Current Biology 18, 678–683, May 6, 2008

ª2008 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved

DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2008.04.012

Report

Regulation of Monoamine Oxidase A
by Circadian-Clock Components
Implies Clock Influence on Mood

Gabriele Hampp,

1

Ju

¨ rgen A. Ripperger,

1

Thijs Houben,

2

Isabelle Schmutz,

1

Christian Blex,

3

Ste´phanie Perreau-Lenz,

4

Irene Brunk,

3

Rainer Spanagel,

4

Gudrun Ahnert-Hilger,

3

Johanna H. Meijer,

2

and Urs Albrecht

1

,

*

1

Department of Medicine

Division of Biochemistry
University of Fribourg
1700 Fribourg
Switzerland

2

Department of Molecular Cell Biology

Laboratory of Neurophysiology
Leiden University Medical Center
2300 RC Leiden
The Netherlands

3

AG Functional Cell Biology

Center for Anatomy
Charite´-Universita¨tsmedizin Berlin
10115 Berlin
Germany

4

Department of Psychopharmacology

Central Institute of Mental Health
68159 Mannheim
Germany

Summary

The circadian clock has been implicated in addiction and
several forms of depression

[1, 2]

, indicating interactions

between the circadian and the reward systems in the brain

[3–5]

Rewards such as food, sex, and drugs influence this

system in part by modulating dopamine neurotransmission
in the mesolimbic dopamine reward circuit, including the
ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the ventral striatum (NAc).
Hence, changes in dopamine levels in these brain areas are
proposed to influence mood in humans and mice

[6–10]

. To

establish a molecular link between the circadian-clock mech-
anism and dopamine metabolism, we analyzed the murine
promoters of genes encoding key enzymes important in dopa-
mine metabolism. We find that transcription of the monoamine
oxidase A (Maoa) promoter is regulated by the clock compo-
nents BMAL1, NPAS2, and PER2. A mutation in the clock
gene Per2 in mice leads to reduced expression and activity
of MAOA in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. Further-
more, we observe increased levels of dopamine and altered
neuronal activity in the striatum, and these results probably
lead to behavioral alterations observed in Per2 mutant mice
in despair-based tests. These findings suggest a role of circa-
dian-clock components in dopamine metabolism highlighting
a role of the clock in regulating mood-related behaviors.

Results and Discussion

The Murine Maoa Promoter Is Regulated
by Clock Components In Vitro
We analyzed the promoter of Maoa for presence of E-box
elements. These elements serve as potential binding sites

for heterodimers of CLOCK/BMAL1 or NPAS2/BMAL1, key
components of the circadian-clock mechanism

[11]

In the

promoter of Maoa, we found E-box elements, which are con-
served among mouse, rat, and human, suggesting compara-
ble regulation of this gene in these species (

Figure 1

A). To

determine whether the Maoa promoter is regulated by clock
components, we cloned a 1.1 kb promoter fragment of the
murine Maoa (mMaoa) gene containing one canonical and
two noncanonical E-boxes into a luciferase reporter vector.
Cotransfection with clock components of this reporter
construct into the neuroblastoma cell line NG108-15 revealed
regulatory effects of clock proteins on the mMaoa promoter
(

Figure 1

B) in a concentration-dependent manner (

Figure S1

A

available online). Surprisingly, CLOCK/BMAL1 does not acti-
vate the mMaoa promoter in the neuroblastoma cell line
(

Figure 1

B) but in COS-7 monkey kidney cells (

Table S1

), sug-

gesting a possible involvement of cell-type-specific cofactors
in this process. Cotransfection of Cry1, a clock component of
the negative limb of the clock regulatory mechanism

[12]

,

dampened the activation by NPAS2/BMAL1 in neuroblastoma
cells. Cotransfection of Per2 resulted in increased activation
(

Figure 1

B) as observed previously for the activation of the

aminolevulinate synthase 1 promoter

[13]

To test whether

the conserved classical E-box is of importance in the mMaoa
promoter, we deleted it. This resulted in a shortened 0.7 kb
promoter that was still activated by NPAS2/BMAL1, however
in a strongly reduced manner, indicating functional importance
of the most 5

0

E-box in the 1.1 kb construct (

Figures 1

and

1B). In contrast to mMaoa, neither a 1.2 kb fragment of the mu-
rine monoamine oxidase B (mMaob) promoter (

Figure S1

B) nor

a 3.3 kb promoter fragment of the tyrosine hydroxylase, the
rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis (data not shown),
displayed comparable effects in our assays. Taken together,
our experiments indicate that the mMaoa promoter is prone
to specific regulation by clock components in vitro.

The MaoA Gene Is Hardwired Directly
to the Circadian Oscillator
In order to test circadian functionality of the mMaoa promoter,
we transfected the mMaoa-luciferase reporter construct into
NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells and followed its expression
by using real-time bioluminescence monitoring. After synchro-
nization with dexamethasone

[14]

we monitored luciferase

activity in the cell population over 4 days (

Figure 1

C and

Figure S1

C). We observed an w24 hr oscillation of luciferase

activity with the same phase as a control reporter construct
containing four E-box elements derived from the clock-con-
trolled Dbp gene

[15]

Similar results were also obtained

upon transfection of the construct into NIH 3T3 fibroblasts
cells (

Figure S1

C). This indicates that the mMaoa promoter is

capable of oscillating in a circadian fashion.

In a next step, we investigated the regulation of the mMaoa

promoter in vivo. We wanted to know whether BMAL1 directly
interacts with the mMaoa promoter in brain regions that
express this gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with
antibodies against BMAL1 revealed binding of this protein to
the promoter of mMaoa in brain tissue containing the VTA
(

Figure 1

D). This binding was also time dependent with

*Correspondence:

urs.albrecht@unifr.ch

significantly more BMAL1 binding at Zeitgeber time (ZT) 6
compared to ZT 18 (p < 0.05, t test) comparable to the time-
dependent binding of BMAL1 to the promoter of Rev-erba,
a circadian-clock component (

Figure 1

D). The lower signal of

BMAL1 binding at the mMaoa promoter in vivo probably
reflects the fact that fewer cells in the analyzed brain region
express mMaoa in a circadian manner as compared to the
Rev-erba gene. Binding of BMAL1 is not observed in the
promoter region of the mBmal1 gene, a circadian gene that
does not regulate itself. BMAL1 binding at the mMaoa pro-
moter was also not observed in the cortex region or the liver
of the same animals (data not shown). We conclude that the
mMaoa promoter can be regulated by BMAL1 in a time-depen-
dent fashion in brain tissue containing the VTA.

Expression of Maoa Is Reduced in Per2 Mutant Mice
Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice display altered responses to drugs of

abuse

[2, 16]

implying abnormal signaling in the mesolimbic

dopaminergic system of these animals. Therefore, we investi-
gated region-specific and time-dependent expression of
mMaoa and mMaob in the mesolimbic system including the
striatum and the VTA. We found cycling diurnal expression of
mMaoa mRNA in the VTA of wild-type animals (p < 0.01, one-
way ANOVA) with a maximum at ZT 6, whereas mMaob
expression was not cycling diurnally (

Figure 2

A). No diurnal

variation for both mMaoa and mMaob could be detected in
Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice having a defective circadian clock

(p > 0.05, one-way ANOVA). Significantly lower mRNA levels
of Maoa were observed in these animals at ZT 6 (p < 0.05,
two-way ANOVA) (

Figure 2

A; for micrographs, see

Figure S2

).

Diurnal expression for mMaoa was also observed in the ventral

striatum (NAc) for both genotypes with reduced expression in
Per2

Brdm1

mutants at ZT 6 and ZT 12 (p < 0.05, two-way

ANOVA), whereas mMaob expression was not diurnal
(

Figure 2

B). However, mMaob expression was lower in

Per2

Brdm1

mutants at ZT 18 (p < 0.01, two-way ANOVA). These

observations support our finding that the mMaoa promoter
can be regulated by clock components and that PER2 proba-
bly plays a positive role in this mechanism by increasing the
amplitude (Figures

1

B,

2

A, and 2B). The expression analyses

presented above indicate that mMaoa mRNA is stronger
expressed than mMaob in parts of the mesolimbic dopaminer-
gic system, but we do not know whether this translates to the
protein level.

MAOA Activity Is Reduced and Dopamine Levels
Are Elevated in Per2 Mutant Mice
Alterations in expression of Maoa mRNA in Per2

Brdm1

mutant

mice lead us to determine the total activity of MAO (MAOA
and MAOB) in the VTA. We find that it follows the mRNA
expression pattern of mMaoa with a maximum of MAO activity
at ZT 6 and a significantly cycling diurnal variation in wild-type
mice (p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA) but no variation (p > 0.05,
one-way ANOVA) and reduced activity in Per2

Brdm1

mutants

(p < 0.0001, two-way ANOVA) (

Figure 2

C). In the striatum (com-

posed of the caudate Putamen [CPu] and the NAc), to which
the VTA projects, MAO activity was diurnal in wild-type mice
(p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA). This activity was constant in
Per2

Brdm1

mutant animals (p > 0.05, one-way ANOVA). The

maximum of activity was delayed to ZT 12 in wild-type animals
(

Figure 2

D) compared to the maximal activity in the VTA

(

Figure 2

C), and activity was significantly reduced at this

Figure 1. Regulation of the mMaoa Promoter by
Clock Components

(A) Schematic representation of E-boxes con-
served in human, rat, and mouse Maoa genes.
Letters E and E’ refer to sites of canonical and
noncanonical

E-box

elements,

respectively,

serving

as potential

binding

sites

for the

BMAL1-NPAS2 heterodimer. Arrows indicate
the transcription start site.
(B) Transcriptional regulation of the mMaoa gene
by clock components in NG108-15 cells. Lucifer-
ase reporter plasmids containing either a 1.1 kb
mMaoa 5

0

upstream region, including the three

E-boxes (Maoa 1.1 kb) or a deletion of the canon-
ical E-box (Maoa 0.7 kb) was used for the tran-
scriptional assays. Presence (+) or absence (2)
of the reporter and expression plasmids is
shown. Each value represents the mean 6 SD
of three independent experiments with three
replicates for each experiment.
(C) Circadian oscillations of luciferase reporter
activity in dexamethasone synchronized NG108-
15 cells. Detrended, normalized time series,
each derived by averaging the bioluminescence
profiles of two independent cultures (representa-
tive experiment out of three independent experi-
ments), are shown. ‘‘pGL3’’ refers to a luciferase
reporter (gray, negative control), ‘‘pGL3_4-E-
box’’ refers to a pGL3 reporter containing four
E-boxes of the Dbp promoter (black, positive
control), ‘‘Maoa 1.1kb’’ refers to a pGL3 reporter
containing a 1.1 kb promoter fragment of the
mouse Maoa promoter (light-gray line).

(D) Binding of BMAL1 to the mMaoa promoter in mouse brain tissue collected at ZT 6 and ZT 18 as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP).
BMAL1 does not bind to its own promoter (black bars, negative control, p > 0.05, ZT 6 versus ZT 18) but binds in a time-dependent fashion to the mRevErba
promoter (gray bars, positive control, p < 0.05, ZT 6 versus ZT 18) and to the mMaoa promoter (white bars, *p < 0.05 and **p < 0.01). Each value represents the
mean 6 SEM of three independent experiments with the p values determined by the Student’s t test.

Regulation of Monoamine Oxidase A by the Clock
679

time point in Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice (

Figure 2

D) (p < 0.001, two-

way ANOVA). The delay of maximal MAO activity in the stria-
tum compared to maximal mMaoa mRNA expression in the
ventral striatum (NAc) might be the result of MAO activity in
the CPu contributing, besides the NAc, to the total activity in
the striatum. However, it appears that the reduced expression
levels of mMaoa in Per2

Brdm1

mutants are reflected in the total

MAO activity, indicating that in the mouse striatum, dopamine
is metabolized predominantly by MAOA under basal condi-
tions. This is consistent with previous findings in Mao-deficient
mice

[17, 18]

Taken together, our observations indicate that

loss of functional PER2 lowers activity of MAO, which appears
to be the result of reduced expression of mMaoa. Because

dopamine is the most prominent neurotransmitter in the NAc
of the striatum, we expected an increase in the dopamine to
DOPAC ratio in this region of the brain. We found that this ratio
was significantly elevated in the striatum (CPu and NAc)
of Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice (p < 0.05, two-way ANOVA)

(

Figure 2

E). This is consistent with our finding that MAO activity

is reduced. To investigate whether this increase can be
observed extracellularly, we performed microdialysis in the
ventral striatum (NAc). We find that under basal conditions,
dopamine release is significantly increased in Per2

Brdm1

mutant animals compared to wild-type littermates (p < 0.05;
two-way ANOVA). Furthermore, we observed in both geno-
types diurnal changes in the levels of this neurotransmitter;

Figure 2. Expression of mMaoa and mMaob,
MAO Activity, and Striatal Dopamine Levels in
Wild-Type and Per2

Brdm1

Mutant Mice

(A) mRNA expression of mMaoa (wild-type, black
squares; Per2

Brdm1

mutant, open circles) and

mMaob (wild-type, black diamonds; Per2

Brdm1

mutant, open triangles) in the VTA (n = 3 per
genotype each). Two-way ANOVA with Bonfer-
roni post test revealed for mMaoa a significant
effect between the genotypes at ZT 6 (*p < 0.05)
but no difference between genotypes for mMaob
(p > 0.05). One-way ANOVA shows a significant
variation of expression over time for mMaoa in
wild-type mice (p < 0.01) and no variation
in Per2

Brdm1

animals (p > 0.05). No variation in

time was observed in both genotypes for mMaob
(p > 0.05). mMaoa was significantly more highly
expressed than mMaob in both genotypes
(p < 0.001).
(B) mRNA expression of mMaoa and mMaob in
the ventral striatum (NAc) (n = 3 per genotype
each). Two-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post
test revealed for mMaoa a significant effect on
genotype (p < 0.01) and time (p < 0.01) but no
interaction between the two (p > 0.05). Significant
differences between the genotypes at ZT 6
(*p < 0.05) and ZT 12 (*p < 0.05) were observed.
For mMaob, a significant difference between
genotypes was observed at ZT 18 (**p < 0.01).
mMaoa was significantly more highly expressed
than mMaob in both genotypes (p < 0.001).
(C) Enzymatic activity of MAO in the VTA (n = 3 per
genotype). Two-way ANOVA revealed a signifi-
cant effect on genotype (p < 0.0001) and time
(p < 0.05) and no interaction between the two
factors (p > 0.05). Bonferroni post test shows
a significant difference between genotypes at
ZT 6 (*p < 0.01) and ZT 0/24 (*p < 0.05).
One-way ANOVA shows significant variation of
enzyme activity over time in wild-type mice
(p < 0.05) and no variation in Per2

Brdm1

animals

(p > 0.05).
(D) Enzymatic activity of MAO in the striatum
(CPu + NAc) (n = 3 per genotype). Two-way
ANOVA revealed a significant difference in geno-
type (p < 0.001) and time (p < 0.05) but no interac-
tion between the two (p > 0.05). Bonferroni post
test shows a significant difference between
genotypes at ZT 12 (*p < 0.001). One-way ANOVA
shows significant variation of enzyme activity
over time in wild-type mice (p < 0.05) and no
variation in Per2

Brdm1

animals (p > 0.05).

(E) Dopamine/DOPAC ratio in the striatum (CPu + NAc). Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant difference in genotype (p < 0.05) and time (p < 0.01) but no
interaction between the two (p > 0.05). Bonferroni post test shows a significant difference between genotypes at ZT 0/24 (*p < 0.05). Data for ZT 0 and ZT 24
are double plotted. Values represent the mean 6 SEM.
(F) Extracellular levels of dopamine in the ventral striatum (NAc). Per2

Brdm1

animals showed higher basal levels of dopamine release compared to wild-types

(p < 0,05; two-way ANOVA for repeated-measures; genotype F

1, 9

= 5.4). A diurnal rhythm was observed in Per2

Brdm1

mice (p < 0.0001; one-way ANOVA; time

F

47, 235

= 2.6) as well as in wild-type littermates (p < 0.0001; one-way ANOVA; time F

47, 188

= 2.5). Values represent the mean 6 SEM (n = 5–6 per genotype).

Current Biology Vol 18 No 9
680

these changes are in opposite phases as compared to MAO
activity in the same brain region. We conclude that loss of
functional PER2 is likely to lower MAOA activity in the striatum,
contributing to increased dopamine levels in Per2

Brdm1

mutant

mice in this brain area. In contrast to Maoa-deficient mice that
show aggressive behavior and elevated serotonin levels,
we did not make these observations in Per2

Brdm1

mutants

(data not shown), probably because Maoa expression is not
completely eliminated in our mutants. However, studies that
associate human MAOA with alcoholism

[19, 20]

highlight a

possible correlation between reduced expression of mMaoa
in Per2

Brdm1

mutants and increased ethanol intake in these

animals

[16]

.

Differences in Despair-Based Behavioral Tests
between Per2

Brdm1

Mutant and Wild-Type Mice

In humans, dopamine levels are related to mood

[6]

. Because

Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice display increased levels of this neuro-

transmitter in the striatum, we wanted to probe for behavioral
alterations

by applying despair-based

behavioral tests

believed to correlate with human mood disorders

[21]

We

examined wild-type and Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice in the Porsolt

forced-swim test (FST) and the tail-suspension test (TST).
They measure the duration of immobility occurring after expo-
sure of mice to an inescapable situation. However, they appear
to be regulated by different sets of genes and hence may result
in different outcomes

[22]

. These tests could be used because

basal locomotor activity in the two genotypes is not different

[2, 23]

. The FST shows that Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice display

significantly less immobility compared to wild-type animals
(p < 0.0001, two-way ANOVA,

Figure 3

A). This indicates an

increase in neurotransmitter levels in Per2

Brdm1

mutants.

Because the response to cocaine

[2]

as well as expression

and activity levels of mMaoa was highest at ZT 6 in the VTA,
we performed all subsequent behavioral tests at ZT 6. To
examine whether the lower immobility in Per2

Brdm1

mutants

is due to their elevated dopamine levels (

Figure 2

F), we aimed

to diminish the amount of dopamine in these animals. We
treated the mice with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT), a
potent inhibitor of tyrosine-hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting
enzyme of catecholamine synthesis, to reduce dopamine
levels. We find that AMPT increased immobility in Per2

Brdm1

mutants compared to saline-treated mutants (p < 0.01, t
test), and immobility became comparable to saline-treated
wild-type mice (nonsignificant difference [ns];

Figure 3

B). We

conclude that inhibition of TH leads to a behavioral rescue
of Per2

Brdm1

mutants in the FST (

Figure 3

B) indicating an in-

volvement of dopamine (and/or other catecholamines) in
this phenotype.

In TST, we find that immobility times are not different

between the genotypes (

Figure S3

). Different outcomes in

these despair-based behavioral tests for mice are not unusual

[22]

However, because of the comparable behavioral base-

lines of the two genotypes, we could use the TST to titrate
MAO activity with an inhibitor in the two genotypes. Because
Per2

Brdm1

mutants show less MAO activity (

Figures 2

C and

2D), we expected these animals to respond to lower doses
of tranylcypromine (TCP), a MAO inhibitor. In comparison
amitriptyline (AMI), a nonselective monoamine reuptake inhib-
itor mainly influencing serotonin and noradrenaline levels in
the synaptic cleft should be effective at similar doses for both
genotypes. We found these predictions to be met by intraper-
itoneal injections of AMI and TCP (

Figure 3

C). Both genotypes

show a similar dose-dependent decrease in immobility for
AMI, whereas Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice are more sensitive to

TCP. These experiments are in agreement with the observa-
tion that mMaoa expression and MAO activity is reduced in
Per2

Brdm1

mutants and therefore less inhibitor is necessary

to abolish MAO function. Taken together, these findings indi-
cate that Per2

Brdm1

mutants react differently compared to

wild-types in tests believed to correlate with human mood
disorders.

Electrical Neuronal Activity Is Altered in Per2 Mutant Mice
in Response to MAO Inhibitors
To test how electrical activity is affected after treatment with
AMI and TCP in wild-type and Per2 mutant mice, we measured
neuronal activity in the ventral striatum (NAc) in vivo. Multiunit
activity recordings show that wild-type and Per2

Brdm1

mutant

animals react similarly to AMI (

Figures 4

A, 4B, and 4E). Inter-

estingly, wild-type mice do not show altered activity traces
after injection of 6 mg/kg TCP at ZT 6. In contrast, Per2 mutant
mice display a strong response visible in the change of the
activity trace after TCP injection at ZT6 (

Figures 4

and 4D).

It appears that neuronal activity in Per2 mutant mice is
significantly affected compared to that in wild-type animals
(p < 0.05, t test,

Figure 4

E). This result indicates that Per2

mutants are more sensitive to TCP than wild-type mice. This
might be the result of lower amounts of MAOA enzyme due
to a reduced expression of the mMaoa gene (

Figure 2

). Hence,

Figure 3. Depression-Resistant-like Phenotype
in Per2

Brdm1

Mutant Mice and Relation to MAO

(A) Comparison of immobility in the forced-swim
test (FST) between wild-type (black bars) and
Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice (white bars) at different

times (n = 6–14 per genotype). Two-way ANOVA
shows

a

significant

effect

on

genotype

(p < 0.0001) but not on time (p > 0.05) and no in-
teraction between these two factors (p > 0.05).
One-way ANOVA with Bonferroni’s multiple-
comparison test reveals significant differences
between the genotypes at all time points (**p <
0.01, ***p < 0.001).

(B) Rescue of the depression-resistant-like phenotype assessed by FST in Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice by blocking tyrosine hydroxylase activity with alpha-

methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT) at ZT 6. A Student’s t test reveals significant differences after AMPT treatment (200 mg/kg) in Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice compared

to basal levels and saline treatment (**p < 0.01, n = 9–12) but no significant difference (ns) to saline-treated wild-type animals.
(C) Decrease in immobility at ZT 6. Tail-suspension test (TST) performed 30 min after saline injection and the subsequent day 30 min after drug treatment with
amitriptyline (AMI) and tranylcypromine (TCP). Concentrations used for AMI were 3, 6, and 9 mg/kg body weight and for TCP 6, 9, and 12 mg/kg body weight
(n = 11–18). A Student’s t test revealed significant differences between the lowest and the highest dose for the AMI treatment in both genotypes (*p < 0.05).
For TCP treatment, only wild-type mice show a significant difference between the lowest and the highest dose (**p < 0.01). This is not the case for Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice, indicating the higher sensitivity of these animals to TCP. Values represent the mean 6 SEM.

Regulation of Monoamine Oxidase A by the Clock
681

these mice are potentially useful to screen for drugs targeting
MAOA to readjust intracerebral dopamine levels.

The behavioral and neuronal activity measurements for

Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice (

Figures 3 and 4

and

[2]

) could also

be explained by a change in the expression of the dopamine
transporter (DAT) and changes in dopamine receptors (DR1
and DR2). This seems to be unlikely because expression of
DAT is not significantly altered in Per2

Brdm1

mutants

(

Figure S4

). Furthermore, expression of the excitatory dopa-

mine receptor DR1 is reduced, and expression of the inhibitory
dopamine receptor DR2 is elevated (

Figure S4

). This indicates

a compensatory response of the mutant organism to the
elevated dopamine concentrations at the level of its receptors.

Conclusions
Taken together, our results indicate a direct influence of circa-
dian-clock components on mMaoa expression and activity
in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. In particular, PER2
appears to act as a positive factor, and its absence leads to
reduced Maoa expression and activity resulting in elevated do-
pamine levels in the ventral striatum (NAc). The behavioral alter-
ations that are observed in Per2 mutant mice with tests modeling
human mood disorders are probably due to the elevated dopa-
mine levels. This implies that alterations in the clock, as they oc-
cur in shift workers, pilots, and people suffering from jet-lag, may
have profound consequences for brain function including mood
regulation by the mesolimbic dopaminergic system.

Supplemental Data

Experimental Procedures, four figures, and three tables are available at

http://www.current-biology.com/cgi/content/full/18/9/678/DC1/

.

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Dr. S. McKnight and Dr. U. Schibler for reagents,
Dr. John Reinhard, S. Baeriswyl-Aebischer, A. Hayoz, and G. Bulgarelli for
technical assistance, and Dr. J.L. Dreyer, Dr. C. deVirgilio, and Dr. P. Lavenex
for suggestions on the manuscript. This research was supported by the
DFG SP383 (R.S.), the Velux Foundation (U.A.), the Swiss National Science
Foundation (U.A.), and EUCLOCK (J.M. and U.A.).

Received: January 29, 2008
Revised: April 1, 2008
Accepted: April 3, 2008
Published online: April 24, 2008

References

1. Baird, T.J., and Gauvin, D. (2000). Characterization of cocaine

self-administration and pharmacokinetics as a function of time of day
in the rat. Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav. 65, 289–299.

2. Abarca, C., Albrecht, U., and Spanagel, R. (2002). Cocaine sensitization

and reward are under the influence of circadian genes and rhythm. Proc.
Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 9026–9030.

3. Andretic, R., Chaney, S., and Hirsh, J. (1999). Requirement of circadian

genes for cocaine sensitization in Drosophila. Science 285, 1066–1068.

4. Yuferov, V., Kroslak, T., Laforge, K.S., Zhou, Y., Ho, A., and Kreek, M.J.

(2003). Differential gene expression in the rat caudate putamen after
‘‘binge’’ cocaine administration: Advantage of triplicate microarray
analysis. Synapse 48, 157–169.

5. Sanchis-Segura, C., and Spanagel, R. (2006). Behavioural assessment

of drug reinforcement and addictive features in rodents: An overview.
Addict. Biol. 11, 2–38.

6. Nestler, E.J., and Carlezon, W.A., Jr. (2006). The mesolimbic dopamine

reward circuit in depression. Biol. Psychiatry 59, 1151–1159.

7. Lu¨scher, C. (2007). Drugs of abuse. In Basic and Clinical Pharmacology,

10th Edition, B.G. Katzung, ed. (New York: McGraw Hill), pp. 511–525.

8. Andretic, R., and Hirsh, J. (2000). Circadian modulation of dopamine

receptor responsiveness in Drosophila melanogaster. Proc. Natl.
Acad. Sci. USA 97, 1873–1878.

9. McClung, C.A., Sidiropoulou, K., Vitaterna, M., Takahashi, J.S., White,

F.J., Cooper, D.C., and Nestler, E.J. (2005). Regulation of dopaminergic
transmission and cocaine reward by the Clock gene. Proc. Natl. Acad.
Sci. USA 102, 9377–9381.

10. Roybal, K., Theobold, D., Graham, A., Dinieri, J.A., Russo, S.J.,

Krishnan, V., Chakravarty, S., Peevey, J., Oehrlein, N., Birnbaum, S.,
et al. (2007). Mania-like behavior induced by disruption of CLOCK.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 104, 6097–6098.

11. Liu, A.C., Lewis, W.G., and Kay, S.A. (2007). Mammalian circadian

signaling networks and therapeutic targets. Nat. Chem. Biol. 3, 630–639.

12. Wijnen, H., and Young, M.W. (2006). Interplay of circadian clocks and

metabolic rhythms. Annu. Rev. Genet. 40, 409–448.

13. Kaasik, K., and Lee, C.C. (2004). Reciprocal regulation of haem

biosynthesis and the circadian clock in mammals. Nature 430, 467–471.

14. Balsalobre, A., Brown, S.A., Marcacci, L., Tronche, F., Kellendonk, C.,

Reichardt, H.M., Schutz, G., and Schibler, U. (2000). Resetting of
circadian time in peripheral tissues by glucocorticoid signaling. Science
289, 2344–2347.

15. Ripperger, J.A., Shearman, L.P., Reppert, S.M., and Schibler, U. (2000).

CLOCK, an essential pacemaker component, controls expression of the
circadian transcription factor DBP. Genes Dev. 14, 679–689.

16. Spanagel, R., Pendyala, G., Abarca, C., Zghoul, T., Sanchis-Segura, C.,

Magnone, M.C., Lascorz, J., Depner, M., Holzberg, D., Soyka, M., et al.
(2005). The clock gene Per2 influences the glutamatergic system and
modulates alcohol consumption. Nat. Med. 11, 35–42.

Figure 4. NAc Electrical Activity Responses
to AMI and TCP Injections in Wild-Type and
Per2

Brdm1

Mutant Mice

(A–D) Raw data traces show the effect of AMI or
TCP injection on multiple unit activity (MUA) in
the NAc of wild-type (WT) and Per2

Brdm1

mutant

mice per 10 s. The gray background represents
lights off, whereas the white background is lights
on. Dotted lines indicate time of injection of
9 mg/kg body AMI or 6 mg/kg TCP. (A) shows
the response to AMI in a WT animal. (B) shows
the response to AMI in a Per2

Brdm1

mutant

mouse. (C) shows the response to TCP in a WT
animal. (D) shows the response to TCP in a
Per2

Brdm1

mutant mouse.

(E) Comparison of the reduction of NAc firing rate
in response to saline, AMI, and TCP injections
between WT (black bars) and Per2

Brdm1

mutant

(white bars) mice (n = 8–11). TCP responses
were significantly different between WT and
Per2

Brdm1

mutant mice (Student’s t test, *p <

0.05). Values represent the mean 6 SEM.

Current Biology Vol 18 No 9
682

17. Fornai, F., Chen, K., Giorgi, F.S., Gesi, M., Alessandri, M.G., and

Shih, J.C. (1999). Striatal dopamine metabolism in monoamine oxidase
B-deficient mice: A brain dialysis study. J. Neurochem. 73, 2434–2440.

18. Cases, O., Seif, I., Grimsby, J., Gaspar, P., Chen, K., Pournin, S., Muller,

U., Aguet, M., Babinet, C., Shih, J.C., et al. (1995). Aggressive behavior
and altered amounts of brain serotonin and norepinephrine in mice
lacking MAOA. Science 268, 1763–1766.

19. Vanyukov, M.M., Moss, H.B., Yu, L.M., Tarter, R.E., and Deka, R. (1995).

Preliminary evidence for an association of a dinucleotide repeat
polymorphism at the MAOA gene with early onset alcoholism/sub-
stance abuse. Am. J. Med. Genet. 60, 122–126.

20. Hsu, Y.-P., Loh, E., Chen, W., Chen, C.-C., Yu, J.-M., and Cheng, A.T.

(1996). Association of monoamine oxidase A alleles with alcoholism
among male Chinese in Taiwan. Am. J. Psychiatry 153, 1209–1211.

21. Castagne´, V., Moser, P., Roux, S., and Porsolt, R.D. (2007). Rodent

models of depression: Forced swim and tail suspension behavioral
despair tests in rats and mice. Current Protocols in Pharmacology
(Supplement 38).

22. Renard, C.E., Dailly, E., David, D.J., Hascoet, M., and Bourin, M. (2003).

Monoamine

metabolism

changes

following

the

mouse

forced

swimming test but not the tail suspension test. Fundam. Clin. Pharma-
col. 17, 449–455.

23. Zheng, B., Larkin, D.W., Albrecht, U., Sun, Z.S., Sage, M., Eichele, G.,

Lee, C.C., and Bradley, A. (1999). The mPer2 gene encodes a functional
component of the mammalian circadian clock. Nature 400, 169–173.

Regulation of Monoamine Oxidase A by the Clock
683