Minireview

Melatonin and mitochondrial function

Josefa Leon

a

, Dario Acun˜a-Castroviejo

b

, Rosa M. Sainz

a

, Juan C. Mayo

a

,

Dun-Xian Tan

a

, Russel J. Reiter

a,

*

a

Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Mail Code 7762,

7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio TX 78229-3900, USA

b

Departamento de Fisiologia, Facultad de Medicina, Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain

Received 21 January 2004; accepted 15 March 2004

Abstract

Melatonin is a natural occurring compound with well-known antioxidant properties. In the last decade a new

effect of melatonin on mitochondrial homeostasis has been discovered and, although the exact molecular
mechanism for this effect remains unknown, it may explain, at least in part, the protective properties found for the
indoleamine in degenerative conditions such as aging as well as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy,
sepsis and other injuries such as ischemia-reperfusion. A common feature in these diseases is the existence of
mitochondrial damage due to oxidative stress, which may lead to a decrease in the activities of mitochondrial
complexes and ATP production, and, as a consequence, a further increase in free radical generation. A vicious
cycle thus results under these conditions of oxidative stress with the final consequence being cell death by necrosis
or apoptosis. Melatonin is able of directly scavenging a variety of toxic oxygen and nitrogen-based reactants,
stimulates antioxidative enzymes, increases the efficiency of the electron transport chain thereby limiting electron
leakage and free radical generation, and promotes ATP synthesis. Via these actions, melatonin preserves the
integrity of the mitochondria and helps to maintain cell functions and survival.
D 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Keywords: Melatonin; Mitochondria; Reactive oxygen species; Reactive nitrogen species; Parkinson’s disease; Alzheimer’s
disease; Aging; Sepsis; Ischemia-reperfusion

0024-3205/$ - see front matter

D 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

doi:10.1016/j.lfs.2004.03.003

* Corresponding author. Tel.: +1-210-567-3860; fax: +1-210-567-6948.
E-mail address: reiter@uthscsa.edu (R.J. Reiter).

www.elsevier.com/locate/lifescie

Life Sciences 75 (2004) 765 – 790

Introduction

Mitochondria play a central role in energy-generating processes within the cell through the electron

transport chain (ETC), the primary function of which is ATP synthesis via oxidative phosphorylation
(OXPHOS). The ETC, located in the inner mitochondrial membrane, comprises a series of electron
carriers grouped into four enzyme complexes: complex I (NADH ubiquinone reductase); complex II
(succinate ubiquinone reductase); complex III (ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase); and complex IV
(cytochrome c oxidase). According to the chemiosmotic hypothesis, the ETC converts redox energy into
an electrochemical gradient of protons (termed proton-motive force, Dp, when expressed in voltage
units) which subsequently drives ATP formation from ADP and phosphate by ATP synthase

(Mitchell

and Moyle, 1967)

. The proton-motive force comprises an electrical component, the membrane potential

(DC

m

), and a transmembrane pH gradient (DpH). DC

m

(which normally accounts for about 80% of Dp)

Fig. 1. Components of the ETC. In cells under aerobic conditions, OXPHOS is responsible for production of 90 – 95% pf the
total amount of ATP, the remainder being synthesized by glycolytic phosphorylation. The synthesis of ATP via the respiratory
chain is the result of two coupled process: electron transport and OXPHOS. CI, CIII and CIV function as proton pumps acting
in series with respect to the electron flux and in parallel with respect to the proton circuit. The antioxidant defense system
controls ROS production during normal metabolism. Melatonin acts as antioxidant but also can interact with the complexes.

J. Leon et al. / Life Sciences 75 (2004) 765–790

766

provides the driving force for the accumulation of calcium in the mitochondrial matrix

(Nicholls and

Budd, 2000) (Fig. 1)

.

The end product of the respiratory chain is water that is generated in a four-electron reduction of

molecular oxygen (O

2

) by complex IV. However, a small proportion of O

2

is involved in generation of

reactive oxygen species (ROS), in particular, superoxide anion radical (O

2

S

), hydrogen peroxide (H

2

O

2

)

and the extremely reactive hydroxyl radical (

S

OH) (Lee et al., 2001; Lenaz, 2001)

Mitochondria can

also produce nitric oxide (NO

S

) from mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS)

(Ghafourifar and

Richter, 1997; Giulivi et al., 1998)

. Depending on the environment, NO

S

can be converted to various

reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitrosonium cation (NO

+

), nitroxyl anion (NO ) or peroxynitrite

(ONOO )

(Stamler et al., 1992)

.

Normally, free radicals are decomposed or their peroxidation products are neutralized by the natural

antioxidative defense system

(Chance et al., 1979; Halliwell and Gutteridge, 1989; Fridovich, 1995;

Ursini et al., 1999; Genova et al., 2003)

. While small fluctuations in the steady state concentration of

ROS/RNS may play a role in intracellular signaling

(Dro¨ge, 2002)

uncontrolled increases in these

metabolites lead to free radical-mediated chain reactions which indiscriminately target proteins

(Stadt-

man and Levine, 2000)

, lipids

(Rubbo et al., 1994)

and DNA

(Richte, 1988; LeDoux et al., 1999)

.

Mitochondria, being a primary site of ROS/RNS generation in the cell, are also a main target

(Raha and

Robinson, 2000)

. This in turn results in damage to the mitochondrial respiratory chain and, as a

consequence, a further increase in free radical generation. A vicious cycle thus results

(Lenaz, 2001)

and,

under these conditions of oxidative stress, the final consequence is cell death via necrosis or apoptosis

(Kim et al., 2003)

.

In the recent years, several findings support the antioxidant effect as well as a direct role of melatonin

in mitochondrial homeostasis

(Martin et al., 2000a,b, 2002)

this latter action of melatonin may contribute

to melatonin’s protective effects in degenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer
disease, epilepsy, aging, ischemia-reperfusion and sepsis, all of which involve mitochondrial dysfunction
as a primary or secondary cause of the disease

(Acun˜a-Castroviejo et al., 2001, 2002; Reiter et al., 2002)

.

Mitochondrial production of free radicals

During normal metabolism, the ETC is the main source of ROS within the cell

(Lenaz, 2001)

Two

principal sites of O

2

S

generation have been identified in mitochondria: complex I

(Barja and Herrero,

1998)

and complex III

(Turrens et al., 1982)

although complex II may also contribute to ROS

production

(Lenaz, 2001)

The contribution of each of these sites to the O

2

S

production depends both on

the organ and on whether mitochondria are actively respiring (State 3) or whether the respiratory chain is
highly reduced (State 4)

(Barja, 1999)

Complex III appears to be responsible for the majority of O

2

S

produced in heart and lung mitochondria

(Turrens and Boveris, 1980; Turrens et al., 1982)

while O

2

S

formation by complex I appears to be the primary source of free radicals in the brain under normal
conditions

(Barja and Herrero, 1998)

O

2

S

is not produced during reduction of dioxygen by cytochrome

c oxidase, because of the almost simultaneous transfer of four electrons to O

2

(Ludwig et al., 2001)

.

In complex I, the primary source of O

2

S

appears to be one of the iron-sulfur clusters, either N2 or N1a

(Genova et al., 2001; Kushnareva et al., 2002)

Oxidant production from complex I is directed into the

mitochondrial matrix, but not into the intermembrane space

(Han et al., 2003b)

and they are inactivated

by matrix antioxidant enzyme systems

(Chen et al., 2003)

.

J. Leon et al. / Life Sciences 75 (2004) 765–790

767

In complex III, most of the O

2

S

appears to be formed as a result of the autoxidation of

ubisemiquinone, an intermediate produced in complex III during the Q-cycle

(Trumpower, 1990)

This

complex has two centers: the Q

o

center, oriented toward the intermembrane space, and the Q

i

center,

located in the inner membrane and facing the mitochondrial matrix. O

2

S

generated at the Q

o

center is

released into the intermembrane space

(Han et al., 2001)

a portion of which diffuses into the cytoplasm

through voltage dependent anion channels

(Han et al., 2003a)

whereas O

2

S

generated at the Q

i

center is

likely to enter the matrix

(Chen et al., 2003)

ROS from the complex III Q

o

center are basically

unaffected by the antioxidant defense system whereas ROS from complex III Q

i

center are rapidly

inactivated by the antioxidant system of the mitochondrial matrix

(Chen et al., 2003; Han et al., 2003b)

.

The free radical NO

S

may be also produced by mitochondria via the activity of mitochondrial nitric

oxide synthase (mtNOS)

(Ghafourifar and Richter, 1997; Giulivi, 1998; Giulivi et al., 1998)

MtNOS,

localized in the inner mitochondrial membrane, requires Ca

2 +

and, in a stereo-selective manner, uses L-

arginine to produce NO

S

and L-citrulline

(Ghafourifar and Richter, 1997)

although other studies

describe an enzyme that is similar to iNOS

(Giulivi et al., 1998)

Purified mtNOS in the absence of L-

arginine and supplemented with NADPH leads to the production of O

2

S

(Giulivi et al., 1999)

Although,

under basal conditions the contribution of mtNOS to the total rate of toxic reactant generation from
mitochondria could be considered negligible

(Sarkela et al., 2001)

under certain pathological situations

it may be important due to the generation of the toxic ONOO

(Ghafourifar et al., 1999)

The oxidizing

reactivity of ONOO is generally considered equivalent to that of

S

OH

(Pryor and Squadrito, 1995)

On

the other hand, mitochondrial production of ROS is also modulated by endogenous NO

S

. At low levels

NO

 can increase O

2

S

and H

2

O

2

production by modulating the rate of O

2

consumption at the

cytochrome c oxidase level

(Sarkela et al., 2001)

whereas at higher levels NO

S

inhibits H

2

O

2

production by coupling with O

2

S

resulting in ONOO

formation

(Cleeter et al., 1994)

.

Free radicals and reactive non-radical species derived from radicals are continually generated in cells

and tissues at low but measurable concentrations

(Halliwell and Gutteridge, 1989)

Higher organisms

have evolved the use of NO

S

and ROS also as signaling molecules for physiological functions

(Dro¨ge,

2002)

. In these cases, temporary exposure to increased ROS or RNS concentrations is necessary for

normal cellular physiology

(Dro¨ge, 2002)

For example, ROS mainly produced by mitochondria have

been implicated in the cell death transduction pathways

(Banki et al., 1999)

Under basal conditions,

NO

S

produced by mtNOS modulates O

2

consumption, ATP production and free radical generation by

mitochondria by the reversible inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase

(Giulivi, 2003)

.

Several mechanisms control ROS/RNS production by mitochondria. One of them is the antioxidant

defense system that neutralizes ROS/RNS or their oxidation products

(Halliwell and Gutteridge, 1989)

.

Enzymatically, O

2

S

is converted to H

2

O

2

by superoxide dismutase (SOD), although this process can

also occur spontaneously

(Fridovich, 1995)

The mitochondrial matrix contains a specific form of

SOD, with manganese in the active site (MnSOD), which removes the O

2

S

formed in the matrix or on

the inner side of the inner membrane

(Fridovich, 1995)

The concentration of O

2

S

in the intermem-

braneous space is controlled by three different mechanisms. First, this compartment contains a different
SOD isozyme which contains copper and zinc instead of manganese (Cu ZnSOD); this enzyme is also
found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells

(Okado-Matsumoto and Fridovich, 2001)

Second, the

intermembrane space contains cytochrome c which can be reduced by O

2

S

regenerating O

2

in the

process

(Butler et al., 1975)

Finally, the spontaneous dismutation of O

2

S

in the intermembrane space

is facilitated by the lower pH in this compartment, resulting from the extrusion of H

+

coupled to

respiration

(Guidot et al., 1995)

.

J. Leon et al. / Life Sciences 75 (2004) 765–790

768

H

2

O

2

, the main precursor of

S

OH, in the presence of reduced transition metals

(Halliwell and

Gutteridge, 1989)

is mostly decomposed by the enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx)

(Chance et al.,

1979)

. This process metabolizes reduced glutathione (GSH) to its disulfide (GSSG), which in turn is

reduced to GSH by matrix glutathione reductase (GRd). A second GPx associated with the
mitochondrial membrane, known as phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, is specifi-
cally involved in reducing lipid peroxides associated with the membrane

(Ursini et al., 1999)

.

Mitochondria do not synthesize GSH but rather take it up from cytosol through a multicomponent
transport system

(McKernan et al., 1991)

In addition, mitochondria do not contain catalase, a major

H

2

O

2

detoxifying enzyme found in peroxisomes. Because of this, mitochondria are largely dependent

on reduced glutathione (GSH) and its recycling enzymes for its antioxidant protection

(Phung et al.,

1994)

.

Coenzyme Q is a source of O

2

S

when partially reduced (semiquinone form) and an antioxidant when

fully reduced

(Genova et al., 2003)

The inner mitochondrial membrane also contains vitamin E, a

powerful antioxidant that interferes with the propagation of free radical-mediated chain reactions

(Ham

and Liebler, 1995)

.

An effective way of diminishing mitochondrial production of ROS is the control of the DC

m

(Kadenbach, 2003)

ROS formation in mitochondria occurs at high DC

m

and increases exponentially

above 140 mV, but is absent below this value

(Korshunov et al., 1997)

The parameters controlling the

DC

m

in vivo, however, are complex and not fully understood. The inhibition of respiration at high DC

m

values can occur via the stimulation of respiration by the uptake of ADP, followed by its decrease after
conversion of ADP into ATP

(Nicholls and Ferguson, 1992)

Also, classical uncouplers of OXPHOS,

fatty acids, an unspecific ‘‘proton leak’’ of the inner mitochondrial membrane, the uncoupling proteins
(UCPs) and any active transport of cations or anions across the membrane via carrier are able to decrease
DC

m

(Kadenbach, 2003)

In contrast to the above mechanisms (extrinsic uncoupling), the inhibition of

respiration can also occur by high ATP/ADP ratios via allosteric ATP inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase

(Kadenbach and Arnold, 1999)

In this case (intrinsic uncoupling), a decrease of the efficiency of the

proton pumps (i.e., decrease of the H

+

/e stoichiometry or slip) would also result in a reduced of DC

m

(Papa et al., 1997)

.

Several control mechanisms are present in mitochondria for modulation of mtNOS activity. These

include the dependence of the availability of L-arginine, NADPH, end-product inhibition and calcium
levels

(Giulivi, 2003)

High concentrations of L-arginine inhibit the production of NO

S

by intact

mitochondria. The reversal of this inhibition by the addition of oxymyoglobin shows NO

S

to be

responsible for enzyme activity inhibition

(Sarkela et al., 2001)

Mitochondria maintained in either State

3 or 4 exhibit high levels of NADPH and have significant rates of NO

S

production. Conversely,

mitochondria in States 3 or 2, with low levels or no NADPH, have a negligible production of NO

S

(Giulivi, 2003)

.

Mitochondria respiring complex II substrate generate NO

S

without an additional supplement of

calcium, indicating that the concentration of this cation in mitochondrial preparations seem to be
sufficient to sustain mtNOS activity

(Ghafourifar and Richter, 1997)

Uptake of calcium by

respiring mitochondria may lead to increased ONOO

formation, which in turn causes calcium

release via the pyridine nucleotide-dependent pathway followed by mtNOS deactivation. Therefore,
stimulation of mtNOS by additional calcium is considered as part of the mechanism that prevents
calcium overloading and allows its release, thereby preserving DC

m

(Ghafourifar and Richter,

1997)

.

J. Leon et al. / Life Sciences 75 (2004) 765–790

769

Mitochondria and cell death

In the mitochondrial-mediated cell death pathway, a non-specific increase in the permeability of the

inner mitochondrial membrane can occur, when mitochondrial matrix calcium is greatly increased

(Szalai et al., 1999)

This phenomenon, known as the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), is

associated with opening of a non-specific ‘‘megachannel’’ in the mitochondrial inner membrane, which
transports any molecule of < 1500 Daltons. Under these conditions, mitochondria become uncoupled
and hydrolyze ATP rather than synthesize it. Not only does its opening prevent ATP synthesis, it also
causes the loss of ions and metabolites from the mitochondrial matrix and induces extensive swelling of
the mitochondria as a result of the colloidal osmotic pressure exerted by the matrix proteins. If the MPT
remains open, ATP levels can be totally depleted leading to cell necrosis. On the contrary, transient
opening of MPT may be involved in the intrinsic pathway or mitochondrial mediated-apoptosis

(Halestrap et al., 2000; Kim et al., 2003)

In this process, cytochrome c moves from the intermembrane

space into the cytoplasm

(Bossy-Wetzel et al., 1998)

where it joins another factor (Apaf-1). In the

presence of dATP this complex polymerizes into an oligomer known as the apoptosome. The
apoptosome activates a protease (caspase-9), which in turn activates caspase-3. The cascade of
proteolytic reactions also activates DNAses with the process resulting in cell death

(Zamzami and

Kroemer, 2001)

.

Several factors are known to greatly enhance the sensitivity of the pore to Ca

2 +

, of which the most

potent and relevant to the cellular setting are oxidative stress, adenine nucleotide depletion, increased
inorganic phosphate concentrations and loss of DC

m

(Chernyak, 1997; Kim et al., 2003)

.

The ability of oxidative stress to produce necrotic cell death as a result of massive cellular damage

associated to lipid peroxidation and alterations of proteins and nucleic acids has been well documented

(Halliwell and Gutteridge, 1989)

However, the possible implication of ROS as signaling molecules in

apoptosis is a more recent concept

(Schulze-Osthoff et al., 1993)

Indeed, several observations suggest

that ROS might mediate apoptosis. First, the addition of ROS or the depletion of endogenous
antioxidants can promote apoptosis

(Sato et al., 1995)

Second, apoptosis can be delayed or inhibited

by antioxidants

(Mayo et al., 1998)

Third, some data raise the possibility that ROS are also required for

the execution of the death program

(Kroemer et al., 1995)

An increased mitochondrial formation of

ROS triggers the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis by opening of transition pores due to the oxidation
of intracellular glutathione and other critical sulfhydryl groups present in the channel

(Fig. 2)

.

NO

S

and RNS kill cells by two main ways: (i) energy depletion-induced necrosis, and (ii) oxidant-

induced apoptosis. In addition, in neurons, NO

S

induces excitotoxic cell death (Brown and Borutaite,

2002)

.

Cells exposed to NO

S

(or NO

S

-producing cells) for several hours show an irreversible inhibition

of mitochondrial respiration, probably due to conversion of NO

S

to RNS

(Cassina and Radi, 1996)

.

ONOO

can inhibit complex I, complex II, complex IV, ATP synthase, aconitase, MnSOD, creatine

kinase, and probably many other proteins

(Murphy, 1999)

This nitrogen-based reactant is a strong

oxidant and can also cause DNA damage, induce lipid peroxidation, and increase mitochondrial
proton permeability

(Klotz and Sies, 2003)

If DNA damage is extensive, both cytosolic NAD

+

(causing inhibition of glycolysis) and adenine nucleotides are depleted due the activation of the
PARP. But activation of this nuclear protein may contribute to energy depletion of the cell, possibly
in synergy with inhibition of respiration, inhibition of glycolysis, and/or activation of MPT

(Brown

and Borutaite, 2002)

.

J. Leon et al. / Life Sciences 75 (2004) 765–790

770

NO

S

can induce apoptosis in cells under conditions where respiratory or glycolytic ATP production is

sufficient. NO

S

-induced apoptosis is mediated by caspase activation (such as caspase-3) and is blocked

by caspase inhibitors

(Borutaite et al., 2000)

Release of cytochrome c has been observed, suggesting

that NO

S

-induced apoptosis is normally mediated by mitochondria

(Yabuki et al., 2000)

although in

some cell types, early activation of caspase-8 or caspase-2 is found, indicating that NO

S

-induced

apoptosis may be triggered by non-mitochondrial pathways

(Moriya et al., 2000)

.

It has also been reported that the addition of calcium to isolated mitochondria stimulates mtNOS,

causing ONOO

production and (cyclosporine-insensitive) cytochrome c release associated with

peroxidation of mitochondrial lipids

(Ghafourifar et al., 1999)

.

Melatonin and free radicals

Melatonin is a highly conservative compound found in non-vertebrates, including bacteria

(Tilden et

al., 1997)

, eukaryotic unicells

(Macias et al., 1999)

macroalgae

(Hardeland and Poeggeler, 2003)

plants

(Manchester et al., 2000; Reiter et al., 2001; Reiter and Tan, 2002)

invertebrates

(Meyer-Rochow and

Vakkuri, 2002; Vivien-Roels and Pevet, 1993)

and vertebrates. In mammals, the synthesis of melatonin

in the pineal gland functions as a message encoding for the duration of darkness and it is responsible for
the picomolar/nanomolar concentration of the indoleamine in serum

(Reiter, 1991a)

However, there are

fluids and tissues, some of which may produce their own melatonin, where it can be found at much
higher concentrations

(Reiter and Tan, 2003; Tan et al., 2003b)

Within subcellular organelles as well,

the concentrations of melatonin may vary, and some authors report that the levels of this indole in nuclei

Fig. 2. Mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis. Apoptosis requires ATP levels to be elevated, whereas in necrosis ATP levels fall.

J. Leon et al. / Life Sciences 75 (2004) 765–790

771

and in mitochondria may significantly exceed those in the serum

(Menendez-Pelaez and Reiter, 1993;

Martin et al., 2000a)

. Certainly, melatonin in multicellular organisms is not in equilibrium

(Reiter and

Tan, 2003)

.

There is evidence demonstrating the complexity of melatonin’s role in modulating a diverse number

of physiological processes including circadian entrainment

(Reiter, 1991b)

the control of seasonal

reproduction

(Reiter, 1980)

retinal physiology

(Dubocovich et al., 1997)

blood pressure regulation

(Doolen et al., 1998)

regulation of the immune system

(Guerrero and Reiter, 2002)

oncogenesis

(Reiter, 2003)

and tumor growth

(Blask et al., 2002)

among others. This complex of actions likely

requires different mechanisms of action. Melatonin membrane receptors have been identified and
belong to two distinct classes of proteins, that is, the G-protein coupled receptor super family (MT

1

,

MT

2

) and the quinone reductase enzyme family (MT

3

) which makes them unique at the molecular

level

(Reppert et al., 1994, 1995; Nosjean et al., 2000)

Also, within the G-protein coupled receptor

family of proteins, the MT

1

and MT

2

receptors can couple to multiple and distinct signal transduction

cascades whose activation can lead to unique cellular responses

(Witt-Enderby et al., 2003)

.

Furthermore, nuclear receptors for melatonin, referred as RZR/RORa

(Wiesenberg et al., 1995)

and

RZRh

(Carlberg et al., 1994)

have been also proposed

(Acun˜a-Castroviejo et al., 1993, 1994)

and

physiologically documented

(Guerrero and Reiter, 2002)

However, the two kinds of receptors

described may not act separately and the existence of a membrane-nuclear signaling pathway has
been suggested

(Carlberg, 2000)

.

Some of the actions of melatonin depend on non-receptor mediated processes. Included in this group is

its interaction with cytosolic proteins, such as calmodulin

(Benitez-King et al., 1993)

and protein kinase c

(Anton-Tay et al., 1998)

and its actions as a direct free radical scavenger. Melatonin reacts with

S

OH,

singlet oxygen (

1

O

2

), H

2

O

2

, hypochlorous acid (HClO), NO

S

, ONOO

and oxoferryl-derived species

(Tan et al., 1993a,b; Reiter et al., 2002; Allegra et al., 2003)

Some of the products that are produced when

melatonin detoxifies reactive species are also efficient antioxidants. N

1

-acetyl-N

2

-formyl-5-methoxyky-

nuramine (AFMK), a product of melatonin oxidation

(Rozov et al., 2004)

and N-acetyl-5-methoxykynur-

amine (AMK), the resulting metabolite from reaction between melatonin and H

2

O

2

, also scavenge H

2

O

2

(Tan et al., 2000, 2001, 2003a; Carampin et al., 2003)

These metabolites are also formed by the

enzymatic metabolism of melatonin in the brain

(Hirata et al., 1974)

Another metabolite of melatonin,

cyclic 3-hydroxymelatonin, generated in the reaction between

S

OH and melatonin

(Tan et al., 1998)

also

scavenges 2 mol of

S

OH yielding AFMK as a final product

(Lopez-Burillo et al., 2003)

As AFMK is also

a free radical scavenger, the action of melatonin as a scavenger is a sequence of scavenging reactions in
which the products are themselves scavengers, resulting in a cascade of protective reactions

(Lopez-

Burillo et al., 2003)

. Melatonin is primarily metabolized in the liver to 6-hydroxymelatonin and this

hydroxylated indole has also been found to function as a

S

OH scavenger and, additionally, to possess

some prooxidative potential

(Matuszak et al., 1997)

.

Besides the direct antioxidant effects described above, other data support an indirect antioxidant

action of melatonin. The indoleamine can regulate the production of NO

S

through its interaction with the

enzymes that synthesize it. In vitro studies have shown that melatonin inhibits nNOS activity in
cerebellum

(Pozo et al., 1994)

hypothalamus

(Bettahi et al., 1998)

and striatum

(Leon et al., 1998)

due

its binding to the calcium-calmodulin complex

(Leon et al., 2000)

Some compounds structurally related

with the brain metabolite, AMK, can also inhibit nNOS activity in rat striatum in a dose-dependent
manner, suggesting that the effect of melatonin on cerebral nNOS may take place, at least in part,
through its metabolites

(Leon et al., 1998, 2000)

Other in vivo studies document that melatonin inhibits

J. Leon et al. / Life Sciences 75 (2004) 765–790

772

iNOS and mtNOS expression and activity in an experimental model of sepsis in young and old rats

(Crespo et al., 1999; Escames et al., 2003)

.

Both physiological and pharmacological doses of melatonin have been shown to increase gene

expression and enzyme activities of GPx, GRd, SOD and CAT

(Antolin et al., 1996; Pablos et al., 1998;

Reiter et al., 2000; Kilanczyk and Bryszewska, 2003; Rodriguez et al., 2004)

. Furthermore, increased

oxidative stress diminishes the activities of the toxic reactant-metabolizing enzymes, responses that are
reversed by melatonin

(Martin et al., 2000a; Reiter et al., 2000)

Since melatonin stimulates GRd, it

benefits the recycling of GSH and helps to maintain a high GSH:GSSG ratio

(Hara et al., 2001)

.

Melatonin also promotes the de novo synthesis of glutathione by stimulating the activity of its rate-
limiting enzyme, g-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase

(Urata et al., 1999)

.

Melatonin and mitochondria: the relationship

Several molecular characteristics of melatonin are decisive for it effects on mitochondria. Melatonin is

a highly lipophilic molecule that crosses cell membranes to easily reach subcellular compartments

(Menendez-Pelaez and Reiter, 1993)

including mitochondria, where it seems to accumulate in high

concentrations

(Martin et al., 2000a)

In addition, melatonin interacts with lipid bilayers

(Costa et al.,

1997)

and stabilizes mitochondrial inner membranes

(Garcia et al., 1999)

an effect that may improve

ETC activity

(Acun˜a-Castroviejo et al., 2001)

.

Studies performed in rats reveal that OXPHOS displays a circadian rhythm

(Simon et al., 2003)

,

possibly regulated by the daily fluctuations in melatonin, although further experiments are necessary to
confirm this point. Melatonin is known to inhibit mitochondrial gene expression in isolated brown
adipocyes obtained from Syrian hamsters

(Prunet-Marcassus et al., 2001)

.

A direct potential relation between melatonin and mitochondria was found by

Yuan and Pang (1991)

and by

Poon and Pang (1992)

They described the pharmacological characteristics of melatonin-binding

sites labeled with 2-[125]-Iodomelatonin in mitochondrial membrane preparations from pigeon brain and
the spleen of guinea pigs, respectively.

The ability of melatonin to influence mitochondrial homeostasis has been tested using both in vivo

and in vitro experiments. Melatonin reportedly increases the activities of the brain and liver
mitochondrial respiratory complexes I and IV in a time-dependent manner after its administration to
rats, whereas the activities of complexes II and III were not affected

(Martin et al., 2000b)

Melatonin

administration also prevented the reduction in the activity of complexes I and IV due to mitochondrial
damage and oxidative stress induced by ruthenium red administration in rats. At the dose used,
ruthenium red did not cause lipid peroxidation but it significantly reduced the activity of the antioxidant
enzyme GPx, an effect also counteracted partially by melatonin

(Martin et al., 2000b)

.

Other studies performed using mitochondrial subparticles obtained from rat brain and liver also show

that melatonin influences complexes I and IV in a concentration dependent-manner

(Martin et al., 2000a,

2002)

. Melatonin at a concentration 1 nM significantly increased the activity of the complexes I and IV

in rat liver mitochondria, whereas 10 –100 nM melatonin stimulated the activities of these same
complexes in brain mitochondria. The effects on complex I were also studied using a BN-PAGE
histochemical procedure to measure changes in its activity induced by melatonin; this study documented
the increase of complex I activity after melatonin treatment

(Martin et al., 2002)

Melatonin counteracts

the inhibition of the complex IV caused by a dose of cyanide sufficient to decrease the enzyme activity

J. Leon et al. / Life Sciences 75 (2004) 765–790

773

by 50%. However, melatonin was unable to counteract the inhibition of the complex IV when it was
totally inactivated by cyanide despite the high concentration of the indoleamine used (up to 5 mM).
These findings suggest that melatonin does not compete with cyanide binding to complex IV, and that it
only improves the activity of the complex IV when the enzyme is in the active form

(Martin et al., 2002)

.

Based on these results, it is possible to conclude that the effect of melatonin in regulating the activity of
complexes I and IV likely do not only rely on the antioxidant role of the indoleamine. In fact, the high
redox potential of melatonin (0.94 V)

(Tan et al., 2000)

suggests that melatonin may interact with the

complexes of the ETC and may donate and accept electrons thereby increasing the electron flow, an
effect not possessed by other antioxidants

(Martin et al., 2002)

.

Some authors claim that compounds which behaved either as electron donors to the mitochondrial

ETC or as mitochondrial respiring substrates support the reduction of GSSG formed during oxidative
stress

(Liu and Kehrer, 1996)

melatonin is an example of this. The indoleamine, but not other

endogenous antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, regulates the glutathione redox status in isolated
brain and liver mitochondria, correcting it when it is disrupted by oxidative stress

(Martin et al., 2000a)

.

Under normal conditions, melatonin (100 nM) increases the mitochondrial GSH pool, decreases GSSG
levels, reduces mitochondrial hydroperoxide levels and stimulates the activity of the two enzymes
involved in the GSH-GSSG balance, i.e., GPx and GRd

(Martin et al., 2000a)

Melatonin also is able to

counteract the oxidative damage induced by high doses of tert-buthyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), restoring
GSH levels and GPx and GRd activities and scavenging hydroperoxides. However, vitamin C and
vitamin E have no such effect under these conditions

(Martin et al., 2000a)

These results are in

agreement with other data showing the effects of melatonin on GSH homeostasis in brain tissue

(Floreani et al., 1997)

and in gastric mucosa and testis in which the intragastric administration of

melatonin also restores the activity of both Mn- and CuZnSOD in rats treated with indomethacin

(Othman et al., 2001)

.

As a result of the interaction of melatonin with complexes I and IV and the subsequent promotion of

electron flux through the ETC, a major physiological consequence of the melatonin action on
mitochondria is revealed, i.e., increase in ATP production

(Martin et al., 2002)

Melatonin also has

been shown to counteract cyanide-induced depletion of ATP associated with complex IV inhibition. The
indolamine also stimulates metabolism in isolated mitochondria from frog oocytes

(de Atenor et al.,

1994)

. Other studies reveal another effect of melatonin on mitochondrial metabolism. Thus, experiments

carried out in isolated rat liver mitochondria demonstrate that the basal respiratory index was inhibited
by melatonin with a threshold at 10

7

M concentration. Melatonin inhibited state 3 respiration at

concentrations of 100 nM–1 mM whereas state 4 was not affected. The ability of melatonin to reduce
acutely the stimulation of oxygen consumption in liver mitochondria may protect this organelle from
excessive oxidative damage

(Reyes-Toso et al., 2003)

In fact, melatonin reduces oxidative stress

induced by the administration of thyroid hormones that can affect the metabolism of oxygen under
aerobic conditions

(Sewerynek et al., 1999) (Fig. 3)

.

Melatonin maintains GSH homeostasis in isolated mitochondria by a mechanism independent of its

free radical scavenging properties

(Martin et al., 2000a)

However, other effects of melatonin on

mitochondria are related with its direct antioxidant activities. Following the discovery that melatonin, in
a cell free system, scavenges

S

OH

(Tan et al., 1993a)

Tan and colleagues

(Tan et al., 1993b)

conducted a

series of in vivo experiments in which melatonin was tested for its ability to protect nuclear DNA from
oxidative damage. However, studies of the protective effects of melatonin on mtDNA damage induced
by free radicals are more recent. In vivo and in vitro exposures to cyanide and kainic acid induce damage

J. Leon et al. / Life Sciences 75 (2004) 765–790

774