7. 

Hakatikangia ngā mahi kino – remedying the atrocities  

 
7.0  

Introduction 

– Ngāti Kahu’s recent experiences of Crown representatives 

Ever  since  the  breaches  of  Te  Tiriti  started, 

Ngāti  Kahu  have  been  trying  to  find 

remedies. The systematic bulldozing of our rights and theft of our lands and resources 

made that extremely difficult. Over the generations a number of approaches have been 

tried.  Some  of  these  have  been  outlined  in  the 

hapū  korero  (chapter  3)  and  in  the 

historical account (chapter 6). This chapter focusses on the strategies adopted over 

the past three decades since the Waitangi Tribunal was established. 

 

7.1 

 

The Waitangi Tribunal  

In  1975  the  Government  created  the Waitangi  Tribunal.  Its primary  purpose  was  to 

defuse the rising tide of Māori anger and protest over the numerous breaches of Te 

Tiriti  o  Waitangi  caused  by  the  on-going  lawlessness  and  criminal  activities  of 

representatives  of  the  Crown.  The  Tribunal  is  a  permanent  commission  of  inquiry 

whose function is to enquire into and make recommendations on claims laid by Māori 

against the Crown that they have been prejudicially affected by government legislation, 

policy, action or inaction that is inconsistent with the treaty.

1

 Although it is a judicial 

body, the Tribunal is a Government-controlled body. The Government appoints all its 

members,  determines  what  resourcing  it  may  have,

2

  has  progressively  reduced  its 

powers and since 1997 and has threatened to reduce its powers further if it uses them 

to make recommendations that are binding on the Crown.

3

 

 

The  first  claims  in  Ngāti  Kahu’s  rohe  were  lodged  with  the  Waitangi  Tribunal  by 

McCully Matiu (Wai 17) and Reremoana Rutene (Wai 16) in 1984. They were the first 

claims to be lodged from Te Hiku o Te Ika. In 1986, Ngāti Kahu’s hapū leaders of that 

time agreed to allow their claims to be consolidated into WAI 45, along with those of 

Ngāti Kurī, Te Aupōuri, Ngāi Takoto and Te Rarawa.  

                                                 

1

 Treaty of Waitangi Act 1975. 

2

  The  Tribunal  has  been  under-resourced  for  almost  all  of  the  time  it  has  been  operational.  Hamer, 

2004, ‘A Quarter Century of the Waitangi Tribunal’, p.10. 

3

 

Hamer, 2004, ‘A Quarter Century of the Waitangi Tribunal’, footnote 22. In fact, the Tribunal’s powers 

have  been  reduced  considerably  since  the  1980s.  Its  power  to  make  recommendations  over  local 
government and private lands and over fisheries was removed in 1992. Its power to register historical 
claims was removed in 2008.  Its powers to consider any claim is removed once settlement of a claim 
has  been  legislated  (the  Office  of  Treaty  Settlements  website 

http://www.ots.govt.nz/

  lists  54 

settlements legislated between 1992 and 2015. Accessed 12 December 2015). 

 

However,  the  claims  were  severed  soon  after  they  were  lodged  in  response  to  the 

Government  arbitrarily  moving  to  create  property  rights  in  all  fisheries  through  a 

fisheries quota management system. That resulted in the fisheries portion of the WAI 

45  claim  being  given  urgency.  The  Tribunal  found  that  all  our  sea  fisheries  still 

belonged to us. But Ngāti Kahu was excluded from the negotiations to settle that claim 

and has never accepted the 1992 Sealords deal.

4

 That deal purported to extinguish 

all  our  rights  to  our  fisheries  in  exchange  for  a  half  share  in  the  Sealord  fishing 

company, some fish quota, a Māori fisheries commission and reducing our customary 

fishing  rights  to  regulations  determined  by  agents  of  the  Crown.  Ngāti  Kahu 

determined then that our land claims would not be allowed to be similarly high-jacked 

and that we would make sure that we kept control over them.

5

 Hearings into our land 

claims did not commence until 1990. What followed were thirteen long and arduous 

weeks of hearings held over five years, from 1990 to 1994.  

The Government fought us every step of the way through the hearings but in the end 

the evidence against them was too overwhelming. And the Tribunal was clear that the 

severe damage that had been done needed to be addressed urgently and that there 

should  be  no  further  delay  in  alleviating  the  conditions  of  deprivation,  poverty  and 

marginalization.  Once  the  Tribunal  understood  that  tikanga  was  the  only  law  that 

applied in this country prior to 1840 and that after 1840 tikanga rather than the legal 

fictions invented by Pākehā settlers

6

 still applied for us and our lands, we knew they 

would uphold our claims. We had made it clear that we had never ceded any of our 

territories and the Tribunal understood and accepted that. And so, while we waited for 

their  report,  we  started  compiling  a  settlement  package  to  address  each  and  every 

claim of the many whānau and hapū of Ngāti Kahu. Implementation of the settlement 

package  would  remedy  the  atrocities  committed  by  the  Government 

against  Ngāti 

Kahu and allow reconciliation to take place. The background to and the content of that 

package is outlined later in this chapter. 

                                                 

4

 Margaret Mutu, 

2012. ‘Fisheries Settlement: The Sea I Never Gave’ in Janine Hayward and Nicola 

Wheen (eds) Treaty of Waitangi Settlements. Wellington, Bridget Williams Book, p.118. 

5

 

Margaret Mutu, 2005, “Recovering Fagin’s ill-gotten gains: Settling Ngāti Kahu’s Treaty of Waitangi claims 
against  the Crown”  in  Michael  Belgrave,  Merata  Kawharu  and  David Williams (eds)  Waitangi  Revisited: 
Perspectives on the Treaty of Waitangi. 
Melbourne, Australia, Oxford University Press, p.201. 

6

 Deloria, Behind the Broken Treaties 

(see footnote ?? in chapter 6); Morris ‘Vine Deloria, Jr., and the 

Development of a Decoloni

sing Critique’; Mutu ‘Unravelling Colonial Weaving’; Waitangi Tribunal  He 

Whakaputanga me Te TiritiMuriwhenua Land Report, p 124. 

 

 

It  took  the  Tribunal  three  years  after  the  closing  hearings  to  release  its  report. 

Sometime before or during closing submissions a 

senior Pākehā historian interfered, 

telling the head claimant for Ngāti Kurī, the Honourable Matiu Rata, that he considered 

that the Tribunal would not uphold our claims. It was extremely unfortunate for all the 

iwi of Te Hiku o Te Ika that Matiu chose to 

believe the Pākehā and not to talk to the 

other four head claimants before unilaterally instructing the Tribunal on the last day of 

closing hearings not to report on our claims. We learnt through the newspapers shortly 

after that he was talking to a government Minister about settling all the Muriwhenua 

claims,  including  Ngāti  Kahu’s,  and  that  he  was  publicly  vilifying  the  claimant 

researchers for having wasted five years of the claimants’ time.

7

  

 

None of us knew why he did that until several years later when the historian revealed 

what  he  had  done  in  the  New  Zealand  Herald

,  the  country’s  largest  newspaper.

8

 

Neither  Matiu  nor  the historian  had  attended  the  hearings  where  our  evidence  was 

presented and so they had not heard the Tribunal questioning our kaumātua and kuia, 

our historians, anthropologists and a linguist at  great length.  Neither had they been 

there  to  hear  the  Tribunal  question  the  Government

’s  historians  who,  on  several 

occasions, simply could not answer their questions. Yet with the confidence bred of 

the historian’s standing in the Pākehā world, he presumed to tell Matiu that we didn’t 

know what we were talking about. And Matiu believed him because the man was a 

professor of history.

9

  

 

That professor could not have been more wrong. Although the Tribunal was set up by 

the Government who also appoints all its members and controls what it does, its job 

is to inquire into and to find out the facts relating to the claims. Unlike earlier inquiries, 

such  as  the  Myers  commission  of  the  1940s,

10

  the  Tribunal  chose  to  listen  to  both 

Māori and the Government instead of listening only to the Government. What Māori 

                                                 

7

 Mar

garet Mutu, 2009, ‘The Role of History and Oral Traditions in the Recovery of Fagin’s Ill-gotten 

Gains: Settling Ngāti Kahu’s Claims against the Crown’ in Te Pouhere Kōrero Journal: Māori History, 
Māori People
, pp. 32-3. 

8

 

Bill Oliver, ‘Waitangi Tribunal Relied on an Insecure Argument’ in  New Zealand Herald 16 October 

1997, p. A17. By the time this confession appeared the Hon. Matiu Rata had been tragically killed in a 
car accident. As such, the damage that had been done and the divisions it caused amongst the iwi of 
Te Hiku o Te Ika could not be healed. 

9

 

Mutu, ‘The Role of History and Oral Traditions’, pp.32-3. 

10

 See section 6.2.1.4. 

 

told the Tribunal was far more consistent with the facts than the Government

’s stories. 

After  all,  as  we  have  already  noted,  the  Government

’s  stories  were  the  myths, 

fantasies and legal fictions

11

 they had created to help them achieve their aspirations 

of depriving us of everything that is ours.

12

 They held little weight before the Tribunal 

in the 1990s.

13

 Some considerable time after the 1994 closing hearings, the other head 

claimants  advised  the  Tribunal  to  ignore  Matiu’s  directive  and  to  complete  their 

report.

14

  

7.2 

 Waitangi Tribunal Muriwhenua Land Report 1997 

The  long  awaited  Muriwhenua  Land  Report  was  finally  released  in  1997.  It 

comprehensively 

upheld all of Ngāti Kahu’s land claims to 1865 and found that the 

Government  had  breached  Te  Tiriti  grievously,  thereby  seriously  prejudicing  Ngāti 

Kahu.  The  report  detailed  the  numerous  illegitimate  and  illegal  policies  and  actions 

used by Government agents to steal over 150,000 hectares (370

,000 acres) of Ngāti 

Kahu’s  lands  and  to  drive  Ngāti  Kahu  into  poverty  and  deprivation.  The  Tribunal 

recommended that the Government make immediate redress for its breaches, starting 

with  a  substantial  transfer  of  benefits  and  properties  to  the  claimants.

15

  It  did  not 

address  land  claims  relating  to  the  post-1865  period  and  the  many  aspects  of  our 

claims  relating  to  matters  other  than  our  lands  such  as  our  language,  culture, 

intellectual  property,  mana  and  tino  rangatiratanga,  seas,  waters,  air  and  our  other 

natural resources. 

The report was seen at the time, by Ngāti Kahu, as a resounding vindication of the 

history that they had painstakingly compiled and presented to the Tribunal in respect 

of our lands. However, right up until the finalisation of our deed of partial settlement 

more  than  18  years  later,  the  Government  has  never  acknowledged,  let  alone 

accepted,  the  findings  of  its  own  Tribunal.

16

  Nor  has  it  paid  a  cent  in  restitution  or 

                                                 

11

 Mikaere, 

Colonising Myths, Māori Realities, pp.133-8. 

12

 Ibid, pp.154-7. 

13

  The  Tribunal  came  under  threat  from  successive  governments  as  a  result  of  its  findings  and 

recommendations of the 1980s and 1990s  (Hamer, ‘A Quarter-century of the Waitangi Tribunal’, p.7) 
and as a result started to revert back to the Crown bias that characterised the Myers Commission.  

14

 

Mutu, ‘The Role of History and Oral Traditions’, p.33. 

15

 Muriwhenua Land Report, p.404. 

16

 See, for example, the evidence provided by M.Hickey and P.Snedden for the Government dated 22 

August 2012 in Wai 45, Ngāti Kahu remedies hearing. 

 

compensation  or  relinquished  an

y  assets  to  Ngāti  Kahu.  Thus  the  prejudice  has 

continued to compound.   

7.3 

 

Ngāti Kahu Settlement Package (Yellow Book 2000) 

Two years before that report appeared we started compiling Ngāti Kahu’s settlement 

package. The research team visited each marae and whānau wherever they were to 

explain the claims and to ask what land they needed the Government to relinquish and 

what redress they needed in order to settle their claims. That included services our 

whānau and hapū need, services that are provided to non-Māori living in our territories 

but not to us. It also included the tools needed to rebuild our shattered economy, and 

the protection of our natural resources in our territories, our language, our culture, our 

heritage, our intellectual property, our mana, our tino rangatiratanga and our human 

and treaty rights. The package is based on living standards enjoyed by the non-

Māori 

community  living  in  our  rohe  in  Kaitāia,  Mangōnui,  the  ever-expanding  coastal 

settlements at Rangiputa, Whatuwhiwhi, Tokerau beach, Taipā, Waipapa (Cable Bay), 

Koekoeā (Coopers beach), Waitetoki (Hīhī) and the surrounding districts. It forms the 

basis of a twenty five year strategic plan for the social, economic and spiritual recovery 

of Ngāti Kahu.  

After the Tribunal’s report was released, Te Rūnanga-a-Iwi o Ngāti Kahu selected and 

mandated  our  negotiators  and  appointed  a  team  to  work  with  us.  We  then  briefed 

whānau and hapū on the Tribunal’s findings in respect of their specific lands that had 

been  stolen  as  described  in  chapter  6.  Numerous  hui  took  place  and  individual 

kaumātua and kuia who held the oral histories of the whānau, hapū and iwi collectively 

spent thousands of hours passing on their knowledge about specific lands and whānau 

and hapū histories. It took five years to compile our settlement package and it covered 

far more than the Crown forest and State Owned Enterprises lands in our territories. 

As we were drawing up this package, Ngāti Kahu assumed, wrongly as we discovered 

several  years  later,  that  the  Government  would  adhere  to  the  Tribunal’s 

recommendation that there be “the transfer of substantial property”.

17

  

                                                 

17

 Muriwhenua Land Report, p.404. 

 

Several  drafts  of  the  package  were  checked  and  corrected  over  that  time  and  it 

continues to be added to as whānau discover more and more about their lands and 

histories.  Despite  the  Government

’s  refusal  to  adhere  to  the  Tribunal’s 

recommendations this settlement package remains to this day, the only package that 

Ngāti Kahu have agreed will fully and finally settle all our historical claims. It is the set 

of instructions the whānau and hapū gave to the negotiators they appointed to settle 

their claims. It became known as our Yellow Book because the covers of the booklet 

were yellow. 

 

By 2000 Ngāti Kahu resolved that the package was sufficiently complete for it to be 

handed  to  the  Government

.  In  a  hui  held  in  the  Kaitāia  Community  Centre  in 

September 2000, it was formally handed over to the Minister of Treaty Negotiations.  

 

The instructions set out in Ngāti Kahu’s Yellow Book include  

  the aim of any settlement of Ngāti Kahu’s claims;  
  the  key  elements  of  the  settlement:  the  non-negotiable  and  the  negotiable 

aspects  including  specific  lands  to  be  relinquished  and  the  numerous  other 

areas  where  action  is  required  to  restore  Ngāti  Kahu’s  social  and  economic 

base;  

  the approved settlement process;  
  the claims that this settlement will address. 

 

The 2000 edition of  the Yellow Book  reflected the best information available  at  that 

time.  It  has  been  significantly  revised  in  this  chapter  to  reflect  the  best  information 

available in 2015. 

 

7.3.1  Aim of settlement 

The aim of any settlement  of our land claims is to right  the wrongs of the  past  and 

remove  the  prejudice by  restoring  justice,  along  with  political,  social,  economic  and 

spiritual well-

being and prosperity to the whānau and hapū who comprise the iwi of 

Ngāti Kahu. In other words, kia pūmau tonu te mana me te tino rangatiratanga o ngā 

whānau, o ngā hapū, o te iwi o Ngāti Kahu. It also aims to restore the relationship 

 

between Ngāti Kahu and the Crown to that set out in Te Tiriti o Waitangi and, as a 

result, to achieve reconciliation. 

 

As the Waitangi Tribunal demonstrated unequivoca

lly, the prejudice caused to Ngāti 

Kahu  was  extensive.  Removing  the  prejudice  necessitates  a  principled  and 

comprehensive  approach  that  recognises  the  nature  and  extent  of  the  damage  at 

whānau and hapū level and moves in a careful and deliberate manner to remove each 

and  every  aspect  of  that  prejudice.  That  cannot  be  achieved  by  taking  the  miserly 

approach  to  settlements  that  all  governments  to  date  have  chosen.

18

  Treaty 

“settlements” to date can be characterised as focussing on  

  nominal  recognition  and  then  redefinition  of  certain  Māori  groups  to  meet 

Pākehā legal and cultural requirements and norms;  

  making false assertions that Māori have ceded their sovereignty to the English 

Crown;  

  making  further  false  assertions  that  the  English  Crown  is  sovereign  and 

exercises unilateral power and control over Māori;  

  transferring hardly any of the lands that were stolen; 
  providing very little money but then demanding it be used to pay for the lands;  
  retaining unilateral power and control and almost all of  the stolen lands and 

natural resources of 

Māori in Government hands.

19

  

Rather  than  removing  the  prejudice  and  hence  the  grievance,  this  approach  has 

compounded  it  leaving  the  relationship  between 

Māori  and  the  Crown  precariously 

unbalanced and Māori sliding even further down the socio-economic statistical scale.

20

 

The settlement designed by Ngāti Kahu avoids that outcome by addressing the claims 

and  grievances  of  each  of  our  whānau  and  hapū  and  formulating  a  package  that 

restores the balance between Ngāti Kahu and the Crown. 

 

7.3.2  Key elements of the settlement 

                                                 

18

 Stavenhagen, Rodolfo, 2006, Report of the Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights and 

Fundamental  Freedoms  of  Indigenous  People.  Mission  to  New  Zealand. 

E

/

CN

.4/2006/78/Add.3.  13 

March 2006, Geneva, United Nations Human Rights Commission, paragraphs 32-3 and 95. Available 
at 

http://www.converge.org.nz/pma/srnzmarch06.pdf

, accessed July 7, 2012, paragraphs 32-3 and 95.  

19

 

Mutu, Recovering Fagin’s Ill-gotten Gains; Mutu, Ceding Mana, Rangatiratanga and Sovereignty. 

20

  See  Tracey  McIntosh  and  Malcolm  Mulholland  (eds),  2012. 

Māori  and  Social  Issues,  Volume  1. 

Wellington, Huia Publishers. 

 

The key elements of the settlement can be divided into two parts: those matters that 

are not negotiable for a full and final settlement of our historical claims to be achieved, 

and those that can be negotiated.  

 

The non-negotiable aspects are: 

7.3.2.1 

Crown Acknowledgement, Apology and Legislation to Restore the 

 

 

 

Balance 

This  part  of  the  settlement  provides  a  full  admission  and  acknowledgement  by  the 

Crown of what 

has been done to Ngāti Kahu in her name by her representatives and 

servants, a full and unconditional apology and the enacting of legislation that restores 

to Ngāti Kahu what was stolen and outlaws any and all further violations against Ngāti 

Kahu.  

 

The admission and acknowledgement details the unfair and dishonourable advantage 

government  agents  representing  the  Crown  took  of  Ngāti  Kahu’s  hospitality  and 

generosity. In doing so they destroyed the balance in the relationship established by 

Te Tiriti o Waitangi by  

  denying,  since  1840,  that  they  have  continuously  breached  and  been  in 

violation of He Whakaputanga o te Rangatiratanga o Nu Tireni and Te Tiriti o 

Waitangi; 

  denying  and  then  attempting  to  extinguish  Ngāti  Kahu’s  mana  and  tino 

rangatiratanga including denying and attempting to extinguish  Ngāti Kahu’s 

mana whenua and mana moana and hence ownership of all the lands, seas, 

waterways,  air,  minerals,  flora,  fauna  and  all  other  natural  resources  in  our 

territories;    

  falsely claiming sovereignty and supremacy over Ngāti Kahu;  
  wrongfully  and  illegitimately  attempting  to  remove  our  laws  and  to  replace 

them  with  English-style  laws  and  legal  fictions  (including  passing  laws  that 

legalised the Government

’s theft of Ngāti Kahu’s lands and resources);  

  wrongly and illegally imposing the English language and culture on us and 

waging  war  on  our  language,  culture  and  intellectual  property  in  order  to 

destroy them;  

 

  knowingly and wilfully perpetrating numerous crimes against Ngāti Kahu that 

caused grievous and unending suffering and harm, and severely impaired our 

economic, social, cultural and spiritual development. 

 

Having made these acknowledgements the Crown, currently the Queen of England, 

then provides a full and unconditional pu

blic apology to the whānau, hapū and iwi of 

Ngāti Kahu. To ensure that the apology is genuine and meaningful the Government 

then enacts legislation that fully and permanently restores to Ngāti Kahu all our lands, 

resources,  language,  culture  and  intellectual  property  and  social,  economic  and 

spiritual well-being as provided in Article 38 of the United Nations Declaration on the 

Rights  of  Indigenous  Peoples  (UNDRIP).  The  legislation  will  make  provisions  that 

ensure that this restoration actually takes place in real and practical terms and is not 

left to languish as empty legislative rhetoric.

21

 The legislation will also outlaw any and 

all violations of He Whakaputanga o te Rangatiratanga o Nu Tireni, Te Tiriti o Waitangi 

and  Ng

āti  Kahu’s  human  rights,  in  particular  those  aspects  of  the  Resource 

Management  Act,  the  Public  Works  Act,  the  Conservation  Act  and  the  Marine  and 

Coastal Area Act that breach Te Tiriti o Waitangi. This is provided in Articles 1 and 37 

of UNDRIP. It will also provide 

full acknowledgement and recognition of Ngāti Kahu’s 

mana  and  rangatiratanga  and  make  mandatory  provision  for  it  to  be  upheld  in  the 

manner set out in He Whakaputanga o Te Rangatiratanga o Nu Tireni and guaranteed 

in Te Tiriti o Waitangi. In other words, rather than simply asserting that it will restore 

its  honour,  the  Crown  will  actually  legislate  to  do  so  and  then  implement  its  own 

legislation. 

  

                                                 

21

  Many  provisions  in  current  Treaty  of  Waitangi  claims  settlement  legislation  fall  into  this  category. 

Government servants unwilling to implement the legislation simply ignore it (See 

Mei Chen’s 2012 ‘Post-

Settlement Implications for Māori-Crown Relations’, in Nicola Wheen & Janine Haywood’s edited book 
Treaty  of  Waitangi  Settlements).  Other  well  known  examples  are  the  provisions  in  the  Resource 
Management Act and the Conservation Act which protect and uphold Māori culture and treaty rights. In 
the Resource Management Act Section 6(e) concerns the recognition and provision of matters of national 
importance including the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral lands, 
water, sites, wāhi tapu, and other taonga. Section 7(a) concerns the requirement to have particular regard 
to kaitiakitanga. Section 8 concerns the requirement to take into account the principles of the Treaty of 
Waitangi. In the Conservation Act section 4 

the Department of Conservation is required to “give effect to 

the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi”. In practice many of the Pākehā bodies who are responsible 
for implementing these sections simply ignore them. See 

Hirini Matunga, 2000, ‘Decolonising Planning: 

The Treaty of Waitangi, the Environment and a Du

al Planning Tradition’ in A, Memon and H. Perkins (eds) 

Environment, Planning and Management in New Zealand. Palmerston North, Dunmore Press. 

10 

 

7.3.2.2 

Immediate relinquishment of lands claimed by the Government and 

State Owned Enterprises 

Th

is part of the settlement provides for the government as the Crown’s representative 

to immediately relinquish,  at  no monetary cost  to Ngāti Kahu,  all Ngāti Kahu lands 

currently claimed by Crown agencies (some 45,000 hectares most of which are shared 

with other iwi) or by any State Owned Enterprise (some 7,000 hectares most of which 

is in Ngāti Kahu’s rohe) along with other lands designated as “private” as provided for 

in Articles 26 and 28 of UNDRIP. This includes some 170 hectares (in 120 parcels) 

on-sold by State Owned Enterprises which carry section 27B notations on their titles.

22

   

 

Map 29(??renumbering required): State-Owned Enterprise including 27B 

memorialised lands in Ngāti Kahu’s rohe 

 

It is crucially important that lands are relinquished to those they were stolen from. Past 

and current governments have a bad habit of selling lands that they know belong to 

particular hapū to other hapū and iwi who express loyalty and support for government 

policies as part of their “settlements”.

23

 In other words, the lands are being sold to the 

wrong people. It is a habit designed to create divisions between closely related hapū 

and  on-going  problems  for  them.  An  important  part  of  the  process  of  restoring  the 

Crown’s honour is weaning governments off this habit.  

 

This part of the settlement takes place and is fully implemented before the settlement 

is finalised. An indicative list of these lands is provided in table 7.1 below. All lands 

relinquished  and  restored  to  Ngāti  Kahu  are  inalienable  in  perpetuity  so  that  the 

whānau and hapū can never have their lands stolen again. 

                                                 

22

 A section 27B memorial is a notation placed on the title of all State Owned Enterprises lands pursuant 

to section 27B of the State-owned Enterprise Act 1986 giving legal notice to buyers of the land that they 
purchase with the risk of the land being return

ed to Māori ownership on the binding recommendation of 

the  Waitangi  Tribunal.  (Waitangi  Tribunal  accessed  at 

http://www.justice.govt.nz/tribunals/waitangi-

tribunal/news/muriwhenua-remedies#what-is-resumption

 1 May 2014.)  

23

 

For Ngāti Kahu the most recent example of this is the National-led government, after ascertaining 

and recognising that  Ngāti Kahu  are mana  whenua  in their  lands at Hukatere,  Sweetwater,  Kaitāia, 
Tangonge, Ngākohu, Takahue, Kaimaumau and Rangiāniwaniwa, then selling the more than 12,000 
hectares that the Crown was claiming there to neighbouring Te Rarawa, Ngāi Takoto, Te Aupōuri and 
Ngāti  Kurī.  Ngāti  Kahu  was  deliberately  excluded  from  those  lands  because  we  do  not  support  the 
government’s treaty claims extinguishment policy and will not allow it to be imposed on us, and we will 
never cede our mana and rangatiratanga to the government (see Statement of Claim of Timoti Flavell 
to the High Court 17 April 2014; Mutu, ‘Ceding Mana, Rangatiratanga and Sovereignty’).