Melatonin, an Endogenous-specific Inhibitor of Estrogen Receptor

via Calmodulin*

Received for publication, March 22, 2004, and in revised form, June 21, 2004

Published, JBC Papers in Press, June 30, 2004, DOI 10.1074/jbc.M403140200

Beatriz del Rı´o‡§, Juana M. Garcı´a Pedrero‡

, Carlos Martı´nez-Campa

, Pedro Zuazua

,

Pedro S. Lazo, and Sofı´a Ramos**

From the Departamento de Bioquı´mica y Biologı´a Molecular and Instituto Universitario de Oncologı´a Del
Principado de Asturias, Universidad de Oviedo, 33071 Oviedo, Spain

Melatonin is an indole hormone produced mainly by

the pineal gland. We have previously demonstrated that
melatonin interferes with estrogen (E

2

) signaling in

MCF7 cells by impairing estrogen receptor (ER) path-
ways. Here we present the characterization of its mech-
anism of action showing that melatonin is a specific
inhibitor of E

2

-induced ER

-mediated transcription in

both estrogen response element- and AP1-containing
promoters, whereas ER

-mediated transactivation is

not inhibited or even activated at certain promoters. We
show that the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to melatonin
depends on the ER

/ER␤ ratio, and ectopic expression

of ER

␤ results in MCF-7 cells becoming insensitive to

this hormone. Melatonin acts as a calmodulin antagonist
inducing conformational changes in the ER

-calmodu-

lin (CaM) complex, thus impairing the binding of
E

2

ER

␣䡠CaM complex to DNA and, therefore, preventing

ER

-dependent transcription. Moreover the mutant

ER

␣ (K302G,K303G), unable to bind calmodulin, be-

comes insensitive to melatonin. The effect of melatonin
is specific since other related indoles neither interact
with CaM nor inhibit ER

-mediated transactivation. In-

terestingly, melatonin does not affect the binding of co-
activators to ER

, indicating that melatonin action is

different from that of current therapeutic anti-estro-
gens used in breast cancer therapy. Thus, they target
ER

␣ at different levels, representing two independent

ways to control ER

␣ activity. It is, therefore, conceiv-

ably a synergistic pharmacological effect of melatonin
and current anti-estrogen drugs.

Melatonin is an indole hormone that is the major secretory

product of the pineal gland. The most clearly defined actions of
melatonin have been demonstrated on the reproductive system
of seasonally breeding animals and on circadian rhythms and
sleep. A rapidly emerging avenue of investigation is the onco-
static and anti-proliferative effects of melatonin on endocrine-
responsive neoplasms, especially in those concerning the mam-
mary gland (1). The most common conclusion in animal models
of tumorigenesis is that either experimental manipulations
that activate the pineal gland or the administration of melato-

nin reduces the incidence and development of chemically in-
duced mammary tumors, whereas pinealectomy usually stim-
ulates breast cancer growth (2– 4). Epidemiological studies
have shown a low incidence of breast tumors in blind women as
well as an inverse relationship between breast cancer incidence
and the degree of visual impairment. Because light inhibits
melatonin secretion, the increase in melatonin-circulating lev-
els might be interpreted as proof of the protective role of this
hormone on mammary carcinogenesis (5). A moderate increase
in breast cancer risk among women who worked extended
periods of rotating night shifts (light exposure during night
suppresses melatonin production) has also been described (6).

Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain how

melatonin could reduce the development of mammary tumors;
they are indirect neuroendocrine mechanisms such as melato-
nin regulation of some pituitary and gonadal hormones that
control tumor growth (1, 4 –7) and the direct effects of melato-
nin as an endogenous hydroxyl radical scavenger (8) or as a
modulator of the immune response to the presence of a malig-
nant neoplasm (9, 10). On the other hand, direct anti-estro-
genic melatonin actions at the cellular level have been pro-
posed (11, 12). Studies using MCF-7 human breast cancer cells
(ER

⫹)

1

(an estrogen-dependent model system, as is the case for

more than 60% of primary breast tumors) demonstrate that
physiological concentrations of melatonin (1 n

M

to 1 p

M

) exert a

direct anti-proliferative effect on estrogen-induced prolifera-
tion of these cells (11, 12) and reduce their invasiveness, caus-
ing a decrease in cell attachment and cell motility, probably by
interacting with estrogen-mediated mechanisms (13). How-
ever, the molecular basis of melatonin action remains largely
unknown.

In a previous report (14), we presented evidence that mela-

tonin interferes with estrogen-signaling pathways. We demon-
strated that melatonin acts as anti-estrogen by preventing the
estrogen-dependent transcriptional activation in MCF-7 cells
through destabilization of the E

2

䡠ER complex from binding to

DNA, and we proposed calmodulin (CaM) as a potential candi-
date for mediating the anti-estrogenic effects of melatonin.
Several lines of evidence support this hypothesis; the interac-
tion of this calcium-regulated protein with ER has been known
for several years, and a number of CaM antagonists exhibit
anti-estrogenic activity and decrease the affinity of ER

␣ for its

ligand as well as the stability of E

2

䡠ER binding to DNA (15). In

addition, it has been shown that melatonin binds to calmodulin
in a Ca

2

-dependent fashion, resulting in the inhibition of

calmodulin (16, 17).

* This work was supported by Comisio´n Interministerial de Ciencia y

Tecnologı´a, Spain (CICYT) Grant SAF/96-0132, Fondo de Investigacio-
nes Sanitarias Grant 00/1086, and CICYT Grant SAF/98-0174.

‡ These authors equally contributed to this work.
§ Recipient of a fellowship from Fundacio´n Cientı´fica de la Asociacio´n

Espan

˜ ola Contra el Ca´ncer.

Recipients of a fellowship from Instituto Universitario de Oncologı´a

del Principado de Asturias, Obra Social Cajastur.

Recipient of a fellowship from Fondo de Investigaciones Sanitarias.

** To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel.: 34-985-10-35-

69; Fax: 34-985-10-31-57; E-mail: sramos@uniovi.es.

1

The abbreviations used are: ER, estrogen receptor; ERE, estrogen

response element; E

2

, estrogen; CaM, calmodulin; GST, glutathione

S-transferase; MOPS, 4-morpholinepropanesulfonic acid; EGF, epider-
mal growth factor; TFP, trifluoperazine; OHT, 4-hydroxytamoxifen.

T

HE

J

OURNAL OF

B

IOLOGICAL

C

HEMISTRY

Vol. 279, No. 37, Issue of September 10, pp. 38294 –38302, 2004

© 2004 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

Printed in U.S.A.

This paper is available on line at http://www.jbc.org

38294

 at University of Saskatchewan on March 18, 2015

http://www.jbc.org/

Downloaded from 

In the search for differences between ER

␣ and the most

recently described ER

␤, we analyzed the interaction of both

receptors with calmodulin, and we demonstrated that ER

␣ but

not ER

␤ directly interacts with calmodulin. Consequently,

CaM antagonists are selective modulators of ER

␣-mediated

transcription (18). In the present study, we have investigated
whether calmodulin could be a link between melatonin and the
estrogen-signaling pathway. Our results indicate that melato-
nin acts as specific inhibitor of ER

␣ at physiological doses, and

therefore, clinical studies on the possible therapeutic value of
melatonin on breast cancer should be considered.

EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES

Materials—Melatonin, 17

␤-estradiol, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, and other

chemicals were purchased from Sigma. ICI 182,780 was provided by Dr.
A. E. Wakeling (Zeneca Pharmaceuticals, Macckesfield, Cheshire, UK).
[

35

S]Methionine (Pro-mix; 14.3 mCi/ml;

⬎1000 Ci/mmol) was from Am-

ersham Biosciences.

Plasmids—The expression vector pcDNA-ER

␣ and the recombinant

plasmid GST-ER

␣-(280–595) have been previously described (18, 19).

pERE-TK-Luc, pS2-Luc, and pCMX-mER

␤ were kindly provided by Dr.

V. Gigue`re from the R. W. Johnson Pharmaceutical Research Institute,
Don Mills, Ontario, Canada. pCXN2-hER

␤-(1–530), GST-hER␣-(117–

595) (20), and pRL-TK (Promega Corp., Madison, WI) were also used in
this work. The plasmid 3x-ERE-TATA-Luc was kindly provided by Dr.
S. Safe from the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacol-
ogy, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX.

⌬coll-73 was kindly

provided by Dr. A. Aranda from Instituto de Investigaciones Biome´dicas
“Alberto Sols” Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientı´ficas, Madrid,
Spain.

Cell Culture and Transient Transfection Assays—HeLa cells were

propagated as previously described (18). Before transfection, HeLa cells
were seeded in 12-well plates and incubated for 12–18 h at 37 °C. Then
cells were transferred to phenol red-free Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s
medium containing 0.5% charcoal, dextran-treated fetal calf serum and
maintained for 3 days. At 60 – 80% confluency, cells were transfected
with 0.5

␮g of estrogen response element (ERE)-driven or AP1-driven

reporter plasmids, 0.1

␮g of ER expression vector, and 50 ng of an

internal control Renilla luciferase plasmid, pRL-TK (Promega), using
FuGENE 6 transfection reagent from Roche Applied Science following
the manufacturer’s protocols. After 18 –24 h, medium was renewed, and
cells were stimulated for 24 h with different chemicals as indicated.

Luciferase was assayed with the dual luciferase system (Promega).

Luciferase activities were normalized to Renilla luciferase activity to
correct for differences in transfection efficiency. The results represent
the means

⫾ S.D. of three independent experiments performed at least

in duplicate. Transactivation experiments were performed with both
mouse and human ER

␤, and identical trends in ligand behavior were

observed in both ER

␤s in HeLa cells.

MCF-7 cells were propagated in RPMI 1640 medium containing 25

m

M

HEPES, NaOH, pH 7.3, and synchronized cells were transfected as

above. When indicated, ER

␤ expression vector or the empty vector was

included in the transfection.

Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay—Binding of the E

2

䡠ER to ERE

was performed as previously described (14). Five to ten microliters of
nuclear extracts of transient transfections were mixed with buffer B (20
m

M

HEPES-KOH, pH 7.9, 10 m

M

MgCl

2

, 1 m

M

EDTA, 10% (v/v) glyc-

erol, 100 m

M

KCl, 0.2 m

M

phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, 0.2 m

M

dithi-

othreitol, 0.5% Nonidet P-40, and protease inhibitors) and incubated
with 1

␮g of poly(dI䡠dC) in a total volume of 40 ␮l. Mixtures were

preincubated at 0 °C for 15 min followed by incubation with the indi-
cated hormones at 0 °C for 10 min.

32

P-Labeled probe (10 fmol contain-

ing 3–5

⫻ 10

4

dpm) corresponding to the ERE from Xenopus vitelloge-

nin A

2

gene was added to the reaction and allowed to proceed for 1 h at

0 °C followed by 30 min at room temperature. The samples were loaded
onto a pre-electrophoresed (10 mA) 5% polyacrylamide gel (acrylamide
to bisacrylamide ratio of 40:1) in TBE (45 m

M

Tris borate, 1 m

M

EDTA)

at 11 mV/cm. Gels were vacuum-dried and exposed at

⫺80 °C to obtain

the autoradiography. For specificity assays, a 100-fold excess of unla-
beled oligonucleotide was used as competitor before adding the probe to
the binding reaction.

Proteolysis Assays—The pcDNA-ER

␣ plasmid (1 ␮g) containing full-

length cDNA of the wild-type human ER

␣ was used to produce

35

S-

radiolabeled ER

␣ using 40 ␮l of a coupled transcription-transla-

tion system according to the manufacturer’s instructions (Promega).
The protease digestion was performed essentially as described by

McDonnell et al. (21). An aliquot (4.5

␮l) of reticulocyte lysate was

incubated for 20 min in the absence or presence of 1

M

17

␤-estradiol,

1 n

M

melatonin, and 1

M

W7 as indicated. Equal aliquots of the

untreated or the hormone-treated receptor were subsequently incu-
bated with a trypsin solution (Roche Applied Science), giving final
enzyme concentration of 25

␮g/ml. After 10 min of incubation at room

temperature, the digestion reaction was terminated by the addition of
gel-denaturing buffer and boiling for 5 min. The products of the diges-
tion procedure were separated on a 12% polyacrylamide-SDS gel. After
electrophoresis the gel was treated with a 0.5

M

sodium salicylate

solution for 15 min. The gel was dried under vacuum, and the radiola-
beled products were visualized by autoradiography. When indicated, 1
␮g of goat polyclonal anti-CaM antibodies (SC-1988, Santa Cruz Bio-
technology, Inc.) was added before the treatment with hormones.

In Vitro Protein-Protein Interaction Assays—GST fusion proteins

were expressed and purified essentially as described by Frangioni and
Neel (22). GST pull-down experiments were performed as previously
described by Cavailles et al. (23).

35

S-Labeled SRC-1a coactivator was

synthesized by in vitro transcription-translation (Promega) using pCR-
SRC-1a as template. The GST fusion proteins loaded on glutathione-
Sepharose beads (25

␮l) were preincubated with 1 ␮

M

concentrations of

ligands (17

␤-estradiol, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, or ICI 182,780) or 1 n

M

melatonin for 30 min at 4 °C followed by incubation with

35

S-labeled

proteins for 1.5 h at 4 °C in a total volume of 150

␮l of IPAB buffer (20

m

M

HEPES-KOH, pH 7.9, 5 m

M

MgCl

2

, 150 m

M

KCl, 0.02 mg/ml bo-

vine serum albumin, 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100, 0.1% Nonidet P-40,
and protease inhibitors). Beads were washed 4 –5 times with IPAB
without bovine serum albumin, collected by centrifugation, and resus-
pended in 20

␮l of loading buffer for SDS-PAGE analysis. The gel was

vacuum-dried, and the radiolabeled products were visualized by
autoradiography.

In Vitro Interaction with Dansyl-CaM—Fluorescence experiments

were performed in a PerkinElmer Life Sciences fluorimeter using a
100-

␮l cuvette. 2.5 nmol of dansyl-CaM (Sigma) were dissolved in 100

␮l of 10 m

M

MOPS, pH 7.2, 1 m

M

MgCl

2

, 100 m

M

KCl, and 1 m

M

CaCl

2.

Emission fluorescent spectra were obtained (

Ex

333 nm) before and

after the addition of 1 n

M

melatonin or the indole derivatives. Equiva-

lent amounts of buffer were added in the controls.

RESULTS

Melatonin Is a Specific Inhibitor of ER

-mediated Transcrip-

tion—We have previously demonstrated that melatonin is able
to inhibit estrogen-dependent transcription and proliferation in
MCF-7 cells (14). Because MCF-7 is a carcinoma-derived cell
line (ER

⫹) that endogenously expresses both ER

␣ and ER␤, we

further investigated the inhibitory effect of melatonin on E

2

-

dependent transactivation mediated by each receptor isoform
independently. For this purpose, we transiently transfected
HeLa cells with either ER

␣ or ER␤ expression vectors along

with the ERE-driven reporter plasmids pEREtkLuc (Fig. 1A),
pS2Luc (Fig. 1B), or 3xERELuc (Fig. 1C). In all cases 10 n

M

E

2

stimulated transcription for both ER

␣- and ER␤-transfected

cells. As expected, the highest E

2

stimulation was obtained

using a strong promoter containing three ERE sites (Fig. 1C).
Physiological concentrations of melatonin (1 n

M

) inhibited

ER

␣-mediated transactivation by 45–60% depending on the

promoter tested. In contrast, ER

␤-mediated transcription was

not affected (Fig. 1, and C) or even potentiated (Fig. 1A) by
this concentration of melatonin. In titration experiments we
observed that melatonin inhibited ER

␣-mediated transcription

in a dose-dependent manner, whereas ER

␤ activity was unaf-

fected by the different concentrations of melatonin assayed
(Fig. 1D). These results indicate that melatonin is a selective
modulator of ER

␣, as we have recently described for CaM

antagonists (18).

An ER

␣ Mutant Unable to Bind CaM Is Insensitive to Mela-

tonin—In a previous report we demonstrated that residues
Lys-302 and Lys-303 of hER

␣ are essential for CaM binding.

Although the wild-type ER

␣ normally binds to CaM, substitu-

tion of lysines 302 and 303 by glycine abolished the interaction
of ER

␣ (K302G,K303G) with CaM (18). Transcriptional activa-

tion studies further demonstrated that these two critical resi-

Melatonin, an ER

-specific Inhibitor via CaM

38295

 at University of Saskatchewan on March 18, 2015

http://www.jbc.org/

Downloaded from 

dues for ER

␣ binding to CaM are not essential for ER␣ tran-

scriptional activation. Thus, when HeLa cells were transiently
transfected with wild-type ER

␣ and compared with those

transfected with ER

␣ (K302G,K303G), both showed similar

levels of basal and E

2

-induced transcriptional activation (18).

However, ER

␣ transactivation was 80% inhibited by 10

⫺6

M

W7, whereas transcription mediated by ER

␣ (K302G,K303G)

was completely insensitive to this calmodulin antagonist. If
melatonin acts as a calmodulin antagonist on ER

␣-mediated

transcription, we could predict no inhibitory effect of the pineal
hormone on ER

␣ (K302G,K303G)-mediated transactivation.

Indeed, when HeLa cells were transiently transfected with
ER

␣ (K302G,K303G) along with the ERE-driven reporter plas-

mid 3xERELuc (Fig. 1E) we observed that ER

␣ (K302G,

K303G) transcription was unaffected by the different concen-
trations of melatonin assayed.

The Sensitivity of MCF7 Cells to Melatonin Depends on the

ER

␣/ER␤ Ratio—In MCF7 cells increasing concentrations of

melatonin resulted in the progressive inhibition of the E

2

-de-

pendent transcription, reaching nearly 100% of inhibition at
pharmacological concentrations of melatonin (Fig. 2A). The

IC

50

was obtained at 1.26

⫻ 10

⫺11

M

as determined with Graph-

Pad Prism.

We next analyzed whether the sensitivity of MCF7 cells to

inhibition by melatonin was associated with the high ER

␣/ER␤

ratio present in these cells, as we have previously reported for
CaM antagonists (18). To test this hypothesis, MCF7 cells were
transfected with the 3xERELuc reporter plasmid in the ab-
sence or presence of an ER

␤ expression vector. We then deter-

mined whether ER

␤ overexpression affects the sensitivity of

these cells to melatonin and compared its effect to those of the
CaM antagonists W7 and calmidazolium. As expected, both
melatonin and CaM antagonists inhibited E

2

-dependent tran-

scriptional activation in MCF7 cells (Fig. 2B). Interestingly,
the inhibitory effects of both melatonin and CaM antagonists
were abolished by ER

␤ overexpression (Fig. 2B). These results

imply that the sensitivity to melatonin of E

2

-induced transcrip-

tion in MCF7 cells depends on the presence of ER

␣. Inhibition

by melatonin correlates with a high ER

␣/ER␤ ratio, whereas an

increased expression of ER

␤ impairs the effect of the hormone.

Melatonin Inhibits E

2

ER

-mediated Transcription in AP1-

containing Promoters—We have previously demonstrated that

F

IG

. 1. Differential effect of melato-

nin on the transactivation properties
of ER

␣ and ERHeLa cells were trans-

fected with 0.1

␮g of ER␣ or ER␤ expres-

sion vectors, 50 ng of the internal control
plasmid pRL-TK, and 0.5

␮g of the fol-

lowing ERE-driven reporter plasmids
pEREtkLuc (A), pS2Luc (B) or 3xERELuc
(C). After 18 –24 h, medium was renewed,
and cells were stimulated for 24 h with 10
n

M

E

2

and 1 n

M

melatonin (Mel) as indi-

cated. Luciferase activities were normal-
ized to the Renilla luciferase activities.
The data are reported as fold induction
relative to untreated cells, which were ar-
bitrarily assigned as 1. The bars repre-
sent the mean

⫾ S.D. of three independ-

ent experiments performed in duplicate.
The asterisk indicates a statistical signif-
icant difference (Student’s test), p

0.05, between the groups. D, dose re-
sponse to melatonin of E

2

-induced ER

(E) or ER

␤ (●) transactivation. HeLa cells

were processed as above and treated with
10 n

M

E

2

and the indicated concentrations

of melatonin. E

2

-dependent luciferase ac-

tivity is expressed as the percentage of E

2

stimulation. The bars represent the
means

⫾ S.D. of three independent exper-

iments run in duplicate. These results
were significantly different from E

2

-

stimulated transcription: *, p

⬍ 0.05; **,

p

⬍ 0.01. E, dose response to Mel of E

2

-

induced ER

␣ (E) or ER␣ (K302G,K303G)

(●) transactivation. HeLa cells were
transfected with 0.5

␮g of 3xERELuc re-

porter plasmid, 50 ng of the internal con-
trol plasmid pRL-TK, and 0.1

␮g of either

ER

␣ or ER␣ (K302G,K303G) expression

vectors, and cells were treated with 10 n

M

E

2

and the indicated concentrations of

melatonin. These results are significantly
different than E

2

-stimulated transcrip-

tion: *, p

⬍ 0.05; **, ⬍ 0.01.

Melatonin, an ER

-specific Inhibitor via CaM

38296

 at University of Saskatchewan on March 18, 2015

http://www.jbc.org/

Downloaded from 

CaM is a regulator of ER

␣-mediated transcription in both ERE-

and AP1-containing promoters since transcription mediated by
both complexes is sensitive to CaM antagonists (18). Therefore,
we decided to test the ability of melatonin to inhibit transcrip-
tion on ER

␣/AP1 pathways. For that purpose, HeLa cells were

transfected with either ER

␣ or ER␤ along with the reporter

plasmid

⌬coll-73-Luc (containing an AP1 binding site). Even

though E

2

䡠ER

␣-mediated AP1 activation in HeLa cells and

other cell lines have been described (24, 25), we and other
authors found it necessary to prime the cells with EGF to
observe this effect. EGF stabilizes the levels of c-Jun and c-Fos
family proteins, allowing a synergistic effect between these
factors and ER

␣ on AP1 transcription (26, 27). We found that

AP1 activity was increased by EGF in cells expressing either
ER

␣ or ER␤ (Fig. 3). E

2

significantly potentiated AP1 activity

in ER

␣-transfected cells but diminished AP1 activity in ER␤-

transfected cells. These results agree with previous reports (26,
27) indicating that EGF synergizes with E

2

. Very importantly,

the synergistic effect of EGF and E

2

in cells expressing ER

was sensitive to melatonin, whereas no effect was observed in
cells expressing ER

␤. Both the activation by E

2

and the inhi-

bition by melatonin were statistically significant. We can infer
from these experiments that melatonin, as other CaM antago-
nists, regulates ER

␣-mediated transcription not only in ERE-

dependent pathways but also in AP1 pathways.

Melatonin but Not Other Indole Derivatives Interact with

CaM—We have previously demonstrated that melatonin blocks
the binding of the E

2

䡠ER complex to ERE in vitro and that this

effect is dose-dependent, saturable, and specific, since different
methoxy- and hydroxyindoles have no effect on binding to DNA
(14). Therefore, we expected that other indole derivatives
would have no effect on E

2

䡠ER

␣-mediated transcription. To

analyze this possibility we carried out transient transfections
in MCF-7 cells using 3xERE-Luc as reporter plasmid. As shown
in Fig. 4B, melatonin effectively inhibited (60%) E

2

-induced

transactivation, whereas treatment with other indole metabo-
lites resulted in no significant decrease on the E

2-

mediated

transcription, indicating that the inhibitory effect of melatonin
on estrogen response is specific.

To further investigate the basis for the specific inhibition

exhibited by melatonin, we examined the ability of the indole
derivatives to bind to dansyl-CaM. Changes on emission fluo-
rescence intensity of dansyl-CaM reflect conformational/struc-
tural changes, suggesting interaction with CaM. As observed in
Fig. 4C, melatonin specifically decreased the fluorescence of
dansyl-CaM, whereas the other indoles tested did not modify
the fluorescence of dansyl-CaM, indicating that only melatonin
is able to interact with this protein. We hypothesize that me-
latonin acts as a CaM antagonist, interfering with the ER

␣-

CaM complex and that this is the underlying basis by which
melatonin specifically inhibits ER

␣-mediated transcription.

Melatonin Induces Conformational Changes on ER

␣ Struc-

ture via CaM—Conformational changes on ER

␣ structure can

be shown by using a protease digestion assay as previously
described by McDonnell et al. (21). Also, W7 induces CaM to
form a globular structure (29). We have determined the effects
of melatonin and W7 on ER

␣ structure on the basis of the

differential susceptibility of the receptor to proteolysis by tryp-
sin.

35

S-Labeled ER

␣ was synthesized in vitro and preincu-

bated with vehicle, E

2

, melatonin, W7, or combinations of these

compounds. The resulting complexes were then subjected to
limited digestion with trypsin, and the products were resolved
by SDS-PAGE (Fig. 5). ER

␣ was highly sensitive to trypsin

degradation in the absence of ligand (Fig. 5, lane 2), whereas in
the presence of E

2

, a trypsin-resistant 32-kDa fragment was

observed (Fig. 5, lane 4), in agreement with results previously
published (21). Incubation of the labeled receptor in the pres-
ence of E

2

plus either melatonin (Fig. 5, lane 6) or W7 (Fig. 5,

lane 8) yielded a distinct digestion patron as compared with E

2

alone. Under these conditions, ER

␣ becomes highly sensitive to

protease digestion. Therefore, treatment with melatonin or
CaM antagonists abolished the protective effect of E

2

on lim-

ited trypsin digestion. Interestingly, the effects of melatonin
(Fig. 5, lane 5) and W7 (Fig. 5, lane 7) were reverted in the
presence of anti-CaM antibodies. Taken together, our data
indicate that melatonin, similar to W7 through the interaction
with CaM, induce conformational changes on ER

␣ that also

affect the stability of ER

␣ against proteolysis.

ER

␣ Stability Is Not Altered by Melatonin—It has been re-

ported that the inhibition of the interaction between CaM and

F

IG

. 2. The sensitivity of MCF7 cells to melatonin and CaM antagonists is abolished by ER

␤ overexpression. A, dose response to

melatonin of E

2

-dependent transactivation in MCF-7 cells. Transfections were performed by using 0.5

␮g of 3xERELuc reporter plasmid, and after

18 –24 h, cells were stimulated for 24 h with either 10 n

M

E

2

alone or 10 n

M

E

2

plus the indicated concentrations of melatonin. An IC

50

value of

1.26

⫻ 10

⫺11

M

was generated by non-linear regression analysis using GraphPad Prism, version 3.02 for windows (GraphPad Software, Inc., San

Diego, CA). B, MCF-7 cells were transfected with 0.5

␮g of the reporter plasmid 3xERELuc, 50 ng of pRL-TK plasmid, and when indicated, with

0.4

␮g of ER␤ expression vector (right set of data). The total amount of DNA was held constant to 0.95 ␮g per well by the addition of empty

expression vector. After transfection, cells were treated for 24 h with 10 n

M

E

2

, 1 n

M

melatonin (Mel), 0.1

M

W7, or 0.1

M

calmidazolium (Calm)

as indicated. Luciferase activities were normalized to the Renilla luciferase activities. The data are reported as -fold induction relative to untreated
cells, which were arbitrarily assigned as 1. The bars represent the means

⫾ S.D. of three independent experiments performed in duplicate. These

results are significantly different than E

2

-stimulated transcription: *, p

⬍ 0.05; **, ⬍ 0.01.

Melatonin, an ER

-specific Inhibitor via CaM

38297

 at University of Saskatchewan on March 18, 2015

http://www.jbc.org/

Downloaded from 

ER reduces the total cellular content of estrogen receptor (28).
Thus, treatment of MCF7 cells with calmodulin antagonists
such as trifluoperazine (TFP) or CGS9343B reduced the num-
ber of estrogen receptors in the cells (30). We have addressed
whether the inhibition of ER

␣ activity by melatonin in MCF7

cells could be due to the modulation of the stability and the
state level of estrogen receptors. For this purpose, MCF7 cells
were treated for 24 h with either vehicle, E

2,

melatonin, TFP, or

combinations, and ER protein levels were determined by West-
ern blot. As shown in Fig. 6, E

2

(fourth lane) and TFP (fifth

F

IG

. 3. Effect of melatonin on E

2

-dependent transactivation at an AP1 element. HeLa cells were transfected with either 0.1

␮g of the ER␣

or ER

␤ expression vectors, 50 ng of internal control plasmid pRL-TK, and 0.5 ␮g of the AP1-containing reporter plasmid (⌬coll-73-Luc). Cultures

were stimulated for 48 h with 1

␮g/ml EGF, 100 n

M

E

2

, and 100 n

M

melatonin (Mel) as indicated. The data are reported as –fold induction relative

to untreated cells, which were arbitrarily assigned as 1. The bars represent the means

⫾ S.D. of three independent experiments run in duplicate.

*, significantly different relative to EGF treatment (p

⬍ 0.05). #, significant relative to EGF plus E

2

treatment (p

⬍ 0.05).

F

IG

. 4. Effect of different hydroxy- and methoxyindoles on ER

-mediated transcription and interaction with dansyl-CaM. A,

schematic diagram of the indole derivatives implicated in the metabolism of melatonin. B, HeLa cells were transfected with 0.1

␮g of the ER␣

expression vector, 50 ng of internal control plasmid pRL-TK, and 0.5

␮g of 3xERELuc as ERE-driven reporter plasmid. After 18–24 h, medium was

renewed, and cells were stimulated for 24 h with 10 n

M

E

2

or 10 n

M

E

2

plus either 1 n

M

melatonin (Mel), 6-hydroxymelatonin (HM),

5-methoxytryptamine (MT), serotonin (S), 5-hydroxytryptophan (HT), or 5-hydroxyindole acetate (HIA) as indicated. Luciferase activities were
normalized to the Renilla luciferase activities. The data are reported as fold induction relative to untreated cells, which were arbitrarily assigned
as 1. The bars represent the means

⫾ S.D. of three independent experiments run in duplicate. Significant difference from E

2

-stimulated

transcription: **, p

⬍ 0.01. C, ability of the different indoles to bind dansyl-CaM. Emission fluorescence spectra of 25

M

dansyl-CaM in 10 m

M

MOPS (pH 7.2), 1 m

M

MgCl

2

, 100 m

M

KCl, and 1 m

M

CaCl

2

were determined, and this intensity was arbitrarily assigned the value 1. 1 n

M

melatonin, 6-hydroxymelatonin, 5-methoxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan, or 5-hydroxyindole acetate was added, and fluorescence
was determined after the addition of each compound. The bars represent the means

⫾ S.D. of two independent experiments performed in duplicate.

**, significant relative to untreated cells; p

⬍ 0.01.

Melatonin, an ER

-specific Inhibitor via CaM

38298

 at University of Saskatchewan on March 18, 2015

http://www.jbc.org/

Downloaded from 

lane) significantly reduced ER

␣ content in MCF7 cells, in

agreement with previous data (30). Strikingly, treatment with
100 n

M

melatonin does not alter the amount of ER

␣ in the cells

(Fig. 6, second lane), indicating that inhibition of ER

␣-medi-

ated transcription by melatonin is not due to a reduction in ER
protein levels. Importantly, neither TFP nor melatonin affected
ER

␤ levels, suggesting that the interaction with CaM is impor-

tant to trigger degradation since ER

␣ but not ER␤ interacts

with calmodulin.

Effect of Melatonin on Coactivator Binding Properties of

ER

ER␣ is a transcriptional factor allosterically regulated

by ligand, which promotes gene transcription by recruiting
coactivator proteins in a ligand-dependent manner (31). Be-
cause melatonin actions involve alterations on ER structure
that could interfere with the association of factors required for
ER activity, we analyzed whether melatonin affects the binding
of the coactivator SRC-1a to ER

␣. GST pull-down experiments

were performed by using

35

S-labeled SRC-1a and GST-ER

␣-

(117–595) purified and immobilized on GSH-Sepharose as an
affinity reagent (Fig. 7, and B). As expected, the binding of
SRC-1a to ER

␣ was stimulated 3-fold in the presence of E

2

, and

the presence of the estrogenic antagonists 4-hydroxytamoxifen
(OHT) and ICI blocked this association to ER

␣ (28). By con-

trast, the E

2

-dependent interaction of SRC-1a with ER

␣ was

unaffected by melatonin. Both melatonin and anti-estrogens
failed to induce by themselves SRC-1a association to ER

␣.

These results strongly suggest that the mechanism of melato-
nin action differs from those of anti-estrogens such as OHT or
ICI, which exert inhibitory effects on ER activity by impairing
coactivator recruitment.

Because melatonin induces conformational changes on ER

structure and this fact seems to have no consequences on the
binding of coactivators, we postulate that CaM and coactivator
binding to ER are independent phenomena. To check this, we
determined whether forms of ER

␣ unbound to CaM retain the

ability to interact with coactivators. This was accomplished in
another set of GST pull-down experiments using

35

S-labeled

SRC-1a and the hybrid protein GST-ER

␣-(280–595), which is

unable to bind CaM (18) immobilized on GST-Sepharose as
affinity reagent (Fig. 7, and D). Under these conditions the
binding of SRC-1a to GST-ER

␣-(280–595) was induced by E

2

,

and once again the presence of melatonin had no effect on this
interaction, whereas the presence of OHT impaired SRC-1a
association. These results indicate that the binding of CaM to
ER

␣ is not a prerequisite for the recruitment of coactivators

and that these are two independent mechanisms for the regu-
lation of ER

␣ activity.

Melatonin Selectively Prevents the Binding of E

2

ER

␣ Com-

plex to ERE in Vitro—We have investigated whether the selec-
tive inhibition of ER

␣-mediated transcription by melatonin is

exerted at the level of DNA binding. To accomplish this, we

conducted electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear
extracts from HeLa cells transfected with ER

␣ or ER␤ to de-

termine the effect of melatonin on the E

2

-dependent binding of

each ER isoform to ERE. ER

␣ binding to ERE was increased

3-fold in the presence of 10 n

M

E

2

(Fig. 8, lane 2). This binding

was 90% inhibited by the addition of 1 n

M

melatonin (Fig. 8,

lane 3). In a similar way the binding of ER

␤ to ERE was also

increased 2.5-fold in the presence of E

2

(Fig. 8, lane 5), but

contrary to ER

␣ the addition of melatonin stimulated the bind-

ing of ER

␤ to DNA (Fig. 8, lane 6). The specificity of the

retarded band was demonstrated by competition with a 100-
fold excess of unlabeled ERE (Fig. 8, lane 7).

Taken together, our results indicate that melatonin induces

conformational changes in CaM that selectively prevent ER

␣-

dependent transcription by destabilizing the binding of
E

2

䡠ER

␣䡠CaM complex to DNA either by modulating ER stabil-

ity at protein level or by impairing coactivator binding to the
receptor.

DISCUSSION

Melatonin is an indole hormone secreted by the pineal gland

only during the night or, more exactly, in darkness. One of the
proposed properties of melatonin is its role as an oncostatic
agent on hormone-dependent tumors. It has also been de-
scribed that melatonin exerts antiproliferative effects on MCF7
cells, which has become a useful model to study the anti-
estrogenic effect of the pineal hormone (11, 32–35). In synchro-
nized MCF7 cells, both estrogen-dependent transcription and
proliferation are inhibited by co-treatment with melatonin. It
has been shown that melatonin binds to calmodulin in a Ca

2

-

dependent fashion, resulting in inhibition of calmodulin (16,
17). We have proposed (14) that calmodulin might be a poten-
tial candidate to mediate the anti-estrogenic effects of melato-
nin. In this regard, we have recently demonstrated that ER

but not ER

␤ interacts with calmodulin, and mutations in the

postulated (36) ER

␣ calmodulin binding site abolish this inter-

F

IG

. 6. Effect of melatonin on estrogen receptor content. MCF7

cells synchronized in 0.5% charcoal, dextran-treated fetal calf serum
were stimulated for 24 h with vehicle (Control), 100 n

M

melatonin (Mel),

10 n

M

E

2

, 20

M

trifluoperazine (TFP), or combinations as indicated.

The relative amount of endogenous ERs present in whole cell extracts
was analyzed by immunoblotting with antibodies directed against ER

or ER

␤ as indicated.

F

IG

. 5. Effect of melatonin and W7

on the proteolysis of ER

In vitro

translated

35

S-labeled ER

␣ was subjected

to digestion with 25

␮g/ml of trypsin in

the absence or presence of 10 n

M

E

2

, 1 n

M

melatonin (Mel), 1

M

W7, and 1

␮g of

polyclonal anti-CaM antibodies (Ab) as
indicated. The products of the digestion
reactions were resolved by SDS-PAGE
and visualized by autoradiography. h-,
human.

Melatonin, an ER

-specific Inhibitor via CaM

38299

 at University of Saskatchewan on March 18, 2015

http://www.jbc.org/

Downloaded from 

action (18). The mutant receptor is otherwise fully functional
promoting E

2

-dependent transcription. As a consequence of the

interaction of the receptor with this calcium ligand protein,
CaM antagonists act as specific inhibitors of ER

␣ in a dose-de-

pendent manner but show no inhibitory effect on ER

␤- medi-

ated transcription both in ERE- and AP1-driven promoters
(18). Considering the observations mentioned above, we ad-
dressed the question of whether the inhibitory effects observed
in MCF7 cells treated with melatonin were exerted via CaM.
For this purpose we studied the effect of melatonin on E

2

-de-

pendent transactivation mediated by each receptor in trans-
fected HeLa cells. We found that similarly to CaM antagonists,
melatonin inhibits E

2

䡠ER

␣-induced transcription at several

ERE-driven promoters, whereas ER

␤ activation is not inhib-

ited (or even enhanced at certain promoters) by treatment with
the hormone. Importantly, the ER

␣ (K302G,K303G) mutant,

which does not interact with CaM, is not inhibited by melato-

nin and behaves in a similar fashion to that of the ER

␤ recep-

tor. This result strongly suggests that the effect of the hormone
is directly exerted through the calmodulin bound to ER

␣ and

not through indirect pathways. All the data mentioned above
indicate that melatonin is a selective modulator of estrogen
receptors. This observation is extremely important since more
than 60% of breast cancers show overexpression of ER

␣, and

the ratio ER

␣/ER␤ increases during breast and ovarian tumor

progression (37). Therefore, melatonin, as we have previously
suggested for CaM antagonists, might have the potential to act
as an ER

␣ inhibitor with antitumor effects on advanced breast,

ovarian, and colon cancer.

We have attempted to determine if the inhibitory effects

observed in MCF7 cells treated with melatonin are associated
with the high ER

␣/ER␤ ratio present in these cells as we have

reported for CaM antagonists (18). Indeed, in MCF7 cells ex-
pressing ectopic ER

␤, the inhibitory effects of melatonin and

F

IG

. 7. Effect of melatonin on E

2

-dependent binding of the SRC-1a coactivator to ER

Ain vitro translated

35

S-labeled SRC-1a was

incubated with GST-ER

␣-(117–595), purified, and immobilized on GSH-Sepharose in the absence of ligand (C) or in the presence of either 1 ␮

M

E

2

,

1

M

OHT, 1

M

ICI 182,780 (ICI), or 1 n

M

melatonin (Mel) alone or combination as indicated. The Input lane represents 20% of the total amount

of labeled SRC-1a used in the binding reactions (lane 1). B, quantification of the specific band was determined by densitometry. The results are
expressed as relative units with respect to and represent the mean

⫾ S.D. of two independent experiments. C, effect of melatonin on

E

2

-dependent binding of the SRC-1a coactivator to CaM-unligated form of ER

␣. In vitro translated

35

S-labeled SRC-1a was incubated with the

GST-ER

␣-(280–595), purified, and immobilized on GSH-Sepharose in the absence of ligand (C) or in the presence of 1 ␮

M

E

2

, 1

M

OHT, and 1 n

M

melatonin as indicated. The Input lane represents 10% of the total amount of labeled SRC-1a used in the binding reactions (lane 1). D,
quantification of the specific band was determined by densitometry. The results are expressed as relative units with respect to and represent
the mean

⫾ S.D. of two independent experiments.

F

IG

. 8. Effect of melatonin on estradiol-dependent binding of both ER

␣ and ER␤ to ERE in vitroA, nuclear extracts from HeLa cells

expressing ER

␣ or ER␤ were assayed for ERE binding activity by EMSA in the absence (Control) or in the presence of 10 n

M

E

2

plus or minus 1

n

M

melatonin. In lane 7, the binding of ER to ERE was competed by a 100-fold excess of unlabeled ERE. B, quantification of the specific band was

determined by densitometry. The results are expressed as arbitrary units and represent the mean

⫾ S.D. of three independent experiments. **,

significantly different; p

⬍ 0.01.

Melatonin, an ER

-specific Inhibitor via CaM

38300

 at University of Saskatchewan on March 18, 2015

http://www.jbc.org/

Downloaded from 

CaM antagonists were abolished. These results imply that the
sensitivity to melatonin correlates with a high ER

␣/ER␤ ratio.

Because we had previously found that CaM antagonists also

inhibit ER

␣-dependent AP1 transcriptional activity (18) we

tested the ability of melatonin to inhibit ER

␣-mediated tran-

scription in AP1-driven promoters. As expected, melatonin sig-
nificantly inhibited AP1/ER

␣ activation by E

2

. Therefore, me-

latonin also acts as a regulator of the ER

␣-CaM/AP1 pathway.

CaM inhibitors and tamoxifen have been reported to show
synergistic inhibitory effects (33). Thus, we propose that mela-
tonin could be a valuable tool to block the mitogenic activity of
ER

␣ in both anti-estrogen-responsive and anti-estrogen-resis-

tant breast cancer cells.

We have previously reported that melatonin blocks the bind-

ing of E

2

䡠ER complex to ERE in vitro, but other methoxy- and

hydroxyindoles were not effective in doing so. Therefore, we
predicted that these compounds would have neither effect on
E

2

-dependent transactivation nor ability to bind dansyl-CaM.

The effect of melatonin is indeed, specific, since none of the
compounds tested inhibited E

2

-dependent transcription or

modified the fluorescence of dansyl-CaM.

The next question we addressed was whether melatonin has

any effect on the stability of ER

␣, as it has been described for

other calmodulin antagonists (30). MCF7 cells treated with
CaM antagonist TFP show a 50% reduction in the ER levels,
and nearly all the receptor disappeared when CGS9343B was
used. These compounds did not significantly modify the level of
ER mRNA. It has been, therefore, proposed that calmodulin
stabilizes the receptor against proteolysis (30). The same au-
thors suggested that the inhibitory effect of W7 on ER

␣-medi-

ated transcription that we have previously reported (18) might
be due to the reduction in ER-protein levels induced by CaM
antagonists (38, 39). Treatment with melatonin did not alter
the amount of ER

␣ present in MCF7 cells, whereas cells

treated with TFP did show a reduction in the ER levels similar
to that previously reported (37). Therefore, the possibility that
melatonin inhibits ER

␣ transcription as a consequence of deg-

radation of the receptor can be excluded. Notably, the levels of
ER

␤ remain unaffected in all the conditions assayed.

We next investigated melatonin to determine if it might

interfere with the association of factors required for ER

␣ ac-

tivity. Anti-estrogens induce a conformational change in the
receptor different to that of E

2

in such way that corepressors

and not coactivators bind to the receptor in the presence of the
tamoxifen (40). We, therefore, considered the possibility that
melatonin might have a similar effect and that the conforma-
tional change induced by melatonin on CaM might imply an-
other change on ER

␣ structure in such way that coactivator

association to the receptor would be impaired. We have ana-
lyzed the binding of the coactivator SRC-1a to ER

␣. We found

that, as previously reported (41, 42), the binding of SRC-1a to
ER

␣ was stimulated by E

2

, whereas the presence of the estro-

genic antagonists OHT and ICI blocked this association. On the
other hand, E

2

-dependent interaction of SRC-1a with ER

␣ was

unaffected by melatonin, indicating that this is not the mech-
anism by which melatonin exerts its inhibitory effect on ER

␣-

mediated transcription. We have also shown that CaM and
coactivator binding to ER

␣ are independent phenomena, since

a GST fusion with a truncated ER

␣ unable to interact with

CaM recruits SRC-1a, and this association is enhanced by es-
tradiol and inhibited by OHT and ICI. In other words, our
results strongly suggest that CaM binding to ER

␣ is not a nec-

essary event for coactivator recruitment. This idea is further
supported by the fact that the mutant ER

␣ (K302G,K303G),

which does not bind CaM, mediates transcription in a similar
way to that of wild-type ER

␣, although treatment with mela-

tonin does not inhibit its actions. How then does melatonin
inhibit transcription? We have investigated whether the differ-
ential action of melatonin on E

2

-dependent transcription by

ER

␣ and ER␤ was exerted on binding of ER to DNA. We

performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear
extracts from HeLa cells expressing either ER

␣ or ER␤ to

determine the effect of melatonin on the E

2

-dependent binding

of each receptor isoform to ERE. The binding of ER

␣ to DNA

was increased in the presence of estradiol and inhibited by
melatonin. On the other hand, melatonin further enhanced the
binding of ER

␤ to DNA, which might explain why at certain

promoters co-treatment with E

2

and melatonin enhanced ER

transcriptional activity.

As mentioned above, the ratio ER

␤/ER␣, which is high in

normal tissues, decreases during breast and ovarian tumor
progression (43) and in both male and female malignant trans-
formation of the colon (44, 45). Notably a large scale study
conducted on long time night-shift workers indicates that those
working night shifts at least three nights per month for 15
years or longer have a moderate but significant increase in the
risk of developing breast and colon cancer (6, 46). Because the
levels of ER

␤ are reduced during tumor progression in most

colon cancers, melatonin might be important for prevention of
the breast and colon malignancies acting through ER

␣. Our

results favor the concept that melatonin and CaM antagonists
could be of therapeutic importance in tumors with high ER

␣/

ER

␤ ratio, that is, in advanced tumors. In addition, CaM an-

tagonists alone or in combination with anti-estrogens have
been reported to decrease the viability and induce apoptosis of
breast cancer cells (47– 49). Melatonin decreased toxicity and
increased efficacy of cancer chemotherapy in metastatic pa-
tients with poor clinical status (50).

In summary, the reported data and the results presented in

this work strongly suggest that melatonin or melatonin deriv-
atives with no toxicity and higher efficacy than the pineal
hormone may have the potential to act as inhibitory agents of
ER

␣ with anti-tumor effects on advanced breast, ovarian, and

colon tumors. Therefore, clinical studies on the possible thera-
peutic value of melatonin on these cancers should be performed
in the future.

Acknowledgments—We thank Ana Corao Trueba for technical assist-

ance. We also thank Dr. M. Muramatsu for providing pCXN2-hER

␤-(1–

530) and GST-hER

␣-(117–595), Dr. V. Gigue`re for providing pERE-

TKLuc, pS2Luc, and pCMX-mER

␤, Dr. M. J. Tsai for providing pCR-

SRC-1a, Dr. S. Safe for providing 3x-ERE-Luc, and Dr. A. Aranda for
providing

⌬ Coll-73.

REFERENCES

1. Sa´nchez-Barcelo´, E., Cos, S., and Mediavilla, M. D. (1988) in The Pineal Gland

and Cancer (D. Gupta, A. Attanasio, and R. J. Reiter, eds) pp. 221–232,
Brain Research Promotion, Tu

¨ bingen, Germany

2. Blask, D. E. (1984) in The Pineal Gland (R. J. Reiter, ed) pp. 253–284, Raven

Press, New York

3. Blask, D. E., and Hill, S. M. (1988) in Melatonin Clinical Perspectives (Miles,

A., Philbrick, D. R. S., and Thompson, C., eds) pp. 128 –173, Oxford Uni-
versity Press, New York

4. Sa´nchez-Barcelo´, E., Mediavilla, M. D., and Cos, S. (1997) in Pineal Update:

From Molecular Mechanisms to Clinical Implications (Webb, S. M., Puig-
Domingo, M., Moller, M., and Pevet, P., eds) pp. 361–368, PJD Publications
Ltd., New York

5. Coleman, M. P., and Reiter, R. J. (1992) Eur. J. Cancer 28, 501–503
6. Schernhammer, E. S., Laden, F., Speizer, F. E., Willett, W. C., Hunter, D. J.,

Kawachi, I., and Colditz, G. A. (2001) J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 93, 1563–1568

7. Blask, D. E., Hill, S. M., Pelletier, D. B., Anderson, J. M., and Lemus-Wilson,

A. (1989) in Advances in Pineal Research (Reiter R. J., and Pang, S. F., eds)
Vol. 3, pp. 259 –263, John Libbey & Co. Ltd., London

8. Reiter, R. J., Poeggeler, B., Tan, D. X., Chen, L. D., Mancherter, L. C., and

Guerrero, J. L. (1993) Neuroendocrinol. Lett. 15, 103–116

9. Maestroni, J. M., Conti, A., and Lissoni, P. (1994) Cancer Res. 54, 4740 – 4743

10. Morrey, K. M., Mclachlan, J. A., Serkin, C. D., and Baouche, O. (1994) J. Im-

munol. 153, 2671–2679

11. Hill, S. M., and Blask, D. E. (1988) Cancer Res. 48, 6121– 6126
12. Cos, S., Blask, D. E., Lemus-Wilson, A., and Hill, A. B. (1991) J. Pineal. Res.

10, 36 – 42

13. Cos, S., Fernandez, R., Guezmes, A., and Sanchez-Barcelo, E. J. (1998) Cancer

Melatonin, an ER

-specific Inhibitor via CaM

38301

 at University of Saskatchewan on March 18, 2015

http://www.jbc.org/

Downloaded from 

Res. 58, 4383– 4390

14. Rato, A. G., Pedrero, J. G., Martinez, M. A., del Rio, B., Lazo, P. S., and Ramos,

S. (1999) FASEB J. 13, 857– 868

15. Hardcastle, I. R., Rowlands, M. G., Houghton, J., and Jarman, M. (1996)

J. Med. Chem. 39, 999 –1004

16. Benitez-King, G., Huerto-Delgadillo, L., and Anton-Tay, F. (1991) Brain Res.

557, 289 –292

17. Romero, M. P., Garcı´a-Pergaden

˜ a, A., Guerrero, J. M., and Osuna, C. (1998)

FASEB J. 12, 1401–1408

18. Garcia Pedrero, J. M., Rio, B., Martinez-Campa, C., Muramatsu, M., Lazo,

P. S., and Ramos, S. (2002) Mol. Endocrinol. 16, 947–960

19. Garcia Pedrero, J. M., Zuazua, P., Martinez-Campa, C., Lazo, P. S., and

Ramos, S. (2003) Endocrinology 144, 2967–2976

20. Ogawa, S., Inoue, S. Orimo, A., Hosoi, T., Ouchi, Y., and Muramatsu, M. (1998)

FEBS Lett. 423, 129 –132

21. McDonnell, D. P., Clemm, D. L., Hermann, T., Golman, M. E., and Pike, J. W.

(1995) Mol Endocrinol. 9, 659 – 669

22. Frangioni, J. V., and Neel, B. G. (1993) Anal. Biochem. 210, 179 –187
23. Cavailles, V., Dauvois, S., Danielian, P. S., and Parker, M. G. (1994) Proc. Natl.

Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 91, 10009 –10013

24. Paech, K., Webb, P., Kuiper, G. G., Nilsson, S., Gustafsson, J., Kushner, P. J.,

and Scanlan, T. S. (1997) Science 277, 1508 –1510

25. Bouhoute, A., and Leclercq, G. (1995) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 208,

748 –755

26. Philips, A., Teyssier, C., Galtier, F., Rivier-Covas, C., Rey, J. M., Rochefort, H.,

and Chalbos, D. (1998) Mol. Endocrinol. 7, 973–985

27. Bollig, A., and Miksicek, R. J. (2000) Mol. Endocrinol. 14, 634 – 649
28. Hall, J. M., Chang, C. Y., and McDonnell, D. P. (2000) Mol. Endocrinol. 12,

2010 –2023

29. Osawa, M., Kuwamoto, S., Izumi, Y., Yap, K. L., Ikura, M., Shibanuma, T.,

Yokokura, H., Hidaka, H., and Matsushima, N. (1999) FEBS Lett. 442,
173–177

30. Li, Z., Joyal, J. L., and Sacks, D. B. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 17354 –17360
31. Lazennec, G., Ediger, T. R., Petz, L. N., Nardulli, A. M., and Katzenellenbogen,

B. S. (1997) Mol. Endocrinol. 9, 1375–1386

32. Molis, T. M., Spriggs, L. L., Jupiter, Y., and Hill, S. M. (1994) J. Pineal. Res.

18, 93–103

33. Wilson, S. T., Blask, D. E., and Lemus-Wilson, A. M. (1992) J. Clin. Endocri-

nol. Metab. 75, 669 – 670

34. Molis, T. M., Spriggs, L. L., and Hill, S. M. (1994) Mol. Endocrinol. 8,

1681–1690

35. Lissoni, P., Barni, S., Meregalli, S., Fossati, V., Cazzaniga, M., Esposti, D., and

Tancini, G. (1995) Br. J. Cancer. 71, 854 – 856

36. Castoria, G., Migliaccio, A., Nola E., and Auricchio, F. (1988) 2, 167–174
37. Pujol, P., Rey, J. M., Nirde, P., Roger, P., Gastaldi, M., Laffargue, F., Rochefort,

H., and Maudelonde, T. (1998) Cancer Res. 58, 5367–5373

38. Matsushima, N., Hayashi, N., Jinbo, Y., and Izumi, Y. (2000) Biochem. J. 347,

211–215

39. Li, L., Li, Z., and Sacks, D.B. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 1195–1200
40. Brzozowski, A. M., Pike, A. C., Dauter, Z., Hubbard, R. E., Bonn, T., Engstrom,

O., Ohman, L., Greene, G. L., Gustafsson, J. A., and Carlquist, M. (1997)
Nature 389, 753–758

41. Beato, M., and Sanchez-Pacheco, A. (1996) Endocr. Rev. 6, 587– 609
42. McInerney, E. M., Tsai, M., O’Malley, B. W., and Katzenellenbogen, B. S.

(1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 93, 10069 –10073

43. Leygue, E., Dotzlaw, H., Watson, P. H., and Murphy, L. C. (1999) Breast

Cancer Res. 58, 64 –72

44. Foley, E. F, Jazaeri, A. A., Shupnik, M. A., Jazaeri, O., and Rice, L. W. (2000)

Cancer Res. 60, 245–248

45. Campbell-Thompson, M.., Lynch, I. J., and Bhardwaj, B. (2001) Cancer Res.

61, 632– 640

46. Schernhammer, E. S., Laden, F., Speizer, F. E., Willett, W. C., Hunter, D. J.,

Kawachi, I., Fuchs, C. S., and Colditz, G. A. (2003) J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 95,
825– 828

47. Wei, J. W., Hickie, R. A., and Klaassen, D. J. (1983) Cancer Chemother.

Pharmacol. 11, 86 –90

48. Frankfurt, O. S., Sugarbaker, E. V., Robb, J. A., and Villa, L. (1995) Cancer

Lett. 97, 149 –154

49. Newton, C. J., Eycott, K., Green, V., and Atkin, S. L. (2000) J. Steroid Biochem.

Mol. Biol. 73, 29 –38

50. Lissoni, P., Barni, S., Mandala, M., Ardizzoia, A., Paolorossi, F., Vaghi, M.,

Longarini, R., Malugani, F., and Tancini, G. (1999) Eur. J. Cancer. 12,
1688 –1692

Melatonin, an ER

-specific Inhibitor via CaM

38302

 at University of Saskatchewan on March 18, 2015

http://www.jbc.org/

Downloaded from 

S. Lazo and Sofía Ramos

Carlos Martínez-Campa, Pedro Zuazua, Pedro 

Beatriz del Río, Juana M. García Pedrero,

  

Calmodulin

 via

α

Inhibitor of Estrogen Receptor 

Melatonin, an Endogenous-specific

Mechanisms of Signal Transduction:

doi: 10.1074/jbc.M403140200 originally published online June 30, 2004

2004, 279:38294-38302.

J. Biol. Chem. 

  

 

10.1074/jbc.M403140200

Access the most updated version of this article at doi: 

  

.

JBC Affinity Sites

Find articles, minireviews, Reflections and Classics on similar topics on the 

 

Alerts: 

  

 

When a correction for this article is posted

•  

 

When this article is cited

•  

 to choose from all of JBC's e-mail alerts

Click here

  

 

http://www.jbc.org/content/279/37/38294.full.html#ref-list-1

This article cites 36 references, 16 of which can be accessed free at

 at University of Saskatchewan on March 18, 2015

http://www.jbc.org/

Downloaded from