Bone Morphogenetic Proteins

DI CHEN

a

, MING ZHAO

b

and GREGORY R. MUNDY

b,

*

a

School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Orthopaedics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA;

b

Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA

(Received 19 March 2004; Revised 17 June 2004)

Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multi-functional growth factors that belong to the
transforming growth factor b (TGFb) superfamily. The roles of BMPs in embryonic development and
cellular functions in postnatal and adult animals have been extensively studied in recent years. Signal
transduction studies have revealed that Smad1, 5 and 8 are the immediate downstream molecules of
BMP receptors and play a central role in BMP signal transduction. Studies from transgenic and
knockout mice and from animals and humans with naturally occurring mutations in BMPs and related
genes have shown that BMP signaling plays critical roles in heart, neural and cartilage development.
BMPs also play an important role in postnatal bone formation. BMP activities are regulated at different
molecular levels. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that BMP-2 can be utilized in various
therapeutic interventions such as bone defects, non-union fractures, spinal fusion, osteoporosis and root
canal surgery. Tissue-specific knockout of a specific BMP ligand, a subtype of BMP receptors or a
specific signaling molecule is required to further determine the specific role of a BMP ligand, receptor
or signaling molecule in a particular tissue.

BMPs are members of the TGFb superfamily. The activity of BMPs was first identified in the 1960s

(Urist, M.R. (1965) “Bone formation by autoinduction”, Science 150, 893 – 899), but the proteins
responsible for bone induction remained unknown until the purification and sequence of bovine BMP-3
(osteogenin) and cloning of human BMP-2 and 4 in the late 1980s (Wozney, J.M. et al. (1988) “Novel
regulators of bone formation: molecular clones and activities”, Science 242, 1528 – 1534; Luyten, F.P.
et al. (1989) “Purification and partial amino acid sequence of osteogenin, a protein initiating bone
differentiation”, J. Biol. Chem. 264, 13377 – 13380; Wozney, J.M. (1992) “The bone morphogenetic
protein family and osteogenesis”, Mol. Reprod. Dev. 32, 160 – 167). To date, around 20 BMP family
members have been identified and characterized. BMPs signal through serine/threonine kinase
receptors, composed of type I and II subtypes. Three type I receptors have been shown to bind BMP
ligands, type IA and IB BMP receptors (BMPR-IA or ALK-3 and BMPR-IB or ALK-6) and type IA
activin receptor (ActR-IA or ALK-2) (Koenig, B.B. et al. (1994) “Characterization and cloning of a
receptor for BMP-2 and BMP-4 from NIH 3T3 cells”, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14, 5961 – 5974; ten Dijke, P.
et al. (1994) “Identification of type I receptors for osteogenic protein-1 and bone morphogenetic
protein-4”, J. Biol. Chem. 269, 16985 – 16988; Macias-Silva, M. et al. (1998) “Specific activation of
Smad1 signaling pathways by the BMP7 type I receptor, ALK2”, J. Biol. Chem. 273, 25628 – 25636).
Three type II receptors for BMPs have also been identified and they are type II BMP receptor
(BMPR-II) and type II and IIB activin receptors (ActR-II and ActR-IIB) (Yamashita, H. et al. (1995)
“Osteogenic protein-1 binds to activin type II receptors and induces certain activin-like effects”, J. Cell.
Biol. 130, 217 – 226; Rosenzweig, B.L. et al. (1995) “Cloning and characterization of a human type II
receptor for bone morphogenetic proteins”, Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 92, 7632 – 7636; Kawabata, M.
et al. (1995) “Cloning of a novel type II serine/threonine kinase receptor through interaction with the
type I transforming growth factor-b receptor”, J. Biol. Chem. 270, 5625 – 5630). Whereas BMPR-IA,
IB and II are specific to BMPs, ActR-IA, II and IIB are also signaling receptors for activins. These
receptors are expressed differentially in various tissues. Type I and II BMP receptors are both
indispensable for signal transduction. After ligand binding they form a heterotetrameric-activated
receptor complex consisting of two pairs of a type I and II receptor complex (Moustakas, A. and C.H.
Heldi (2002) “From mono- to oligo-Smads: the heart of the matter in TGFb signal transduction” Genes
Dev. 16, 67 – 871). The type I BMP receptor substrates include a protein family, the Smad proteins, that
play a central role in relaying the BMP signal from the receptor to target genes in the nucleus. Smad1, 5
and 8 are phosphorylated by BMP receptors in a ligand-dependent manner (Hoodless, P.A. et al. (1996)
“MADR1, a MAD-related protein that functions in BMP2 signaling pathways”, Cell 85, 489 – 500;
Chen Y. et al. (1997) “Smad8 mediates the signaling of the receptor serine kinase”, Proc. Natl Acad.
Sci. USA 94, 12938 – 12943; Nishimura R. et al. (1998) “Smad5 and DPC4 are key molecules in

ISSN 0897-7194 print/ISSN 1029-2292 online q 2004 Taylor & Francis Ltd
DOI: 10.1080/08977190412331279890

*Corresponding author. E-mail: mundy@uthscsa.edu

Growth Factors, December 2004 Vol. 22 (4), pp. 233–241

Growth Factors Downloaded from informahealthcare.com by University of Chicago Library on 06/08/12

For personal use only.

mediating BMP-2-induced osteoblastic differentiation of the pluripotent mesenchymal precursor cell
line C2C12”, J. Biol. Chem. 273, 1872 – 1879). After release from the receptor, the phosphorylated
Smad proteins associate with the related protein Smad4, which acts as a shared partner. This complex
translocates into the nucleus and participates in gene transcription with other transcription factors
(Fig. 1). A significant advancement about the understanding of in vivo functions of BMP ligands,
receptors and signaling molecules has been achieved in recent years.

Keywords: Bone morphogenetic proteins; Transforming growth factor b; Bone; Fibrodysplasia
ossificans progressiva

BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS OF BMP

S

Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been impli-
cated in a variety of functions. BMPs induce the formation
of both cartilage and bone. BMPs also play a role in a
number of non-osteogenic developmental processes.
Neural induction represents the earliest step in
the determination of ectodermal cell fates. In vertebrates,

BMPs act as signals of epidermal induction (Mun˜oz-
Sanjua´n and Brivanlou, 2002). BMP-2 directs the
development of neural crest cells into neuronal pheno-
types (Christiansen et al., 2000), while BMP-4 and 7
specifically induce a sympathetic adrenergic phenotype.
BMPs give direction to somite development by inhibiting
the process of myogenesis. In the limb bud, BMP-2
interacts with the fibroblast growth factor 4 and sonic

FIGURE 1

BMP signaling and its regulation. BMP signals are mediated by type I and II BMP receptors and their downstream molecules Smad1, 5

and 8. Phosphorylated Smad1, 5 and 8 proteins form a complex with Smad4 and then are translocated into the nucleus where they interact with other
transcription factors, such as Runx2 in osteoblasts. BMP signaling is regulated at different molecular levels: (1) Noggin and other cystine knot-
containing BMP antagonists bind with BMP-2, 4 and 7 and block BMP signaling. Over-expression of noggin in mature osteoblasts causes osteoporosis in
mice (Devlin et al., 2003; Wu et al., 2003). (2) Smad6 binds type I BMP receptor and prevents Smad1, 5 and 8 to be activated (Imamura et al., 1997).
Over-expression of Smad6 in chondrocytes causes delays in chondrocyte differentiation and maturation (Horiki et al., 2004). (3) Tob interacts
specifically with BMP activated Smad proteins and inhibits BMP signaling. In Tob null mutant mice, BMP signaling is enhanced and bone formation is
increased (Yoshida et al., 2000). (4) Smurf1 is a Hect domain E3 ubiquitin ligase. It interacts with Smad1 and 5 and mediates the degradation of these
Smad proteins (Zhu et al., 1999). (5) Smurf1 also recognizes bone-specific transcription factor Runx2 and mediates Runx2 degradation (Zhao et al.,
2003). (6) Smurf1 also forms a complex with Smad6, is exported from the nucleus and targeted to the type I BMP receptors for their degradation
(Murakami et al., 2003). Over-expression of Smurf1 in osteoblasts inhibits postnatal bone formation in mice (Zhao et al., 2004).

D. CHEN et al.

234

Growth Factors Downloaded from informahealthcare.com by University of Chicago Library on 06/08/12

For personal use only.

hedgehog, inhibits limb bud expansion and induces the
formation of chondrocyte and osteoblast precursors
(Niswander and Martin, 1993; Wall and Hogan, 1994).

Physiological roles of BMPs and BMP receptor

signaling in normal bone formation have been investi-
gated. Injection of BMP-2 locally over the surface of
calvariae of mice induces periosteal bone formation on the
surface of calvariae without a prior cartilage phase (Chen
et al., 1997). Over-expression of a dominant-negative
truncated BMPR-IB in osteoblast precursor 2T3 cells
inhibits osteoblast-specific gene expression and miner-
alized bone matrix formation (Chen et al., 1998). In the
transgenic mice in which expression of a dominant-
negative truncated BMPR-IB transgene is targeted to the
osteoblast lineage using the osteoblast-specific type I
collagen promoter, the postnatal bone formation, includ-
ing bone mineral density, static bone volume and dynamic
bone formation rates, is decreased (Zhao et al., 2002).
These results demonstrate that BMP receptor signaling
plays a necessary role in normal postnatal bone formation.

MUTATIONS IN BMP

S

AND BMP RECEPTORS

Studies of naturally occurring mutations of BMPs and
BMP receptors have shown that BMPs play important
roles in several inherited diseases. In mice with short ear
mutations BMP-5 gene was disrupted. This mutation in
the BMP-5 gene is associated with a wide range of skeletal
defects, including reductions in long bone width and the
size of several vertebral processes and an overall lower
body mass (Kingsley et al., 1992; Mikic et al., 1995).
Mutations in growth/differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5,
CDMP-1 and BMP-11) gene result in brachypodism in
mice (Storm et al., 1994) and chondrodysplasia in humans
(Thomas et al., 1996; Thomas et al., 1997). Both BMP-5
and GDF-5 genes are localized on chromosome 2 in mice
and on chromosome 20 in humans (Storm et al., 1994).
GDF-5 has been shown to bind BMPR-IB specifically
(Nishitoh et al., 1996) and null mutations in the BMPR-IB
gene causes a similar skeletal phenotype as that observed
in GDF-5 mutant mice (Yi et al., 2000).

Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is an

extremely rare and disabling genetic disorder character-
ized by congenital malformations of the great toes and by
progressive heterotopic endochondral ossification in
predictable anatomical patterns. Ectopic expression of
BMP-4 was found in FOP patients (Gannon et al., 1997;
Xu et al., 2000). Familial primary pulmonary hyper-
tension is a rare autosomal dominant disorder that has
been mapped to chromosome 2q33. Monoclonal plexi-
form lesions of proliferating endothelial cells in
pulmonary arterioles are the major phenotype of this
disease. These lesions lead to elevated pulmonary
artery pressure, right ventricular failure and death. After
genotyping multiple families with this disorder, BMPR-II
mutations have been found in these patients (Lane et al.,
2000; Deng et al., 2000; Newman et al., 2001). Mutations

in GDF-9 and GDF-9b genes have been found in patients
with premature ovarian failure and polycystic ovary
syndrome (Takebayashi et al., 2000). Over-expression of
BMP-2, 4 and 5 and BMPR-IA is associated with
malignancy of the oral epithelium (Jin et al., 2001) and
over-expression of BMP-3 and 2 has been described in
prostate cancer cells (Harris et al., 1994).

NULL MUTATIONS OF BMP

S

, BMP RECEPTORS

AND SMADS

To determine the roles of BMP ligands, receptors and
signaling proteins in embryonic development and in
postnatal life, null mutations of BMP ligands, receptors
and Smad genes have been created and phenotypic
changes in these animals have been extensively studied.
Mice deficient for BMP-2 and 4 are nonviable.
Homozygous BMP-2 mutant embryos die between
embryonic day 7.5 (E7.5) and 10.5 (E10.5) and have
defects in cardiac development, manifested by the
abnormal development of the heart in the exocoelomic
cavity (Zhang and Bradley, 1996). Homozygous BMP-4
mutant embryos die between E6.5 and E9.5 and show little
or no mesodermal differentiation (Winnier et al., 1995).
BMP-7 deficient mice die shortly after birth because of
poor kidney development. Histological analysis of mutant
embryos at several stages of development reveals that
metanephric mesenchymal cells fail to differentiate,
resulting in a virtual absence of glomerulus in newborn
kidneys. In addition, BMP-7 deficient mice have eye
defects that appear to originate during lens induction.
BMP-7 deficient mice have minor defects in the skeleton
(Dudley et al., 1995; Luo et al., 1995). BMP-6 deficient
mice are viable and fertile, and show no overt defects in
tissues known to express BMP-6 mRNA (Solloway et al.,
1998). BMP-6 is mainly expressed in hypertrophic
cartilage. Since BMP-2 and 6 are co-expressed in this
tissue, BMP-2 may functionally compensate the loss of
BMP-6 in BMP-6 null mutant mice. Conditional knockout
of BMP-2 gene in cartilage with BMP-6 null mutation will
be required to answer this question.

Growth/differentiation factor-8 (GDF-8, myostatin) is

expressed specifically in developing and adult skeletal
muscle. During early stages of embryogenesis, GDF-8
expression is restricted to the myotome compartment of
developing somites. At later stages and in adult animals,
GDF-8 is expressed in many different muscles throughout
the body. GDF-8 null mutant mice are significantly larger
than wild-type mice and show a large and widespread
increase in skeletal muscle mass (McPherron et al., 1997).

Null mutation of the BMPR-IA gene causes embryonic

lethality in mice. Animals die at E9.5. Homozygous
mutants with morphological defects are first detected at
E7.5. No mesoderm forms in the mutant embryos,
suggesting that BMPR-IA is essential for the inductive
events that lead to the formation of mesoderm during
gastrulation (Mishina et al., 1995). Mice lacking

BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEINS

235

Growth Factors Downloaded from informahealthcare.com by University of Chicago Library on 06/08/12

For personal use only.

BMPR-IB are viable and exhibit defects in the
appendicular skeleton. In BMPR-IB deficient mice,
proliferation of prechondrogenic cells and chondrocyte
differentiation in the phalangeal region are markedly
reduced. In adult mutant mice, the proximal interpha-
langeal joint is absent, and the phalanges are replaced by a
single rudimentary element, while the distal phalanges are
unaffected. The lengths of the radius, ulna and tibia are
normal, but the metacarpals and metatarsals are reduced
(Yi et al., 2000). The appendicular defects in BMPR-IB
mutant mice resemble those seen in mice homozygous for
the GDF-5

bp – j

null allele of the GDF-5 locus. Since GDF-

5 has been shown to play a critical role in cartilage
formation and binds BMPR-IB with high affinity (Gannon
et al., 1997), these results suggest that BMPR-IB plays a
non-redundant role in cartilage formation in vivo. BMP
ligands may utilize multiple type I BMP receptors to
mediate their signaling during cartilage and bone
formation. In BMPR-IB and BMP-7 double mutant
mice, severe appendicular skeletal defects have been
observed in the forelimbs and hind limbs. The ulna is
nearly absent and the radius is shortened (Yi et al., 2000).
Since BMP-7 binds efficiently to both BMPR-IB and
ActR-IA (Alk2) (Macias-Silva et al., 1998), it is
conceivable that BMPR-IB and ActR-IA (Alk2) play
important synergistic or overlapping roles in cartilage and
bone formation in vivo.

Smad1 null mutant mice die at E10.5 because they fail

to connect to the placenta. Smad1 mutant embryos show
overgrowth of the posterior visceral endoderm as well as
extra-embryonic ectoderm and mesoderm of the chorion.
The overgrowth effect on the allantois in Smad1 mutant
embryos leads to a dramatic reduction in the size and
patterning of this tissue and concomitant failure to form
the umbilical connection to the placenta (Tremblay et al.,
2001). Homozygous Smad5 null mutant mice die between
days 10.5 and 11.5 of gestation due to defects in
angiogenesis. The mutant yolk sacs lack normal
vasculature and had irregularly distributed blood cells.
Smad5 mutant embryos have enlarged blood vessels
surrounded by decreased numbers of vascular smooth
muscle cells (Yang et al., 1999). These findings suggest
that Smad5 may regulate endothelium-mesenchyme
interactions during angiogenesis.

NEGATIVE REGULATION OF BMP SIGNALING

BMPs are potent stimulators on bone formation and on
other cellular functions. The activity of BMPs is
controlled at different molecular levels: (1) a series of
BMP antagonists bind BMP ligands and inhibit BMP
functions, (2) Smad6 is member of the Smad family.
It binds type I BMP receptors and prevents the binding and
phosphorylation of Smad1 and 5, (3) tob is an anti-
proliferative protein. It selectively binds Smad1 and 5 and
inhibits BMP signaling in osteoblasts and (4) Smad
ubiquitin regulatory factor 1 (Smurf1) is an E3 ubiquitin

ligase. It interacts with Smad1 and 5 and mediates the
degradation of these Smad proteins.

The mutations of the BMP antagonists have shown how

important the activity of BMPs is controlled in a given
system. For example, proximal symphalangism is an
autosomal-dominant disorder with ankylosis of the
proximal interphalangeal joints, carpal and tarsal bone
fusion and conductive deafness. These symptoms are
shared by another disorder of joint morphogenesis,
multiple synostoses syndrome. Recently, it was reported
that both disorders were caused by heterozygous
mutations of the human noggin gene. To date, seven
mutations of noggin gene have been identified from
unrelated families affected with joint morphogenesis
(Gong et al., 1999; Takahashi et al., 2001). Noggin is a
secreted polypeptide which binds and inactivates BMP-2,
4 and 7. Co-crystal structures of noggin and BMP-7 show
that noggin inhibits BMP signaling by blocking the
molecular interfaces of the binding epitopes for both type I
and II BMP receptors. The type I and II receptor binding
domains on each BMP-7 monomer interact with a specific
clip section from each monomer of the dimeric noggin
complex (Groppe et al., 2002), thus preventing BMP-7 to
bind with BMP receptors. This 3D crystal structure clearly
shows how noggin specifically inhibits BMP-2, 4 and 7.
A transgenic mouse model has recently been established
using the osteocalcin promoter to drive the noggin
transgene. The animals develop osteoporosis. Significant
reductions in bone mineral density, bone volume and bone
formation rates are observed (Fig. 1) (Devlin et al., 2003;
Wu et al., 2003).

Sclerostosis is a recessive inherited osteosclerotic

disorder caused by mutations in the protein sclerostin.
The disease was initially considered to be a variant of
osteopetrosis (Truswell, 1958), but subsequent metabolic
studies reveal that the disorder is primarily due to
increased bone formation, rather than defects in bone
resorption (Stein et al., 1983). Recently, it was found that
sclerostin is related in sequence to the family of secreted
BMP antagonists, which includes Noggin, Chordin,
Gremlin and Dan. Sclerostin is expressed in osteoblasts
and osteocytes and binds BMP-5, 6 and 7 with high
affinity. Expression of sclerostin in multipotent fibroblast
C3H10T1/2 cells blocks osteoblast differentiation and
over-expression of sclerostin in osteoblasts under the
control of the osteocalcin promoter in transgenic mice
causes osteoporosis (Winkler et al., 2003). Taken
together, these findings provide evidences that activation
of endogenous BMP signaling can enhance bone
formation, and regulation of the amount of BMP
activity in postnatal stage is required for normal bone
formation.

Smad6 is another member of Smad family which plays

a negative regulatory role in BMP signaling by stably
binding to type I BMP receptors. Smad6 interferes
the phosphorylation of Smad1 and 5 proteins and
the subsequent heteromerization with Smad4 (Fig. 1)
(Imamura et al., 1997). Over-expression of Smad6 in

D. CHEN et al.

236

Growth Factors Downloaded from informahealthcare.com by University of Chicago Library on 06/08/12

For personal use only.

chondrocytes causes delays in chondrocyte differentiation
and maturation (Horiki et al., 2004). Expression of Smad6
is regulated by BMPs. In mouse Smad6 promoter, four
overlapping copies of the GCCGnCGC-like motif, which
is the binding site for Smad1 and 5, have been identified
(Ishida et al., 2000). These findings establish a negative
feedback regulation mechanism for BMP signaling.
Smad6 knock-in mice shows that expression of Smad6
is largely restricted to the heart and blood vessels. Smad6
mutant mice have multiple cardiovascular abnormalities.
Hyperplasia of the cardiac valves and outflow tract
separation defects indicate that Smad6 plays an important
function in the regulation of endocardial cushion
transformation. The development of aortic ossification
and elevated blood pressure in Smad6 mutant mice
demonstrate that Smad6 also plays a role in homeostasis
of adult cardiovascular system (Galvin et al., 2000).

Tob is a member of a novel anti-proliferative protein

family including Tob, Tob2, BTG1, BTG2 and BTG3. Tob
inhibits BMP-induced, Smad-dependent transcription in
osteoblasts through its association with Smad1 and 5
proteins (Yoshida et al., 2000). In Tob knockout mice,
BMP-2 signaling is enhanced and the effects of BMP-2 on
osteoblast proliferation and differentiation are increased.
BMP-2-induced local bone formation is also enhanced in
Tob knockout mice (Usui et al., 2002). Bone volume and
bone formation rates are increased in adult Tob knockout
mice (Fig. 1) (Yoshida et al., 2000).

Another important regulatory mechanism by which the

activity of BMP signaling proteins is modulated involves
ubquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. The ubiqui-
tin-proteasome proteolytic pathway is essential for various
important biological processes including cell-cycle
progression, gene transcription and signal transduction
(Hershko and Ciechanover, 1998; Weissman, 2001). The
formation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates requires three
enzymes that participate in a cascade of ubiquitin transfer
reactions: ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1), ubiquitin-
conjugating enzyme (E2) and ubiquitin ligase (E3). The
specificity of protein ubiquitination is determined by E3
ubiquitin ligases, which play a crucial role in defining
substrate specificity and subsequent protein degradation
by 26S proteasomes (Hershko, 1983; Ciechanover et al.,
2000).

Smurf1 was identified by the yeast two-hybrid assay

by its ability to interact with Smad1 and 5 and mediate
the degradation of these Smad proteins (Fig. 1) (Zhu
et al., 1999). Since bone-specific transcription factor
Runx2/Cbfa1 interacts with Smad1 protein (Hanai et al.,
1999) whose degradation is mediated by Smurf1 (Zhu
et al., 1999), we have examined the effect of Smurf1 on
Runx2 degradation in myoblast/osteoblast precursor
C2C12 cells and osteoblast precursor 2T3 cells. We
found that Smurf1 mediates Runx2 degradation in a
ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent manner (Fig. 1) (Zhao
et al., 2003). Smurf1 also binds Smad6 in the nucleus and
is exported with Smad6 to the plasma membrane to target
the degradation of the type I BMP receptors (Fig. 1)

(Murakami et al., 2003). These findings suggest that
Smurf1 regulates BMP signaling through targeting to
multiple BMP signaling proteins. To determine the role of
Smurf1 in bone formation in vivo, we have recently
generated transgenic mice (Col1a1-Smurf1) in which
expression of a Smurf1 transgene is targeted to osteoblasts
using the murine 2.3 kb type I collagen promoter.
In Col1a1-Smurf1 transgenic mice, trabecular bone
volume and bone formation rates are decreased.
Osteoblast proliferation and differentiation are inhibited
in Col1a1-Smurf1 transgenic mice, suggesting that bone
formation defects found in Smurf1 transgenic mice are
mainly due to decreased osteoblast proliferation and
differentiation (Fig. 2) (Zhao et al., 2004). Consistent
with these findings, recent studies demonstrate that bone
formation is enhanced in Smurf1 null mutant mice. Bone
mineral density is increased in 4- to12-month-old Smurf1
null mutant mice. Trabecular bone volume and bone
formation rates are also increased in these mice
(Yamashita et al., 2003). These results demonstrate that
regulation of BMP signaling proteins may also play an
important physiological role in bone formation in vivo.

THERAPEUTIC UTILIZATION OF BMP-2

The osteoinductive capacity of BMP-2 has been demon-
strated in preclinical models and evaluated in clinical
trials. Many of the animal models used to evaluate the
capacity of BMP-2 to heal bone defects have utilized
critical-sized defects. In these animal models, bone
defects are large enough that they will not heal without
a therapeutic intervention. This setting facilitates analysis
of the ability of BMP-2 to induce bone. Healing of long
bone critical-sized defects by BMP-2 has been demon-
strated in species including rats, rabbits, dogs, sheep and
non-human primates (Murakami et al., 2002). Gene
therapy studies show that bone defects are healed by the
implantation of a bioresorbable polymer mixed with bone
marrow mesenchymal stem cells to which adenovirus
BMP-2 is transferred (Chang et al., 2003). Systemic
administration of rhBMP-2 increases mesenchymal stem
cell activity and reverses ovariectomy-induced and
age-related bone loss in two different mouse models
(Turgeman et al., 2002). These results suggest that
BMP-2 may be utilized for the treatment of osteoporosis.
Recent studies show that rhBMP-2 delivered in an
injectable formula with a calcium phosphate carrier or
with a liposome carrier accelerates bone healing in a rabbit
ulna osteotomy model and a rat femoral bone defect model
(Li et al., 2003; Matsuo et al., 2003). Recent clinical
studies show that rhBMP-2 can be used as complete bone
graft substitutes in spinal fusion surgery. In some
circumstances, the efficacy of BMP-2 for inducing
successful fusion is superior to that of autogenous bone
graft. BMP-2 is shown to be efficacious in several
fusion applications, including intervertebral and lumbar
posterolateral fusion (Sandhu, 2003). BMP-2 has also

BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEINS

237

Growth Factors Downloaded from informahealthcare.com by University of Chicago Library on 06/08/12

For personal use only.

FIGURE 2

Smurf1 inhibits bone formation in Col1a1-Smurf1 transgenic mice. (a,b) Reduction in Smad1 and Runx2 protein levels in 2T3 osteoblast

precursor cells stably transfected with Smurf1 expression plasmid (2T3/Smurf1). The protein levels of Smad1 and Runx2 were detected by Western blot
analysis. In 2T3/Smurf1 cells, Smad1 and Runx2 protein levels were decreased. (c) Inhibition of BMP signaling in 2T3/Smurf1 cells. 2T3/vector and
2T3/Smurf1 cells were transfected with BMP signaling reporter construct, 12xSBE-OC-Luc (Zhao et al., 2003), and treated with 50 ng/ml of BMP-2.
Expression of Smurf1 inhibited BMP-2-stimulated luciferase activity. Transfection of Smad6 further inhibited BMP-2-stimulated luciferase activity.
*p , 0:05; #p , 0:05; unpaired t-test, compared to the same treatments in 2T3/vector group. (d) Expression of the Flag-tagged Smurf1 transgene in
Col1a1-Smurf1 transgenic mice. Primary osteoblasts were isolated from calvariae of transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates. Expression of Flag-
Smurf1 protein in osteoblasts of Smurf1 transgenic mice was detected by Western blot analysis using the anti-Flag M2 antibody. (e, f) Trabecular bone
volume (BV) is decreased in Col1a1-Smurf1 transgenic mice. Bone volume was analyzed in two separate lines of transgenic mice in a defined area in
proximal tibiae of 3-mo-old Smurf1 transgenic mice and wild-type littermates ðn ¼ 10Þ and the BV was normalized to tissue volume (TV) (f). In Smurf1
transgenic mice, a 33% decrease in BV was observed compared with their wild-type littermates (e, f). *p , 0:05; unpaired t-test. (g, h) Bone formation
rates (BFR) are decreased in Col1a1-Smurf1 transgenic mice. BFR were measured and calculated in the same area as BV was measured using the
OsteoMeasure system (Osteometrics Inc., Atlanta, GA). BFR were significantly decreased (40%) in Smurf1 transgenic mice compared with littermate
control mice. *p , 0:05; unpaired t-test. (i) ALP staining. In Col1a1-Smurf1 transgenic mice, ALP staining in osteoblasts of trabecular bone of proximal
tibiae was reduced compared with that in wild-type control mice.

D. CHEN et al.

238

Growth Factors Downloaded from informahealthcare.com by University of Chicago Library on 06/08/12

For personal use only.

been shown to induce new dentine formation and has a
potential application as a substitute for root canal surgery
and BMP-2 is an effective bone inducer around dental
implants for periodontal reconstruction (Cochran and
Wozney, 1999).

Although a significant acheivment has been made in

recent years in understanding the role of BMP signaling
in vivo, tissue-specific knock-outs of the individual BMP
ligands, receptors and signaling molecules are required to
further determine the specific roles of BMP signaling in a
particular tissue since null mutations of most of BMP
ligands, receptors and signaling molecules produce lethal
phenotype perinatally. Generation of tissue-specific and
inducible conditional knockout alleles for BMP ligands,
receptors and signaling molecules would allow us to gain
further information about physiological functions of BMP
signaling in postnatal and adult animals.

References

Chang, S.C., Chuang, H.L., Chen, Y.R., Chen, J.K., Chung, H.Y.,

Lu, Y.L., Lin, H.Y., Tai, C.L. and Lou, J. (2003) “Ex vivo gene
therapy in autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for tissue-
engineered maxillofacial bone regeneration”, Gene Ther. 10,
2013 – 2019.

Chen, Y., Bhushan, A. and Vale, W. (1997) “Smad8 mediates the

signaling of the receptor serine kinase”, Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 94,
12938 – 12943.

Chen, D., Harris, M.A., Rossini, G., Dunstan, C.R., Dallas, S.L., Feng,

J.Q., Mundy, G.R. and Harris, S.E. (1997) “Bone morphogenetic
protein 2 (BMP-2) enhances BMP-3, 4 and bone cell differentiation
marker gene expression during the induction of mineralized bone
matrix formation in cultures of fetal rat calvarial osteoblasts”, Calcif.
Tissue Int. 60, 283 – 290.

Chen, D., Ji, X., Harris, M.A., Feng, J.Q., Karsenty, G., Celeste, A.J.,

Rosen, V., Mundy, G.R. and Harris, S.E. (1998) “Differential roles for
BMP receptor type IB and IA in differentiation and specification of
mesenchymal precursor cells to osteoblast and adipocyte lineages”,
J. Cell. Biol. 142, 295 – 305.

Christiansen, J.H., Coles, E. and Wilkinson, D.G. (2000) “Molecular

control of neural crest formation, migration and differentiation”,
Curr. Opin. Cell. Biol. 12, 719 – 724.

Ciechanover, A., Orian, A. and Schwartz, A.L. (2000) “The ubiquitin-

mediated proteolytic pathway: mode of action and clinical
implications”, J. Cell. Biochem. 77(S34), 40 – 51.

Cochran, D. and Wozney, J.M. (1999) “Biological mediators for

periodontal regeneration”, Periodontology 19, 40 – 58.

Deng, Z., Morse, J.H., Slager, S.L., Cuervo, N., Moore, M.J., Venetos, G.,

Kalachikov, S., Cayanis, E., Fischer, S.G., Barst, R.J., Hodge, S.E.
and

Knowles,

J.A.

(2000)

“Familial

primary

pulmonary

hypertension (gene PPH1) is caused by mutations in the bone
morphogenetic protein receptor-II gene”, Am. J. Hum. Genet. 67,
737 – 744.

Devlin, R.D., Du, Z., Pereira, R.C., Kimble, R.B., Economides, N.,

Jorgetti, V. and Canalis, E. (2003) “Skeletal over-expression of
noggin results in osteopenia and reduced bone formation”,
Endocrinology 144, 1972 – 1978.

ten Dijke, P., Yamashita, H., Sampath, T.K., Reddi, A.H., Estevez, M.,

Riddle, D.L., Ichijo, H., Heldin, C.H. and Miyazono, K. (1994)
“Identification of type I receptors for osteogenic protein-1 and bone
morphogenetic protein-4”, J. Biol. Chem. 269, 16985 – 16988.

Dudley, A.T., Lyons, K.M. and Robertson, E.J. (1995) “A requirement for

bone morphogenetic protein-7 during development of the mammalian
kidney and eye”, Genes Dev. 9, 2795 – 2807.

Galvin, K.M., Donovan, M.J., Lynch, C.A., Meyer, R.I., Paul, R.J.,

Lorenz, J.N., Fairchild-Huntress, V., Dixon, K.L., Dunmore, J.H.,
Gimbrone, Jr., M.A., Falb, D. and Huszar, D. (2000) “A role for
smad6 in development and homeostasis of the cardiovascular
system”, Nat. Genet. 24, 171 – 174.

Gannon, F.H., Kaplan, F.S., Olmsted, E., Finkel, G.C., Zasloff, M.A. and

Shore, E. (1997) “Bone morphogenetic protein 2/4 in early
fibromatous lesions of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva”, Hum.
Pathol. 28, 339 – 343.

Gong, Y., Krakow, D., Marcelino, J., Wilkin, D., Chitayat, D., Babul-

Hirji, R., Hudgins, L., Cremers, C.W., Cremers, F.P., Brunner, H.G.,
Reinker, K., Rimoin, D.L., Cohn, D.H., Goodman, F.R., Reardon, W.,
Patton, M., Francomano, C.A. and Warman, M.L. (1999)
“Heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding noggin affect
human joint morphogenesis”, Nat. Genet. 21, 302 – 304.

Groppe, J., Greenwald, J., Wiater, E., Rodrizuez-Leon, J., Economides,

A.N., Kwiatkowshi, W., Affolter, M., Vale, W., Belmonte, J.C.I. and
Choe, S. (2002) “Structural basis of BMP signaling inhibition by the
cystine knot protein Noggin”, Nature 420, 636 – 642.

Hanai, J.I., Chen, L.F., Kanno, T., Ohtani-Fujita, N., Kim, W.Y., Guo, W-

H., Imamura, T., Ishidou, Y., Fukuchi, M., Shi, M.J., Stavnezer, J.,
Kawabata, M., Miyazono, K. and Ito, Y. (1999) “Interaction and
functional cooperation of PEBP2/CBF with Smads. Synergistic
induction of the immunoglobulin germline Calpha promoter”, J. Biol.
Chem. 274, 31577 – 31582.

Harris, S.E., Harris, M.A., Mahy, P., Wozney, J.M., Feng, J.Q. and

Mundy, G.R. (1994) “Expression of bone morphogenetic protein
messenger RNAs by normal rat and human prostate and prostate
cancer cells”, Prostate 24, 204 – 211.

Hershko, A. and Ciechanover, A. (1998) “The ubiquitin system”, Annu.

Rev. Biochem. 67, 425 – 479, Review.

Hershko, A. (1983) “Ubiquitin: roles in protein modification and

breakdown”, Cell 34, 11 – 12.

Hoodless, P.A., Haerry, T., Abdollah, S., Stapleton, M., O’Connor, M.B.,

Attisano, L. and Wrana, J.L. (1996) “MADR1, a MAD-related
protein that functions in BMP2 signaling pathways”, Cell 85,
489 – 500.

Horiki, M., Imamura, T., Okamoto, M., Hayashi, M., Murai, J., Myoui,

A., Ochi, T., Miyazono, K., Yoshikawa, H. and Tsumaki, N. (2004)
“Smad6/Smurf1 overexpression in cartilage delays chondrocyte
hypertrophy and causes dwarfism with osteopenia”, J Cell. Biol. 165,
433 – 445.

Imamura, T., Takase, M., Nishihara, A., Oeda, E., Hanai, J., Kawabata,

M. and Miyazono, K. (1997) “Smad6 inhibits signalling by the TGF-
beta superfamily”, Nature 389, 622 – 626.

Ishida, W., Hamamoto, T., Kusanagi, K., Yagi, K., Kawabata, M.,

Takehara, K., Sampath, T.K., Kato, M. and Miyazono, K. (2000)
“Smad6 is a Smad1/5-induced smad inhibitor. Characterization of
bone morphogenetic protein-responsive element in the mouse Smad6
promoter”, J. Biol. Chem. 275, 6075 – 6079.

Jin, Y., Tipoe, G.L., Liong, E.C., Lau, T.Y., Fung, P.C. and Leung, K.M.

(2001) “Overexpression of BMP-2/4, -5 and BMPR-IA associated
with malignancy of oral epithelium”, Oral Oncol. 37, 225 – 233.

Kawabata, M., Chytil, A. and Moses, H.L. (1995) “Cloning of a novel

type II serine/threonine kinase receptor through interaction with the
type I transforming growth factor-b receptor”, J. Biol. Chem. 270,
5625 – 5630.

Kingsley, D.M., Bland, A.E., Grubber, J.M., Marker, P.C., Russell, L.B.,

Copeland, N.C. and Jenkins, N.A. (1992) “The mouse short ear
skeletal morphogenesis is associated with defects in a bone
morphogenetic member of the TGF superfamily”, Cell 71, 399 – 410.

Koenig, B.B., Cook, J.S., Wolsing, D.H., Ting, J., Tiesman, J.P., Correa,

P.E., Olson, C.A., Pecquetl, F., Ventura, F., Grant, R.A., Chen, G.,
Wrana, J., Massague´, J. and Rosenbaum, J.S. (1994) “Characteriz-
ation and cloning of a receptor for BMP-2 and BMP-4 from NIH 3T3
cells”, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14, 5961 – 5974.

Lane, K.B., Machado, R.D., Pauciulo, M.W., Thomson, J.R., Phillips,

J.A., Loyd, J.E., Nichols, W.C. and Trembath, R.C. (2000)
“Heterozygous germline mutations in BMPR2, encoding a TGF-b
receptor, cause familial primary pulmonary hypertension”, Nat.
Genet. 26, 81 – 84.

Li, R.H., Bouxsein, M.L., Blake, C.A., D’Augusta, D., Kim, H., Li, X.J.,

Wozney, J.M. and Seeherman, H.J. (2003) “rhBMP-2 injected in a
calcium phosphate paste (alpha-BSM) accelerates healing in the
rabbit ulnar osteotomy model”, J. Orthop. Res. 21, 997 – 1004.

Luo, G., Hofmann, C., Bronchers, A.J., Sohocki, M., Bradley, A. and

Karsenty, G. (1995) “BMP-7 is an inducer of nephrogenesis, and is
also required for eye development and skeletal patterning”, Genes
Dev. 9, 2808 – 2820.

Luyten, F.P., Cunningham, N.S., Ma, S., Muthukumaran, N., Hammonds,

R.G., Nevins, W.B., Woods, W.I. and Reddi, A.H. (1989)
“Purification and partial amino acid sequence of osteogenin,

BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEINS

239

Growth Factors Downloaded from informahealthcare.com by University of Chicago Library on 06/08/12

For personal use only.

a protein initiating bone differentiation”, J. Biol. Chem. 264,
13377 – 13380.

Macias-Silva, M., Hoodless, P.A., Tang, S.J., Buchwald, M. and

Wrana, J.L. (1998) “Specific activation of Smad1 signaling pathways
by the BMP7 type I receptor, ALK2”, J. Biol. Chem. 273,
25628 – 25636.

Matsuo, T., Sugita, T., Kubo, T., Yasunaga, Y., Ochi, M. and Murakami,

T. (2003) “Injectable magnetic liposomes as a novel carrier of
recombinant human BMP-2 for bone formation in a rat bone-defect
model”, J. Biomed. Mater. Res. 66A, 747 – 754.

McPherron, A.C., Lawler, A.M. and Lee, S.J. (1997) “Regulation of

skeletal muscle mass in mice by a new TGFb superfamily member”,
Nature 387, 83 – 90.

Mikic, B., van der Meulen, M.C., Kingsley, D.M. and Carter, D.R. (1995)

“Long bone geometry and strength in adult BMP-5 deficient mice”,
Bone 16, 445 – 454.

Mishina, Y., Suzuki, A., Ueno, N. and Behringer, R.B. (1995) “Bmpr

encodes a type I bone morphogenetic protein receptor that is essential
for gastrulation during mouse embryogenesis”, Genes Dev. 9,
3027 – 3037.

Moustakas, A. and Heldi, C.H. (2002) “From mono- to oligo-Smads: the

heart of the matter in TGFb signal transduction”, Genes Dev. 16,
67 – 1871.

Mun˜oz-Sanjua´n, I. and Brivanlou, A.H. (2002) “Neural induction, the

default model and embryonic stem cells”, Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 3,
271 – 280.

Murakami, N., Saito, N., Horiuchi, H., Okada, T., Nozaki, K. and

Takaoka, K. (2002) “Repair of segmental defects in rabbit humeri
with titanium fiber mesh cylinders containing recombinant human
bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and a synthetic polymer”,
J. Biomed. Mater. Res. 62, 169 – 174.

Murakami, G., Watabe, T., Takaoka, K., Miyazono, K. and Imamura, T.

(2003) “Cooperative inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein
signaling by Smurf1 and inhibitory Smads”, Mol. Biol. Cell. 14,
2809 – 2817.

Newman, J.H., Wheeler, L., Lane, K.B., Loyd, E., Gaddipati, R.,

Phillips, 3rd, J.A. and Loyd, J.E. (2001) “Mutation in the gene for
bone morphogenetic protein receptor II as a cause of primary
pulmonary hypertension in a large kindred”, N. Engl. J. Med. 345,
319 – 324.

Nishimura, R., Kato, Y., Chen, D., Harris, S.E., Mundy, G.R. and

Yoneda, T. (1998) “Smad5 and DPC4 are key molecules in mediating
BMP-2-induced osteoblastic differentiation of the pluripotent
mesenchymal precursor cell line C2C12”, J. Biol. Chem. 273,
1872 – 1879.

Nishitoh, H., Ichijo, H., Kimura, M., Matsumoto, T., Makishima, F.,

Yamaguchi, A., Yamashita, H., Enomoto, S. and Miyazono, K. (1996)
“Identification of type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors
for

growth/differentiation

factor-5”,

J.

Biol.

Chem.

271

,

21345 – 21352.

Niswander, L. and Martin, G.R. (1993) “FGF-4 regulates expression

of Evx-1 in the developing mouse limb”, Development 119,
287 – 294.

Rosenzweig, B.L., Imamura, T., Okadome, T., Cox, G.N., Yamashita, H.,

ten Dijke, P., Heldin, C. and Miyazono, K. (1995) “Cloning and
characterization of a human type II receptor for bone morphogenetic
proteins”, Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 92, 7632 – 7636.

Sandhu, H.S. (2003) “Bone morphogenetic proteins and spinal surgery”,

Spine 28, S64 – S73.

Solloway, M.J., Dudley, A.T., Bikoff, E.K., Lyons, K.M., Hogan, B.L.

and Robertson, E.J. (1998) “Mice lacking Bmp6 function”, Dev.
Genet. 22, 321 – 339.

Stein, S.A., Witkop, C., Hill, S., Fallon, M.D., Viernstein, L., Gucer, G.,

McKeever, P., Long, D., Altman, J., Miller, N.R., Teitelbaum, S.L.
and Schlesinger, S. (1983) “Sclerosteosis: neurogenetic and
pathophysiologic analysis of an American kinship”, Neurology 33,
267 – 277.

Storm, E.E., Huynh, T.V., Copeland, N.G., Jenkins, N.A., Kingsley, D.M.

and Lee, S.J. (1994) “Limb alterations in brachypodism mice due to
mutations in a new member of the TGFb superfamily”, Nature 368,
639 – 643.

Takahashi, T., Takahashi, I., Komatsu, M., Sawaishi, Y., Higashi, K.,

Nishimura, G., Saito, H. and Takada, G. (2001) “Mutations of the
NOG gene in individuals with proximal symphalangism and multiple
synostosis syndrome”, Clin. Genet. 60, 447 – 451.

Takebayashi, K., Takakura, K., Wang, H., Kimura, F., Kasahara, K. and

Noda, Y. (2000) “Mutation analysis of the growth differentiation

factor-9

and

-9B

genes

in

patients

with

premature

ovarian failure and polycystic ovary syndrome”, Fertil. Steril. 74,
976 – 979.

Thomas, J.T., Lin, K., Nandedkar, M., Camargo, M., Cervenka, J.

and Luyten, F.P. (1996) “A human chondrodysplasia due to
a mutation in a TGFb superfamily member”, Nat. Genet. 12,
315 – 317.

Thomas, J.T., Kilpatrick, M.W., Lin, K., Erlacher, L., Lembessis, P.,

Costa, T., Tsipouras, P. and Luyten, F.P. (1997) “Disruption of human
limb morphogenesis by a dominant negative mutation in CDMP1”,
Nat. Genet. 17, 58 – 64.

Tremblay, K.D., Dunn, N.R. and Robertson, E. (2001) “Mouse embryos

lacking Smad1 signals display defects in extra-embryonic tissues and
germ cell formation”, Development 128, 3609 – 3621.

Truswell, A. (1958) “Osteopetrosis with Syndactyly: a morphological

variant of Albers-Schonberg’s disease”, J. Bone Joint Surg. 40,
208 – 218.

Turgeman, G., Zilberman, Y., Zhou, S., Kelly, P., Moutsatsos, I.K.,

Kharode, Y.P., Borella, L.E., Bex, F.J., Komm, B.S., Bodine, P.V. and
Gazit, D. (2002) “Systemically administered rhBMP-2 promotes
MSC activity and reverses bone and cartilage loss in osteopenic
mice”, J. Cell. Biochem. 86, 461 – 474.

Urist, M.R. (1965) “Bone formation by autoinduction”, Science 150,

893 – 899.

Usui, M., Yoshida, Y., Yamashita, T., Tsuji, K., Isao, I., Yamamoto, T.,

Nifuji, A. and Noda, M. (2002) “Enhancing effect of Tob
deficiency on bone formation is specific to bone morphogenetic
protein-induced osteogenesis”, J. Bone Miner. Res. 17, 1026 – 1033.

Wall, N.A. and Hogan, B.L. (1994) “TGF-beta related genes in

development”, Curr. Opin. Genet. Dev. 4, 517 – 522.

Weissman, A. (2001) “Themes and variations on ubiquitylation”, Nat.

Rev. Mol. Cell. Biol. 2, 169 – 178, Review.

Winkler, D.G., Sutherland, M.K., Geoghegan, J.C., Yu, C., Hayes, T.,

Skonier, J.E., Shpektor, D., Jonas, M., Kovacevich, B.R., Staehling-
Hampton, K., Appleby, M., Brunkow, M.E. and Latham, J.A. (2003)
“Osteocyte control of bone formation via sclerostin, a novel BMP
antagonist”, EMBO J. 22, 6267 – 6276.

Winnier, G., Blessing, M., Labosky, P.A. and Hogan, B.L.M.

(1995)

“Bone

morphogenetic

protein-4

is

required

for

mesoderm formation and patterning in the mouse”, Genes Dev. 9,
2105 – 2116.

Wozney, J.M., Rosen, V., Celeste, A.J., Mitsock, L.M., Whitters, M.J.,

Kriz, R., Hewick, R. and Wang, E.A. (1988) “Novel regulators of
bone formation: molecular clones and activities”, Science 242,
1528 – 1534.

Wozney, J. (1992) “The bone morphogenetic protein family and

osteogenesis”, Mol. Reprod. Dev. 32, 160 – 167.

Wu, X.B., Li, Y., Schneider, A., Yu, W., Rajendren, G., Iqbal, J.,

Yamamoto, M., Alam, M., Brunet, L.J., Blair, H.C., Zaidi, M. and
Abe, E. (2003) “Impaired osteoblastic differentiation, reduced bone
formation, and severe osteoporosis in noggin-overexpressing mice”,
J. Clin. Investig. 112, 924 – 934.

Xu, M.Q., Feldman, G., Le Merrer, M., Shugart, Y.Y., Glaser, D.L.,

Urtizberea, J.A., Fardeau, M., Connor, J.M., Triffitt, J., Smith, R.,
Shore, E.M. and Kaplan, F.S. (2000) “Linkage exclusion and
mutational analysis of the noggin gene in patients with fibrodysplasia
ossificans progressiva (FOP)”, Clin. Genet. 58, 291 – 298.

Yamashita, H., ten Dijke, P., Huylebroeck, D., Sampath, T.K., Andries,

M., Smith, J.S., Heldin, C.H. and Miyazono, K. (1995) “Osteogenic
protein-1 binds to activin type II receptors and induces certain
activin-like effects”, J. Cell. Biol. 130, 217 – 226.

Yamashita, M., Ying, S., Cheng, S.Y., Deng, C., and Zhang, Y. Smurf1

negatively regulates osteoblast differentiation by antagonizing BMP
signaling. FASEB Summer Research Conferences July 12 – 17, 2003,
Tucson, Arizona.

Yang, X., Castilla, L.H., Xu, X., Li, C., Gotay, J., Weinstein, M.,

Liu, P.P. and Deng, C.X. (1999) “Angiogenesis defects and
mesenchymal apoptosis in mice lacking SMAD5”, Development
126

, 1571 – 1580.

Yi, S.E., Daluiski, A., Pederson, R., Rosen, V. and Lyons, K.M. (2000)

“The type I BMP receptor BMPRIB is required for chondrogenesis in
the mouse limb”, Development 127, 621 – 630.

Yoshida, Y., Tanaka, S., Umemori, H., Minowa, O., Usui, M.,

Ikematsu, N., Hosoda, E., Imamura, T., Kuno, J., Yamashita, T.,
Miyazono, K., Noda, M., Noda, T. and Yamamoto, T. (2000)
“Negative regulation of BMP/Smad signaling by Tob in osteoblasts”,
Cell 103, 1085 – 1097.

D. CHEN et al.

240

Growth Factors Downloaded from informahealthcare.com by University of Chicago Library on 06/08/12

For personal use only.

Zhang, H. and Bradley, A. (1996) “Mice deficient for BMP-2 are

nonviable and have defects in amnion/chorion and cardiac
development”, Development 122, 2977 – 2986.

Zhao, M., Harris, S.E., Horn, D., Geng, Z., Nishimura, R., Mundy, G.R.

and Chen, D. (2002) “Bone morphogenetic protein receptor signaling
is necessary for normal murine postnatal bone formation”, J. Cell.
Biol. 157, 1049 – 1060.

Zhao, M., Qiao, M., Oyajobi, B., Mundy, G.R. and Chen, D. (2003) “E3

ubiquitin ligase Smurf1 mediates core-binding factor a1/Runx2

degradation and plays a specific role in osteoblast differentiation”,
J. Biol. Chem. 278, 27939– 27944.

Zhao, M., Qiao, M., Harris, S.E., Oyajobi, B., Mundy, G.R. and

Chen, D. (2004) “Smurf1 inhibits osteoblast differentiation and
bone formation in vitro and in vivo”, J. Biol. Chem. 279,
12854 – 12859.

Zhu, H., Kavsak, P., Abdollah, S., Wrana, J. and Thomsen, G.H.A.

(1999) “SMAD ubiquitin ligase targets the BMP pathway
and affects embryonic pattern formation”, Nature 400, 687 – 693.

BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEINS

241

Growth Factors Downloaded from informahealthcare.com by University of Chicago Library on 06/08/12

For personal use only.