Sinica (Taipei, Taiwan) were used in the present
study. They were maintained on a 12/12 hr light/dark
cycle (light on at 6:30 am) in a temperature-regulated

room (23

6 2°C) with food and water continuously

available.

Drugs

MPTP hydrochloride, deprenyl, and GM1 ganglio-

side were purchased from Research Biochemical, Inc.
(Wayland, MA). Melatonin was purchased from Sigma
(St. Louis, MO). RNA isolation kit was purchased from
Biotecx Laboratories, Inc. (Houston, TX). DNase, RNase
inhibitor (RNasin), dNTP, avian myeloblastosis virus
reverse transcriptase (AMVRT), and Taq polymerase
were purchased from Promega (Madison, WI). Primer
pairs for GDNF mRNA were synthesized by Genosys
Biotechnologies, Inc. (The Woodlands, TX).

Surgery and Drug Administration

For MPTP administration, one injection per day of

MPTP (30 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered to rats continu-
ously for 7 days. Animals were killed on the day 8, and
the brains were removed. The striatal tissue was further
punched out for GDNF mRNA determination, and the
substantia nigra was punched out for DA assay. For other
drug injections, rats were subjected to stereotaxic surgery
under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia (40 mg/kg, i.p.).
Twenty-three-gauge stainless-steel thin-wall cannulae (10
mm long) were implanted bilaterally into the striatum and
affixed on the skull with dental cement. The coordinates
for the striatum are: anteroposterior (AP)

11.0 mm from

Bregma, mediolateral (ML)

62.9 mm from the midline,

and dorsoventral (DV)

2 4.5 mm below the skull surface.

The tooth bar was set at

2 2.4 mm. Approximately 1

week after recovery from the surgery, deprenyl (1.25 µg,
2.5 µg, and 5.0 µg), GM1 ganglioside (45 µg), or
melatonin (30 µg, 60 µg, and 120 µg) was infused directly
into the striatum at a rate of 1.0 µl/min (1.2 µl for each
side). Rats were decapitated 30 min after drug infusion;
their brains were taken out, and the striatal tissue was
dissected out for GDNF mRNA determination.

High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Analysis

Concentration of DA was estimated by high-

performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluores-
cence detection. The chromatographic system used was a
5-µm Ultrasphere ODS reverse-phase column (4.6 mm by
15 cm; Beckman, CA) with a Waters pump (model 501;
Millipore Corp., Bedford, MA) and a Shimadzu RF 530
spectromonitor (Shimadzu, Japan): Excitation and emis-
sion wavelengths were set at 290 nm and 330 nm,
respectively. The flow rate was maintained at 1.2 ml/min,
and the sensitivity of the detector was set at 2 nA/V. The
mobile phase consisted of 1.8 g/liter potassium-phos-
phate monobasic containing 0.66 g/liter of 1-heptanesul-

594

Tang et al.

fonic acid sodium salt, pH 3.28, and 180 ml/liter of
methanol. Output was recorded with a Shimadzu C-RIB
integrator. DA was estimated according to the method of
Peat and Gibb (1983) with some modifications. Briefly,
tissue was weighed while it was still frozen and was
homogenized in six volumes of 0.1 N perchloric acid
containing 4 mM sodium metabisulfite. The homogenate
was then centrifuged at 12,000 for 15 min, and the clear
supernatant (20 µl) was injected directly into the chromato-
graphic system. DA was resolved around 5.2 min.

Quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase
Chain Reaction Analysis

Because of the minute amount of GDNF mRNA

level in the brain, the reverse transcription polymerase
chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was adopted in the
present study. Total RNA was prepared according to the
method of Chomczynski and Sacchi (1987). Briefly,
tissue was homogenized with 1 ml of RNA isolation
reagent. The homogenate was then added with 0.2 ml of
chloroform and centrifuged at 12,000 for 15 min. The
aqueous phase was removed and added with equal
volume of isopropanol. The mixture was then stored on
ice for 10 min and centrifuged again at 12,000 for 15
min. The RNA was precipitated by centrifugation and
washed twice with 75% ethanol. After that, total RNA
was briefly dried under vacuum and then dissolved in
diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC)-treated H

2

O.

To avoid DNA contamination, DNase treatment

was applied. The 20-µl reaction solution contained 0.1
U/µl DNase, 0.2 U/µl RNasin, Taq buffer, and 20 µg total
RNA. This mixture was incubated at 37°C for 30 min and
then extracted by phenol/chloroform (3:1). The aqueous
phase was recovered by centrifugation (12,000 for 15
min) and was added with 1:10 volume of 2.5 mM sodium
acetate, pH 5.01, and 2 volumes of 95% ethanol. The
mixture was then placed in a

2 20°C freezer overnight.

Finally, total RNA was precipitated by centrifugation and
washed with 75% ethanol. It was then dried and dissolved
in DEPC-treated H

2

O and quantified by using a spectro-

photometer (U-2000; Hitachi, Japan) at 260 nm wave-
length.

Variable amounts of total RNA were reverse tran-

scribed by avain myeloblastosis virus reverse transcrip-
tase (AMVRT; 8U) at 42°C with 0.5 µg oligo-dT as the
primer in a 20-µl reaction buffer containing 50 mM
Tris-HCl, pH 8.3; 50 mM KCl; 10 mM MgCl

2

; 10 mM

dithiothreitol; 0.5 mM spermidine; 1 mM dNTPs; and 1
U/µl of RNasin. After 1 hr, the AMVRT was heat
inactivated at 95°C for 5 min. For PCR quantitation, the
endogenously expressed mRNA for hypoxanthine phos-
phoribosyltransferase (HPRT; Jansen et al., 1992) was
used as the internal control, which was coamplified along
with the GDNF mRNA. The RT products were incubated

with 0.4 µM of primer sets and 1 U of Taq polymerase in a
20-µl reaction mixture containing Taq buffer; 1.5 mM
MgCl

2

; 200 µM each of dATP, dTTP, and dGTP; 100 µM

dCTP; and 5 µCi [

35

S] dCTP. To increase the specificity of

PCR amplification, a touch-down program was designed
for the conditions of denaturing (95°C, 2 min), annealing
(three cycles each at 54°C and 51°C in order and then 24
cycles at 48°C, 30 sec), and polymerization (72°C, 1
min). A final 10-min incubation at 72°C was carried out
after these 30 cycles of PCR. Aliquots from PCR reaction
were electrophoresed through an 8% polyacrylamide gel.
The gel was dried and subjected to phosphorimager
analysis (Molecular Dynamics, Eugene, OR). The gel
was then exposed to x-ray film (Eastman Kodak, Roches-
ter, NY). Pilot experiments were performed to determine
the range of PCR cycles in which amplification efficiency
remained constant and to demonstrate that the amount of
amplified PCR product was also directly proportional to
the amount of input RNA.

Primer Pairs for PCR

The oligonucleotide primer pairs for PCR were

designed by using the a computer program from Lowe et
al. (1990). Murine gene sequences for GDNF and HPRT
were obtained from GenBank (Genetic Computer Group).
The primer pairs for GDNF and HPRT were designed to
span introns. The sequences of primer pairs were as
follows: 1) GDNF: 5

8 primer, 58-TGGGATGTCGTGGC-

TGTCTG-3

8; 38 primer, 58-CCTCCTTGGTTTCGTA-

GCCC-3

8; product size, 406 base pairs (bp); 2) HPRT:

5

8 primer, 58-CTCTGTGTGCTGAAGGGGGG-38; 38

primer, 5

8-GGGACGCAGCAACTGACATT-38; product

size, 625 bp.

Measurement of Lipid Peroxidation

Malonaldehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxy-2(E)-non-

enal (4-HNE) which are indices of lipid peroxidation,
were measured by using a colorimetric assay kit (LPO-
586, CALBIOCHEM, San Diego, CA). Brain tissues
were sonicated in an ice bath in 20 volumes (weight/
volume) of 0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.8. The homoge-
nates were centrifuged at (1,000 for 10 min. Aliquots of
the supernatants were reacted with reagents, including
N-methyl-2-phenylindole, methanol, and methanesul-
fonic acid, at 45°C for 40 min. This reaction was stopped
by chilling samples on ice. These samples were then
centrifuged at (12,000 for 5 min. The resulting superna-
tants were measured at 586 nm, and concentrations of
MDA and 4-HNE were calculated from a standard curve
with known amounts of MDA or 4-HNE standards. The
apparent molar extinction coefficient (

e) of the measured

product is equal to the slope of standard curve. Further-
more, the

e values of MDA or 4-HNE are not significantly

different from one another.

(

2)-Deprenyl, Melatonin, and GDNF Gene Expression

595

A

Figure 1.

596

Tang et al.

Measurement of GPx Activity

Selenium-dependent peroxidase activity was mea-

sured by using a coupled enzyme procedure with glutathi-
one reductase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide
phosphate (NADPH; Flohe and Gunzler, 1984). Tissue
homogenates were centrifuged at (12,000 for 15 min.
Aliquots of the supernatants were added with 0.1 M
phosphate buffer, pH 7.8, containing 1 mM NaN

3

, 1 mM

glutathion, 0.2 mM NADPH, and 0.24 U GSH reductase.
Reaction was started by adding 100 (l of 2.5 mM H

2

O

2

(total reaction volume was 1 ml) and was measured at 340
nm for 5 min. Units of enzyme activity were calculated by
using the ( value of 6.22 mM

21

cm

-1

for NADPH. One

unit of GPx activity is defined as 1 (mol NADPH
consumed/min.

Measurement of SOD Activity

SOD activity was assayed according to the method

of Misra and Fridovich (1972). Tissue homogenates were
centrifuged at (1,000 for 10 min. Aliquots of the
supernatants were added with 0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH
7.8, containing 0.2 mM xanthine and 0.3 mM epineph-
rine. Xanthine oxidase was diluted appropriately, so that
an assay mixture without SOD source increased OD
value 0.03 per min at 320 nm. Reaction was started by the
addition of xanthine oxidase (total reaction volume was 1
ml), and absorbance was measured at 320 nm continu-
ously for 3 min. Fifty percent inhibition of epinephrine
oxidation is defined as 1 unit of enzyme activity.

Measurement of MAOB Activity

The activity of MAOB was assayed radioenzymati-

cally, as described by Kindt et al. (1988), with minor
modifications. Briefly, [

14

C] benzylamine was used as the

substrate for MAOB. Enzyme activity was expressed as
nanomole substrate oxidized/hr/mg protein. Blank values
were obtained by adding to the incubating mixture 10 µM
(

2)-deprenyl to inhibit MAOB. The striatal tissue was

sonicated in an ice bath in 10 volume (weight/volume) of
0.3 M ice-cold sucrose containing 10 mM phosphate
buffer, pH 7.4. The homogenate was centrifuged at 1,000
for 10 min. Duplicate aliquots containing 100–200 µg
of protein were incubated with 0.1 mM benzylamine
(containing 0.25 µCi [

14

C] benzylamine, 59 mCi/mmol)

in 0.05 M potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, at a final
volume of 0.5 ml for 10 min at 37°C. The reaction was
terminated by adding 5 ml of toluene:ethylacetate (1:1,
volume/volume) and vortexing for 30 sec. The samples
were centrifuged at (400 for 5 min to separate the
organic and aqueous phases. Then, 3 ml from the organic
layer were removed, added to 5 ml of Beckman Ready
Safe Liquescent (Palo Alto, CA), and analyzed by using
liquid scintillation spectrometry. The protein content in
the brain tissue was determined by the method of
Bradford (1976) using bovine serum albumin as a stan-
dard.

Protein Determination

Protein concentration was determined by using the

method of Bradford (1976) with bovine serum albumin as
standard.

Statistics

The results were analyzed with a Student’s t-test or

with a one-way analysis of variance followed by Dun-
nett’s t-test for comparisons between the experimental
group and a common control group.

RESULTS

Quantitative RT-PCR in Determining GDNF
and HPRT mRNA Levels

The quantitative RT-PCR analyses yielded a linear

relationship between the OD value and the amount of
total RNA ranging from 0.2 µg to 2.0 µg for both primer
sets (Fig. 1A–D). Similarly, there was a linear relation-
ship between the OD value and the PCR cycle number
ranging from 22 to 32. Based on these results, 0.5 µg total
RNA and a PCR cycle number of 30 were used for further
experiments.

Distribution of GDNF mRNA Level in Different
Brain Regions

The preferential, selective effect of GDNF on DA

neurons made us interested in examining the GDNF
mRNA level in different DA-containing areas. Figure 2
shows that statistical analysis revealed an overall signifi-
cant effect in GDNF mRNA regional distribution (F

5

4.30; P

, 0.01). Further analyses indicated that the

GDNF mRNA level is higher in general in neurons along

Fig. 1. Calibration and quantification of glial cell line-derived
neurotrophic factor (GDNF) mRNA for the reverse transcriptase-
polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Total RNA was
isolated from the hippocampus of rat and was reverse-
transcribed and amplified by PCR. A: Representative x-ray film
of reaction using primer pairs of GDNF and hypoxanthine
phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) for coamplification with
different amounts (µg) of total RNA. B: Quantitative results of
A from two independent experiments. Data are mean ( SEM. C:
Representative x-ray film of reaction also with GDNF and
HPRT primer pairs but with different PCR cycle numbers. D:
Quantitative results of C also from two independent experi-
ments. Data are mean ( SEM.

(

2)-Deprenyl, Melatonin, and GDNF Gene Expression

597

the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways.
The order from the most abundant to the least expressed
area is striatum

. ventral tegmental area . nucleus

accumbens

. substantia nigra . hippocampus . hypo-

thalamus.

Effects of Chronic MPTP Injection on GDNF mRNA
Expression

Figure 3A shows the autoradiographic results of

GDNF mRNA expression in the striatum upon chronic
MPTP injection. Figure 3B shows that MPTP signifi-
cantly increased GDNF mRNA level (t

5 2.33; ,

0.05). Meanwhile, MPTP markedly decreased DA concen-
tration in the corresponding cell body area, the substantia
nigra (t

5 1.70; 5 0.05).

Effects of (

2)-Deprenyl, GM1 Ganglioside,

and Melatonin on GDNF mRNA Expression

Figure 4A illustrates the representative autoradio-

graphic results of GDNF mRNA expression in the
striatum upon various doses of (

2)-deprenyl, GM1

ganglioside, and melatonin injections into this area.
Figure 4B shows that statistical analysis indicated an
overall significant effect of drug treatment (F

5 6.27;

P

, 0.01). Further analyses revealed that (2)-deprenyl

both at 1.25 µg and at 2.5 µg significantly increased
GDNF mRNA level in the striatum (tD

5 3.24, , 0.01

and tD

5 3.61, , 0.01, respectively). However,

(

2)-deprenyl at a higher dose (5 µg) was without such an

effect (tD

5 0.27; , 0.05). Similarly, melatonin both at

60 µg and at 120 µg markedly elevated GDNF mRNA
level in the striatum (tD

5 3.78, , 0.01 and tD 5 4.73,

P

, 0.01, respectively). Melatonin at 30 µg was without

such an effect (tD

5 0.68; . 0.05). On the other hand,

GM1 at 45 µg did not affect GDNF mRNA expression in
the striatum (tD

5 1.36; . 0.05).

Effects of (

2)-Deprenyl and Melatonin on SOD, GPx

Activities, Lipid Peroxidation, and/or MAOB Activity
in the Striatum

We have examined the antioxidant enzyme activi-

ties, and lipid peroxidation, and/or MAOB activity upon
various doses of (

2)-deprenyl and melatonin treatments.

Table I shows that separate sets of one-way analysis of
variance revealed that there was not an overall significant
effect of drug treatment on SOD activity (F

5 1.71;

P

. 0.05). Further analyses indicated that (2)-deprenyl

at 5.0 µg markedly elevated SOD activity in the striatum
(tD

5 2.86; , 0.05). On the other hand, there was an

overall significant drug effect on GPx activity (F

5 4.40;

P

, 0.01). Further analyses revealed that this was due to

(

2)-deprenyl treatment, because (2)-deprenyl at 2.5 µg

significantly elevated GPx activity in the striatum (tD

5

4.77; P

, 0.01). Moreover, there was an overall signifi-

cant effect on lipid peroxidation measure (F

5 4.52; ,

0.01). Further comparisons indicated that this was due to
melatonin treatment at 120 µg, because this dose mark-

Fig. 2. Quantitative analyses of GDNF mRNA expression in several dopamine (DA)-
containing cell body and terminal regions. Five independent assays were performed in each
area. Data are expressed as mean

6 SEM. SN, substantia nigra; VTA, ventral tegmental area;

ST, striatum; NAc, nucleus accumbens; Hypo, hypothalamus; Hippo, hippocampus.

598

Tang et al.

edly increased lipid peroxidation in the striatum (tD

5

3.68; P

, 0.01). For MAOB activity measure, no

treatment at any dose affected MAOB activity in the
striatum (F

5 0.97; . 0.05).

DISCUSSION

Results of the present study demonstrated that

GDNF mRNA expression is present in various DA-
containing nuclei and terminal areas in the brain, with the
nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons show-
ing relatively higher distributions. These results are
consistent with many reports that have suggested the role
of GDNF as a selective neurotrophic factor for DA
neurons (Lin et al., 1993, 1994). Furthermore, we have
found that the striatal astrocyte culture expressed little
GDNF mRNA (unpublished observation). This finding is
consistent with the observation that the GDNF mRNA is
expressed mainly in neurons (Pochon et al., 1997). The
regional distribution results also revealed that the ventral
tegmental area expressed more GDNF mRNA than the
substantia nigra. Similar results were found with brain-

derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), another dopaminer-
gic neurotrophic factor in which expression is also higher
in the ventral tegmental area than in the substantia nigra
(approximately 1.7 fold; Hung and Lee, 1996). These
results suggest that DA neurons in the ventral tegmental
area are better protected than DA neurons in the substan-
tia nigra. This suggestion may also explain partially the
differential vulnerability of the nigrostriatal and mesolim-
bic dopaminergic pathways upon MPTP toxicity and in
Parkinson’s disease (Jacobowitz et al., 1984; Schneider et
al., 1987; Hirsch et al., 1988). However, at present, we do
not know the origin of GDNF mRNA in the nondopamin-
ergic neurons. GDNF may be synthesized locally in the
striatum and nucleus accumbens and may be transported
retrogradely to the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental
area to support DA neurons (Tomac et al., 1995b).

We have also found that chronic MPTP injections

decreased DA concentration in the substantia nigra,
whereas it significantly increased GDNF mRNA expres-
sion in the striatum. These results suggest that, upon
dopaminergic damage, more GDNF is synthesized and

A

Fig. 3. Alterations in GDNF mRNA expression in the striatum following subchronic
1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment. The amount of GDNF mRNA
was expressed relative to that of HPRT. A: Representative x-ray film. B: Quantitative results of
A are shown on the left. The right shows a decreased DA level in the substantia nigra upon
MPTP treatment. Data are expressed as mean

6 SEM. Asterisk indicates , 0.05 compared

with the corresponding control group. The number in each column indicates animal number.

(

2)-Deprenyl, Melatonin, and GDNF Gene Expression

599

expressed in the striatum: It is then transported retro-
gradely to the substantia nigra (Tomac et al., 1995b) to
cope with the environmental insult. Similar results were
found with BDNF, in which expression is also enhanced
upon MPTP and MPP

1

treatments (Hung and Lee, 1996).

However, at present, we do not know which signals were
sent to those neurons and/or the to surviving DA neurons
to express more GDNF and BDNF mRNAs upon DA
neuron damage. This awaits clarification.

(

2)-Deprenyl has been reported previously to in-

hibit MAOB activity and to reduce free-radical forma-
tion. Upon neurotoxin insults, such as MPTP, it protects
and rescues the dying DA neurons, possibly through the
mechanisms described above (for review, see Magyar et
al., 1996). However, in the present study, we found that
direct injections of (

2)-deprenyl into the striatum at

concentrations that did not significantly affect MAOB
activity in this area (1.25 µg and 2.5 µg doses) markedly

enhanced GDNF mRNA expression almost twofold.
These results suggest a new pharmacological action of
(

2)-deprenyl in addition to its action as an MAO

inhibitor. Indeed, we have found that the same concentra-
tions of (

2)-deprenyl also increased BDNF mRNA level

in the striatum (unpublished observation). In another
study, Seniuk et al. (1994) reported similarly that (

2)-

deprenyl augmented ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)
gene expression in injured astrocytes. Moreover, Ansari
et al. (1993) reported that (

2)-deprenyl rescued axoto-

mized rat facial motoneurons independent of MAO
inhibition. However, in this study, we also found that the
highest dose of (

2)-deprenyl examined (5 µg) lacked of

an effect on GDNF mRNA expression. The reason for this
is not known yet. It is possible that, at higher concentra-
tions, the pharmacological action of (

2)-deprenyl switches

to other mechanisms. This speculation is supported by the
examination of the effects of (

2)-deprenyl on antioxidant

A

Fig. 4. Alterations in GDNF mRNA expression in the striatum upon (

2)-deprenyl, GM1

ganglioside, and melatonin injections into this area. The amount of GDNF mRNA was
expressed relative to that of HPRT. A: Representative x-ray film. C, control; D, (

2)-deprenyl

2.5 µg; G, GM1 ganglioside 45 µg; M, melatonin 60 µg. B: Quantitative results of A. Data are
expressed as described in Figure 3B. Asterisks indicate P

, 0.01 compared with the control

group.

600

Tang et al.

enzyme systems, because (

2)-deprenyl at 2.5 µg and 5.0

µg, but not 1.25 µg, markedly increased GPx and/or SOD
activity (Table I). These results are consistent with the
finding that chronic (

2)-deprenyl treatment increases

SOD activity (Knoll, 1989; Clow et al., 1991). These
results are also in line with the report that (

2)-deprenyl

reduces hydroxyl radical formation produced by DA
autoxidation (Wu et al., 1996). These results suggest that
(

2)-deprenyl can readily remove the superoxide mol-

ecule in the cell to prevent the possible occurrence of
Fenton reaction. However, this observation is not consis-
tent with that of Carrillo et al. (1991), who reported that
(

2)-deprenyl altered SOD activity but not GPx activity in

rat striatum. At present, we do not have an explanation for
this discrepancy; however, in their study, Carrillo et al.
adopted a chronic injection regimen, whereas we used the
acute injection paradigm. Nonetheless, the present results
demonstrate that, other than functioning as an MAO
inhibitor and a free-radical scavenger, (

2)-deprenyl also

enhanced GDNF mRNA expression to protect DA neu-
rons, and the concentration of (

2)-deprenyl that was

needed to enhance GDNF mRNA expression was lower
than that needed for its antioxidant action and for MAO
inhibition.

Other than its well-known role in reproductive and

circadian physiology, in recent years, melatonin was also
found to act as a free-radical scavenger and an antioxidant
(for reviews, see Reiter et al., 1995; Reiter 1996). In a
cell-free in vitro system, Poeggeler et al. (1994) have
demonstrated that, by adding exogenous melatonin to the
system, it reacts with the hydroxyl radical to form a much
less reactive indolyl cation radical: It therefore reduces
the toxic environment of a cell. Furthermore, Tan et al.
(1993) have reported that melatonin was also able to
inhibit DNA damage caused by the chemical carcinogen

safrole, which is believed to exert its toxicity through
free-radical production in animals. More related to the
present study, melatonin was found to decrease lipid
peroxidation produced by MPTP and to protect DA
neurons against MPTP toxicity, and these effects are
probably due to the antioxidant action of melatonin
(Acuna-Castroviejo et al., 1997). However, in the present
study, we found that direct injections of melatonin into rat
striatum enhanced GDNF mRNA expression in a dose-
dependent manner in this area. Most of these injections
did not affect SOD, GPx, or lipid peroxidation, except
that the highest dose of melatonin (120 µg) increased lipid
peroxidation in the striatum. The mechanism for this
action is not known at present, although it is possible that,
at such a high dose, some nonspecific, physiological
effects may occur that may cause cell damage indirectly.
Together, the above results suggest that melatonin has
multiple protective mechanisms on DA neurons and that
the threshold dose for melatonin to increase GDNF
mRNA expression is lower than that for functioning as a
free radical scavenger. These results also provide new
information on the therapeutic aspect of melatonin for
disorders associated with DA neuron degeneration.

The monosialoganglioside, GM1 ganglioside, was

shown to modulate neuronal differentiation, neuronal
development, and synaptic plasticity (Nagai and Tsuji,
1988). More related to the present study, GM1 ganglio-
side was shown to rescue the injured DA neurons and to
recover the dopaminergic neuronal function in monkeys
(Schneider et al., 1992; Herrero et al., 1993). Further-
more, when GM1 ganglioside was coadministered with
neurotrophic factors, such as BDNF (Fadda et al., 1993)
and EGF (Schneider and DiStefano, 1995), it protected
DA neurons to a greater extent. These results prompted
our interest in examining the effect of GM1 ganglioside

TABLE I. Effects of (

2)-Deprenyl and Melatonin on Superoxide Dismutase and Gluthathione

Peroxidase Activities, Lipid Peroxidation, and Monoamine Oxydase B Activity in Rat Striatum
(n

5–12 in each group)

Treatment

SOD

(U/mg protein)

a

GPx

(U/mg protein)

LP

(nmol/mg protein)

MAOB

(nmol/mg protein/min)

Saline (1.2 µl)

5.29

6 0.61

1.26

6 0.30

1.17

6 0.02

1.55

6 0.07

(

2)-Deprenyl (1.25 µg)

6.16

6 0.15

1.78

6 0.07

0.75

6 0.03

1.34

6 0.12

(

2)-Deprenyl (2.5 µg)

5.40

6 0.20

2.73

6 0.03**

1.13

6 0.03

1.56

6 0.13

(

2)-Deprenyl (5 µg)

6.63

6 1.47*

1.40

6 0.08

1.28

6 0.38

1.35

6 0.16

Melatonin (30 µg)

6.17

6 1.27

1.31

6 0.07

1.63

6 0.14

Melatonin (60 µg)

5.99

6 0.60

1.36

6 1.16

1.22

6 0.08

Melatonin (120 µg)

6.07

6 1.40

1.67

6 0.30

2.06

6 0.92**

a

SOD, superoxide dismutase; GPx, glutathione peroxidase; LP, lipid peroxidase; MAOB, monoamine oxydase B.

Data are expressed as mean

6 SEM. Statistical significance was evaluated by analysis of variance followed by

Dunnett’s t-test. U is defined as one unit of the amount that reduces the absorbance change by 50% per minute in
SOD assay. U is defined as 1 µmole nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidized per minute in GPx
assay.
*P

, 0.05.

**P

, 0.01.

(

2)-Deprenyl, Melatonin, and GDNF Gene Expression

601

on GDNF gene expression, because GDNF shows prefer-
ential selectivity to DA neurons. However, recently, we
have found that direct injection of GM1 ganglioside into
the rat striatum did not affect GDNF mRNA expression,
and it did not alter BDNF mRNA expression either
(unpublished observation). These results suggest that
GM1 ganglioside probably does not act through enhanc-
ing neurotrophic factor gene expression to protect DA
neurons. However, these results do not rule out the
possibility that an interaction between GM1 ganglioside
and neurotrophic factor does occur. For example, GM1
ganglioside may interact with the neurotrophic factor
signaling pathways to potentiate their effects. This expla-
nation is supported by the finding that GM1 ganglioside
increased tyrosine kinase nerve growth factor receptor
autophosphorylation (Ferrari and Greene, 1996). More-
over, in most studies, GM1 treatment has been adminis-
tered as a chronic regimen, whereas, in the present study,
we adopted the acute-injection paradigm. The relatively
long treatment duration that is required for GM1 ganglio-
side to be effective may explain partially the lack of an
effect of GM1 ganglioside on GDNF and BDNF mRNA
expression in the present study. Nevertheless, the cellular
and molecular mechanisms underlying the pharmacologi-
cal actions of GM1 ganglioside need to be elucidated.

In summary, in the present study, we have found

that GDNF mRNA expression is present in the major
DA-containing cell body and terminal areas and, along
with the ventral tegmental area, has a higher expression
level than the substantia nigra. Chronic MPTP treatment
decreased the DA level in the substantia nigra, whereas it
significantly increased GDNF mRNA expression in the
striatum. These results suggest that neurons in the stria-
tum may synthesize and express more GDNF so that the
surviving DA neurons can cope with the environmental
insult. Investigations of the dopaminergic protective
agents indicate that intrastriatal injections of (

2)-

deprenyl and melatonin both significantly up-regulated
GDNF mRNA expression, whereas GM1 ganglioside was
without such an effect. Furthermore, at the effective
concentrations in enhancing GDNF expression, (

2)-

deprenyl did not alter MAOB activity but increased GPx
and/or SOD activity at higher doses. Similarly, at the
effective doses of melatonin for enhancing GDNF expres-
sion, it did not alter SOD and GPx activities or lipid
peroxidation, except at the highest dose examined. These
results suggest a new protective mechanism of (

2)-

deprenyl and melatonin other than their roles as MAO
inhibitors and/or antioxidants. In addition to the neuropro-
tective action of GDNF on DA neurons, accumulative
evidence has further implicated the therapeutic potential
for GDNF in treating disorders associated with DA
neuron dysfunction, such as Parkinson’s disease (for
reviews, see Lapchak et al., 1996, 1997). Although the

GDNF-RET receptor signaling pathway has been re-
ported (Mason, 1996), and there is evidence indicating
that concurrent activation of the cAMP-dependent signal-
ing pathway is needed for GDNF to manifest its function
(Engele and Franke, 1996), the exact cellular and molecu-
lar mechanisms underlying the pharmacological actions
of GDNF are not well known yet. Further investigations
are ongoing in this laboratory to elucidate these mecha-
nisms.

REFERENCES

Acuna-Castroviejo D, Coto-Montes A, Gaia-Monti M, Ortiz GG,

Reiter RJ (1997): Melatonin is protective against MPTP-
induced striatal and hippocampus lesions. Life Sci 60:23–29.

Ansari KS, Yu PH, Kruck TP, Tatton WG (1993): Rescue of axoto-

mized immature rat facial motoneurons by R(

2)-deprenyl:

Stereospecificity and independence from monoamine oxidase
inhibition. J Neurosci 13:4042–4053.

Bradford MM (1976): Rapid and sensitive method for the quantifica-

tion of microgram quantities of protein utilizing the principle of
protein-dye binding. Anal Biochem 72:248–254.

Carrillo MC, Kanai S, Nokubo M, Kitani K (1991): (

2)-Deprenyl

induces activities of both superoxide dismutase and catalase but
not of glutathione peroxidase in the striatum of young male rats.
Life Sci 48:517–517.

Choi-Lundberg DL, Bohn MC (1995): Ontogency and distribution of

glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) mRNA in rat.
Dev Brain Res 85:80–88.

Chomczynski P, Sacchi N (1987): Single-step method of RNA isolation

by acid guanidinium thiocyanatephenol-chloroform extraction.
Anal Biochem 162:156–159.

Clow A, Hussain T, Glover V, Sandler M, Dexter DT, Walker M (1991):

(

2)-Deprenyl can induce soluble superoxide dismutase in rat

striata. J Neural Transm 6:77–80.

Engele J, Franke B (1996): Effects of glial cell line-derived neuro-

trophic factor (GDNF) on dopaminergic neurons require concur-
rent activation of cAMP-dependent signaling pathways. Cell
Tissue Res 286:235–240.

Fadda E, Negro A, Facci L, Skaper SD (1993): Ganglioside GM1

cooperates with brain-derived neurotrophic factor to protect
dopaminergic neurons from 6-hydroxydaopmine-induced degen-
eration. Neurosci Lett 159:147–150.

Ferrari G, Greene LA (1996): Prevention of neuronal apoptotic death

by neurotrophic agents and ganglioside GM1: Insights and
speculations regarding a common mechanism. Perspect Dev
Neurobiol 3:94–100.

Flohe L, Gunzler WA (1984): Assays of glutathione peroxidase.

Methods Enzymol 105:114–121.

Gash DM, Zhang Z, Ovadia A, Cass WA, Yi A, Simmerman L, Russell

D, Martin D, Lapchak PA, Collins F, Hoffer BJ, Gerhardt GA
(1996): Functional recovery in Parkinsonian monkeys treated
with GDNF. Nature 380:252–255.

Heinonen EH, Lammintausta R (1991): A review of the pharmacology

of selegiline. Acta Neurol Scand 84(Suppl 136):44–59.

Herrero MT, Perez-Otano I, Oset C, Kastner A, Hirsch EC, Agid Y,

Luquin MR, Obeso JA, Rio JD (1993): GM-1 ganglioside
promotes the recovery of surviving midbrain dopaminergic
neurons in MPTP-treated monkeys. Neuroscience 56:965–972.

602

Tang et al.