Volume 16, February 2017

Science Highlight

Characterizing Parent of Origin Effects in the Hutterite Population 

 

Each of us has two copies of each gene in our genome; we inherit one from our father and one 

from our mother. In most cases, each of our genes or genetic regions from each parent are 

expressed and contribute equally to the genetic component that makes us who we are. 

However, there are some genes that have an imbalance of parental contribution because the 

gene from one parent is silenced and only the gene from the other parent is expressed.

Genes that are silenced in this manner are referred to as imprinted. The genes or regions that 

are imprinted depend on the parent that passed them down, such that paternally imprinted 

genes are different from maternally imprinted genes. Imprinted regions generally have 

epigenetic marks that control whether they are silenced or expressed. While few imprinted 

genes have been well characterized, there are still many imprinted regions in humans yet to be 

discovered, and we have yet to learn how these regions are marked in different cells. 

 

 

 

 

Resouces:

 

Beagle Wiki

Get detailed usage information from 

the Beagle2 team

Beagle Support

Contact the Beagle experts for help

Globus

For file transfer. Get started moving 

files to/from Beagle2 using this fast 

service

Other CI resources

Learn about other computing 

resources available at the 

Computation Institute 

 

We are working toward uncovering genetic variation that contributes to parent of origin effects on 

gene expression and common disease-associated traits. 

Our group has been studying the genetics of complex traits in the Hutterites, a founder population of 

European descent. The approximately 1500 Hutterites in our studies are related to each other in a 

13-generation pedigree including more than 3,671 individuals. For each individual, for as many as 5 

million genetic variants, called SNPs, we can determine which allele was inherited from the father 

and which from the mother. We can use this information to test for association with common 

quantitative traits that are associated with cardiovascular disease (e.g. BMI, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-

cholesterol, Triglycerides) and asthma (e.g. IgE levels, blood eosinophil count, fev1 (forced 

expiratory volume in one second), feNO (fraction exhaled nitric oxide)). 

 We test for association of the maternal alleles and paternal alleles separately for each trait. Some 

variants impact triglyceride levels, age of menarche, LVMI (left ventricular mass index), fev1, and 

cimt (carotid intima media thickness) only when inherited from the mother. In contrast, other variants 

affect blood eosinophil count, fev1, lymphocytes, systolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol only 

when inherited from the father.

We are working on characterizing these further with parent of origin specific gene expression 

understand by what means and by how much these novel effects can contribute to our phenotypes. 

Intro to Data Science using

Pandas

February 16th, 1:30PM

Room 240A, at the Computation 

Institute of the University of 

Chicago

Topics will include:

   Python basicse

   Data cleaning and processing

   using Pandas

   Data analysys using Pandas

   Basic statistics

   Appropriate use of local and     

 

    network filesystems

  Recognize different distributions

  Interpret data to evaluate 

  Hypothesis tests

Beagle2 Events To learn more 

about Beagle2 training.  

Training:

by Sahar Mozaffari

 

Many studies of imprinting have focused on large families in which we 

can test for parent of origin effects on different diseases or phenotypes, 

or on gene expression, to uncover new imprinted loci. Parent of origin 

effects flag potentially imprinted regions in which the genetic 

information behaves differently depending on the parent it is inherited 

from.

For example, imprinted diseases, such as Prader-Willi and Angelman 

syndrome, depend on from parent the mutated gene is inherited. In 

normal individuals, due to imprinting, only the paternally inherited copy 

of some genes on chromosome 15 are expressed, whereas only the 

maternally inherited genes are silenced. If the paternally expressed 

genes are mutated, the individual will have Prader Willi syndrome 

because the paternal (normally expressed) copy is silenced. However, 

if the maternally expressed gene is mutated, a different disease called 

Angelman syndrome will result since the maternal copy (normally 

silenced) is now also expressed. 

 

 

 

Beagle Related 
Publications

Olopade OI, Pitt JJ, Riester M, 

Odetunde A, Yoshimatsu T et al.

Comparative analysis of the genomic 

landscape of breast cancers from 

women of African and European 

ancestry

SABCS 2016, San Antonio, Texas, 

December 2016

 

Searle Chemistry Laboratory
5735 South Ellis Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637 

Help E-Mail:

beagle-support@lists.uchicago.edu

Beage2 CI Website:

beagle.ci.uchicago.edu

 

Request
for RECENT publications

made using Beagle

Please send us your most updated list, 

including papers that are only under 

revision. Feel free to add also older 

ones, since they might not be in our lists 

yet and press releases that talk about 

your work with Beagle.

References

    Ober, C., Abney, M. & McPeek, M. S. The genetic dissection of complex traits in a founder population. The American Journal of 

Human Genetics 69, 1068–1079 (2001).

   Cusanovich, D. A. et al. Integrated analyses of gene expression and genetic association studies in a founder population. Human 

Molecular Genetics 25, 2104–2112 (2016).

   T.-C. Y. M. et al. Genome-wide association study of lung function phenotypes in a founder population. Journal of Allergy and 

Clinical Immunology 133, 248–255.e10 (2014).

    Lawson, H. A., Cheverud, J. M. & Wolf, J. B. Genomic imprinting and parent- of-origin effects on complex traits. Nature 

Publishing Group 14, 609–617 (2013). 

   Kong, A. et al. Parental origin of sequence variants associated with complex diseases. Nature Publishing Group 462, 868–874 

(2009). 

   Baran, Y. et al. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues. Genome Res. 25, 927–936 (2015).

   Guilmatre, A. and Sharp, A. J. Parent of origin effects. Clinical Genetics 81, 201–209 (2011). 

   Garg, P., Borel, C. and Sharp, A. J. Detection of Parent-of-Origin Specific Expression Quantitative Trait Loci by Cis-Association 

Analysis of Gene Expression in Trios. PLoS ONE 7, e41695 (2012). 

   Falls, J. G., Pulford, D. J., Wylie, A. A. & Jirtle, R. L. Genomic imprinting: implications for human disease. The American journal 

of pathology 154, 635–647 (1999). 

   Peters, J. The role of genomic imprinting in biology and disease: an expanding view. Nature Reviews Genetics 15, 517–530 

(2014). 

Mikolai Fajer, Yilin Meng and Benoît 

Roux

The Activation of c

Src Tyrosine Kinase: 

Conformational Transition Pathway and 

Free Energy Landscape

J. Phys. Chem. B, Article ASAP, October 

7, 2016

Huan Rui, Pablo Artigas, Benoît Roux

The selectivity of the Na+/K+-pump is 

controlled by binding site protonation 

and self-correcting occlusion

eLife 2016;5:e16616