Ahrar Al Sham’s leader clarifies its role in Syria

Hassan Hassan

May 29, 2016

Updated: May 29, 2016 05:31 PM

Related

Hardline Ahrar Al Sham

says it shot down warplane
over northern Syria

Why Jaish Al Islam and

Ahrar Al Sham are at the
heart of Geneva squabbles

Russia agrees ‘terrorist

groups’ can take part in
Syrian peace talks

Fighters from Ahrar Al Sham march in the eastern Damascus suburb of Ghouta. Ahrar Al Sham Twitter page via AP
Photo

Over the past five years in Syria, Ahrar Al Sham has emerged as an
important political and religious experiment. The group, one of the most
powerful rebel forces, has struggled to reconcile the legacy of many of its
founders as jihadi veterans with the need for an acceptable political
discourse in the war-ravaged country.

The ideology of the group is further muddled by the fact that it works closely
with 

Al Qaeda

-affiliated Jabhat Al Nusra while it participates in political

conferences and pacts that appear to deviate from the canons of jihadist
organisations.

After the death of its leaders in an explosion at a high-level meeting in
September 2014, it has also sought to present itself to the outside world as a
moderate group and an indispensable fighting force on the ground.

Countries involved in the conflict in Syria are split about the organisation.
Some, including Russia, are pushing for its designation as a terrorist
organisation. As the group engages cautiously in the political process for a
transition, it is also important to understand whether it has really broken
away from Salafi-jihadism, the movement to which its top echelon once
subscribed.

Is Ahrar Al Sham merely a conservative Syrian faction immersed in an

Ahrar Al Sham’s leader clarifies its role in Syria | The National

http://www.thenational.ae/opinion/comment/ahrar-al-shams-leader...

1 von 6

30/05/16 16:33

armed struggle against the regime of Bashar Al Assad?

Ali Al Omar, the group’s deputy leader, answered some of these questions
during an hour-long talk he gave on Friday, titled “The Place of Ahrar Al
Sham among Islamist Currents". Three points stand out.

First, Mr Al Omar begins the insightful talk by laying outmain Islamist
movements that emerged after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire. He says
all the four movements differ in their approach but agree on the objective,
which is the restoration of the Islamic caliphate.

Two of these movements, the Muslim Brotherhood and the Tablighi Jamaat,
seek to establish the caliphate without stating that as their goal, through
political participation and proselytisation respectively. The failure of those
movements, he says, led to the rise of a third one: jihadism.

Ahar Al Sham belongs to a new movement that sees merits in each of the
movements he mentioned. The group combines, rather than departs from,
the approaches of all of its predecessors. Significantly, he points out that the
difference between Ahrar Al Sham and jihadists is that the group does more
than just jihad. The difference between the two is not that jihad is a
temporary tactic for them, he says. That is a key clarification because some
observers think that Ahrar Al Sham’s engagement in armed struggle is
dictated by the reality in Syria, as the war against the regime rages.

The group’s position on jihad is heavily shaped by Salafi-jihadism, which
views jihad as a goal in and of itself. According to a recent 78-page study by
Ahmad Abazeid, one of the group’s closest observers, the group “adopts the
writings of Salafi-jihadism in its training camps and discourse".

A second point that stands out from Mr Al Omar’s lecture is his group’s real
stance on political participation. He explains that Ahrar Al Sham’s
participation in political talks, conferences or pacts is designed as a form of
“takhtheel" – disruption or subversion.

This is a telling statement, considering that it is such “flexibility" that led
many to rethink the group’s ideology and to conclude that it broke away from
Salafi-jihadism – the “crucible from which it emerged", in the words of one of
its media activists.

Third, Mr Al Omar singles out the Taliban as a model worth following. This is
the second time the group has officially praised the Taliban in this way. Last
August, Ahrar Al Sham paid a tribute to the Taliban’s dead leader Mullah
Omar, describing him as “the happy emir" and his group as “the blessed
movement".

Throughout his talk, Mr Al Omar emphasises that his group’s objectives are
part of a broader global Islamist project, and echoes common beliefs among
Salafi-jihadists that Syrian society’s Islam has been distorted by decades of
a Baathist education system. In his view, Syrian society is not Muslim
enough. He also clarifies that political engagement and flexibility are a ploy,
as part of the Ahrar Al Sham’s strategy of combining the approaches
followed by the three movements he cited as influencers of his group.

If the remarks made by Mr Al Omar are supposed to represent a shift from
jihadism, the apple did not fall far from the tree.

Hassan Hassan is associate fellow at Chatham House’s Middle East and

Ahrar Al Sham’s leader clarifies its role in Syria | The National

http://www.thenational.ae/opinion/comment/ahrar-al-shams-leader...

2 von 6

30/05/16 16:33

Related

Hardline Ahrar Al
Sham says it shot
down warplane
over northern
Syria

Why Jaish Al
Islam and Ahrar
Al Sham are at the
heart of Geneva
squabbles

Russia agrees
‘terrorist groups’
can take part in
Syrian peace talks

UAE motorists to
pay more at the
pump in June

Dubai eyes 3-D
printing for
medical treatment

Mawazine 2016:
Christina Aguilera
wants to work with
Beyoncé

Night markets in
the UAE —
something for
everyone this
Ramadan

EDITOR'S PICKS

FOLLOW US

North Africa Programme, non-resident fellow at the Tahrir Institute for Middle
East Policy and co-author of 
ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror

On Twitter: @hxhassan

Add your comment

View all comments

Ahrar Al Sham’s leader clarifies its role in Syria | The National

http://www.thenational.ae/opinion/comment/ahrar-al-shams-leader...

3 von 6

30/05/16 16:33

More Comment

How Hollande is
losing his own
war of words

Israeli liberalism
is dead as the
right finally
triumphs

Ahrar Al Sham’s
leader clarifies its
role in Syria

Suggestions to
meet some of the
challenges of
Emiratisation

MOST VIEWED
1. Ahrar Al Sham’s leader clarifies its
role in Syria

2. Egypt faces a tourism challenge

3. Israeli liberalism is dead as the right
finally triumphs

4. Why the US can’t disengage from the
Middle East

5. Time to enforce noise guidelines

6. Suggestions to meet some of the
challenges of Emiratisation

7. How Hollande is losing his own war
of words

8. A wake up call for all parents

9. Cool books for hot months

10. Does the killing of Mullah Akhtar
change US-Pakistan relations?

More Most Viewed

OPINION | ALL

Ahrar Al Sham’s leader clarifies its role in Syria | The National

http://www.thenational.ae/opinion/comment/ahrar-al-shams-leader...

4 von 6

30/05/16 16:33

Embed

View on Twitter

Tweets 

by 

@NationalComment

33s

1m

Seven tips for always looking on the bleak side of 

life, by 

@DrJustinThomas thenational.ae/opinion

/commen…

 via 

@TheNationalUAE

In the US it's all about the economy – and it's not 

good news, writes Tony Karon  

thenational.ae/opinion/commen…

 via 

@TheNationalUAE

The National Comment

@NationalComment

Seven tips for always looking

There are steps to take if you c

thenational.ae

The National Comment

@NationalComment

It's all about the economy an

The bulk of American workers h

thenational.ae

UAE youth ‘addicted to social media’
- graphic

US and Arab-backed rebels open
new front against ISIL in southern
Syria

SPOTLIGHT

Ahrar Al Sham’s leader clarifies its role in Syria | The National

http://www.thenational.ae/opinion/comment/ahrar-al-shams-leader...

5 von 6

30/05/16 16:33

Ahrar Al Sham’s leader clarifies its role in Syria | The National

http://www.thenational.ae/opinion/comment/ahrar-al-shams-leader...

6 von 6

30/05/16 16:33