THE 6

TH 

ANNUAL RULE OF LAW 

SYMPOSIUM 

 

Assessing the Progress of the Rule of 

Law in Uganda 51 Years after 

Independence 

Friday, 4

th

 October 2013 

Golf Course Hotel, Kampala 

 

Organized by Uganda Law Society (ULS)  

Supported by Konrad Adenauer Stiftung and Ministry of 

Justice/JLOS 

 

Table of Contents 

1.0 

INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 3 

2.0 

OFFICIAL OPENING .............................................................................................................. 3 

2.1  Welcome Remarks ................................................................................................................... 3 

2.2  Opening Remarks .................................................................................................................... 4 

3.0 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS BY HON. PAUL K. MUITE - CONSTITUTIONAL LAWYER 
AND FORMER KENYA PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE .................................................. 4 

4.0 

PANEL DISCUSSIONS ............................................................................................................ 5 

4.1  Ms. Margaret Sekaggya – UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of Human Rights 

Defenders .................................................................................................................................. 5 

4.2  Mr. David Mafabi - Political Scientist and Presidential Advisor on Political Affairs .... 7 

4.3  Mr. Peter Walubiri, Land Law Expert and Lecturer ........................................................... 8 

5.0 

PLENARY DISCUSSIONS ...................................................................................................... 9 

5.1  Going beyond the norm to champion Constitutionalism and Rule of Law .................... 9 

5.2  The Need for a Constitutional Review to address Current Gaps ..................................... 9 

5.3  The Role of Civil Society ....................................................................................................... 10 

5.4  Balancing Economic Development and Social Welfare ................................................... 10 

5.5  Duality of Land ...................................................................................................................... 10 

6.0 

CONCLUSION AND KEY RECCOMMENDATIONS ..................................................... 11 

7.0 

ANNEX 1: OUTCOME STATEMENT ................................................................................. 12 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.0  INTRODUCTION 

 

One year into the next half-century since the Union Jack  was lowered—as the Uganda 
flag  was  hoisted—the  legal  fraternity  together  with  their  partners  Konrad  Adenauer 
Stiftung and the Justice, Law and Order Sector convened the sixth annual Rule of Law 
Symposium.  The  overall  objective  was  to  provide  a  platform  for  critical  thought, 
discussion  and  space  within  which  to  muster  a  clearly  defined  set  of  action  points 
towards  making  the  legal  fraternity  the  vanguard  for  the  development  of  a  political 
culture that espouses the Rule of Law, Constitutionalism and Democracy.  

Convened on Friday, 4

th

 October 2013 at Kampala Golf Course Hotel, it was attended by 

over  six  hundred  lawyers  and  invited  guests  from  within  and  outside  Uganda.  As 
planned,  the  papers  presented  by  distinguished  scholars  and  the  subsequent 
deliberations from the floor were consistent with the need to accelerate current efforts by 
the  fraternity  towards  defending  Constitutionalism  as  well  as  comprehensive 
approaches  geared  towards  the  amelioration  of  the  socio-economic  and  political 
predicaments that have been pervasive in Uganda’s past and current dispensation.  
 
The  event  featured  a  keynote  presentation  by  Hon.  Paul  Kibugi  Muite,  a  renowned 
expert  in  Constitutional  Law  and  veteran Kenyan  politician.  The  keynote  address  was 
followed  by  a    panel  of  experts  including;  Ms.  Margaret  Sekaggya,  the  former 
Chairperson  of  the  Uganda  Human  Rights  Commission  and  currently  United  Nations 
Special  Rapporteur  on  the  situation  of  Human  Rights  Defenders;  Mr.  David  Mafabi,  a 
Political  Scientist  and  Presidential  Advisor  on  Political  Affairs  to  the  President  of 
Uganda who made the case for ―a revolutionary approach to development‖ and the final 
discussant, Mr. Peter Walubiri, a seasoned Land Law expert and Lecturer at Makerere 
University whose presentation’s mainstay was the inconsistencies and impracticalities of 
the  legal  regime  governing  land  (both  in  the  Constitution  and  the  Land  Act)  whose 
adverse effects have been borne by the ordinary Ugandan.  
 

2.0  OFFICIAL OPENING  

2.1 

Welcome Remarks 

The  Symposium  commenced  with  a  hearty  welcome  by  Ms.  Ruth  Ssebatindira,  the 
President  of  the  Uganda  Law  Society  (ULS)  who  in  addition  to  thanking  partners 
Konrad Adenauer Stiftung and the Ministry of Justice/Justice, Law and Order Sector for 
their  technical  and  financial  support  towards  the  event,  proceeded  to  underscore  the 
importance of having the legal fraternity play a lead role in championing the observance 
of  the  Rule  of  Law  by  checking  the  adherence  of  state  institutions  to  democratic 

 

principles and good practice. She noted that the Annual  Rule of Law Day provides an 
important avenue through which to assess Uganda’s performance.  

2.2 

Opening Remarks  

On his part, Mr. Peter Wendoh, the Project Advisor 
from  the  Konrad  Adenauer  Stiftung  Rule  of  Law 
Programme  for  Sub-Saharan  Africa  Office 
acknowledged and encouraged the  legal fraternity 
in  Uganda  to  continue  with  ongoing  efforts 
towards safeguarding the observance of the Rule of 
Law  since  it  is  necessary  for  progress  and 
development.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3.0  KEYNOTE ADDRESS BY HON. PAUL K. MUITE - CONSTITUTIONAL LAWYER 

AND FORMER KENYA PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE 

Hon. Muite commenced his address with an observation that a common thread that runs 
through Tanzania, Kenya, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda and Burundi 

is  the  penchant  for  undertaking  much-touted 
Constitution  making  processes  within  the 
recent  past,  with  Kenya  being  the  latest  to 
promulgate a new Constitution. 
He  proceeded  to  question  what  he  called  the 
obsession  with  Constitution  making  processes 
yet  incumbents  have  mastered  a  plethora  of 
manipulative  methods  of  prolonging  their  stay 
in  power  including  the  invariable  rigging  of 
elections.  He  underscored  the  urgency  with 
which  lawyers  ought  to  lead  the  rest  of  the 
citizenry  in  the  defense  of  the  Rule  of  Law, 

 

Constitutionalism and the broader subject of Democracy. 

He explained that part of the problem is historical. Whereas the past was punctuated by 
illiteracy, poverty and suffering, overt military dictatorships, one-party states have, over 
the last twenty years, been abandoned for one form or other type of elected government. 

He concluded that the pervasive African Paradox of having Constitutions and elaborate 
legal  regimes  but  without  Constitutionalism  is  antithetical  to  political  stability. 
Fundamentally,  Constitutional  mechanisms  revolve  around  the  basic  organs  of 
government: Legislature, Executive and the Judiciary. Constitutionalism is not just about 
laws and following them. It is about the legitimacy of the laws: ultimately, unjust laws 
are illegitimate. 

The Citizen’s Duty is to muster and use civic courage; stand up to oppressive designs. 
Quoting  Justice  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes,  he  stated  that  “…  when  men  have  realized  that 
time  has upset many  fighting faiths, they may come  to believe even more than they believe the 
very  foundations  of  their  own  conduct  that  the  ultimate  good  desired  is  better  reached  by  free 
trade in ideas -- that the best test of truth is the power of the thought to get itself accepted in the 
competition of the market, and that truth is the only ground upon which their wishes safely can be 
carried out.”

 

He also called upon the legal fraternity  network with the Civil Society, the Media and 
the Citizen around issues of public interest such as the illegal re-appointment of a retired 
Chief Justice as Chief Justice as well as the lifting of term limits. 

4.0  PANEL DISCUSSIONS 

4.1 

Ms. Margaret Sekaggya – UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of 
Human Rights Defenders  

In her remarks, Ms. Sekaggya explained the origins of the 1995 Constitution of Uganda 
which  was  developed  against  the  back  drop  of  mass  human  rights  violations  and  a 
history  of  turbulence.  She  averred  that  the  Justice  Odoki  Commission  that  was  put  in 
place then sought to establish;  

i) 

The Legislature, Executive and Judiciary; 

ii) 

Commissions including the Human Rights Commission; 

iii) 

Constitutional safeguards, checks and balances. 

 

 

She  also  noted  that  on  the  international  front, 
Uganda  has  signed,  ratified  and  domesticated  a 
number  of  international  instruments  such  as  the 
Convention  on  the  Elimination  of  all  forms  of 

Discrimination 
against 

Women 

(CEDAW); 
Convention  on  the 
Elimination 

of 

Racial 
Discrimination 
(CERD); 
Convention  on  the 
Rights of the Child 

(CRC);  and  Universal  Declaration  of  Human 
Rights (UDHR) among others. 

This then begs the question: with the above policy and legal framework, have the Rule of 
Law,  Democracy  and  Constitutionalism  taken  root?  Article  1  of  the  Universal 
Declaration  of  Human  Rights  stipulates  that  “All  human  beings  are  born  equal  in  dignity 
and  rights.”
  This  is  reiterated  by  the  1995  Constitution  by  guaranteeing  equality  and 
freedom from discrimination. 
 
However,  she  observed  that  the  requisite  values  haven’t  been  inculcated  into  the 
population.  It  is  the  work  of  the  State  to  inculcate  values  otherwise  the  Rule  of  Law 
cannot  be  realized  when  basic  values  are  not  appreciated.  Further  she  noted  that 
impunity  is  another  limitation  because  in  spite  of  trial  processes  and  Commissions  of 
Inquiry, no culprits are brought to book in a manner that resolves disputes to a logical 
and  satisfactory  conclusion.  Coupled  with  impunity,  Ms  Sekaggya  noted  that  it  is 
corruption  that  is  impeding  the  enjoyment  of  human  rights  and  hence  an  avenue  for 
disenfranchisement. This she argued is because corruption emasculates institutions and 
thereby eroding democracy. Thirdly, she argued that the rule of law has been hampered 
by  lack  of  adequate  security  and  law  enforcement  as  flagged  by  successive  Uganda 
Human Rights Commission Reports.   

Finally she decried the development of oppressive  legislation such as the Public Order 
Management  Act,  Non  Governmental  Organizations  Act,  Interception  of 

―It is the work of the State to 
inculcate values…the Rule 
of Law cannot be realized 
when basic values are not 
appreciated.‖ 

MARGARET SEKAGGYA 

 

Communications Act et-cetera; all of which give unfettered discretionary powers to the 
Police and serve to stifle the enjoyment of rights. 

Needless to add, assaults to the independence of the Judiciary, closure and harassment 
of  media  houses  and  journalists,  fusion  of  the  arms  of  government/disregard  for  the 
Rule of Law have been prominent as manifested in the High Court siege of 2007. 
 

4.2 

Mr. David Mafabi - Political Scientist and Presidential Advisor on 
Political Affairs 

Mr.  Mafabi  begun  his  presentation  by  referring  to  three  quote  which  read  as  follows: 
“The Sabbath was made for man and not man for Sabbath”; found in the Book of Mark, 2:27 in 
the Bible; “ Seek Truth” by Mao Tse Tung and “ The truth must be solid” by Anon.  
 

His  first  port  of  call  was  the  prospects  and 
challenges  of  the  Nexus  between  achieving 
middle income status in Uganda by 2017. He 
noted the significance of the nexus between 
economics,  politics  and  society;  stating  that 
the biggest problem with Uganda and Africa 
at  large  was  that  the  elite  suffer  from 
ideological disorientation. He proffered that 
lawyers  ought  to  contribute  to  the  progress 
of  their  continent  by  taking  a  revolutionary 
approach to democratization. Economics pre 
determines the politics; that is why the NRM 
Government  is  focusing  on  economic 
growth  which  will  resultantly  deliver  a 

stable polity. 
 
He further added that the leadership of Uganda is preoccupied with energy, peace and 
security,  increase  in  foreign  direct  investment  and  exploration  of  new  frontiers  like 
cybernetics, metallurgy, nuclear energy, regional integration and petroleum exploration. 

In  conclusion,  he  stated  that  the  NRM’s  landslide  victory  of  68% is  a  testimony of  the 
citizens’ trust in the current regime, and the peace and security that has been pursued by 
the  National  Resistance  Movement.  The  Middle  Class  must  participate  in  the  socio-
economic struggle for liberation. They must emulate Amilcar Cabral, Meles Zenawi and 
of course, Yoweri Museveni…as well as Ugandans deep in academia but at the forefront 

 

of  liberation  such  as  Prof.  Dan  Nabudere.  That  we  must  steer  clear  of  becoming 
―peasants  in  suits‖  because  of  ideological  disorientation  and  emphasized  that  the 
economy must be liberated first. 

 

4.3 

Mr. Peter Walubiri, Land Law Expert and Lecturer 

In  his  presentation,  Mr.  Walubiri 
approached  the  theme  from  the 
Land rights angle and argued that 
Uganda  cannot  solve  the  land 
question 

by 

resolving 

the 

conflicting  rights  created  by  the 
1995  Constitution.    Why  then  are 
we 

discussing 

the 

land 

question(s)? 

There 

are 

two 

contestations going on: 

 

Between landlords and 
tenants; 

 

Between the central 
government and 
kingdoms. 

He  noted  that  the  foregoing 
questions have their origins in the 
Colonial  Settlement  (Buganda 
Agreement) 

which 

created 

categories  of  land  tenure  systems 

without elaborate safe-guards for all attendant interests. The Busuulu and Envujjo laws in 
Buganda, Tooro Landlord and Tenant Law, Ankole Landlord and Tenant Law were shattered 
by  the  1975  Land  Reform  Decree  thereby  creating  a  vacuum.  By  designating  ―public 
land‖, the stage was set for mass evictions which have continued to this day.  

The obtaining Land Act is unconstitutional because it legalizes trespass in purporting to 
protect  occupants.  The  lawful  occupant/bona  fide  occupant  is  an  unproductive 
marriage. It is a retrogressive law. Summarily, the Land Act creates a dispensation of the 
Rule  by  Law  not  the  Rule  of  Law.  There  is  no  security  of  tenancy  for  either 
interest/occupant. 

 

On  how  government  can  resolve  the  contest  between  government  and  districts  where 
land acquisitions are taking place, he noted that we must realize that this is a political 
question  that  must  be  debated  openly  and  exhaustively.  The  simmering  contests 
between the occupants of Amuru and a government-backed investor should be resolved 
against  that  background.  This  is  a  microcosm  that  proves  the  fact  that  the  1995 
Constitution didn’t resolve the land question. Disregard for the Rule of Law and mal-
administration  of  public  resources  only  make  an  already  combustible  situation  more 
volatile. 

The following were the solutions recommended by Mr. Walubiri; 

 

We  need  a  new  legal  regime  that  clearly  defines  who  owns  land  between 
landlords and tenants. 

 

The new law must fix a formula for compensation for both landlords and tenants. 

 

We  must  then  go  back  to  compulsory  acquisition  of  land  for  development 
purposes. 
 

5.0  PLENARY DISCUSSIONS   

The next session captured the key discussion areas from the plenary which included the 
following: 

5.1 

Going beyond the norm to champion Constitutionalism and Rule of Law 

The  participants  at  the  symposium  noted  the  need  to  identify  mechanisms  by  which 
constitutionalism and rule of law can be championed beyond the conventional seminars, 
symposia  etc  that  can  be  undertaken  by  lawyers  such  as  the  Future  of  the  International 
Criminal Court.  

5.2 

The Need for a Constitutional Review to address Current Gaps 

It was noted that the 1995 Constitution of Uganda as it stands created certain gaps that 
need  urgent  review  and  amelioration.  This  could  be  one  of  the  ways  that  the  Uganda 
Law  Society  can  practically  champion  rule  of  law  and  constitutionalism.  This  may 
include;  supporting  independent  and  bold  judges;  mobilizing  the  population  around 
specific issues, and providing leadership to the legal fraternity and the general public. 

10 

 

 

 
 
 
 

The Lord Mayor Elias 
Lukwago (Right) and 
Hon. Betty Kamya 
(left) advance their 
arguments during the 
plenary session 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

5.3 

The Role of Civil Society 

The struggle for constitutionalism and rule of law requires concerted efforts by the legal 
fraternity together with other likeminded civil society institutions. Governments need to 
find a balance between neo-liberalism and the welfare of citizens.  

5.4 

Balancing Economic Development and Social Welfare  

Constitutionalism  and  the  Rule  of  Law  cannot  take  root  in  an  exclusive  system.  The 
economy must be aligned along equal opportunity terms but ultimately equal access to 
healthcare,  education  and  services  are  a  guarantor  of  stability  and  the  Rule  of  Law. 
Changes  in  the  economy  for  instance  were  fundamental  to  the  democratization  and 
socio-economic progress of England. 

5.5 

Duality of Land 

There is urgent need to address the question of duality of land rights that were created 
by  the  1995  Constitution  that  curtail  meaningful  development  in  Uganda  considering 
that land is a major factor of production.