Volume 17, May 2017

Science Highlight

Determining controllability of sepsis using genetic algorithms on a proxy

agent-based model of systemic inflammation 

 

ABSTRACT

Sepsis, the body’s response to severe infection or injury, kills more people each year in the US than AIDS, breast cancer and 
prostate cancer combined. After nearly 50 years of investigation not a single drug is currently available to treat sepsis; 
therefore the question as to whether sepsis can be controlled is an open question. We approach this by viewing the systemic 
inflammatory response as a random dynamical system that can be represented with an agent-based model, the Innate 
Immune Response ABM (IIRABM) as an abstracted proxy model for human sepsis. We then deploy a genetic algorithm (GA) 
on Beagle to identify control strategies to guide sepsis back to a state of health. System behavior is generated primarily by a 
set of five external parameters (microbial invasiveness, microbial toxigenesis, host resilience, environmental toxicity, and initial 
injury size). The GA is trained on a single parameter set with multiple stochastic replicates. For the parameter set used to train 
the GA, an eight-stage intervention, with 12 cytokine synthesis pathways either inhibited or augmented at each state, was 
discovered which lowered the mortality rate from 82% to 16%. This intervention was generalizable to other parameter sets 
located near to the training set in parameter space; for two alternate but close parameter sets, the mortality rate was lowered 
from 79% to 10% and 99% to 27%. The derived intervention did not perform as well on parameter sets that were less similar to 
the training set, suggesting that individualized interventions are desirable.

INTRODUCTION

Approximately 1 million people will be diagnosed with sepsis, a condition with a mortality rate ranging from 28%-50%, each 
year. Attempts to discover biologically-targeted therapies for sepsis have thus far been focused on manipulating a single 
mediator/cytokine, generally administered with either a single dose or over a very short course (less than 72 hours). 
Unfortunately, all these attempts, likely due to both the nonlinear nature of the human inflammatory signaling network and the 
paucity of clinical time-course data to place network relationships in context, have been unsuccessful. It is well known in 
biology that the systemic response to identical perturbations in genetically identical individuals (i.e., mice) is governed 
according to some probability distribution. In a chaotic system, this small stochastic variability in response can ultimately lead 
to a radically different final state. It logically follows then, that a single time point/single cytokine intervention is unlikely to be 
successful on a broad range of patients with a broad range of conditions that have lead to the state of sepsis. The challenge, 
however, is that the range of possible interventions, which is a function of the number of potential molecular targets, the extent 
to which they are modified, the time at which such modification can occur and the combinations thereof, is staggering, and 
cannot be tractably investigated given the logistical and practical limitations of both experimental and clinical research. We 
propose to address this challenge by the use of evolutionary computing (in the form of genetic algorithms) applied to a 
sufficiently complex, albeit abstracted, proxy computational model of sepsis. We have previously proposed that dynamic 
computational modeling, and specifically agent based modeling, can be used to represent mechanistic biological knowledge in 
a way that reproduces the non-linear dynamics of the real world system. Specifically, was have previously developed an 
agent-based model (ABM) of systemic inflammation, the Innate Immune Response agent-based model (IIRABM). The IIRABM 
is a two-dimensional abstract representation of the human endothelial-blood interface. This abstraction is designed to model 
the endothelial-blood interface for a traumatic (in the medical sense) injury, and does so by representing this interface as the 
unwrapped internal vascular surface of an azimuthally averaged 2D projection of the terminus for a branch of the arterial 
vascular network. We have previously utilized Beagle to demonstrate that the IIRABM casts the immune response as a 
random dynamical system with chaotic elements (see Fig. 1). We propose to use the existing IIRABM as a proxy system for 
the investigation of potential control strategies for sepsis. Discovery of an effective or optimal intervention can then be viewed 
as a nonlinear optimization/optimal control problem. Given a sufficiently validated model GA’s can be utilized to develop 
complex treatment strategies by solving the optimal control problem on a biological ABM. 

RESULTS

We have selected a set of cytokines and associated targets (Platelet-activating factor (PAF), Tumor necrosis factor alpha 
(TNFα), Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors (sTNFr), Interleukin-1 (IL1), soluble interleukin-1 receptors (sIL1r), Interleukin-
1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra), Interferon-gamma IFNγ, Interleukin-4 (IL4), Interleukin-8 (IL8), Interleukin-10 (IL10), Interleukin-
12 (IL12), and Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF)), which are the principal drivers of the inflammatory/immune 
dynamics expressed by the model. In order to search for an optimal intervention strategy, we allow production of each of these 
targets to be augmented or inhibited alone or as a group. The best solution (that which minimized the probability of death for 
both the specific patient case and the general case) was found by using 8 sequential interventions. For the specific patient 
upon which the GA was trained, the probability of death was reduced from 68% to 12% through application in the intervention 
shown in Fig 2; for the general case, the probability of death with this intervention was reduced from 82% to 16%. This 
intervention is represented as a three-dimensional bar graph in Figure 2. The height of the bars along the z-axis represents the 
log2 of the intervention multiplier; the x-axis enumerates the interventions; the y-axis shows which cytokine has its protein 
synthesis augmented or inhibited according to its associated bar. This solution was also tested against two additional 
parameter sets with similar aggregate mortality rates. The first test cause used a medium sized injury on a weak host with a 
microbial infection of low virulence; in this case, the probability of death was reduced from 79% to 10%. The second test case 
used the same parameter set as the first, but with a larger initial injury; in this case, the probability of death was reduced from 
99% to 27%. While GA is quite successful at healing at IIRABM under a wide range of conditions, it has a few drawbacks 
which preclude it from being the ideal solution: 1) more extreme conditions (either very large injuries or extremely virulent 
bacteria) require either a finer degree of control than is computationally tractable using GA, as each sequential intervention 
multiplies the size of the search space by a factor of 912 (approximately 5 billion), or more aggressive interventions; 
intervention multipliers were limited to a small set of values we considered clinically tractable – removing this constraint would 
lead to an unconstrained search, increasing computational cost and potentially generating implausible interventions; 2) 
adjusting the temporal density of interventions requires a new run of the GA, which can be computationally expensive; 3) the 
GA does not have the ability to react to non-responders and adjust the intervention accordingly – rather, it finds the single 
sequence of interventions which (locally) maximizes the survival probability for a given patient population.

 

 

 

 

 

Resouces:

 

Beagle Wiki

Get detailed usage information from 

the Beagle2 team

Beagle Support

Contact the Beagle experts for help

Globus

For file transfer. Get started moving 

files to/from Beagle2 using this fast 

service

Other CI resources

Learn about other computing 

resources available at the 

Computation Institute 

 

Intro to Beagle

June 9th, 1PM

Room 240A, at the Computation 

Institute of the University of Chicago

Topics will include:

   Overview of Beagle2’s Cray XE6 

system architecture

   Basic access and navigation 

operations

   Using compilers and applications

   Use of local and network filesystems

   Submitting jobs and monitoring jobs

   Data transfer

   Multiple MPI jobs on Beagle 

  Chaining jobs on Beagle

  Packing jobs on Beagle

  Benchmarking

 

Beagle2 Events To learn more 

about Beagle2 training.  

Training:

by Chase Cockrell and Gary An 

 

Beagle Related 
Publications

H. Li, I. Achour, L. Bastarache et al.
Integrative genomics analyses unveil 
downstream biological effectors of disease-
specific polymorphisms buried in intergenic 
regions
npj Genomic Medicine 1:16006, 2016. 
doi:10.1038/npjgenmed.2016.6.

 

Searle Chemistry Laboratory
5735 South Ellis Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637 

Help E-Mail:

beagle-support@lists.uchicago.edu

Beage2 CI Website:

beagle.ci.uchicago.edu

 

Request
for RECENT publications

made using Beagle

Please send us your most updated list, 

including papers that are only under 

revision. Feel free to add also older 

ones, since they might not be in our lists 

yet and press releases that talk about 

your work with Beagle.

L. Waldron, J. D. Steimle, T. M. Greco et al. 
The Cardiac TBX5 Interactome Reveals a 
Chromatin Remodeling Network Essential for 
Cardiac Septation
Developmental Cell, Volume 36, Issue 3, 8 
Feb. 2016, 262–275, 
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2016.01.009

K.Balasubramanian, M.Vaidya, J.Southerland, 
et al.
Changes in Cortical Network Connectivity with 
Long-term Brain-Machine Interface Exposure in 
Chronic Amputees
Nature Communications, (under revision)

Additional information about Science on Beagle can be found here: Beagle2 website