ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS- MODULE 9  ZINC MINING IN MEXICO 

NOVEMBER 2016 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (retired) 

MODULE 9 ZINC MINING IN MEXICO 

 
 
Summary 
 
Several mines are overcoming operational issues in 2015/2016 but this is essentially negated by poor 
2016 production performance at Goldcorp’s Peñasquito mine.  As illustrated in Table 1, production 
should increase markedly in 2017 assuming all mines return to normal operations.  New production 
should be expected in 2017/2018 from ramp ups commencing at Peñoles’s Rey de Plata mine, 
Fresnillos’s San Julian mine and Americas Silver San Rafael mine.  The Fresnillo mine is moving into 
higher zinc grade ore. 
 
Typical Zn + Pb grades are generally less than 4% so most mines rely upon precious metals and copper 
by-products and/or high throughput to remain viable.  The net result of this is that there are very few 
mines that will benefit in a huge way with a zinc price run up.  They have been viable due to previous 
low zinc price leverage but conversely they will not benefit much at higher prices either.  Americas Silver 
is the only small miner about to become more leveraged to zinc but the current market capitalization 
suggests limited upside and as Nevsun experienced in the past, the precious metal premium in stock 
prices disappears when shareholders realize they have an unsexy base metal miner in their portfolio 
instead. 
 
 
Table 1 Summary of Zinc Mine Production for Mexico, Actual and Forecast 
 

Company 

 

2012 

2013 

2014 

2015 

2016 

2017 

2018 

2019 

2020 

2021 

2022 

Goldcorp 

174000 

150000 

179000 

209000 

134000 

200600 

200600 

200600 

200600 

200600 

200600 

Peñoles 

158478 

194492 

238308 

219116 

233990 

224000 

244000 

264000 

264000 

264000 

264000 

Fresnillo 

24928 

24882 

31700 

46022 

53000 

68000 

85000 

87000 

87000 

87000 

87000 

Sth. Copper 

89766 

99434 

70289 

65736 

86900 

100910 

100910 

100910 

100910 

103910 

107910 

Min. Frisco 

70250 

63675 

58913 

72000 

72000 

72000 

72000 

72000 

72000 

72000 

72000 

1

st

 Majestic 

2246 

3054 

5724 

7949 

5700 

5000 

5000 

5000 

5000 

5000 

5000 

Gr. Panther 

1478 

1673 

1675 

1850 

1600 

1800 

1800 

1800 

1800 

1800 

1800 

P.Am. Silver 

5600 

7700 

8910 

9700 

9500 

16000 

16000 

16000 

16000 

16000 

16000 

Gold Res. 

5600 

6760 

13195 

13900 

12900 

13000 

13000 

13000 

13000 

13000 

13000 

Americas S. 

7470 

6600 

5730 

5283 

4750 

5000 

10000 

16000 

18000 

18000 

18000 

Capstone 

7811 

8085 

6509 

5860 

4200 

5000 

6000 

6000 

9000 

9000 

9000 

Excellon    

4750 

4500 

4550 

3350 

2600 

3000 

Other 

107972 

71687 

35375 

27980 

30000 

30000 

30000 

30000 

30000 

30000 

30000 

Total 
 

660349 

642542 

659878 

687746 

651140 

744310 

784310 

812310 

817310 

820310 

824310 

 

Other: 

2012-2014 includes past producers now closed (Peñoles’ Naica and Nyrstar’s Campo Morado), small miners and statistical 
differences between government and company reported figures. 
2015- includes small miners and statistical differences between government and company reported figures. 
2016-2022- includes small miners only.  It is assumed Naica and Camp Morado remain closed during the study period. 
 
Total: 
2012-2015
 Government statistics from Cámara Minera de México.  
2016-2022 Derived by adding forecast mine production to small miner output provision.  

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS- MODULE 9  ZINC MINING IN MEXICO 

NOVEMBER 2016 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (retired) 

Table 2 summarizes the zinc mine supply for the countries reviewed in various Modules to date.  As 
illustrated, zinc production will not return to 2015 levels during the study period cumulatively for the 
countries reviewed to date.

 

 
Table 2 Summary of Actual and Expected Mined Zinc Production for Countries Reviewed to Date 
 

Mod.  Country 

2012 

2013 

2014 

2015 

2016 

2017 

2018 

2019 

2020 

2021 

2022 

Canada 

     

622.6  

     

412.8  

     

332.5  

     

295.6  

     

316.1  

     

332.0  

     

320.0  

     

319.0  

     

264.0  

     

160.0  

     

105.0  

USA 

     

738.0  

     

774.0  

     

812.0  

     

817.0  

     

769.0  

     

751.0  

     

736.0  

     

721.0  

     

682.0  

     

662.0  

     

659.0  

India 

     

738.5  

     

764.7  

     

758.7  

     

744.2  

     

546.0  

     

854.0  

     

624.0  

     

984.0  

     

892.0  

     

729.0  

     

688.0  

Australia 

  

1,541.2  

  

1,524.5  

  

1,561.1  

  

1,547.0  

     

840.3  

     

841.8  

  

1,016.5  

  

1,078.0  

  

1,051.7  

  

1,011.0  

     

972.7  

Peru 

  

1,204.3  

  

1,262.5  

  

1,250.1  

  

1,342.0  

  

1,273.2  

  

1,408.6  

  

1,415.5  

  

1,425.0  

  

1,447.7  

  

1,416.1  

  

1,422.0  

Europe 

  

1,000.8  

     

988.3  

     

990.2  

     

907.1  

     

911.7  

     

902.0  

     

906.3  

     

931.5  

     

958.5  

     

980.5  

     

986.5  

Mexico 

     

660.3  

     

642.5  

     

659.9  

     

687.7  

     

651.1  

     

744.3  

     

784.3  

     

812.3  

     

817.3  

     

820.3  

     

824.3  

 

  

  

6,505.8  

  

6,369.4  

  

6,364.5  

  

6,340.7  

  

5,307.5  

  

5,833.7  

  

5,802.5  

  

6,270.8  

  

6,103.2  

  

5,778.9  

  

5,657.5  

 

 

 

-2.1% 

-0.1% 

-0.4% 

-16.3% 

9.9% 

-0.5% 

8.1% 

-2.7% 

-5.3% 

-2.1% 

 
 
 
Discussion 
 
The curious thing about zinc mining in Mexico is that only Peñoles really identifies themselves as zinc 
miners.  Even then, it only constitutes 17.3% of their mining revenue when 75% owned subsidiary 
Fresnillo is included.  Virtually every other company considers themselves to be either precious metal 
miners or copper miners.  This has two key impacts:   
 

1)  In times of zinc market oversupply, zinc production is not curtailed since it is a by-product; 
2)  Conversely, in times of zinc market undersupply, zinc production is not increased either. 

 
The challenge in this Module has been to track down the clear majority of producers to reconcile 
government statistics with mine reported statistics and then to ask the question, who can increase 
production (prior to 2022) or conversely, who is running out of ore? 
 
Quite frankly, I was disappointed by the level of disclosure with respect to mining, geology and reserves 
for numerous companies.  These companies want the luxury of accessing our capital markets but in 
many cases, are unwilling to provide basic information such as reserves by mine site.  This unwillingness 
to provide an adequate level of disclosure therefore leads to my unwillingness to be a shareholder in the 
company.  It is a real shame that a very small miner such as Great Panther Silver has better disclosure 
than a behemoth like Southern Copper. 
 
 
 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS- MODULE 9  ZINC MINING IN MEXICO 

NOVEMBER 2016 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (retired) 

Zinc mining in Mexico can be subdivided into six areas: 
 

1)  Goldcorp’s Peñasquito mine; 
2)  Peñoles’s six mines; 
3)  Fresnillo’s three precious metal mines; 
4)  Southern Copper’s (IMMSA) five mines; 
5)  Minera Frisco’s three mines; 
6)  Small silver miners. 

 
Only Peñoles’s production is somewhat sensitive to the price of zinc.  Goldcorp considers their mine to 
be a gold/silver mine.  Southern Copper is more preoccupied with expanding their copper operations 
and the numerous small miners are also concerned more with silver/gold mining.   

 

Like Peru, Mexico does a good job of tracking zinc mine production on an annual basis and the 2015 
summary report is located 

here

  I have split out and reproduced the zinc data for 2015 and cross 

referenced it with the producer below.   

The government statisticians have made one serious error in this table which is to list the zinc 
concentrate production for Peñoles’s Velardeña mine in Cuencamé municipality and not the zinc in 
concentrate.  Data presented for the prior year of 83,783 T Zn for Cuencamé was essentially correct but 
this then increases to 176,104 T for 2015 whereas the mine only produced 80,538 T Zn according to 
Peñoles.  They have therefore overstated annual production for Mexico by 95,566 T in 2015.  They have 
also double counted La Platosa’s production of ~3,400 T since it is mined in one municipality but then 
trucked and milled in another.  I have taken the liberty to correct their data.  This report therefore 
identifies 22 mines constituting 96% of the mined zinc production in Mexico with the remainder 
attributed to very small miners.  Like Peru, I also suspect some of this remaining 4% is related to miners 
reporting the zinc present in lead or copper concentrates although this is not recoverable nor payable. 

All zinc production is from underground mines apart from Goldcorp’s very large Peñasquito open pit 
mine.  This is an important consideration since ramping up production in response to commodity price 
increases is more difficult for underground operations. 

 

 

 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS- MODULE 9  ZINC MINING IN MEXICO 

NOVEMBER 2016 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (retired) 

 

CÁMARA MINERA DE MÉXICO REPORTED 

 

COMPANY REPORTED 

 

 

State 

Municipality 

T Zinc 

T Zinc 

Mine 

Company 

Small miners/ 

 

  

 

  

  

  

Adjustments 

Aguascalientes 

  

  

  

  

 

 

Asientos 

30,529 

30,529 

Asientos 

Minera Frisco 

Chihuahua 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aquiles Serdan 

2,453 

2,453

 

Santa Eulalia 

S. Copper 

 

Ascensión 

42,043 

41,325 

Bismark 

Peñoles 

718 

 

Cusihuiriachi 

543 

 

 

 

543 

 

Hidalgo del Parral 

766 

 

 

 

766 

 

San Francisco del Oro 

23,823 

23,823 

San Francisco del Oro 

Minera Frisco 

 

Santa Bárbara 

34,555 

34,555 

Santa Barbara 

S. Copper 

 

Urique 

668 

 

 

 

668 

Durango 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canelas 

 

 

 

 

Cuencamé 

176,104 

80,538 

Velardeña 

Peñoles 

95,566 

 

Indé 

1,120 

 

 

 

1,120 

 

Mapimí 

3,755 

3,339 

La Platosa 

Excellon 

416 

 

Nombre de Dios 

7,948 

7,949 

La Parrilla 

First Majestic 

- 1 

 

Otaez 

83 

 

 

 

83 

 

Pánuco de Coronado 

2,144 

 

 

 

2,144 

 

Santiago Papasquiaro 

7,658 

5,970 

Cienego 

Fresnillo 

1,688 

 

Tepehuanes 

1,474 

 

 

 

1,474 

 

Topia 

3,340 

1,850 

Topia Mine 

Great Panther 

1,490 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

Guerrero 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arcelia 

495 

 

C. Morado (closed) 

Nyrstar 

495 

Hidalgo 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zimapan 

12,119 

 

Unknown 

 

12,119 

Jalisco 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bolaños 

 

 

 

Mexico 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zacazonapan 

45,430 

40,996 

Tizapa 

Peñoles 

4,434 

 

Zacualpan 

955 

 

 

 

955 

Oxaxaca 

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Pedro Totalapam 

14,964 

13,900 

Arista Mine 

Gold Res. Corp. 

1,064 

Queretaro 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cadereyta de Montes 

537 

 

 

 

537 

San Luis Potosa 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charcas 

28,728 

28,728 

Charcas 

S. Copper 

Sinaloa 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Concoria 

31 

 

 

 

31 

 

Cosalá 

5,807 

5,284 

Cosalá Operations 

Americas Silver 

523 

Zacatecas 

 

 

Note 1

 

 

 

 

Chalchihuites 

9,460 

8,910 

La Colorada 

Pan American 

550 

 

Fresnillo 

55,348 

19,029 

Fresnillo Mine 

Fresnillo 

15,296 

 

  

 

21,023 

Saucito 

Fresnillo 

 

 

Mazapil 

207,844 

209,000 

Peñasquito 

Goldcorp 

- 20,314 

 

  

 

19,158 

Tayahua, 

note 2

 

Minera Frisco 

 

 

Miguel Auza 

3,462 

 

Note 3

 

 

3,462 

 

Morelos 

51,085 

42,610 

Madero 

Peñoles 

2,615 

 

  

 

5,860 

Cozamin 

Capstone 

 

 

Sombrerete 

11,490 

13,738 

Sabinas 

Peñoles 

-  2,248 

 

  

786,774 

660,567 

 

 

126,207 

 

Cuencamé adjustment 

- 95,566 

 

Note 4

 

 

- 95,566 

 

La Platosa adjustment 

- 3,462 

 

Note 5

 

 

-  3,462 

Adjusted Mexico Production 

687,746 

660,567 

  

  

27,179 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note 1 

Zacatecas State figures reconcile to within 639T 

 

 

 

Note 2 

Tayahua production is Q1-Q3 prorated to 12 months 

 

 

Note 3 

La Platosa ore is milled here.  Therefore, it has been double counted. 

 

 

Note 4 

Government statistical error. 

 

 

 

Note 5 

La Platosa double counting eliminated. 

 

 

 

 

 

        

Figures in red is government data since data not reported by the company for 2015 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS- MODULE 9  ZINC MINING IN MEXICO 

NOVEMBER 2016 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (retired) 

Deposit Geology 

Mine by mine geological descriptions are generally not provided in this Module.  Most deposits 
containing zinc that are being mined in Mexico are either carbonate replacement deposits (mantos, 
chimneys) or vein type deposits.  The vein type deposits tend to be silver rich/ zinc poor whereas the 
carbonate replacement type deposits are more zinc rich/ silver poor.  The figure below illustrates the 
idealized typical setting for both types of deposits (essentially identical to the model Tinka is using to 
guide exploration in Peru where they have discovered manto, distal and vein type ore near a porphyry). 

 

 

Below is a plan view of the swarm of veins that constitute the prolific Fresnillo district, home to the 
Fresnillo and Saucito mines.  Numerous mines in Mexico commenced mining in the 1500’s. 

 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS- MODULE 9  ZINC MINING IN MEXICO 

NOVEMBER 2016 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (retired) 

 

 

In general, the small miners and Fresnillo are mining epithermal vein type deposits whereas Peñoles and 
Southern Copper are mining manto and chimney style carbonate replacement deposits.  Insufficient 
information was located to properly classify Minera Frisco’s mines. 

 

 

 

 

 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS- MODULE 9  ZINC MINING IN MEXICO 

NOVEMBER 2016 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (retired) 

Goldcorp 

You probably did not realize that Goldcorp operates one of the ten largest zinc mines in the world.  The 
key reason why precious metal companies often play down their role in the base metal markets is that 
they realize that precious metal stocks trade at a premium in comparison to their unfortunate base 
metal cousins.  The geology is not typical for Mexico and is described as: 

Peñasquito occurs as diatreme pipes that extend from shallow intrusives with most of the Ag-Au-
Zn-Pb mineralisation hosted within diatremes that intrude the carbonate basement rocks in a 
synclinal fold hinge, that forms the valley low. The diatremes are considered to have breached 
the Paleosurface with the volcanic apron having been eroded away. 

The base metal revenue is credited against precious metal mining costs.  Companies such as New Gold 
can report negative gold mining costs at the New Afton mine for instance because the copper revenue 
streams pays all the bills at higher copper prices.  Likewise, Freeport often reports negative copper 
production costs due to the often-large gold revenue stream at Grasberg. 

The Peñasquito mine has overpromised and underdelivered for years.  2015 production figures and 
reserves are illustrated in Table 3.    
 
 

Table 3  Proven and Probable Reserves as of December 31,2015, and 2015 Production 

 

Tonnes 

Zn% 

Pb% 

Au (g/t) 

Ag (g/t) 

 

P+P Reserves 

586,680,000 

0.69 

0.29 

0.52 

30.04 

2015 Production 

38,870,100 

0.68 

0.3 

28.5 

 
The figure below illustrates the 2010 NI 43-101 planned production schedule milled tonnage versus 
actual for 2011-2016.   No production schedules were provided in the 2014 and 2015 NI 43-101 reports.  
Planned production for 2015 was recently expected to be 45 MT but as illustrated, this is another missed 
target. 
 
 

 

2016 performance is Q1-Q3 prorated to 12 months.  Goldcorp indicates they expect to improve upon this rate for Q4.

 

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Annual Milling Rate (MT)- Planned vs. Actual

Planned

Actual

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS- MODULE 9  ZINC MINING IN MEXICO 

NOVEMBER 2016 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (retired) 

Likewise, zinc recovery has consistently underperformed the 82.1% used for reserve calculations in the 
2015 NI 43-101. 
 

  

The planned zinc recovery listed is from the 2015 NI 43-101. 2016 is ytd. 

 
Finally, annual zinc grades have also consistently been less than anticipated in the 2010 NI 43-101 as 
illustrated below.  Due to the large tonnage processed, this apparently minor grade slip can amount to 
50,000 T of zinc annually.  
 

 

 
 
I would, therefore, rather use my estimate of performance going forward instead of that provided by 
Goldcorp.  Table 4 lists anticipated annual zinc production based upon: 
 
40,000,000 T milled grading 0.635% Zn at 79% Zn recovery for 200,660 T of annual zinc output.   
 

72.00%

74.00%

76.00%

78.00%

80.00%

82.00%

84.00%

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Annual Zinc Recovery- Planned vs. Actual

Planned

Actual

0.00%

0.10%

0.20%

0.30%

0.40%

0.50%

0.60%

0.70%

0.80%

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Annual Mined Zinc Grade- Planned vs. Actual

Planned

Actual

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS- MODULE 9  ZINC MINING IN MEXICO 

NOVEMBER 2016 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (retired) 

The grade chosen is 95% of that listed in the 2010 NI 43-101 production schedule for years 2017-2022.  
Yearly zinc production will likely vary around the 200,000 T mean by upwards of plus or minus 30,000 T 
due to annual zinc grade swings. 
 
Table 4 Actual and Expected Zinc Production for Peñasquito 

2012 

 

2013 

2014 

2015 

2016 

2017 

2018 

2019 

2020 

2021 

2022 

174,000 
 

150,000  179,000  209,000  134,000  200,600  200,600  200,600  200,600  200,600  200,600 

2012-2016 figures were derived by multiplying reported mill tonnage by ore grade and zinc recovery, rounded to the nearest 
thousand.  2016 figures are Q1-Q3 prorated to 12 months.  Goldcorp indicates they expect to do better in Q4 than ytd. 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

References: 

NI 43-101 Reports  

December 31, 2010 

 

 

 

 

 

January 8, 2014 

 

 

 

 

 

December 31, 2015 

www.sedar.com

 

 

 

ZINC MINING RAMBLINGS- MODULE 9  ZINC MINING IN MEXICO 

NOVEMBER 2016 

10 

Doug Beattie, Mining Engineer (retired) 

Peñoles 

Peñoles operates five underground zinc/lead/silver mines and is developing a sixth.  An additional mine, 
Naica, was closed permanently late 2014 due to flooding.  Peñoles also owns 75% of Fresnillo which is 
predominantly a gold/silver miner with zinc and lead by-product production from three mines.  This 
means Peñoles obtains zinc production from a total of eight mines.  The proportion of production for 
2015 is illustrated below for the eight mines.  Note that although Peñoles reports figures in tons, these 
are metric tonnes.   
 
All mines, apart from perhaps Bismark, appear to have ample reserves to continue steady state mining 
throughout the study period.  No brownfield expansion plans have been announced.  Bismark’s zinc 
grades have gradually decreased with time. 
 
The Peñoles operated mines are typical carbonate replacement type deposits.  Bismark ore is near 
vertical and related to a contact.  Velardeña and Madero are typical manto type deposits.  Information 
on individual mines is somewhat sparse but good operating and cost data is available.   
 
The tonnes processed for each mine and the reserves as of December 31,2015 is illustrated in the table 
below.  Individual annual mining grades for each mine are not reported by Peñoles.