Acutely administered melatonin decreases somatostatin-binding
sites and the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on adenylyl cyclase
activity in the rat hippocampus

Introduction

Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytriptamine) is the principal
secretory product produced by the pineal gland. It is
currently thought that melatonin reaches its neural targets
via the peripheral circulation [1]. In addition, cerebrospinal
fluid melatonin seems to originate directly from the pineal
gland. Thus, melatonin could reach its targets through the
cerebroventricular system [2]. To date, only MT

1

and MT

2

receptors have been detected in mammals [3]. The distri-
bution pattern of these melatonin receptors in the central
nervous system (CNS) has been extensively studied in
different species in recent years [3, 4]. Some of the responses
of melatonin have been reported to be mediated through
GABA-benzodiazepine receptors in the CNS [5–7]. In
addition, melatonin is known to possess free radical
scavenging and antioxidant properties [8, 9].

Melatonin has been shown to inhibit the excitability of

the CNS [10]. However, it has been recently shown that
melatonin increases neuronal activity in hippocampal

neurons [11, 12]. These effects are contrary to that of the
tetradecapeptide

somatotropin

(somatostatin

release-

inhibiting factor, SRIF) in this brain area [13, 14]. In the
hippocampus, immunohistochemical studies have revealed
many SRIF-containing interneurons and a profuse network
of intrinsic and extrinsic SRIF-containing fibers that
appear to project to pyramidal and granule neurons [15].
The hippocampus has been found to be highly enriched
with SRIF receptors concentrated in the molecular layer of
the dentate gyrus and the dendritic fields of hippocampal
CA1 pyramidal cells [16] suggests that the SRIF receptors
are localized on intrinsic neurons of the hippocampus.
Candidates are the pyramidal and granule cells, which
correlates well with the majority of the immunohistochem-
ical studies suggesting the presence of SRIF terminals in
close vicinity to these cells [17]. Five SRIF receptor
subtypes, designated SSTR1–5, have been cloned and
shown to belong to the seven transmembrane domain
receptor family [18]. All SRIF receptor subtypes are linked
to guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) [19]

Abstract: Melatonin is known to increase neuronal activity in the
hippocampus, an effect contrary to that of somatostatin (somatotropin
release-inhibiting factor, SRIF). Thus, the aim of this study was to
investigate whether the somatostatinergic system is implicated in the
mechanism of action of melatonin in the rat hippocampus. One group of rats
was injected a single dose of melatonin [25 lg/kg subcutaneously (s.c.)] or
saline containing ethanol (0.5%, s.c.) and killed 5 hr later. Melatonin
significantly decreased the SRIF-like immunoreactivity levels and induced a
significant decrease in the density of SRIF receptors as well as in the
dissociation constant (K

d

). SRIF-mediated inhibition of basal and forskolin-

stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity was markedly decreased in hippocampal
membranes from melatonin-treated rats. The functional activity of Gi
proteins was similar in hippocampal membranes from melatonin-treated and
control rats. Western blot analyses revealed that melatonin administration
did not alter Gia1 or Gia2 levels. To determine if the changes observed were
related to melatonin-induced activation of central melatonin receptors, a
melatonin receptor antagonist, luzindole, was administered prior to
melatonin injection. Pretreatment with luzindole (10 mg/kg, s.c.) did not
alter the melatonin-induced effects on the above-mentioned parameters and
luzindole, alone, had no observable effect. The present results demonstrate
that melatonin decreases the activity of the SRIF receptor–effector system in
the rat hippocampus, an effect which is apparently not mediated by
melatonin receptors. As SRIF exerts an opposite effect to that of melatonin
on hippocampal neuronal activity, it is possible that the SRIFergic system
could be implicated in the mechanism of action of melatonin in the rat.

Rosa Marı´a Izquierdo-Claros,
Marı´a del Carmen Boyano-
Ada´nez and Eduardo Arilla-
Ferreiro

Departamento de Bioquı´mica y Biologı´a
Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, Grupo de
Neurobioquı´mica, Universidad de Alcala´,
Madrid, Spain

Key words: adenylyl cyclase, G proteins,
hippocampus, melatonin, rat, somatostatin
receptors

Address reprint requests to Eduardo Arilla-
Ferreiro, Departamento de Bioquı´mica y
Biologı´a Molecular, Facultad de Medicina,
Ctra. Madrid-Barcelona Km. 33,600,
Universidad de Alcala´, E-28871 Alcala´ de
Henares, Madrid, Spain.
E-mail: carmen.boyano@uah.es

Received July 21, 2003;
accepted September 25, 2003.

J. Pineal Res. 2004; 36:87–94

Copyright

 Blackwell Munksgaard, 2004

Journal of Pineal Research

87

and lead to adenylyl cyclase (AC) inhibition following
hormone binding [20]. The SRIF receptors also regulate
other effectors via G proteins, which include inhibition of
calcium channels, stimulation of potassium channels and
stimulation of serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphatases
[21].

The aim of this study was to investigate if the SRIFergic

system is implicated in the mechanism of action of
melatonin in the rat hippocampus. The effects of melatonin
on SRIF-like immunoreactivity (SRIF-LI) content and

125

I-Tyr

11

-SRIF binding to its specific receptors in the rat

hippocampus were evaluated. The integrity of SRIF recep-
tor function was determined by assaying the ability of SRIF
to inhibit AC activity. In addition, we assessed the
functional activity of the guanine nucleotide-binding inhib-
itory protein (Gi) and determined the levels of the ai1 and
ai2 G protein subunits by Western blot using isoform-
specific antibodies.

Materials and methods

Materials

Synthetic Tyr

11

-SRIF and SRIF tetradecapeptide were

purchased from Universal Biologicals Ltd (Cambridge,
UK). Melatonin, bacitracin, bovine serum albumin (frac-
tion V) (BSA) phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF),
3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), guanosine triphos-
phate (GTP), forskolin (FK), prestained protein markers
and other reagents for sodium dodecylsulfate–polyacryl-
amide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE) were from Sigma
(Madrid, Spain). Luzindole was supplied by Alexis Cor-
poration (Nottingham, UK). Dextran was obtained from
Serva Feinbiochemica (Heidelberg, Germany) and carrier-
free Na[

125

I] (IMS 30, 100 mCi/mL) from the Radiochem-

ical Centre (Amersham, Buckinghamshire, UK). Specific
antiserum against ai1 (MAB3075) or ai2 (MAB3077) G
protein subunits was obtained from Chemicon Interna-
tional (Temecula, CA, USA). Nitrocellulose membranes as
well as the chemiluminescence Western blotting detection
system were purchased from Amersham. The rabbit anti-
body used in the radioimmunoassay technique was pur-
chased from the Radiochemical Centre. This antiserum was
raised in rabbits against SRIF-14 conjugated with BSA and
is specific for SRIF but as SRIF-14 constitutes the
C-terminal portions of both SRIF-25 and SRIF-28, the
antiserum does not distinguish between these three forms.

Experimental animals

All procedures conform to the guidelines set by our animal
care and use committee and were approved by the
committee before implementation. All efforts were made
to minimize animal suffering and to use only the number of
animals necessary to produce reliable scientific data. Male
Wistar rats weighing 200–250 g were used in the present
study. All animals received food and tap water ad libitum.
Room temperature was kept at 22

C and a 12 hr day–night

cycle was maintained. Melatonin was dissolved in saline
containing ethanol (0.5%) and administered subcutane-
ously (s.c.) at 09:00 hr in a volume of 100 lL according to

the method described by Alexiuk and Vriend [22] at a dose
of 10, 25, 50 or 100 lg/kg (s.c.) and the rats were killed at
14:00 hr. A second experimental group of rats was injected
a single dose of melatonin (25 lg/kg, s.c.) at 09:00 hr and
killed at 14:00 hr. A third experimental group of rats
received the melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole, dis-
solved in saline, at a dose of 10 mg/kg (s.c.) [23] at 09:00 hr
and killed at 14:00 hr. A fourth experimental group of rats
was injected luzindole as described above, 30 min prior to
melatonin (25 lg/kg, s.c.) injection and were killed at
14:30 hr. Control animals for each group were injected with
saline containing ethanol. The brains were removed and the
hippocampus was rapidly dissected as described by Glo-
winski and Iversen [24].

Binding assay

Tyr

11

-SRIF was radioiodinated by Chloramine-T iodina-

tion according to the method of Greenwood et al. [25]. The
tracer was purified in a Sephadex G-25 fine column
(1

· 100 cm) equilibrated with 0.1 m acetic acid containing

BSA 0.1% (w/v). The specific activity of the purified
labelled peptide was about 600 Ci/g.

Hippocampal membranes were prepared as previously

described by Reubi et al. [26]. Protein concentration was
assayed by the method of Lowry et al. [27], with BSA as a
standard. Specific SRIF binding was measured according to
the modified method of Czernik and Petrack [28]. Briefly,
the membranes (0.15 mg protein/mL) were incubated in
250 lL of a medium containing 50 mm Tris–HCl buffer
(pH 7.5), 5 mm MgCl

2

, 0.2% (w/v) BSA and 0.1 mg/mL

bacitracin with 250 pm [

125

I]-Tyr

11

-SRIF either in the

absence or presence of 0.01–10 nm unlabeled SRIF. After
a 60-min incubation at 30

C, bound and free ligand were

separated by centrifugation at 11,000 g for 2 min. The
supernatant was discarded and the pellet was washed with
Tris (50 mm)–sucrose (0.9%) buffer (pH 7.4). The radioac-
tivity in the pellet was measured in a Kontron gamma
counter.

Non-specific

binding

was

obtained

from

the amount of radioactivity bound in the presence of
10

)7

m

SRIF and represented about 20% of the binding

observed in the absence of unlabeled peptide. This non-
specific component was subtracted from the total bound
radioactivity in order to obtain the corresponding specific
binding.

Evaluation of radiolabelled peptide degradation

The inactivation of [

125

I]-Tyr

11

-SRIF in the incubation

medium after exposure to membranes was studied by
measuring the ability of preincubated peptide to rebind to
fresh membranes. Briefly, [

125

I]-Tyr

11

-SRIF (250 pM) was

incubated with membranes from rat hippocampus (0.15 mg
protein/mL) for 60 min at 30

C. After this preincubation,

aliquots of the medium were added to fresh membranes and
incubated for an additional 60 min at 30

C. The fraction of

the added radiolabelled peptide which was specifically
bound during the second incubation was measured and
expressed as a percentage of the binding that had been
obtained in control experiments performed in the absence
of membranes during the preincubation period.

Izquierdo-Claros et al.

88

Tissue extraction and somatostatin
radioimmunoassay

For measurements of SRIF-LI content, the hippocampus
was rapidly homogenized in 1 mL of 2 m acetic acid using a
Brinkman polytron (setting 5, 30 s). Extracts were boiled
for 5 min in a water bath and chilled on ice. Subsequently,
homogenates were centrifuged at 15,000 g for 15 min at
4

C. The pellet was discarded and 25 lL of the supernatant

were taken for protein analysis [27]. Extracts were imme-
diately stored at

)80C until assay. The immunoreactivity

content was determined in tissue extracts by a modified
radioimmunoassay method [29], with a sensitivity limit of
10 pg/mL. The possibility that substances present in the
tissue extracts might interfere with antibody-antigen bind-
ing and give rise to erroneous results was checked by
performing serial dilutions of selected extracts in the assays
and comparing the resulting changes in SRIF immunore-
activity with those of the diluted standards. In addition,
known standard amounts of the hormone were added to
varying amounts of the extracts and serial dilutions were
again assayed, in order to determine if this exogenously
added hormonal immunoreactivity could be measured
reliably in the presence of tissue extracts. Incubation tubes
prepared in duplicate contained 100 lL samples of
unknown or standard solutions of 0–500 pg cyclic SRIF
tetradecapeptide, diluted in phosphate buffer (0.1 m, pH 7.2
containing 0.2% BSA, 0.1% sodium azide), 200 lL of
appropriately diluted anti-SRIF serum, 100 lL of freshly
prepared [

125

I]-Tyr

11

-SRIF, diluted in buffer to yield 6000–

10,000 cpm (equivalent to 5–10 pg), and enough buffer to
give a final volume of 0.8 mL. All reagents, as well as the
assay tubes, were kept chilled in ice before incubation at 4

C

for 24 hr. Separation of bound and free hormone was
accomplished by addition of 1 mL dextran-coated charcoal
(dextran: 0.2% w/v). Dilution curves for each brain area were
parallel to the standard curve. The coefficients for intra- and
inter-assay variation were 6.5 and 8.3%, respectively.

AC assay

Hippocampal membranes were prepared as previously
described by Reubi et al. [26]. Protein concentration was
assayed by the method of Lowry et al. [27] with BSA as a
standard. AC activity was measured as previously described
[30], with some minor modifications. Briefly, hippocampal
membranes (0.06 mg/mL) were incubated with 1.5 mm
ATP, 5 mm MgSO

4

, 10 lm GTP, an ATP-regenerating

system (7.5 mg/mL creatine phosphate and 1 mg/mL
creatine kinase), 1 mm IBMX, 0.1 mm PMSF, 1 mg/mL
bacitracin, 1 mm EDTA, and test substances (10

)4

m

SRIF

or 10

)5

m

FK) in 0.1 mL of 0.025 m triethanolamine/HCl

buffer (pH 7.4). After a 15-min incubation at 30

C, the

reaction was stopped by heating the mixture at 100

C for

3 min. Once cooled, 0.2 mL of an aluminum slurry (0.75 g/
mL in triethanolamine/HCl buffer, pH 7.4) were added and
the suspension was centrifuged. The supernatant was then
removed for assay of cyclic AMP (cAMP) by the method
described by Gilman [31]. The SRIF concentration used
was that deemed necessary to achieve inhibition of rat AC
activity [32]. Similarly, FK was used at a concentration that

could effectively stimulate the catalytic subunit of rat AC
[32].

Immunodetection of G protein ai subunits

Membranes (100 lg) were solubilized in SDS sample buffer
and the resulting proteins were then run on a 12% SDS–
polyacrylamide gel as described by Laemmli [33]. After
separation, the proteins were transferred onto nitrocellulose
membranes in a buffer consisting of 25 mm Tris–HCl pH
8.3, 192 mm glycine, 20% methanol and 0.05% SDS. The
transferred nitrocellulose membranes were blocked with
Tris-buffered saline with Tween 20 [50 mm Tris–HCl
(pH 7.5), 150 mm NaCl, and 0.05% Tween-20) containing
5% (w/v) (TTBS)] non-fat dry milk during 1.5 hr at 4

C.

Nitrocellulose membranes were subsequently immunoblot-
ted with anti-Gia1 or anti-Gia2 monoclonal antibodies
(1:1000 dilution) in TTBS and incubated overnight at 4

C.

After incubation, three 5-min washes in TTBS containing
5% (w/v) non-fat dry milk were carried out. A mouse IgG-
peroxidase conjugate (1:2000 dilution) in TTBS was then
added to the membranes and incubated for 1 hr at 4

C.

After washing, the bound immunoreactive proteins were
detected by an enhanced chemiluminescent detection sys-
tem ECL



kit.

Data analysis

The computer program LIGAND [34] was used to analyze
the binding data. The use of this program enabled models
of receptors, which best fit a given set of binding data to be
selected. The same program was also used to present data in
the form of Scatchard plots and to compute values for
receptor affinity (K

d

) and density (B

max

) that best fit the sets

of binding data for each rat. Statistical comparisons of all
the data were carried out by one-way analysis of variance
(ANOVA) and the Student’s Newman–Keuls test. Mean
among groups were considered significantly different when
the P values were less than 0.05. Each individual experi-
ment was performed in duplicate.

Results

Melatonin administration at a single dose decreased SRIF-
LI content in the rat hippocampus as compared with the
control group (Fig. 1). The specific binding of [

125

I]-Tyr

11

-

SRIF to hippocampal membranes was studied in rats
treated with 10, 25, 50 or 100 lg/kg (s.c.) of melatonin. The
doses of 10 and 25 lg/kg significantly decreased the specific
binding of [

125

I]-Tyr

11

-SRIF to rat hippocampal mem-

branes as compared with the control group (Table 1), with
no changes being observed at the higher doses. As the
maximal effect of melatonin on SRIF receptors was
detected at the dose of 25 lg/kg (Table 1), subsequent
studies were therefore carried out at this dose. Stoichio-
metric experiments were performed on rat hippocampal
membranes using a fixed concentration of [

125

I]-Tyr

11

-SRIF

and increasing doses of unlabeled SRIF at 30

C for 60 min.

A single dose of melatonin decreased the number of SRIF
receptors and increased their apparent affinity in the
hippocampal membranes at 5 hr of its administration.

Melatonin modulates the rat hippocampal somatostatinergic system

89

Hippocampal membranes from melatonin-treated (5 hr)
rats exhibited a significant decrease in the maximum SRIF-
binding capacity, with changes in the corresponding K

d

values (Fig. 2, right panel; Table 2) as compared with the
control group. The in vitro addition of increasing concen-
trations of melatonin (10

)11

–10

)5

m

) to the incubation

medium at the time of the binding assay had no effect on
hippocampal SRIF receptors (data not shown). Pretreat-
ment with the melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole
(10 mg/kg, s.c.) did not alter the melatonin-induced effect

on SRIF-LI content and SRIF binding (Fig. 2, right panel;
Table 2). Administration of luzindole alone had no
observable effect on these parameters (Table 2).

In order to investigate whether SRIF function was

affected by melatonin treatment, hippocampal membranes
from control and melatonin-treated rats were assayed for
SRIF-induced inhibition of AC activity. In the melatonin-
or luzindole plus melatonin-treated groups, the degree of
SRIF inhibition of both basal and FK-stimulated activity
was significantly lower than in the control group after 5 hr
of a single dose of melatonin (Table 3).

To test if the observed changes were related to modifi-

cations in the expression of AC, the response of the enzyme
to the diterpene FK (10

)5

m

), which is assumed to act

directly upon the catalytic subunit, was measured. No
significant differences were detected in the fold FK stimu-
lation over basal AC activity between the control group and
rats treated with melatonin (Table 3). Pretreatment with the
melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole (10 mg/kg, s.c.) did
not alter the melatonin-induced effect on SRIF-mediated
inhibition of both basal and FK-stimulated AC activity.

Further experiments were carried out in order to explore

the effect of melatonin on the functionality of Gi or Gs
proteins in rat hippocampal membranes by determining the
ability of low and high Gpp(NH)p concentrations to inhibit
FK (3

· 10

)6

m

)-stimulated AC activity. A characteristic

biphasic response curve was obtained in all experimental
groups. Gpp(NH)p concentrations ranging from 10

)11

to

10

)7

m

decreased AC activity due to Gi activation, whereas

higher nucleotide concentrations (10

)6

–10

)4

m

) resulted in

stimulation of both AC and Gs activities. Hippocampal
membranes from control and melatonin-treated rats
showed similar functionality of Gi and Gs (Fig. 3).

In order to investigate whether Gia1 and Gia2 levels were

affected by melatonin, Western blot analyses were per-
formed. Melatonin administration did not significantly alter
the amount of the Gia1 or Gia2 subunits in hippocampal
membranes after 5 hr of a single dose (data not shown).

Discussion

The present study demonstrates that a single dose of
melatonin decreases the activity of the rat hippocampal
somatostatinergic system. The doses of melatonin tested
herein were in the range of those used by other authors for
similar studies of melatonin actions in the CNS [35]. The
SRIF-LI levels in the control animals, as determined by
radioimmunoassay, were similar to those previously repor-
ted by our group and other authors [29, 36]. The SRIF-LI
content was decreased in the hippocampus 5 hr after
administration of 25 lg/kg of melatonin.

The equilibrium parameters of the SRIF receptors in the

hippocampus of control rats were similar to those previ-
ously reported by our group and others [36, 37]. Melatonin
produced a significant decrease in the number of

125

I-Tyr

11

-

SRIF receptors in the hippocampus. Pretreatment with
luzindole, a competitive antagonist of the melatonin recep-
tors, did not alter the melatonin-induced effect on SRIF-LI
content and SRIF binding. In addition, administration of
luzindole alone had no observable effect on these two
parameters. These results suggest that the effects of

Fig.1.

Effect of melatonin (25 lg/kg) treatment for 5 hr on

somatostatin (SRIF)-like immunoreactivity in the rat hippocam-
pus. Values are expressed as the mean ± S.E.M. of five experi-
ments, each performed in duplicate. Statistical comparison vs.
control: ***P < 0.001.

Table 1. Effect of increasing melatonin concentrations (10, 25, 50
or 100 lg/kg, s.c.) on equilibrium parameters for [

125

I]-Tyr

11

-SRIF

binding to hippocampal membranes

Groups

SRIF receptors

B

max

K

d

Control

486 ± 42

0.46 ± 0.03

Melatonin

10 lg/kg

346 ± 13**

0.34 ± 0.02*

25 lg/kg

322 ± 17**

0.32 ± 0.02**

50 lg/kg

467 ± 29

0.36 ± 0.06

100 lg/kg

486 ± 14

0.41 ± 0.03

Binding parameters were calculated from Scatchard plots by linear
regression.
K

d

and B

max

are expressed as nanomoles and femtomoles,

respectively, of SRIF bound per milligram of protein.
The results are represented as the mean ± S.E.M. of five separate
experiments performed by duplicate in individual rats.
Statistical comparison vs. control: *P < 0.05; **P < 0.01.

Izquierdo-Claros et al.

90

melatonin on the SRIFergic system are not mediated by
melatonin receptors. Li et al. [6] showed that the effects
of melatonin on isolated carp retinal neurons were not
blocked by luzindole. Wan et al. [12] showed that melato-
nin inhibits GABA-induced Cl

)

currents in the hippocam-

pus, unlike other brain areas where melatonin potentiates
GABA-induced Cl

)

currents. Several studies indicate that

there is a binding site for melatonin on the GABA

A

receptor [38]. This binding site may not distinguish subtle
difference between melatonin and its competitive antagonist
luzindole. Luzindole modulates the GABA-induced cur-
rents in a way similar to melatonin [6]. Several experiments
indicate that there is a binding site of melatonin on the
GABA

A

receptor [38]. Therefore, it is possible that the

modulatory effect of melatonin on the GABA

A

receptors

may be due to an allosteric action caused by melatonin
binding to a modulatory site on these receptors. This may
explain why the melatonin-induced effect on SRIF binding
was not blocked by luzindole, a competitive antagonist of the
melatonin receptor, and why luzindole modulates the
GABA-induced currents in a way similar to that of melatonin
[6]. Previous studies of our group suggest that stimulation of
GABAergic neurotransmission decreases the number of
SRIF receptors in the rat frontoparietal cortex [39]. Immun-
ochemical studies have revealed GABAergic innervation of
SRIF-containing neurons in the hippocampus [40], as well as
the presence of GABA receptors on SRIF neurons in this
brain area [41]. In addition, colocalization of GABA and
SRIF and reciprocal modulation of SRIF and GABA release
have been described [42, 43]. GABA tonically inhibits SRIF
release [44] and synthesis of SRIF [45]. Therefore, if
melatonin inhibits GABA receptor function in the rat
hippocampus [41] this may lead to an increase in SRIF
release and therefore a decrease in SRIF content in the
hippocampus. Increased SRIF release might lead to down-
regulation of SRIF receptors from adjacent SRIF-containing
neurons. Receptor density has been previously shown to be
modulated by changes in tissue SRIF concentration [46–48].

At present, there is evidence supporting the hypothesis

that changes in membrane polarization may induce mod-
ifications in the number of receptors present in the
membrane of neuronal cells [49]. As melatonin inhibits
GABA-induced Cl

)

currents in the hippocampus, inhibi-

tion of GABA-induced neuronal hyperpolarization might
be implicated in the action of melatonin on the SRIFergic
system. In this regard, our group has shown that glycine,
which causes neuronal hyperpolarization upon binding to

Fig.2.

Binding of [

125

I]-Tyr

11

-SRIF to rat hippocampal membranes. Left panel: Displacement of [

125

I]-Tyr

11

-SRIF binding by increasing

concentrations of unlabelled SRIF. Specific binding was calculated as described in Materials and methods. Membranes (0.15 mg of protein/
mL) were incubated for 60 min at 30

C in the presence of 250 pm [

125

I]-Tyr

11

-SRIF and increasing concentrations of SRIF. Points

correspond to values for the animals in the control group (

s

, n

¼ 5), the melatonin (25 lg/kg, s.c.)-treated group (

d

, n

¼ 5) and the

luzindole (10 mg/kg, s.c.) plus melatonin (25 lg/kg, s.c.)-treated group (m, n

¼ 5). The animals were killed 5 hr after the last injection. The

control group corresponds to a pool of the control rats, as the B

max

and K

d

values of the different controls were not affected by the vehicle.

Each point is the mean of five separate experiments, each performed in duplicate. Right panel: Scatchard analysis of the binding data.

Table 2. Effect of a single dose of melatonin (25 lg/kg), luzindole
(10 mg/kg) or luzindole (10 mg/kg) plus melatonin (25 lg/kg) on
the equilibrium parameters for [

125

I]-Tyr

11

-SRIF binding to rat

hippocampal membranes

Groups

SRIF receptors

B

max

K

d

Control

518 ± 20

0.46 ± 0.03

Melatonin

349 ± 24***

0.35 ± 0.03*

Luzindole

480 ± 57

0.50 ± 0.04

Luzindole + melatonin

360 ± 14***

0.36 ± 0.02*

Binding parameters were calculated from Scatchard plots by linear
regression.
K

d

and B

max

are expressed as nanomoles and femtomoles,

respectively, of SRIF bound per milligram of protein.
The results are represented as the mean ± S.E.M. of five experi-
ments performed in duplicate.
Statistical comparison vs. control: *P < 0.05; ***P < 0.001.

Melatonin modulates the rat hippocampal somatostatinergic system

91

its receptor, a chloride channel, increases the number of
SRIF receptors and SRIF-mediated inhibition of AC
system in the rat hippocampus [50].

As previously shown, the basal and FK-stimulated AC

activity was inhibited by SRIF in all the experimental groups
[21]. A high concentration of SRIF (10

)4

m

) was required to

produce this inhibition, although the same concentration
was used by other investigators in their studies on

SRIF-mediated inhibition of AC activity in rat brain [51,
52]. In the present study, the SRIF-mediated inhibition of
AC activity was only significant at the maximal concentra-
tion tested (10

)4

m

). Thus, this concentration was chosen for

subsequent studies involving AC activity. It should also be
noted that abundant studies on SRIF-mediated inhibition of
AC activity were performed in cell lines expressing higher
levels of SRIF receptors than in animal tissues and therefore,
the inhibitory effect of SRIF is obtained at lower peptide
concentrations. Another possible explanation may lie in the
observation that G proteins can modulate the affinity of
SRIF receptors and the coupling to the effector system (AC
among others). In this respect, Enjalbert et al. [53] have
demonstrated that the mobilization of the G protein by GTP
reduces the SRIF receptor affinity for the neuropeptide in
cerebral cortical cells. Indeed, in the presence of GTP
necessary to couple the SRIF receptor to the AC catalytic
subunit, the SRIF receptor may shift from an apparent high-
affinity state (observed in binding studies) to an apparent
low-affinity state (observed in AC studies). However, the
synaptic concentration of SRIF is, to date, unknown.
However, it is tempting to speculate that as the hippocampus
is very rich in SRIF-containing neurons, the amount of SRIF
released may be sufficiently high as to justify the increased
SRIF concentration that was used to inhibit AC activity.
Therefore, it is possible to assume that the high concentra-
tion of SRIF was necessary to inhibit AC activity under the
present experimental conditions.

Melatonin administration led to a decrease in SRIF-

mediated inhibition of basal and FK-stimulated AC activity
after 5 hr of a single melatonin dose. The capacity of SRIF
to inhibit basal and FK-stimulated AC activity was
significantly lower in the melatonin-treated rats when
compared with controls. This decreased sensitivity of AC
to SRIF induced by melatonin administration might be a
consequence of SRIF receptor downregulation. We can
exclude the possibility that it was due to a decrease in the
functionality of the AC catalytic subunit as FK-stimulated
AC activity was unaffected by melatonin administration.

To test the functionality of Gi proteins, the response of AC

to the GTP analog Gpp(NH)p was examined. As the
inhibitory effect of Gpp(NH)p on FK-stimulated AC activity

Table 3. Effect of somatostatin (SRIF) (10

)4

m

) and forskolin (FK) (10

)5

m

) on brain adenylyl cyclase activity (pmol cAMP/min/mg

protein) in hippocampal membranes from control- (n

¼ 15), melatonin- (n ¼ 5), luzindole- (n ¼ 5) and luzindole plus melatonin-treated

(n

¼ 5) rats

Control

Melatonin

Luzindole

Luzindole + melatonin

Basal activity

287.6 ± 10.3

299.3 ± 11.7

253.9 ± 29.8

329.0 ± 36.7

+10

)4

m

SRIF

211.5 ± 8.3

260.3 ± 24.0

181.6 ± 23.0

295.0 ± 38.9

+10

)5

m

FK

740.7 ± 32.3

792.2 ± 108.4

692.7 ± 74.4

815.1 ± 87.0

10

)5

m

FK + 10

)4

m

SRIF

553.6 ± 13.3

693.3 ± 90.3

528.0 ± 84.7

704.9 ± 44.5

Fold FK stimulation over basal

2.58 ± 0.11

2.65 ± 0.26

2.73 ± 0.3

2.48 ± 0.06

% SRIF inhibition of basal activity

26.5 ± 2.4

13.04 ± 4.61

a

28.0 ± 0.5

10.32 ± 2.07

c

% SRIF inhibition of FK stimulation

25.3 ± 3.6

12.48 ± 0.59

b

24.6 ± 2.8

13.53 ± 3.27

d

Experiments were performed as described in Materials and methods.
Values represent the mean ± S.E.M. of five experiments, each performed in duplicate.
Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA.

a

P

< 0.05 and

c

P

< 0.001: comparison of the % SRIF inhibition of basal activity between control and melatonin-treated rats and between

control and luzindole + melatonin-treated rats, respectively.

b

P

< 0.01 and

d

P

< 0.05: comparison of the % SRIF inhibition of FK stimulation between control and melatonin-treated rats and

between control and luzindole + melatonin-treated rats, respectively.

Fig.3.

Dose–effect

curves

for

5-guanylylimidodiphosphate

[Gpp(NH)p]-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity in rat
hippocampal membranes from control (

s

, n

¼ 5) and melatonin

(25 lg/kg)-treated (

d

, n

¼ 5) rats. The effect of Gpp(NH)p on

adenylyl cyclase activity was studied in the presence of 3

· 10

)6

m

FK and the indicated concentrations of Gpp(NH)p. Data are
expressed as a percentage of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase
activity in the absence of Gpp(NH)p (100%). The results are given
as the mean ± S.E.M. of five separate determinations, each
performed in duplicate.

Izquierdo-Claros et al.

92

was not altered by melatonin treatment, the possibility that
the decreased SRIF-mediated inhibition of basal and
FK-stimulated AC activity was due to a decrease in the
functional activity of the Gi proteins can also be ruled out.
Finally, Western blot analyses of Gia

1

and Gia

2

proteins were

performed. The results obtained indicate that melatonin
treatment did not alter the amount of the Gia

1

or Gia

2

levels.

As melatonin decreases the activity of the SRIFergic

system in the hippocampus and increases it in the fronto-
parietal cortex [54, 55], effects that were not blocked by
luzindole, a competitive antagonist [56, 57], it is unlikely
that the modulatory effects of melatonin on the SRIF
receptors are mediated by melatonin receptors, although
they are present in both brain areas [3]. Melatonin enhances
GABAergic function in the cerebral cortex [5] whereas it
inhibits GABA-induced Cl

)

currents in the rat hippocam-

pus. GABA tonically inhibits the release [44] and synthesis
of SRIF [45]. In the frontoparietal cortex from rats treated
with melatonin we previously observed a significant increase
in SRIF receptors, despite the fact that no changes in SRIF
content were found [55]. Although the overall content of
SRIF in the frontoparietal cortex did not decrease, the rate
of SRIF synthesis and release may have changed. If this
were the case, decreased SRIF release or turnover might
lead to upregulation of SRIF receptors in the frontoparietal
cortex, although we could not detect any increase in SRIF
content by radioimmunoassay. In the hippocampus, how-
ever, melatonin inhibits GABA receptor function, which
affects the GABA-SRIF neurons of the hippocampus. This
could lead to SRIF release, resulting in significant short-
term internalization of the SRIF receptors, as has been
previously demonstrated both in brain and pituitary [58, 59].

The functional significance of the melatonin-induced

decrease of SRIFergic activity in the rat hippocampus
remains to be established. In rats, melatonin increases
neuronal activity in hippocampal neurons [11, 12]. As SRIF
exerts an opposite effect to that of melatonin on hippo-
campal neuronal activity [13, 14], it is possible that the
SRIFergic system could be implicated in the mechanism of
action of melatonin in the rat. However, the precise mode
of action of acute melatonin administration on SRIFergic
neurotransmission warrants further investigation.

Acknowledgments

We wish to thank Lilian Puebla for her excellent linguistic
assistance and Mercedes Griera-Merino for her excellent
technical assistance. This study was supported by grants
from the Direccio´n General de Investigacio´n del Ministerio
de Ciencia y Tecnologı´a (PM99-0129) and the University of
Alcala´ (E007/97; E039/99), Spain.

References

1. Reppert SM, Perlow MJ, Tamarkin L et al. A diurnal

melatonin rhythm in primate cerebrospinal fluid. Endocrinol-
ogy 1979; 104:295–301.

2. Skinner DC, Malpaux B. High melatonin concentration in

third ventricular cerebrospinal fluid are not due to Galen vein
blood recirculating through the choroid plexus. Endocrinology
1999; 140:4399–4405.

3. Laudon M, Nir I, Zisapel N. Melatonin receptors in discrete

brain areas of the male rat. Impact for aging on density and on
circadian rhythmicity. Neuroendocrinology 1988; 48:577–583.

4. Stankov B, Fraschini F, Reiter RJ. Melatonin binding sites

in the central nervous system. Brain Res Rev 1991; 16:245–256.

5. Coloma FM, Niles LP. Melatonin enhancement of [

3

H]-

gamma-aminobutyric acid and [

3

H]muscimol binding in rat

brain. Biochem Pharmacol 1988; 37:1271–1274.

6. Li GL, Li P, Yang XL. Melatonin modulates gamma-ami-

nobutyric acid (A) receptor-mediated currents on isolated carp
retinal neurons. Neurosci Lett 2001; 301:49–53.

7. Acun

˜ a-Castroviejo

D, Rosenstein RE, Romeo HE et al.

Changes in gamma-aminobutyric acid high affinity binding to
cerebral cortex membranes after pinealectomy or melatonin
administration to rats. Neuroendocrinology 1986; 43:24–31.

8. Reiter RJ, Tan DX, Manchester LC et al. Biochemical

reactivity of melatonin with reactive oxygen and nitrogen
species: a review of the evidence. Cell Biochem Biophys 2001;
34:237–256.

9. Allegra M, Reiter RJ, Tan DX et al. The chemistry of

melatonin’s interaction with reactive species. J Pineal Res 2003;
34:1–10.

10. Acun

˜ a-Castroviejo

D, Escames G, Macias M et al. Cell

protective role of melatonin in the brain. J Pineal Res 1995;
19:57–63.

11. Musshoff U, Riewenherm D, Berger D et al. Melatonin

receptors in rat hippocampus: molecular and function inves-
tigations. Hippocampus 2002; 12:165–173.

12. Wan Q, Man HY, Lin F et al. Differential modulation of

GABAA receptor function by Mel1a and Mel1b receptors. Nat
Neurosci 1999; 2:401–403.

13. Boehm S, Betz H. Somatostatin inhibits excitatory transmis-

sion at rat hippocampal synapses via presynaptic receptors.
J Neurosci 1997; 17:4066–4075.

14. Tallent MK, Siggins GR. Somatostatin depresses excitatory

but not inhibitory neurotransmission in rat CA1 hippocampus.
J Neurophysiol 1997; 78:3008–3018.

15. Bakst I, Avendano C, Morrison JH et al. An experimental

analysis of origins of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in
the dentate gyrus of the rat. J Neurosci 1986; 6:1452–1462.

16. Reubi JC, Maurer R. Autoradiographic mapping of somat-

ostatin receptors in the rat central nervous system and pituit-
ary. Neuroscience 1985; 15:1183–1193.

17. Petrusz P, Sar M, Grossman GH et al. Synaptic terminals

with somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the rat brain. Brain
Res 1977; 137:181–187.

18. Schonbrunn A. Somatostatin receptors: present knowledge

and future directions. Ann Oncol 1999; 10:S17–S21.

19. Law SF, Manning D, Reisine T. Identification of the sub-

units of GTP-binding proteins coupled to somatostatin
receptors. J Biol Chem 1991; 266:17885–17897.

20. Dorflinger LJ, Schonbrunn A. Somatostatin inhibits basal

and vasoactive intestinal peptide-stimulated hormone release
by different mechanisms in GH pituitary cells. Endocrinology
1983; 113:1551–1558.

21. Meyerhof W. The elucidation of somatostatin receptor

functions: a current view. Rev Physiol Biochem Pharmacol
1998; 133:55–108.

22. Alexiuk NA, Vriend JP. Melatonin reduces dopamine con-

tent in the neurointermediate lobe of male syrian hamsters.
Brain Res Bull 1993; 32:433–436.

23. Dubocovich ML, Mogilnicka E, Areso PM. Antidepres-

sant-like activity of the melatonin receptor antagonist,

Melatonin modulates the rat hippocampal somatostatinergic system

93

luzindole (N-0774), in the mouse behavioral despair test. Eur J
Pharmacol 1990; 182:313–325.

24. Glowinski J, Iversen LL. Regional studies of catecholamines

in the rat brain. I. The disposition of [

3

H]norepinephrine,

[

3

H]dopamine and [

3

H]DOPA in various regions of the brain.

J Neurochem 1966; 13:655–669.

25. Greenwood FC, Hunter WM, Glover JS. The preparation

of

131

I-labelled human growth hormone of high specific

radioactivity. Biochem J 1963; 89:114–123.

26. Reubi JC, Perrin MH, Rivier JE et al. High affinity binding

sites for a somatostatin-28 analog in rat brain. Life Sci 1981;
28:2191–2198.

27. Lowry OH, Rosenbrough NJ, Farr AL et al. Protein

measurement with the Folin phenol reagent. J Biol Chem 1951;
193:265–275.

28. Czernik AJ, Petrack V. Somatostatin receptor binding in rat

cerebral cortex. Characterization using a nonreducible somat-
ostatin analog. J Biol Chem 1983; 285:5525–5530.

29. Patel YC, Reichlin S. Somatostatin in hypothalamus, ext-

rahypotalamic brain, and peripheral tissues of the rat. Endo-
crinology 1978; 102:523–530.

30. Houslay MD, Metcalfe JC, Warren GB et al. The gluca-

gon receptor of rat liver plasma membrane can couple to
adenylate cyclase without activating it. Biochim Biophys Acta
1976; 436:489–494.

31. Gilman AG. A protein binding assay for adenosine 3

¢5¢-cyclic

monophosphate. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1970; 67:305–312.

32. Schettini G, Florio T, Meucci O et al. Somatostatin inhi-

bition of adenylate cyclase activity in different brain areas.
Brain Res 1989; 492:65–71.

33. Laemmli UK. Cleaveage of structural proteins during the

assembly of the head of bacteriophage T4. Nature 1970;
227:680–685.

34. Munson PJ, Rodbard D. A versatile computerized approach

for characterization of ligand binding systems. Anal Biochem
1980; 107:220–239.

35. Acun

˜ a-Castroviejo

D, Castillo JL, Ferna´ndez B et al.

Modulation by pineal gland of ouabain high-affinity bind-
ing sites in rat cerebral cortex. Am J Physiol 1992; 262:
R698–R706.

36. Pitkanen A, Sirvio J, Jolkonnne J et al. Somatostatin-like

immunoreactivity and somatostatin receptor binding in rat
brain before and after pentylenetetrazol induced convulsion.
Neuropeptides 1986; 7:63–71.

37. Epelbaum J, Tapia-Arancibia L, Kordon C et al. Charac-

terization, regional distribution and subcellular distribution of

125

I-Tyr

1

-somatostatin binding sites in rat brain. J Neurochem

1982; 38:1515–1523.

38. Niles LP, Peace CH. Allosteric modulation of t-[35S]but-

ylbicyclophosphorothionate binding in rat brain by melatonin.
Brain Res Bull 1990; 24:635–638.

39. Martinez A, Arilla E. The effect of diazepam and the ben-

zodiazepine antagonist CGS8216 on the somatostatinergic
neuronal system. Neuropharmacology 1993; 32:393–399.

40. Gulya´s AI, Go¨rcs TJ, Freund TF. Innervation of different

peptide-containing neurons in the hippocampus by gabaergic
septal afferents. Neuroscience 1990; 37:31–44.

41. Gao B, Fritschy JM. Selective allocation of GABA

A

recep-

tors containing the alpha1 subunit to neurochemically distinct
subpopulations of rat hippocampal interneurons. Eur J Neu-
rosci 1994; 6:837–853.

42. Epelbaum J, Dournaud P, Fodor M et al. The neurobiology

of somatostatin. Crit Rev Neurobiol 1994; 8:25–44.

43. Kosaka T, Wu JY, Benoit R. GABAergic neurons containing

somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the rat hippocampus
and dentate gyrus. Exp Brain Res 1988; 71:388–398.

44. Gamse R, Vaccaro D, Gamse G et al. Release of immuno-

reactive somatostatin from hypothalamic cells in culture:
inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid. Proc Natl Acad Sci
USA 1980; 77:5552–5556.

45. LLorens-Cortes C, Bertherat J, Jomary C et al. Regula-

tion of somatostatin synthesis by GABA

A

receptor stimulation

in mouse brain. Mol Brain Res 1992; 13:277–281.

46. Ramirez JL, Mouchantaf R, Kumar U et al. Brain somat-

ostatin receptors are up-regulated in somatostatin-deficient
mice. Mol Endocrinol 2002; 16:1951–1963.

47. Gonza´lez-Guijarro L, Lo´pez-Ruiz MP, Prieto JC et al.

Modulation of somatostatin binding sites in cytosol of rabbit
gastric fundic mucosa by cisteamine administration. Gen
Pharmacol 1986; 17:637–639.

48. Srikant CB, Patel YC. Cysteamine-induced depletion of

brain somatostatin is associated with up-regulation of cere-
brocortical

somatostatin

receptors.

Endocrinology

1984;

115:990–995.

49. Liles WC, Nathanson NM. Regulation of muscarinic acet-

ylcholine receptor number in cultured neuronal cells by chronic
membrane depolarization. J Neurosci 1987; 7:2556–2563.

50. Puebla L, Arilla E. Glycine increases the number of

somatostatin receptors and somatostatin-mediated inhibition
of adenylate cyclase system in the rat hippocampus. J Neurosci
Res 1996; 43:346–354.

51. Garlind A, Fowler CJ, Alafuzoff I et al. Neurotransmit-

ter-mediated inhibition of post-morten human brain adenylyl
cyclase. J Neural Transm Gen Sect 1992; 87:113–124.

52. Nagao M, Sakamoto C, Matozaki T et al. Coupling of

inhibitory GTP binding protein to somatostatin receptors on
rat cerebrocortical membranes. Nippon Naibunpi Gakkai
Zasshi 1989; 65:1357–1366.

53. Enjalbert A, Rosolon-Janahary R, Moyse E et al. Guan-

ine nucleotide sensitivity of [

125

I]iodo-N-Tyr

1

-somatostatin

binding in rat adenohypophysis and cerebral cortex. Endo-
crinology 1983; 113:822–824.

54. Izquierdo-Claros RM, Boyano-Ada´nez MC, Torrecillas

G et al. Acute modulation of somatostatin receptor function
by melatonin in the rat frontoparietal cortex. J Pineal Res
2001; 31:46–56.

55. Izquierdo-Claros RM, Boyano-Ada´nez MC, Arilla-Fer-

reiro

E. Effects of subchronic and chronic melatonin treat-

ment on somatostatin binding and its effects on adenylyl
cyclase activity in the rat frontoparietal cortex. J Pineal Res
2002; 33:1–9.

56. Dubocovich ML, Masana MI, Iacob S et al. Melatonin

receptor antagonists that differentiate between the human
Mel

1a

and Mel

1b

recombinant subtypes are used to assess the

pharmacological profile of the rabbit retina ML1 presynaptic
heteroreceptor. Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol 1997;
355:365–375.

57. Dubocovich ML. Pharmacology and function of melatonin

receptors. FASEB J 1988; 2:2765–2773.

58. Draznin B, Sherman N, Sussman K et al. Internalization

and cellular processing of somatostatin in primary culture of
rat anterior pituitary cells. Endocrinology 1985; 117:960–966.

59. Csaba Z, Bernard V, Helboe L et al. In vivo internalization

of the somatostatin sst2A receptor in rat brain: evidence for
translocation of cell-surface receptors into the endosomal
recycling pathway. Mol Cell Neurosci 2001; 17:646–661.

Izquierdo-Claros et al.

94